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ANNUAL CONFERENCE HANDBOOK 2014 3

Gold Partner

ASE ANNUAL CONFERENCE

2014

WEDNESDAY 8 to SATURDAY 11 JANUARY “EXCELLENCE IN SCIENCE EDUCATION; TAKING ON THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE”

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The most extensive science education exhibition in Europe

…new curricula, developing assessment, policy into practice, practical/outdoor science, primary focus, international, using technology creatively, research into practice, leadership…

Key Locations ASE Registration

The ASE registration, information and booked courses desks are all in the Great Hall in the Aston Webb Building. Thursday 9 January

0830-1800

Friday 10 January

0830-1800

Saturday 11 January

0830-1400

International Registration

Overseas delegates can collect their delegate handbooks from the Registration desk in the Great Hall in the Aston Webb Building from 1200 on Wednesday 8 January 2014.

ASE Booksales (Stand A2, in the Exhibition Marquee)

Books and ASE accessories are for sale on the ASE Booksales Stand, A2, in the Exhibition Marquee.

Exhibitions (please note opening times)

The commercial exhibition of publishers, manufacturers, suppliers, awarding bodies and organisations providing services to science educators is in the Exhibition Marquee, immediately opposite the Aston Webb Building, in the centre of the campus. Thursday 9 January

0900-1800

Friday 10 January

0900-1800

Saturday 11 January

0900-1500

TTS Primary Room (Mason Lounge, Arts Building)

As in recent years, the Primary Welcome Room has been sponsored by TTS. The welcome room will provide a meeting point with refreshments, help and advice from ASE Primary Science Committee members, a display of children’s work and an opportunity to see the latest teaching and learning equipment from the TTS range. In addition, the popular, and free, workshops return; they run throughout the Conference and details are found in the daily session information later on in the handbook. All are welcome to come along and join in.

First Timers, Students and NQTs Welcomers

(Great Hall, Aston Webb Building) First timers, student teachers and NQTs are welcome at the ASE Annual Conference. Haven’t got a clue what to go to? Too much to choose from? Where’s the closest place to get some lunch? What’s the dress code at the disco? Help is at hand! Come and find out how to make the most of the Annual Conference, how to get what you want out of the Exhibition, and how to work your way through the handbook. The welcomers will be in the Great Hall in the Aston Webb Building every morning waiting to help you.

Free internet access at the Cyber Centre

(Registration desk, Great Hall, Aston Webb Building) Collect a password and user id from the Registration Desk (in the Great Hall of the Aston Webb Building) for checking your emails or browsing the Internet throughout the conference.

Receptions

ASE stand and Open Conference

(DS2 and D1, Exhibition Marquee, respectively) Please come and visit the ASE stand at any time during the conference: ASE staff and Field Officers will be there to help with your queries. The Open Conference is an informal mix of short sessions: if you’ve not been before, drop in and listen. There are slots still available so come along and present your own 15 minute session.

Everyone is invited to attend the Members’ Reception, in the Exhibition Marquee on Thursday 9 January from 1715-1800. Details of private receptions are not published in the Annual Conference handbook; please retain your invitation for time and venue details.

Catering

Please see page 15.

Left Luggage

(Great Hall in the Aston Webb Building) A cloakroom for coats and bags is in the Great Hall in the Aston Webb Building.

International Welcome Room

(Mason Lounge, Arts Building) International delegates are invited to the International Welcome Room, Mason Lounge, on the ground floor of the Arts Building. Meet members of the International Committee and friends and colleagues from around the globe

The ASE would like to thank our key partners and other sponsors for their support of the ASE and the Annual Conference 2014, in particular:

Gold Partner

Silver Partner

Bronze Partner

Bronze Partner

1

Contents Key locations

Inside Front Cover

Welcome from the Association Chair 2013-2014

2

Welcome from the Annual Conference Secretary

3

ASE President 2014

8

Welcome from the Vice Chancellor of The University of Birmingham

10

About the University of Birmingham

11

Useful Information

13-16

Two Day Primary Programme

24-25

Sponsorship and Conferences

26

Frontier Science Lectures

28-29

Social Programme

32

International Day (Wednesday 8 January)

34-35

Thursday 3 January Thursday full listing

39-53

Friday 4 January Friday full listing

54-75

Saturday 5 January Saturday full listing

76-84

Exhibition List of Exhibitors and Advertisers

86

Exhibition Floor Plan

87

ASE Contact Information

88

Getting to Birmingham

Inside Back Cover

Campus Map

Back Cover

Design: www.elmtreecreative.co.uk

ASE, College Lane, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL10 9AA Tel: 01707 283000 Email: conferences@ase.org.uk Web site: www.ase.org.uk

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2

Welcome from the Association Chair 2013-2014

Welcome to the 2014 ASE Annual Conference at the University of Birmingham. This may well be your first ever ASE Conference or you Pete Robinson could be a seasoned conference Chair of the Association veteran. Either way, this conference has something for everyone. It’s a ‘one stop shop’ for great science professional development; a ‘Glastonbury’ in the Education world. ASE believes in Excellence in Science Education and the conference theme of ‘taking on the challenge of change’ supports excellence in many different ways. Education is never static and we should be grateful for this. For example, contemporary science is a rich and fertile area for learning and the conference has great opportunities to find out about innovative applications and new discoveries in the fields of science and technology. If this is an area of interest for you, keep your eyes open for the ‘Frontier Science’ lectures and events put on by the University. Curriculum and specification changes may not always be quite as welcome but at least there is a wealth of opportunities to support you; ‘Inquiry skills’ at KS2 and KS3 and planning support for new examination courses for 14-19 students. There are opportunities to share education research and plan your own action research; keep your eyes peeled for ‘Research into Practice’ lectures and workshops. And where would science be without practical work? Practical sessions abound with such diverse topics as ‘spinning jelly’, ‘chemical magic’ and the ‘science of music’. The Primary programme has much to offer again this year with support for investigative science, crosscurricular work, collaborative learning and tackling ‘hard’ science such as evolution and genetics at an early age. The conference is not just about the sessions. There is much, much more. The marquee hosts the largest collection of exhibitors you

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could hope to gather at one event. Exhibitors contribute so much to the conference; they give you advice and ideas, free samples, support sessions and provide us with their latest ideas and thinking to support our work. Do talk to them; they want to have your ideas and feedback and might just produce that resource you’ve thought about and wanted for years. A real bonus this year is the ‘stamp collection’ card. Collect stamps from exhibitors and enter the prize draw each day. The prizes are Kindles for the lucky winners! No ASE conference would be complete without the social programme and this year is no exception. Our first event is the International dinner on Wednesday night, held this year in ‘Staff House’ on campus. You don’t have to be an International member to attend and it’s a great opportunity to meet fellow science educators from around the globe. The Members’ Reception on Thursday is an opportunity to celebrate our successes of the year with existing and future members alike. The Association Dinner is at the Crowne Plaza Hotel on Friday Night and continues the long ASE tradition. A formal dinner with after dinner speaker makes it a special and memorable event. There are other social receptions dotted around the programme too where sponsors and exhibitors reward delegates with freebies and refreshments… I will take this opportunity to thank all of our contributors which make this such a rich and varied conference. Our special thanks go to you, the delegates, for coming, our presenters and exhibitors for putting on a show and the ASE staff and volunteers for all their hard work to make it happen. I would like to thank the University Vice Chancellor, Professor David Eastwood, and his staff for all their hard work to support the conference and finally, I would like to extend our special thanks to our partners OCR (gold), AQA (silver), Edu-Lab (Bronze) and Oxford University Press (Bronze) for their continued support for ASE and the Annual Conference. Thanks for coming, everyone, and have a great conference!

3

Welcome from the Honorary Annual Conference Secretary

Susan Burr Honorary Annual Conference Secretary

It is with great pleasure that I welcome you back to the University of Birmingham. ASE gratefully accepts the invitation of the Vice Chancellor and Principal Professor David Eastwood.

This year we have again an extensive programme of workshops, courses and lectures run by members, friends and exhibitors. There are two days of primary events, research seminar series and specialist presentations in Biology, Physics and Earth Science. Teachers, technicians and science educators attach enormous importance to our Conference, with its most extensive science education exhibition in Europe. Once again our accommodation will be in local hotels. This year we are offering a more formal International Dinner on campus together with the Association Dinner in the city centre Crowne Plaza hotel. There will continue to be our members’ reception and this year it will be followed by an extended opportunity to meet with old friends and make new ones. The University staff have given us unstinting support over the past year and I would like to thank them all. Michael Grove has represented the Vice Chancellor on our Management Group and has encouraged his colleagues to produce a superb programme of Frontier Science Lectures, which show just what cutting edge research is going on at Birmingham. Julie Zacaroli, Sally Badham and Christine Crompton from the Conference Department have worked tirelessly to meet our requirements.

Blakeney continues to lead the team with the able support of Ray Hancock (exhibition) and Emma Hill. I should also like to thank the ASE field officer team, particular Tanya Dempster and Frances Evans, and the book sales team of Rob Oxley and Suzanne Dickinson. I am also delighted to have an opportunity to thank local members of the West Midlands Region, Peter Humphries, Norma Broadbridge, Gill and John Parkin, and Ray and Rosemary Plevey who have all been part of the Management Group. Last but not least I should also like to thank in advance our band of volunteers who answer questions and organise activities before, during and at the end of the conference and also, of course, the numerous presenters of the conference sessions. Every year we try to get feedback from delegates and once again I am asking for your help. Last year we had an excellent response from the “fast feedback” system and we will continue to use this, focusing on the individual sessions. After the conference we will be sending you an electronic survey on more general aspects of the conference and again we would ask you to help us by completing the survey. The comments both good and bad are also very useful. This feedback is extremely important and is our main way of maintaining our standards and improving any weaker aspects. Finally I would like to pay tribute to all of our sponsors who, by their generosity, enable us to enrich the whole Conference. I do hope that you enjoy our 2014 Birmingham Conference and that it inspires and motivates you for a successful year ahead.

Our own ASE conference team have, as always, been extremely busy both in setting timings of events and negotiating contracts. Belinda

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PUBLICATIONS

Visit the Booksales area in the Exhibition Marquee and browse our wide range of books

Publications from the Association for Science Education are designed to provide advice, support and information to teachers at all stages of their professional development, and to be innovative in identifying and taking forward key issues in science education – see them all at the Conference.

...................................................................................................................... Primary Cover:Layout 1 08/12/2010 11:27 Page 1

Each chapter sets out its main theme and explores the implications for teachers and others, often with illustrations of classroom practice. The chapters have further references to publications and websites for information, ideas and resources. The authors are drawn from a wide cross-section of ASE members who are all committed to and experienced in science education. In the same series: • ASE Guide to Secondary Science Education, Editor Martin Hollins • ASE Guide to Research in Science Education, Editor John Oversby – gives easy access to research that has informed classroom practice and also provides guidance for those wishing to conduct their own research. The Association for Science Education is a dynamic community of teachers, technicians, and other professionals supporting science education and is the largest subject association in the UK. The ASE is an independent and open forum for debate and a powerful force to promote excellence in science teaching and learning, with unique benefits for members. For further information contact The Association for Science Education College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AA tel: 01707 283000 e-mail: info@ase.org.uk website: www.ase.org.uk

NEW EDITION

ISBN: 978 0 86357 427 6

The Association for Science

Education

Edited By Wynne Harlen

It’s Not Fair – or is it? Tells you exactly what you need to know for teaching the new primary science curriculum.

This book draws on the experience of a wide range of teachers and those involved in science education. It has been produced as part of the Association for Science Education’s commitment to supporting science teachers by disseminating best practice and new ideas to enhance teaching. Series editor: David Sang

The authors are drawn from a wide cross-section of ASE members who are all committed to and experienced in science education..

In the same series: • ASE Guide to Primary Science Education, Editor Wynne Harlen • ASE Guide to Research in Science Education, Editor John Oversby – gives easy access to research that has informed classroom practice and also provides guidance for those wishing to conduct their own research. The Association for Science Education is a dynamic community of teachers, technicians, and other professionals supporting science education and is the largest subject association in the UK. The ASE is an independent and open forum for debate and a powerful force to promote excellence in science teaching and learning, with unique benefits for members. For further information contact The Association for Science Education College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AA tel: 01707 283000 e-mail: info@ase.org.uk website: www.ase.org.uk

ASE Science Practice series Invaluable support for NQTs and trainee science teachers and for experienced teachers who want to extend the range of strategies and approaches they use for Science

A S E S C I E NACSEE PSR CA ICE TNI C E P R A C T I C E

teaching secondary

This book will provide invaluable support whether you are a newly-qualified science teacher, an experienced teacher of physics who wants to extend the range of strategies and approaches used, a biologist or chemist who has to teach physics, or a student training to be a teacher. Each chapter covers a broad section of the curriculum and is divided into topics. For each topic the book covers:

CHEMISTRY NEW EDITION

s Students’ likely Previous knowledge s A suggested Teaching sequence with activities necessary to cover the basic physics ED I TO R : K E I T H s Advice about students’ misconceptions, common problems with individual activities, and safety issues s Further activities that develop the students’ understanding of the topic s Enhancement ideas that relate the science to everyday contexts and provide new ideas for experienced teachers s Suggestions for using ICT

TA B E R

This second edition reflects changes in curricula, ideas from recent curriculum development projects, and the current availability of ICT. This book draws on the experience of a wide range of teachers and those involved in science education. It has been produced as part of the Association for Science Education’s commitment to supporting science teachers by disseminating best practice and new ideas to enhance teaching. Series editor: David Sang

781444 124323

........................................................ Health and safety in school science and technology for teachers of 3- to 12-year-olds

A Key book for Primary and Secondary science ASE Guide to Research in Science Education Enables science teachers to critically evaluate and develop their practice

PHYSICS NEW EDITION

s Students’ likely Previous knowledge s A suggested Teaching sequence with activities necessary to cover the basic biologyED I TO R : DAV I D s Advice about students’ misconceptions, common problems with individual activities, and safety issues s Further activities that develop the students’ understanding of the topic s Enhancement ideas that relate the science to everyday contexts and provide new ideas for experienced teachers s Suggestions for using ICT

SANG

This second edition reflects changes in curricula, ideas from recent curriculum development projects, and the current availability of ICT. This book draws on the experience of a wide range of teachers and those involved in science education. It has been produced as part of the Association for Science Education’s commitment to supporting science teachers by disseminating best practice and new ideas to enhance teaching.

ASE SCIENCE PRACTICE

teaching secondary

B I O LO GY NEW EDITION

ED I TO R : M I C H A E L R E I S S

REISS

9

teaching secondary

Education

Series editor: David Sang

www.ase.org.uk

www.ase.org.uk

I S B N 978-1-444-12432-3

FOURTH EDITION

A S E S C I E N ACSE E P SR C A ICE TNI C C EE P R A C T I C E This book will provide invaluable support whether you are a newly-qualified science teacher, an experienced teacher of biology who wants to extend the range of strategies and approaches used, a chemist or physicist who has to teach biology, or a student training to be a teacher. Each chapter covers a broad section of the curriculum and is divided into topics. For each topic the book covers:

SANG

www.ase.org.uk

NEW EDITION Edited By Martin Hollins

The Association

ISBN: 978 0 86357 428 3

t e a c hin g s e c o n d ar y BI O LO GY

This second edition reflects changes in curricula, ideas from recent curriculum development projects, and the current availability of ICT.

Each chapter sets out its main theme and explores the implications for teachers and others, often with illustrations of classroom practice. The chapters have further references to publications and websites for information, ideas and resources

ASE S CI EN CE PR AC T I CE

s Students’ likely Previous knowledge s A suggested Teaching sequence with activities necessary to cover the basic chemistry s Advice about students’ misconceptions, common problems with individual activities, and safety issues s Further activities that develop the students’ understanding of the topic s Enhancement ideas that relate the science to everyday contexts and provide new ideas for experienced teachers s Suggestions for using ICT

This ASE Guide to Secondary Science Education provides critical consideration of: • learning and teaching in the secondary science curriculum • the assessment and attainment of students • organisation of resources • management and professional development of staff.

t e a c hin g s e c o nd ar y PHYSICS

10:07

ASE Guide to Secondary Science Education Everyone concerned with the practice of secondary science education should have this book

ASE S CI EN CE PR AC T I CE

21/11/2010

This book is written for all those involved in secondary school science education. It offers guidance and practical support for student teachers, practising teachers, technicians and assistants, and those with management responsibilities for science. The need for a new edition of this highly regarded guide reflects the rapidly changing world of science education. This is a new book in which chapters address contemporary issues in the familiar landscape of pupils’ learning, teachers’ roles and school organisation.

TA B E R

Be Safe! Indispensible – every primary school teacher needs a copy!

1

t e a c hin g s e c o n d a r y CH E M IS TRY

Be-safe-4th-edition-front-4col.pdf

This book will provide invaluable support whether you are a newly-qualified science teacher, an experienced teacher of chemistry who wants to extend the range of strategies and approaches used, a biologist or physicist who has to teach chemistry, or a student training to be a teacher. Each chapter covers a broad section of the curriculum and is divided into topics. For each topic the book covers:

ASE S CI EN CE PR AC T I CE

ASE SCIENCE PRACTICE

A partnership publication with Millgate House Education

.................................................................................................

This ASE Guide to Primary Science Education provides critical consideration of: • learning and teaching in the primary science curriculum • the assessment and attainment of pupils • provision for science at the school level • the national and international context.

Key books for Secondary science

ASE Guide to Secondary Science Education New edition

ASE Guide to Primary Science Education Essential reading for everyone concerned with the practice of primary science education

Secondary Cover:Layout 1 08/12/2010 12:55 Page 1

ASE Guide to Primary Science Education New edition

Key books for Primary science This book is written for all those involved in primary school science education. It offers guidance and practical support for student teachers, practising teachers and assistants, and those with management responsibilities for science. The need for a new edition of this highly regarded guide reflects the rapidly changing world of science education. This is a new book in which chapters address contemporary issues in the familiar landscape of pupils’ learning, teachers’ roles and school organisation.

I S B N 978-1-444-12430-9

THE

OPEN

UNIVERSITY 9

SET

I S B N 978-1-444-12431-6

BOOK

781444 124309

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A partnership publication with Hodder Education

Science Leaders’ Hub Are you a science leader? Ever wished for more support and guidance? Ever been curious to find out how other science leaders are getting on? The new Science Leaders' Hub on the ASE website is being written BY science leaders FOR science leaders. Come along and find out about it at the Open Conference sessions – 12.30 Saturday 11 January, and see a demo on the ASE stand.

Safeguards in the School Laboratory Essential reading for every teacher – all trainee teachers should read this before they go in to the laboratory with a class

Explore how you can share your ideas on science education through ASE Journals, ASE books and ASE Online. Come along to our booked course Writing for ASE Publications, Saturday 11 January 11.00–13.00.

ASE Booksales: The Association for Science Education, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AA Tel: 01707 283000 Freefax: 0800 371856 Online: www.ase.org.uk

Official Gold Partner of ASE Conference 2014

JOIN US ON A VOYAGE OF SCIENCE DISCOVERY

VISIT US ON STAND A1

Discover our spectrum of Science qualifications which let you enjoy the freedom and excitement of teaching Science. Our qualifications inspire students of all abilities and provide an ideal foundation for progression to advanced studies and Science-related careers. You can also get advice and guidance on GCSE and A Level reform at ocr.org.uk/gcsealevelreform GCSE

REFORM

A LEVEL

ocr.org.uk/science

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STEM Sessions 2014 Wednesday 8 January T008 Supporting Scotland’s STEM Education and Culture Stuart Farmer, Robert Gordon’s College 1635-1730 Arts 201

Thursday 9 January T031 STEM collaboration in North Tyneside Julian Clarke, National STEM Centre 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering B01 W017 Can STEM change the world? Alex Marsh, Mark Prime, Philip Harris Education 1400-1500 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 W019 Explore the National STEM Centre eLibrary Tom Lyons, Karen Hornby, National STEM Centre 1400-1500 Learning Centre UG08 FS08 FS: The immune system: What goes wrong to cause rheumatoid arthritis and what can be done about it? Karim Raza, Immunity and Infection, MDS 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G29

W029 Regenerate! Will stem-cell biologists make Time Lords of us all? Dr Cathy Southworth, Ingrid Heersche, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh 1600-1700 Arts LR8

T056 ASE Research seminar series: Developing a Profiling Tool for Measuring the Impact of STEM Enrichment Programmes Wai Yi Feng, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education

T039 An update on all things STEM from the CSE! Pat Morton, Jill Collins, Centre for Science Education, Sheffield Hallam University 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 122

1130-1200 Muirhead Tower 118 BC16 Success with STEM Sue Howarth, Linda Scott, University of Worcester 1400-1600 W053 Project based learning in FE improving outcomes for STEM students Guest speaker, Next Steps in STEM 1600-170 Mechanical Engineering B04

DI06 Teachmeet STEM 1600-1730 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6

Friday 10 January W030 ASE Research seminar series: Ontological and epistemological tensions in the teaching and learning of school science investigations Prof Deb McGregor, Oxford Brookes University 0930-1000 Muirhead Tower 113

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Saturday 11 January W081 The STEM Challenge: Using toys and artefacts for inspirational science teaching Pete Robinson, Karen Hornby, National STEM Centre 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering B01

Proud to work alongside the ASE for the past

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January to Saturday 7 Wednesday 4

Gold partner

www.elmtreecreative.co.uk

Science A-level and GCSE changes are on the way – are you ready? Every teacher has questions about the changes to A-levels and GCSEs. Join us at stand C1 where we’ll answer your questions and show you how we’ll support you through the changes. To keep up to date with the latest exam changes, join us online examchange.org.uk Get in touch with our science subject team anytime for help or advice on 0161 953 1180 or email science-gce@aqa.org.uk

aqa.org.uk

Copyright © 2013 AQA and its licensors. All rights reserved.

ASE conference preview advert G00319.indd 1

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ASE President 2014 Alice originally trained as a medical doctor, before becoming a university lecturer. She taught anatomy on the medical course at Bristol University for eleven years, and developed a research interest in biological or physical anthropology, looking at what ancient skeletons can tell us about human evolution, and the diversity of the human species. She has a PhD in Professor Alice Roberts palaeopathology (the study of disease ASE President in ancient human remains). Alice is now Professor of Public Engagement in Science at the University of Birmingham. As well as undertaking more traditional academic roles in teaching and research at Birmingham, she is interested in encouraging and promoting dialogue between university researchers and the wider public. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Cheltenham Festival of Science, and a judge for the annual Wellcome Image Awards, celebrating art in science. Alice is the Patron of the Association of Science and Discovery Centres, and an Honorary Fellow of the British Science Association, and of the Society of Biology. She is a member of the board of the University of Oxford Natural History Museum and the University of Bristol Vesalius Clinical Training Centre.

ASE Annual General Meeting 2014

Alice is also the Director of Anatomy for the NHS Severn Deanery School of Surgery, running a course in surgical anatomy for trainee surgeons in the northern half of the South West. She has written four popular science books and writes a regular science column for The Observer. Two of her books were written to accompany television series: Don’t Die Young (an introduction to human anatomy and physiology), and Incredible Human Journey (about the ancient colonisation of the world), while themes of anatomy and human evolution are further explored in two illustrated volumes, The Complete Human Body and Evolution: the human story. Alice's television debut came as a human bone specialist on Channel 4's Time Team, in 2001. Part of the original team of presenters on BBC2's Coast, she went on to present a range of other series and programmes on BBC2, including Don't Die Young, The Incredible Human Journey, Digging for Britain, Horizon (Are we still evolving?; How to make a human), Origins of Us, Prehistoric Autopsy and Ice Age Giants. She has been a regular presenter on Radio 4’s environment programme, Costing The Earth. In 2013, she joined the team presenting the new radio 4 series, Inside Science. Alice is currently writing a book about embryology, evolution and anatomy, for publication in 2014.

Birmingham 2014 Annual Conference Management Group

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of the Association for Science Education will be held from 17.00 to 18.00 hours on Friday 10 January 2014 in Room G15 of the Muirhead Tower, at the University of Birmingham, for the purpose of transacting the following business:

Chair and Honorary Annual Conference Secretary

Susie Burr

Vice Chancellors’ Representative

Michael Grove

1. To receive, consider and approve the Annual Report of Council.

General Manager venuebirmingham Conference and Events

Julie Zacaroli

2. To receive, consider and approve the Annual Statement of Accounts. 3. To receive the Report of the Quality and Audit Committee.

Commercial Conference and Events Manager Sally Badham

4. To approve a series of Votes of Thanks to be proposed by the Annual Conference Secretary.

Event coordinator

Christine Lyons

ASE Conferences Manager

Ray Hancock

ASE Director of Conferences

Belinda Blakeney

5. To notify the election of the President for the ensuing year. 6. To elect Honorary Members. 7. To elect the Auditors. 8. To transact any other business which can be considered under the Rules of the Association. All members of the Association are entitled to be present and to vote. Copies of the Annual Report and the Annual Statement of Accounts are available on request from ASE Headquarters, by emailing info@ase.org.uk. They will be available for downloading from the members’ area of the ASE website at www.ase.org.uk in due course.

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ASE West Midlands Region Representatives Norma Broadbridge, Ray Plevey, Rosemary Plevey, Peter Humphries, Gill Parkin and John Parkin

ASE Conferences Team Director of Conferences

Belinda Blakeney

Conferences Manager

Ray Hancock

Conferences Administrator/ Communications Officer

Emma Hill

Handbook design: Elmtree Creative Handbook printing: Streetsprocesscolour print & design

LearnChemistry Partnership Be part of our exciting new schools programme

• Royal Society of Chemistry complimentary membership • Large periodic table wall chart for your school

Visit us at stand BS12 to find out more

Registered charity number 207890

Register free and receive:

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ASE Annual Conference 2014 Welcome from the Vice-Chancellor Professor David Eastwood

On behalf of the University of Birmingham I am delighted to welcome you to the 2014 Association for Science Education Conference. The University Prof. David Eastwood last hosted the Conference in 2007, Vice Chancellor and and while there have been many Principal exciting changes and developments to our beautiful Edgbaston campus since your last visit, including the Bramall Music Building which now completes the crescentshaped Aston Webb building, and the extensive refurbishment of both Muirhead Tower and Metallurgy and Materials, our tradition and commitment to supporting excellence and participation in science education at all levels remains stronger than ever. The University of Birmingham’s origins are firmly grounded in science and medical education. The origins of the University of Birmingham Medical School, one of Britain’s oldest and largest, can be traced back to the medical education seminars of John Tomlinson in 176768, and with the establishment of the Birmingham Medical School in 1825 a tradition of medical teaching in Birmingham began which continues to this very day. In 1875 Sir Josiah Mason, a Birmingham industrialist and philanthropist, founded Mason Science College. This was followed in 1898 with the creation of Mason University College, ultimately paving the way for the establishment of the University of Birmingham in 1900. The buildings you see in Chancellor’s Court are a direct result of our scientific heritage; they were built following a grant by the steel magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie to our first Chancellor Joseph Chamberlain to establish a “first class modern scientific college”. Over the years we have continued our commitment to ensuring world-class scientific knowledge and education is accessible to all. The science we pursue at Birmingham has an impact on the lives of individuals and our researchers continue to tackle the major

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challenges facing 21st century global society. Eight of our alumni and staff have been recognised with Nobel Prizes, the Chemist, Professor Norman Haworth, who was the first person to synthesise vitamin C in 1937, and Biology graduate and now President of the Royal Society Sir Paul Nurse, who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2001 for his work with cells which opened up new possibilities for cancer treatment. The traditions exemplified by our Nobel Laureates are those we seek to instil within all who work or study at the University of Birmingham. We remain committed to transforming lives by raising student aspirations, maximising potential, and providing the widest possible range of educational opportunities. In 2015, as part of this ongoing commitment, we will open the University of Birmingham School and Sixth Form. Throughout the conference you will be able to hear of some of the world leading scientific research that is currently taking place within our University through the Frontier Science Programme and the contributions of our academic members of staff. Once the Conference is over, I am delighted that our involvement with the Association for Science Education will continue through Professor Alice Roberts who will be the ASE President in 2014. Once again, welcome to Birmingham and I wish you a successful and enjoyable conference. With best wishes,

Professor David Eastwood| Vice Chancellor and Principal

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The University of Birmingham The University

The Times and Sunday Times University of the Year 2013-14, the University of Birmingham is a vibrant, global community and an internationally-renowned institution, in the top 75 globally. With approximately 28,000 students and 6,000 members of staff, its work brings people from more than 150 countries to Birmingham. The University has a long-standing commitment to the challenging and varied field of science. It has four Nobel Prize winners amongst its prestigious science alumni, including biochemist Sir Paul Nurse and physicist Francis Aston. This spirit of innovation and progression has flourished and, although we are proud of our tradition of excellence, we are keen to continue to push forward the boundaries of knowledge. Birmingham is leading the field in many of the emerging disciplines of the 21st century,. and its major research themes include sustainable environment, energy and resources, transport technology,genetics,, superdiversity, moraility and values, international conflict, cancer, immunity and infection and particle physics where our scientists played an important role in the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Colider, CERN All of our research themes are of global significance and we encourage different disciplines and departments to work together to share skills and expertise. It was at the University of Birmingham that: n Pacemakers and plastic heart valves were developed n Vitamin C was synthesised n The first over the counter male fertility test was developed n The botanic and geological foundations of the British Antarctic Survey were laid n The microwave was harnessed – for radar and ovens

Medicine, £6 million for a cryogenic energy storage centre and a £15 million gift from an alumnus and former staff member to create an Institute for Forest Research. Our campus at Edgbaston reflects our unique talent for embracing the past and inspiring the future, with the magnificent red-brick buildings of the early 20th century, contrasted against innovative modern architecture.The campus also boasts its own botanic garden, art collection which is housed in the outstanding Barber Institute of Fine Arts, and excellent sporting facilities which delegates are welcome to use on payment of a visitor fee.

Global reach

With almost 5,000 international students from more than 150 countries, and a third of our academic staff from overseas, our campus is truly a diverse and global place. We are a founding member of Universitas 21, a renowned consortium of world-leading, researchintensive universities, and have more than 225 international exchange partners, as well as robust links with leading global employers including Rolls-Royce, Procter & Gamble, and KPMG. This broad international perspective enables our graduates, academics and professionals to develop into individuals with the knowledge, skills and qualities to fulfil their potential as global citizens. We are developing our international presence and collaborations across academia, industry, culture and government in a number of key territories. Our international strategy is demonstrated by numerous significant initiatives including our landmark Birmingham Guangzhou Centre, a novel partnership with the municipal government in Guangzhou; our considerable joint investment with the University of Nottingham in Brazil; extensive engagement with cultural partners in Chicago and the American Midwest; and our permanent presence in New Delhi, Shanghai, Nigeria and Brussels.

n Edward Elgar was the first professor of music n Allergy vaccines were pioneered n The effectiveness of intravenous drips in the survival of burns victims was revolutionised n The earth was weighed n The key components of artificial blood were synthesised n Plant and animal breeding techniques were transformed by advances in genetics Our graduates are highly sought after, both nationally and internationally, but are also cherished regionally in a city that is keen to retain people with the skills and knowledge necessary to support the strong local economy. The University contributes over £1 billion to the West Midlands economy and supports over 12,000 jobs and its research grant capture this year totals £130 million. Major funds to scientific research include £60 million for a High Temperature Research Centre, £24 million for the Institute of Translational

Learning Resources

As a major research-led institution, our learning environment provides both pastoral and academic support for our students. We have one of the largest academic libraries in the country – with a book stock of over two and a half million volumes, and access online to over 370,000 ebooks, and nearly 70,000 journals. The Main Library houses our principal collection and services for Humanities, Social Sciences, Sciences and Engineering. There are separate satellite libraries for Fine Arts, Music, Shakespeare Studies (at the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon), Education, Law, the Social Sciences of Eastern Europe, Medical and Life Sciences, and Dentistry.

The City of Birmingham

No longer the dark heart of industry, Birmingham has bloomed over the past 20 years into one of Europe’s most exciting destinations. Home to the acclaimed City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra and the Birmingham Royal Ballet, Birmingham also boasts contemporary art at the Ikon Gallery. Major exhibitions are held at the City Museum and

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Art Gallery, which contains an outstanding art collection particularly relating to the pre-Raphaelite movement with which the city has many connections. We also have a thriving cultural life that embraces the broad ethnic mix of the region. This is reflected in the abundance of restaurants offering food from across the globe. Birmingham has invested heavily in establishing itself as a young, professional city. The Bullring isone of the largest retail developments in Europe, and leading brand names including Selfridges and Debenhams have chosen to base flagship stores here and designer labels such as Harvey Nichols and Emporio Armani have found their own space in Birmingham’s answer to Bond Street, The Mailbox. The city centre canal side developments, particularly those around Brindley Place, have given rise to the new phenomenon of a 'cityliving lifestyle' with significant numbers of people choosing to live within walking distance of their city centre work, entertainment and leisure facilities. With a wide range of theatres, pubs and clubs, the nightlife is hard to beat; while top-class sport of all kinds, from athletics to Premiership and Championship football, is on hand at venues including Aston Villa, Birmingham City and West Bromwich Albion football clubs. The prestigious Priory Tennis Club is based close to the University campus in Edgbaston and of course the worldfamous Edgbaston cricket ground is only a mile away.

Heritage

Acknowledged as ‘the first manufacturing town in the world’, Birmingham has played an important role in the economic development of the UK in the last 250 years. Home to James Watt and Matthew Boulton, pioneers of the Industrial Revolution, goods produced in the city have been sold all over the world. Metalwork of all kinds, including nautical chain making and jewellery, were key industries for Birmingham in the 18th and 19th centuries. During the 20th century the motor industry emerged as one of the major employers in the city. Whilst Birmingham is justly proud of its heritage as a major industrial centre, the city and its shires have continued to grow and develop to become both a diverse and cosmopolitan place to live and work, embracing a population of around two million people. A growing financial district, huge diversification in the companies and trades represented in the city, sought after city-based and rural accommodation, and its developing role as a tourism hub from which to explore rural England, have all played their part in revolutionising images of Birmingham. Come and see for yourself.

Graduates of the University of Birmingham are invited to come to a coffee reception and reminisce with others, members of the Guild of Graduates committee and staff from the alumni office during the ASE Annual Conference. These will take place on Thursday, Friday and Saturday between 10.30 and 11.30 in the Rotunda of the Aston Webb building (upstairs over the main University reception desk). There’s no need to register, though it would help to know if you intend to be present. ggaapresident@bhamalumni.com We look forward to meeting you there!

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Useful Information Birmingham 2014 Car Parking Edgbaston Campus

Visitor car parks located at the South Car Park, Pritchatts Road and North Car Park run a pay and display system. All vehicles must display a valid ticket for the appropriate fee dependent upon the length of stay. Parking in unauthorised areas or without payment may result in your car being clamped. Details on how to find the university can be found at http://www.location.bham.ac.uk

Charges 09.30 - 16.30 Mon - Fri: 0-1 hours £2 1-3 hours £3 3-5 hours £4 5-8 hours £6 Parking is free on Saturday and Sunday In addition to the visitor car parks there are a number of disabled bays across campus. Disabled blue badge holders can park on the University campus free of charge but must ensure that their badge is clearly displayed.

Security

n Please note that the university can accept no responsibility for injury to persons (however caused), loss or damage to visitors’ or residents’ goods or other personal effects, including vehicles parked in car parks. All belongings are at owner’s risk. n In a genuine emergency, the University Security Office can be contacted on 0121-414-3000 twenty-fours hour a day. This number must not be used for leaving messages for delegates or exhibitors.

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Useful Information Birmingham 2014

HEALTH AND FIRST AID n If first aid is required on campus contact the Security Office via the internal telephone in the building, number 43000 n Hospital – the nearest emergency department is at Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Telephone 0121-627-2000. In the Conference Park, contact the main reception in Lucas House. n University Dental and Implant Centre telephone 0121-687-8882 (Monday-Thursday 09.00 to 17.30, Friday 09.00 to 13.30) n Outside of working hours (and up to 21.00) the number of the emergency dental services may be obtained by phoning the practice on 0121-687-8882 n NHS Direct can be contacted on 111 from any landline or mobile phone free of charge n Chemists – Boots has a large store on High Street, Harborne, approximately 15 minutes from the main campus

SMOKING All meeting rooms, lecture theatres, foyers and public areas within the university operate a no smoking policy.

BANKS,SHOPS AND POST OFFICES n Banks with cashpoints available in University Centre are Barclays and Lloyds TSB. Santander Bank is available in the Guild of Students n Spar in University Centre will be open from 7.00 am – till late Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and 7.00 am - 5.00 pm Saturday. Spar is a general store that sells newspapers and groceries n Tesco Express on Bristol Road South, adjacent to the main campus, is open 24 hours a day n Post Office services are situated in Unique, located in University Centre n The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is open on Friday and Saturday 10.00 am – 5.00 pm and from 12.00 noon – 5.00 pm Sunday. Admission is free

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PLACES TO EAT University Centre Café Go Wed – Fri 08.00 – 17.00 Go Central Wed – Sat 08.00 – 16.00 Costa Coffee Wed – Fri 08:00 – 18.00 Sat 10.00 – 16.00 Medical School Food Court Wed – Fri 09.00 – 15.30 Learning Centre Go2

Wed – Fri

08.30 – 15.00

School of Education

Wed – Fri

10.00 – 14.00

Gisbert Kapp

Wed – Fri

09.00 – 15.00

The Peregrine Falcon is the fastest animal on earth, reaching speeds of up to 273 mph.

Bramall Music Building Costa Wed 08.00 – 17.00 Thu – Fri 08.00 – 18.30 Sat 08.00 – 16.00 Muirhead Tower Starbucks Wed – Fri 08.00 – 17.00 Marquee Thu 09.00 – 16.30 Fri 09.00 – 18.00 Sat 09.00 – 15.00

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Useful Information Birmingham 2014 INFORMATION FOR THE DISABLED The University campus is quite hilly and some of our older buildings vary in their accessibility. We can advise on individual access needs. There is a Visual Impairment Resource Room in the Main Library with limited Brailling facilities. The Munrow Sports Centre, including the swimming pool, is accessible to wheelchair users. You can obtain further information from: Disability Services Tel: 0121- 414 - 5130 Email: disability@bham.ac.uk Disabled blue badge holders can park on the University campus free of charge but must ensure that their badge is clearly displayed.

WORSHIP AT ASE 2014 Information about contacts and places of worship for a number of faiths has been provided by the University Chaplaincy. A list of these contacts will be available on the ASE Registration Desk, in the Aston Webb Building.

www.wild-learning.com

WILD LEARNING specialises in connecting adults and children with their local outdoor spaces. We are experts in ‘Outdoor Learning’ and ‘Natural Play’. We offer a wide range of events, activities and training courses all designed to enjoy whilst learning and help us reconnect with and discover our local wild spaces. We offer Forest School Leadership training, Outdoor School Practitioner Training, bespoke training courses designed for you and your needs - both accredited and non-accredited, plus advice and help with school grounds development to enhance your ‘Learning Outside the Classroom’ opportunities. Our skills base covers; all aspects of curriculum linked outdoors learning, scientific investigation and study, field studies, conservation, tools use, campfires, shelter building, bushcraft, organic gardening, orchards, fruit production, and much more. Please visit our bell tent to find out more about us and how we can help you to enhance and create your Outdoor Learning programme. We’ll be donating free trees and seeds for schools who come and visit us.

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Themes 2014 The overall theme at this year’s Annual Conference is Excellence in science education; taking on the challenge of change. Within this overall theme are several topical sub-themes; …new curricula, developing assessment, policy into practice, practical/outdoor science, primary focus, international, using technology creatively, research into practice, leadership… Sessions which fall under these headings are shown here (some sessions fall into more than one theme so may be listed twice):

New curricula Wednesday 8 T002 Essentials of Science – A concept of a science course focusing on the Big Ideas of Science and experience-based Scientific Inquiry and Scientific Reasoning - 1500-1555 Arts 201 Wednesday 8 T003 Teaching content and language skills in the science classroom (repeated Thursday 1400) 1500-1555 Arts LR2 Wednesday 8 T005 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeated Thursday 1600 as a booked course) - 16351730 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 T008 Supporting Scotland’s STEM Education and Culture - 1635-1730 Arts 201 Wednesday 8 T009 Science and cultural contexts (repeated Friday 0930) - 1735-1830 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 W004 The Jurassic Coast: Cross-curricular approaches to teaching earth science - 1735-1830 Arts LR2 Thursday 9 FS01 FS: How Round is Your Circle - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 FS02 FS: Humans, Holodecks, Heritage and Healthcare: Virtual Technologies for the Real Worl - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Thursday 9 T014 IOP: Girls in Physics - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Thursday 9 T015 Planning a science curriculum: AQA’s Post-16 offer 09301030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Thursday 9 W007 Smarter Science for Key Stage 3 - 0930-1030 Arts LR2 Thursday 9 T016 Teaching the new curriculum with Switched On Science 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 T017 The Spinning Jelly and other fun physics experiments 0930-1030 Physics West 117 Thursday 9 T018 What On Earth? – connecting the curriculum through Big Science - 0930-1030 Arts LR6 Thursday 9 BC01 Practical challenges linking science with design and technology - 0930-1230 Thursday 9 W010 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Thursday 9 BC02 DNA Fingerprinting - 1100-1300 Thursday 9 BC03 Fantastic Forensics on a low budget. Highly evaluated course - 1100-1300 Thursday 9 BC05 Making animations

for teaching and learning science 1100-1300 Thursday 9 T022 Top GCSE grades by teaching outstanding OFSTED lessons. - 1100-1300 Arts LR8 Thursday 9 T025 Concept Cartoons: reaching the places that other strategies don’t reach - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 121 Thursday 9 FS04 FS: Recreating the Big Bang with the World's Largest Machine - The LHC at CERN - 11301230 Mechanical Engineering G29 Thursday 9 T029 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work (repeated Friday 1130) 1130-1230 BioSciences lab E204 Thursday 9 SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum - 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G31 Thursday 9 T031 STEM collaboration in North Tyneside - 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering B01 Thursday 9 W015 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth Science for the new KS3 curriculum - 1130-1300 BioSciences lab 201 Thursday 9 DI01 Wellcome Trust funding surgery - 1230-1430 Arts LR2 Thursday 9 W019 Explore the National STEM Centre eLibrary - 1400-1500 Learning Centre UG08 Thursday 9 FS07 FS: Examining the Performance of Urban Interventions in the Far Future - 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 T034 Getting to grips with lesson planning - 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Thursday 9 W021 Post-16 chemistry learning resources using 3D crystal structures - 1400-1500 Learning Centre LG15 Thursday 9 T035 Science teaching: What works? - 1400-1500 Arts Thursday 9 W022 Supporting teachers through GCSE reform – an overview for Heads of Science and advisors 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G36 Thursday 9 T037 Teaching content and language skills in the science classroom (repeat) - 1400-1500 Arts LR4 Thursday 9 W025 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Thursday 9 BC07 Developing language and literacy skills in science - 14001600 Thursday 9 BC09 IOP: Thinking on Your Feet: Football and Physics 14001600 Thursday 9 W027 Update on resources for particle physics: the particle zoo and Feynman diagrams - 14001600 Physics West 103 Thursday 9 W028 A-level Chemistry: Plan ahead with AQA - 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering G36 Thursday 9 T039 An update on all things STEM from the CSE! - 16001700 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 DI05 Developing numeracy skills in science - 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 121 Thursday 9 T041 Dramatic Science : Exploring how drama can help children understand science at KS 2 1600-1700 Arts LR2

Thursday 9 BC08 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeat) - 16001700 Thursday 9 FS09 FS: Barefoot running: back to our roots? 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG5 Thursday 9 FS10 FS: Fighting disease with maths - 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 T042 Putting the context into the KS3 draft curriculum - 16001700 BioSciences 201 Thursday 9 W029 Regenerate! Will stem-cell biologists make Time Lords of us all - 1600-1700 Arts LR8 Thursday 9 DI06 Teachmeet STEM - 1600-1730 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Thursday 9 SE08 Talking science education - 1600-1800 Nuffield G17 Friday 10 SE09 Biology in the real world: Mighty mitochondria - 09301015 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 SE10 A Key Stage 3 assessment model for the new curriculum (repeated Saturday 0930) 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 121 Friday 10 W031 A-level Physics: Plan ahead with AQA - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Friday 10 BC10 Do you upcycle? Thought-provoking sustainable core science for juniors - 09301030 Friday 10 FS11 FS: Music of the Sun and stars - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Friday 10 FS12 FS: What do we mean by chaos? - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Friday 10 BC11 IDEA- Inquiry in Dye Electrohporesis - 0930-1030 Friday 10 T046 Problem based learning course for prospective medical students - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Friday 10 T047 Science and cultural contexts (repeat) - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Friday 10 T049 Transition to Post 16 Science (and not just A level) - 09301030 Muirhead Tower 122 Friday 10 SE12 Biology in the real world: Waste into energy - 1015-1100 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 SE13 Timstar’s Bright Idea campaigns finalists - 1030-1200 exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Friday 10 T052 Light – think it, talk it, be it, understand it - 1100-1200 Arts 201 Friday 10 T053 NAIGS day: Assessment Update - 1100-1200 Nuffield G17 Friday 10 T055 The Human Condition Project - using psychology in primary science - 1100-1200 Arts LR4 Friday 10 W037 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Friday 10 BC13 Developing schemes of learning for the new Programme of Study in KS1&2 - 1100-1300 Friday 10 SE14 Biology in the real world: Metabolism and energy balance - 1130-1215 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 T058 AQA: Supporting

practical science - 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G36 Friday 10 T059 Building success in linear GCSE - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 Friday 10 T060 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for KS3 - 1130-1230 Arts LT3 Friday 10 FS15 FS: Nuclear Energy: What is the Future for the UK? - 11301230 Mechanical Engineering G29 Friday 10 T064 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab 204 Friday 10 T065 The structure triangle: a periodic table which includes compounds - 1130-1230 BioSciences 201 Friday 10 T066 Wonderfully helpful animation to develop understanding in organic chemistry - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 112 Friday 10 SE16 Biology in the real world: Natural selection as the power house of diversity - 1215-1300 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 SE17 Biology in the real world: Life without light - 1400-1445 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 SE18 ASE Presidential Address - 1400-1500 University Centre Avon Room Friday 10 DI10 Developing literacy skills in science - 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 121 Friday 10 T071 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for Primary - 1400-1500 Arts LT3 Friday 10 DI11 Edexcel A level Science 2015 update - 1400-1500 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Friday 10 W042 Embracing spoken language in the primary science curriculum - 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Friday 10 T072 NAIGS day: Curriculum - Primary Update - 14001500 Nuffield G17 Friday 10 BC14 Microbiology for primary-small and clever! - 14001530 Friday 10 W045 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Friday 10 BC16 Success with STEM 1400-1600 Friday 10 W047 Teaching resources for particle physics: particle detectors 1400-1600 Physics West 103 Friday 10 SE19 Biology in the real world: Drug development - the unexpected role of plants - 1445-1530 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 SE20 Biology in the real world: High pressure plants - 15301615 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 W049 Get out! - 1530-1630 Arts LR2 Friday 10 W050 Planning for the new primary science curriculum - 15301630 Arts LR8 Friday 10 DI13 Teachmeet secondary - 1530-1700 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Friday 10 T078 AQA: Supporting mathematics in science - 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering G36 Friday 10 T079 Developing talk at KS4 - 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 113 Friday 10 T080 Digital Explorer

Ocean Science for GCSE - 1600-1700 Arts LT3 Friday 10 SE21 EARTH SCIENCE: ESTA/ESEU Distinguished speaker: Devastating earthquakes - 1600-1700 BioSciences NG08 Friday 10 W053 Project based learning in FE - improving outcomes for STEM students - 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering B04 Friday 10 T082 Project-based learning developments at School 21 - 16001700 Muirhead Tower 122 Friday 10 BC18 Things that Fly 1600-1700 Friday 10 DI15 Working scientifically at KS3 - 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 121 Friday 10 T084 World Friendly Science - 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 109 Saturday 11 SE23 A Key Stage 3 assessment model for the new curriculum - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 121 Saturday 11 W055 A-level Biology: Plan ahead with AQA - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 FS18 FS: Sex, Lies and Nanotechnology - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 W057 Great ideas that work: Novel science activities for 11-16 year old - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Saturday 11 T087 IOP: Using evidence to inform your teaching - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Saturday 11 T088 Learn chemistry – Exploring new resources - 0930-1030 Learning Centre UG08 Saturday 11 T089 Let’s talk about science - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 Saturday 11 T090 NAIGS : Making cross-curricular links with science 0930-1030 Nuffield G17 Saturday 11 T091 Science enquiry in the new primary national curriculum 0930-1030 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 W059 Super scientists 0930-1030 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 T093 What's an eyeball made of, miss? - 0930-1030 Arts 201 Saturday 11 W061 Planning your new science curriculum? Let’s make it cross-curricular - 1100-1200 Arts LR5 Saturday 11 T095 Literacy and numeracy in science - 1100-1230 Mechanical Engineering G26 Saturday 11 BC21 Astrophysics in the Sixth Form – Examined and Nonexamined - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 W062 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills - 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Saturday 11 W064 Developing formative assessment in practice 1100-1300 Muirhead Tower 122 Saturday 11 BC22 INSPIRING PRIMARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! - 11001300 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 BC25 Electronics for Novices - 1130-1230 Saturday 11 FS20 FS: Could a baby robot grow up to be a mathematician?

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Themes 2014 - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Saturday 11 FS21 FS: Plant adaptation to changing environments: A role for GM - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 W067 Strictly Come Fractional Distillation: a revision script for GCSE Science - 1130-1230 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 W069 Using research to improve teaching and learning - 11301230 Mechanical Engineering B04 Saturday 11 DI22 Edexcel A level Science 2015 update - 1230-1330 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Saturday 11 T097 Evolution and genetics in the new primary national curriculum - 1400-1500 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 W072 From scientific enquiry to working scientifically 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 FS23 FS: 100 million to 1: what can maths tell us about the Great Sperm Race? - 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 W073 Improving progress in primary science - 14001500 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 T098 Resources and ideas for teaching animal behaviour - 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G28 Saturday 11 W075 Supporting teachers through GCSE reform – an overview of ‘science for all’ offer for Heads of Science and advisors -1500 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 W076 The Human Guinea Pig – Careers in Healthcare Science - 1400-1500 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Saturday 11 W077 Yes we can! 1400-1530 BioSciences Lab 201 Saturday 11 BC26 INSPIRING SECONDARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! - 14001600 Saturday 11 W078 A-level Science: Plan ahead with AQA - 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 W081 The STEM Challenge: Using toys and artefacts for inspirational science teaching - 15301630 Mechanical Engineering B01 Saturday 11 W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum - 15301630 Arts LR5

Developing assessment Wednesday 8 T002 Essentials of Science – A concept of a science course focusing on the Big Ideas of Science and experience-based Scientific Inquiry and Scientific Reasonin - 1500-1555 Arts 201 Thursday 9 T015 Planning a science curriculum: AQA’s Post-16 offer 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Thursday 9 BC02 DNA Fingerprinting - 1100-1300 Thursday 9 SE02 OCR Special event 1: Coursework in public examinations; should we have it at all? - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower G15 Thursday 9 T034 Getting to grips with lesson planning - 1400-1500 Arts LR8

Thursday 9 DI03 Preparing for terminal assessment in GCSE sciences - 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 121 Thursday 9 BC07 Developing language and literacy skills in science - 1400-1600 Thursday 9 W028 A-level Chemistry: Plan ahead with AQ - 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering G36 Friday 10 SE10 A Key Stage 3 assessment model for the new curriculum (repeated Saturday 0930) 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 121 Friday 10 W031 A-level Physics: Plan ahead with AQA - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Friday 10 BC11 IDEA- Inquiry in Dye Electrohporesis - 0930-1030 Friday 10 SE15 OCR Special event 2 - 1130-1230 Haworth 101 Friday 10 T073 SAILS – assessment of science inquiry - 1400-1500 Arts 201 Friday 10 T077 Assessment in primary science: meeting the new challenges 1530-1630 Arts 120 Main LT Friday 10 W052 IOP: Investigative Practical Work through the Extended Project Qualification - 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 112 Friday 10 DI14 Supporting effective teaching and learning: science subject leaders - 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering B01 Saturday 11 SE23 A Key Stage 3 assessment model for the new curriculum - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 121 Saturday 11 W055 A-level Biology: Plan ahead with AQA - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 T094 The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project - 1100-1200 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 W064 Developing formative assessment in practice 1100-1300 Muirhead Tower 122 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 DI21 What – no levels? Assessment and tracking at KS3 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 121 Saturday 11 W075 Supporting teachers through GCSE reform – an overview of ‘science for all’ offer for Heads of Science and advisors 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 W078 A-level Science: Plan ahead with AQA - 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 SE30 Preparing for linear assessment in triple science - 15301630 Mechanical Engineering B04 Saturday 11 W079 Socrative: A practical by any other means - 15301630 Learning Centre UG08

Policy into practice Thursday 9 T014 IOP: Girls in Physics - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Thursday 9 SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum - 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G31 Thursday 9 SE04 ASE Science Education Policy Lecture - 1500-1600 University Centre Avon Room

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Thursday 9 T042 Putting the context into the KS3 draft curriculum - 16001700 BioSciences 201 Thursday 9 SE06 Science education in 2043 – a vision for the future - 16001700 Muirhead Tower G15 Friday 10 T048 Technically speaking: a guide to what’s going on for science technicians - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 Friday 10 T069 NAIGS day: Ofsted Update - Maintaining Curiosity 1200-1300 Nuffield G17 Friday 10 BC16 Success with STEM 1400-1600 Friday 10 SE22 ASE AGM - 17001800 Muirhead Tower G15 Saturday 11 W055 A-level Biology: Plan ahead with AQA - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 SE25 Supporting science teachers with disabilities forum -1230 Muirhead Tower 118 Saturday 11 W075 Supporting teachers through GCSE reform – an overview of ‘science for all’ offer for Heads of Science and advisors 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G36

Practical/outdoor science Wednesday 8 W001 Outdoor inquirybased science education: PriSciNet - 1400-1455 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 W002 Waste into Energy – an interactive education project (repeated Thursday 1100) - 14001455 Arts LR5 Wednesday 8 W003 EARTH SCIENCE: International Earth Science: Earthlearningidea (KS2/3/4) - 15001555 Arts LR4 Wednesday 8 T002 Essentials of Science – A concept of a science course focusing on the Big Ideas of Science and experience-based Scientific Inquiry and Scientific Reasoning - 1500-1555 Arts 201 Wednesday 8 T009 Science and cultural contexts (repeated Friday 0930) - 1735-1830 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 W004 The Jurassic Coast: Cross-curricular approaches to teaching earth science - 1735-1830 Arts LR2 Thursday 9 T013 Classroom activities for Dark Matter - 0930-1030 Physics West 103 Thursday 9 W005 Presenting ‘DNA and Genome Sequencing’ to a sixth form audience - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B01 Thursday 9 T016 Teaching the new curriculum with Switched On Science - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 T017 The Spinning Jelly and other fun physics experiments 0930-1030 Physics West 117 Thursday 9 W008 Working scientifically , ideas and activities to promote learning - 0930-1030 Arts LR4 Thursday 9 T019 WRL - The Wallace Resource Library - a free science resource - 0930-1030 Mechanical

Engineering G33 Thursday 9 T020 ZSL London Zoo – Engaging schools through authenticity - 0930-1030 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Thursday 9 BC01 Practical challenges linking science with design and technology - 0930-1230 Thursday 9 W010 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Thursday 9 BC02 DNA Fingerprinting - 1100-1300 Thursday 9 BC03 Fantastic Forensics on a low budget. Highly evaluated course - 1100-1300 Thursday 9 BC04 IOP: Live Sounds - The Physics of Sound - 11001300 Thursday 9 W011 Waste into Energy – an interactive education project (repeat) - 1100-1300 Arts LR5 Thursday 9 W012 Hands-on waveparticle duality - 1130-1230 Physics West 103 Thursday 9 W013 Heat control, sweating and keeping cool - 11301230 Nuffield G18 Thursday 9 W014 Jelly baby waves at egg parachute and bouncy custard balls post a pringle to an alien zoo 1130-1230 Arts LR4 Thursday 9 T029 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work (repeated Friday 1130) - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab E204 Thursday 9 SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum - 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G31 Thursday 9 T030 Science Magic - 1130-1230 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Thursday 9 W015 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth Science for the new KS3 curriculu - 1130-1300 BioSciences lab 201 Thursday 9 W017 Can STEM change the world? - 1400-1500 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Thursday 9 W018 EARTH SCIENCE: Earth science out of doors (KS2/3/4) 1400-1500 BioSciences lab 201 Thursday 9 W020 Making Molecules Real: a Molecular Mass Meter and what’s inside it - 1400-1500 BioSciences N202 Thursday 9 T036 Supporting effective teaching and learning: established teachers - 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering B01 Thursday 9 W024 The effects of exercis - 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Thursday 9 W025 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Thursday 9 W026 Biology Practicals that Work – hands-on drop-in session- 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Thursday 9 BC06 Bringing science lessons to lif - 1400-1600 Thursday 9 BC09 IOP: Thinking on Your Feet: Football and Physics 1400-1600 Thursday 9 DI04 Practical microbiology: eats, soils and leaves 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Thursday 9 T040 Bridge building

workshop - 1600-1700 Arts LR4 Thursday 9 SE05 Chemical Magic 1600-1700 Haworth 203 Thursday 9 SE07 Higgs and the LHC: News from the Energy Frontier 1600-1800 Arts LR5 Friday 10 W032 Beyond the atom: Particle Physics - 0930-1030 Physics West 103 Friday 10 BC10 Do you upcycle? Thought-provoking sustainable core science for juniors - 09301030 Friday 10 W033 Remember the egg race - 0930-1030 Poynting Physics Lab P02 Friday 10 T047 Science and cultural contexts (repeat) - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Friday 10 T048 Technically speaking: a guide to what’s going on for science technicians - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 Friday 10 BC12 Toys – Science, History and Technology - 09301030 Friday 10 SE13 Timstar’s Bright Idea campaigns finalists - 1030-1200 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Friday 10 W036 Primary Engineers 1100-1200 Arts LR2 Friday 10 W037 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Friday 10 BC17 IOP: Electromagnetic Spectrum - 1100-1300 Friday 10 W038 Curved space-time in the classroom - 1130-1230 Physics West 103 Friday 10 T061 EARTH SCIENCE: Amazing planet – action-packed classroom science - 1130-1230 BioSciences NG08 Friday 10 T062 EARTH SCIENCE: Detecting earthquakes and nuclear explosions - 1130-1230 Physics West 117 LT Friday 10 W039 Mechanics and Advanced Mechanics. Time, speed acceleration and momentum in an hour! - 1130-1230 Nuffield G18 Friday 10 T064 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab 204 Friday 10 W040 Investigating and identifying wildlife in the school grounds - 1230-1330 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Friday 10 W041 Electrical data logging - 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Friday 10 W042 Embracing spoken language in the primary science curriculum - 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Friday 10 W043 ESERO-UK: Using space in primary science - 1400-1500 Arts LR4 Friday 10 T073 SAILS – assessment of science inquiry - 1400-1500 Arts 201 Friday 10 W044 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth science for the new KS2 curriculum - 1400-1530 Arts LR5 Friday 10 BC14 Microbiology for primary-small and clever! - 14001530 Friday 10 W045 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills -

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1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Friday 10 W046 Biology Practicals that Work – hands-on drop-in session - 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Friday 10 BC15 IOP: Toys for Forces - 1400-1600 Friday 10 DI12 Practical microbiology: eats, soils and leaves 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Friday 10 BC16 Success with STEM 1400-1600 Friday 10 T074 Developing expertise in teaching organic chemistry - 14001700 BioSciences lab E204 Friday 10 T076 IOP: The Physics of Music - 1500-1700 Poynting Physics P02 Friday 10 W050 Planning for the new primary science curriculum - 15301630 Arts LR8 Friday 10 W051 Putting the WOW factor into the new primary curriculum - 1530-1630 Arts LR4 Friday 10 W052 IOP: Investigative Practical Work through the Extended Project Qualification - 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 112 Friday 10 T081 Physics Demos with Maximum Impact - 1600-1700 Poynting Physics Small Lecture theatre Friday 10 T083 Science and food production - 1600-1700 BioSciences E102 Friday 10 BC18 Things that Fly 1600-1700 Saturday 11 T085 Any story, any age, same activity - 0930-1030 Arts 119 Saturday 11 W057 Great ideas that work: Novel science activities for 11-16 year olds - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Saturday 11 T086 If it doesn’t work, it’s physics - 0930-1030 Poynting Physics Lab P02 Saturday 11 T090 NAIGS : Making cross-curricular links with science 0930-1030 Nuffield G17 Saturday 11 BC19 Optical Fibre Technology - 0930-1030 Saturday 11 W059 Super scientists 0930-1030 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 T093 What's an eyeball made of, miss? - 0930-1030 Arts 201 Saturday 11 BC20 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils 0930-1100 Saturday 11 W060 Fp7 Early years inquiry-based science - 1100-1200 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 BC21 Astrophysics in the Sixth Form – Examined and Nonexamined - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 W062 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Saturday 11 W063 Biology Practicals that Work – hands-on drop-in session - 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Saturday 11 BC22 INSPIRING PRIMARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! - 11001300 Saturday 11 BC23 IOP: Electricity: the ‘good, the ‘bad’ and the ‘fiddly’! 1100-1300 Saturday 11 DI18 Practical microbiology: eats, soils and leaves 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202

Saturday 11 SE24 Think Universe: All is One Coordinated natural science for primary and secondary - 11001300 Mechanical Engineering G29 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 W065 Datalogging and more with iPads - 1130-1230 Nuffield G18 Saturday 11 DI19 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils – drop in session - 1130-1230 BioSciences N202 Saturday 11 W066 Oxford Sparks – public science from Oxford University - 1130-1230 Nuffield G13 Saturday 11 T096 Supporting effective teaching and learning: starting out in your career - 11301230 Mechanical Engineering B01 Saturday 11 W071 Datalogging for Primary Science Investigations 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Saturday 11 SE27 Forensic anthropology in the real world 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower G15 Saturday 11 W072 From scientific enquiry to working scientifically 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 T098 Resources and ideas for teaching animal behaviour - 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G28 Saturday 11 W076 The Human Guinea Pig – Careers in Healthcare Science - 1400-1500 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Saturday 11 W077 Yes we can! 1400-1530 BioSciences Lab 201 Saturday 11 BC26 INSPIRING SECONDARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! - 14001600 Saturday 11 SE29 Alan Dale Tunnicliffe Memorial primary worksho - 1530-1630 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 BC28 Making Moving Models - 1530-1630 Saturday 11 W079 Socrative: A practical by any other means - 15301630 Learning Centre UG08 Saturday 11 W080 Taking the new curriculum outside! - 1530-1630 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 W081 The STEM Challenge: Using toys and artefacts for inspirational science teaching 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering B01 Saturday 11 W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum - 15301630 Arts LR5

Primary focus Wednesday 8 W001 Outdoor inquirybased science education: PriSciNet - 1400-1455 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 W004 The Jurassic Coast: Cross-curricular approaches to teaching earth science - 1735-1830 Arts LR2 Thursday 9 T016 Teaching the new curriculum with Switched On Science - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 W008 Working scientifically , ideas and activities to promote learning - 0930-1030 Arts LR4 Thursday 9 BC01 Practical challenges linking science with design and

technology - 0930-1230 Thursday 9 T026 Concepts before language in primary school science lessons - 1130-1230 Arts 201 Thursday 9 DI02 Outdoor Education Drop-In Session - 1400-1500 Exhibition Marquee ASE stand DS2 Friday 10 W033 Remember the egg race - 0930-1030 Poynting Physics Lab P02 Friday 10 SE11 The Brenda Keogh Primary Science Keynote Lecture 2014: The new primary science curriculum: origins, changes, opportunities, issues - 0930-1030 Arts 120 Main LT Friday 10 DI08 Outdoor Education Drop-In Session - 1030-1130 Exhibition Marquee ASE stand DS2 Friday 10 W035 Forces: practical approach to the new curriculum 1100-1200 Arts LR5 Friday 10 T052 Light – think it, talk it, be it, understand it - 1100-1200 Arts 201 Friday 10 T055 The Human Condition Project - using psychology in primary scienc - 1100-1200 Arts LR4 Friday 10 W040 Investigating and identifying wildlife in the school grounds - 1230-1330 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Friday 10 DI09 Primary Pop-Up 1230-1330 Arts LR5 Friday 10 T070 Achieving fabulous primary science - 1400-1500 Arts LR2 Friday 10 T071 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for Primary - 14001500 Arts LT3 Friday 10 W042 Embracing spoken language in the primary science curriculum - 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Friday 10 W043 ESERO-UK: Using space in primary scienc - 1400-1500 Arts LR4 Friday 10 BC14 Microbiology for primary-small and clever! - 14001530 Friday 10 T077 Assessment in primary science: meeting the new challenges - 1530-1630 Arts 120 Main LT Friday 10 W048 Developing enquiry skills within the new primary curriculum - 1530-1630 Arts LR5 Friday 10 W050 Planning for the new primary science curriculum - 15301630 Arts LR8 Friday 10 W051 Putting the WOW factor into the new primary curriculum - 1530-1630 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 W056 Becoming a primary science specialist - 09301030 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 T091 Science enquiry in the new primary national curriculum 0930-1030 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 W059 Super scientists 0930-1030 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 T092 Visitors from industry in the primary classroom 0930-1030 Arts LR5 Saturday 11 T093 What's an eyeball made of, miss? - 0930-1030 Arts 201 Saturday 11 BC20 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils 0930-1100 Saturday 11 DI16 Teachmeet primary - 1030-1200 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6

Saturday 11 W060 Fp7 Early years inquiry-based science - 1100-1200 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 DI17 Outdoor Education Drop-In Session - 1100-1200 Exhibition Marquee ASE stand DS2 Saturday 11 W061 Planning your new science curriculum? Let’s make it cross-curricular - 1100-1200 Arts LR5 Saturday 11 T094 The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project - 1100-1200 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 BC22 INSPIRING PRIMARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! - 11001300 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 DI19 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils – drop in session - 1130-1230 BioSciences N202 Saturday 11 SE26 Margaret Collis ASE Primary Science Lecture“Reaching for the Stars” a Beginner’s Guide to the Universe - 1230-1330 Arts 120 Main LT Saturday 11 W070 Story science – science and literature - 1400-1500 Arts LR5 Saturday 11 W071 Datalogging for Primary Science Investigations 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Saturday 11 T097 Evolution and genetics in the new primary national curriculum - 1400-1500 Arts LR2 Saturday 11 W072 From scientific enquiry to working scientifically 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Saturday 11 W073 Improving progress in primary science - 14001500 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 BC28 Making Moving Models - 1530-1630 Saturday 11 W080 Taking the new curriculum outside! - 1530-1630 Arts LR4

International Wednesday 8 SE01 Welcome to the Conference! - 1340-1355 Arts 120 Main LT Wednesday 8 W001 Outdoor inquirybased science education: PriSciNe - 1400-1455 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 W003 EARTH SCIENCE: International Earth Science: Earthlearningidea (KS2/3/4) - 15001555 Arts LR4 Wednesday 8 T003 Teaching content and language skills in the science classroom (repeated Thursday 1400) - 1500-1555 Arts LR2 Wednesday 8 T004 Working with international trainee science teachers in English secondary schools - 15001555 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 T005 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeated Thursday 1600 as a booked course) - 16351730 Arts LR8 Wednesday 8 T006 Global learning 1635-1730 Arts LR4 Wednesday 8 Arts LR2 Wednesday 8 T008 Supporting Scotland’s STEM Education and Culture - 1635-1730 Arts 201 Wednesday 8 T009 Science and cultural contexts ( repeated Friday 0930) - 1735-1830 Arts LR8

Wednesday 8 T010 Talking scienceMothers in Bangladesh, a CASTME project - 1735-1830 Arts LR4 Wednesday 8 W004 The Jurassic Coast: Cross-curricular approaches to teaching earth science - 1735-1830 Arts LR2 Thursday 9 T017 The Spinning Jelly and other fun physics experiments 0930-1030 Physics West 117 Thursday 9 BC01 Practical challenges linking science with design and technology - 0930-1230 Thursday 9 T024 A South African adventure : the flora (and fauna) of the Western Cape - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 112 Thursday 9 T027 Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Part 1 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal - -1230 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 T029 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work (repeated Friday 1130) - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab E204 Thursday 9 T037 Teaching content and language skills in the science classroom (repeat) - 1400-1500 Arts LR4 Thursday 9 BC08 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeat) - 16001700 Thursday 9 T043 Young Scientists Journal Part 2 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal - 16001700 Arts LT3 Friday 10 T047 Science and cultural contexts (repeat - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Friday 10 T064 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab 204 Friday 10 BC16 Success with STEM 1400-1600 Saturday 11 W057 Great ideas that work: Novel science activities for 11-16 year olds - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Saturday 11 W060 Fp7 Early years inquiry-based science - 1100-1200 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300

Using technology creatively Wednesday 8 T005 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeated Thursday 1600 as a booked course) - 16351730 Arts LR8 Thursday 9 T011 Augmented reality teaching - 0930-1030 Arts LT3 Thursday 9 T016 Teaching the new curriculum with Switched On Science - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 BC02 DNA Fingerprinting - 1100-1300 Thursday 9 BC05 Making animations for teaching and learning science 1100-1300 Thursday 9 T027 Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Part 1 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journa 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 122

Unleash the joy of Science with OCR at ocr.org.uk/science

20

Thursday 9 W013 Heat control, sweating and keeping cool - 11301230 Nuffield G18 Thursday 9 W024 The effects of exercise - 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Thursday 9 BC08 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeat) - 16001700 Friday 10 BC11 IDEA- Inquiry in Dye Electrohporesis - 09301030 Friday 10 W034 Using the new technologies to enhance science teaching - 0930-1030 Learning Centre UG08 Friday 10 T062 EARTH SCIENCE: Detecting earthquakes and nuclear explosions - 1130-1230 Physics West 117 LT Friday 10 W039 Mechanics and Advanced Mechanics. Time, speed acceleration and momentum in an hour! - 1130-1230 Nuffield G18 Friday 10 T066 Wonderfully helpful animation to develop understanding in organic chemistry - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 112 Friday 10 W041 Electrical data logging - 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Saturday 11 W058 Learning science with tablets and phones - 09301030 Mechanical Engineering B01 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 W065 Datalogging and more with iPads - 1130-1230 Nuffield G18 Saturday 11 DI20 Janet videoconferencing - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 Saturday 11 W071 Datalogging for Primary Science Investigation 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Saturday 11 DI23 Tablets for the science teacher - 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 121 Saturday 11 W079 Socrative: A practical by any other means - 15301630 Learning Centre UG08

Research into practice Wednesday 8 T001 Innovative pedagogy for engagement - 14001455 Arts 201 Thursday 9 T012 BERG: Opening up biology inquiry - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 Thursday 9 FS01 FS: How Round is Your Circle? - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 FS02 FS: Humans, Holodecks, Heritage and Healthcare: Virtual Technologies for the Real World - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Thursday 9 W006 Research: How should I do it? - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 113 Thursday 9 T021 BERG: Making and using slowmation films to help explain biology concept - 11001130 Muirhead Tower 109 Thursday 9 W009 Research: Where should I start? : Setting about your Literature Review - 1100-1200 Muirhead Tower 113

Thursday 9 T023 BERG: Relating science and religion and perceptions about the theory of evolution 1130-1200 Muirhead Tower 109 Thursday 9 T026 Concepts before language in primary school science lessons - 1130-1230 Arts 201 Thursday 9 FS03 FS: Fossil teeth and bones: Windows into past environments? - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 FS04 FS: Recreating the Big Bang with the World's Largest Machine - The LHC at CERN 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 Thursday 9 FS05 FS: Targeting the foe within: The immune response to cancer - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Thursday 9 T027 Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Part 1 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 T028 Neuroscience and education: what’s the potential? 1130-1230 Arts LT1 Thursday 9 T032 BERG: Drawing inspiration: a fresh look at biological diagrams - 1200-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 Thursday 9 W016 Research: Drawing valuable conclusions from data? - 1200-1300 Muirhead Tower 113 Thursday 9 T033 BERG: Becoming a biologist through a field visit. 1400-1430 Muirhead Tower 109 Thursday 9 FS06 FS: DNA damage: The cause of, and answer to, cancer development? - 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG5 Thursday 9 FS07 FS: Examining the Performance of Urban Interventions in the Far Future - 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 FS08 FS: The immune system: What goes wrong to cause rheumatoid arthritis and what can be done about it? - 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G29 Thursday 9 T035 Science teaching: What works? - 1400-1500 Arts Thursday 9 W023 Teachers improving learning through diagrams - 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 113 Thursday 9 W027 Update on resources for particle physics: the particle zoo and Feynman diagrams - 1400-1600 Physics West 103 Thursday 9 T038 BERG: Teaching science for health literacy: how the LifeLab project is changing pupils’ attitudes to health issues - 14301500 Muirhead Tower 109 Thursday 9 T039 An update on all things STEM from the CSE! - 16001700 Muirhead Tower 122 Thursday 9 FS09 FS: Barefoot running: back to our roots? - 16001700 Aston Webb WG5 Thursday 9 FS10 FS: Fighting disease with maths - 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 Thursday 9 W029 Regenerate! Will stem-cell biologists make

Unleash the joy of Science with OCR at ocr.org.uk/science

Time Lords of us all? - 1600-1700 Arts LR8 Thursday 9 T043 Young Scientists Journal Part 2 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal 1600-1700 Arts LT3 Thursday 9 SE07 Higgs and the LHC: News from the Energy Frontier - 1600-1800 Arts LR5 Friday 10 T044 ASE Research seminar series: Collaborative study in diagrams with a teacherresearcher group - 0930-1000 Muirhead Tower 118 Friday 10 W030 ASE Research seminar series: Ontological and epistemological tensions in the teaching and learning of school science investigations - 0930-1000 Muirhead Tower 113 Friday 10 SE09 Biology in the real world: Mighty mitochondria - 09301015 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 T045 “What’s a stragedy [sic]?” - Techniques, tactics and strategies for conceptual change in school science - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G33 Friday 10 FS11 FS: Music of the Sun and stars - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Friday 10 FS12 FS: What do we mean by chaos? - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Friday 10 BC11 IDEA- Inquiry in Dye Electrohporesis - 09301030 Friday 10 T050 ASE Research seminar series: Do pre-service Secondary Science Teachers know what they are talking about? - 10001030 Muirhead Tower 118 Friday 10 T051 ASE Research seminar series: Science teachers’ access to physics-specific CPD: the current picture - 1000-1030 Muirhead Tower 113 Friday 10 T055 The Human Condition Project - using psychology in primary science 1100-1200 Arts LR4 Friday 10 T056 ASE Research seminar series: Developing a Profiling Tool for Measuring the Impact of STEM Enrichment Pr Muirhead Tower 118 Friday 10 T057 ASE Research seminar series: How has SKE developed the trainees' subject knowledge so that they are well prepared to teach their subject in the classroom? - 1130-1200 Muirhead Tower 113 Friday 10 FS13 FS: Getting small blood cells through small gaps: What could go wrong? - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Friday 10 FS14 FS: Getting to the root of the problem: using maths to feed the world - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 Friday 10 FS15 FS: Nuclear Energy: What is the Future for the UK? 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 Friday 10 T067 ASE Research seminar series: A case study of teachers’ thinking about diagrams 1200-1230 Muirhead Tower 113

Friday 10 T068 ASE Research seminar series: Fifteen year old London school students’ perceptions and experiences of their physics education - 1200-1230 Muirhead Tower 118 Friday 10 SE16 Biology in the real world: Natural selection as the power house of diversity - 12151300 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 T073 SAILS – assessment of science - 1400-1500 Arts 201 Friday 10 W047 Teaching resources for particle physics: particle detectors - 1400-1600 Physics West 103 Friday 10 SE20 Biology in the real world: High pressure plants - 15301615 Biosciences 301 Friday 10 FS16 FS: Air in the Age of the Cit - 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG5 Friday 10 FS17 FS: How do we tackle the epidemic of liver disease in the UK? - 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 Friday 10 W054 Using history and philosophy in science classes 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 118 Saturday 11 FS18 FS: Sex, Lies and - 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 FS19 FS: The Permanent Attraction of Magnets 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Saturday 11 T087 IOP: Using evidence to inform your teaching 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Saturday 11 T093 What's an eyeball made of, miss? - 0930-1030 Arts 201 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 FS20 FS: Could a baby robot grow up to be a mathematician? - 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Saturday 11 FS21 FS: Plant adaptation to changing environments: A role for GM - 11301230 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 SE25 Supporting science teachers with disabilities forum - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 118 Saturday 11 W068 Teaching the nature of science through climate change - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 113 Saturday 11 FS22 FS: Frontier Science Special: A tour of the Hydrogen Technology and Rare Earth Magnet laboratories and visit to 'The Ross Barlow', the University's hydrogen powered narrow boat 1130-1330 Aston Webb foyer Saturday 11 FS23 FS: 100 million to 1: what can maths tell us about the Great Sperm Race? - 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 FS24 FS: Opportunities and Challenges from nanomaterials for the Environment - 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG5 Saturday 11 BC27 Exploring Bioenergy – class discussion with 1400-1630 Saturday 11 T099 Animating Science - 1530-1630 Arts LT3 Saturday 11 FS25 FS: Egg and

sperm – a chatty couple - 15301630 Aston Webb WG5 Saturday 11 FS26 FS: Stress is bad, Exercise is good: Are the effects on immunological health really that simple? - 1530-1630 Aston Webb WG12 Saturday 11 W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum 1530-1630 Arts LR5

Leadership Thursday 9 T014 IOP: Girls in Physics - 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Thursday 9 T015 Planning a science curriculum: AQA’s Post-16 offer 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 Thursday 9 T029 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work (repeated Friday 1130) - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab E204 Thursday 9 SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum - 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G31 Friday 10 DI07 Successful subject leader networks - 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B01 Friday 10 T054 Self evaluation: Are we really outstanding in science? 1100-1200 Arts 120 Main LT Friday 10 T059 Building success in linear GCSE - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 Friday 10 T063 How to complete your Rsci, RSciTech and CSciTeach application and CPD record - 11301230 Muirhead Tower 121 Friday 10 T064 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work - 1130-1230 BioSciences lab 204 Friday 10 T070 Achieving fabulous primary science - 1400-1500 Arts LR2 Friday 10 BC16 Success with STEM - 1400-1600 Friday 10 T075 Evaluating your department - workshop - 1430-1600 Mechanical Engineering G26 Friday 10 DI14 Supporting effective teaching and learning: science subject leaders - 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering B01 Saturday 11 W056 Becoming a primary science specialist - 09301030 Arts LR4 Saturday 11 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications - 1100-1300 Saturday 11 SE25 Supporting science teachers with disabilities forum - 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 118 Saturday 11 W074 Making the most out of collaborative and cluster work - 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering B01

Is all fair in evidence and education? The “Talking Science Education” debate returns to ASE 2014. Chaired by Carole Willis, the burning issues in science education will be discussed in this lively and topical debate. The Royal Society, the Science Learning Centres and the Wellcome Trust have come together to generate debate on the issues important to all within the science education sector.

education@royalsociety.org www.royalsociety.org

enquiries@slcs.ac.uk www.sciencelearningcentres.org.uk

education@wellcome.ac.uk www.wellcome.ac.uk

Come along and join us for a glass of wine and debate on Thursday 9th January at 4pm in room G17, Nuffield Building.

Talking Science Education

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Key Speakers at This Year's Annual Conference SE18 ASE Presidential Address Friday 10 1400 Professor Alice Roberts Alice originally trained as a medical doctor, before becoming a university lecturer. She taught anatomy on the medical course at Bristol University for eleven years, and developed a research interest in biological or physical anthropology, looking at what ancient skeletons can tell us about human evolution, and the diversity of the human species. She has a PhD in palaeopathology (the study of disease in ancient human remains). Alice is now Professor of Public Engagement in Science at the University of Birmingham. As well as undertaking more traditional academic roles in teaching and research at Birmingham, she is interested in encouraging and promoting dialogue between university researchers and the wider public. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Cheltenham Festival of Science, and a judge for the annual Wellcome Image Awards, celebrating art in science. Alice is the Patron of the Association of Science and Discovery Centres, and an Honorary Fellow of the British Science Association, and of the Society of Biology. She is a member of the board of the University of Oxford Natural History Museum and the University of Bristol Vesalius Clinical Training Centre. Alice is also the Director of Anatomy for the NHS Severn Deanery School of Surgery, running a course in surgical anatomy for trainee surgeons in the northern half of the South West. She has written four popular science books and writes a regular science column for The Observer. Two of her books were written to accompany television series: Don’t Die Young (an introduction to human anatomy and physiology), and Incredible Human Journey (about the ancient colonisation of the world), while themes of anatomy and human evolution are further explored in two illustrated volumes, The Complete Human Body and Evolution: the human story. Alice’s television debut came as a human bone specialist on Channel 4’s Time Team, in 2001. Part of the original team of presenters on BBC2’s Coast, she went on to present a range of other series and programmes on BBC2, including Don’t Die Young, The Incredible Human Journey, Digging for Britain, Horizon (Are we still evolving?; How to make a human), Origins of Us, Prehistoric Autopsy and Ice Age Giants. She has been a regular presenter on Radio 4’s environment programme, Costing The Earth. In 2013, she joined the team presenting the new radio 4 series, Inside Science. Alice is currently writing a book about embryology, evolution and anatomy, for publication in 2014. SE02 OCR Special event 1: Coursework in public examinations; should we have it at all? Thursday 9 1130 add OCR logo please Tim Oates Director of Assessment Research and Development Cambridge Assessment (University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate) Tim Oates is Group Director of Assessment Research and Development at Cambridge Assessment, leading a 40+ research group which focuses on national and international research on assessment and measurement. In 2005, whilst Head of Research at the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, Tim co-authored, with Dr Mike Coles, the foundational research for the European Framework of Reference Levels, which became the European Qualifications Framework. He joined Cambridge Assessment in 2006. In 2010, again with Mike Coles and an international group of researchers, Tim had a major

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role in the European strategy document ‘Changing Qualifications – a review of qualifications policies and practices’, a key document for the European Commission. From Dec 2010-Dec 2011 he was chair of the Expert Panel for Review of the National Curriculum (Profs Mary James, Andrew Pollard, and Dylan Wiliam) informing the Secretary of State’s 2011 review. In 2010 he published ‘Could do better – using international comparisons to refine the National Curriculum in England’ which both laid down the principles for the review of the National Curriculum in England and explored progressive comparative methodology. He has published widely on technical evaluation of assessment and is a member of the Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation’s Standards Advisory Group. Tim regularly has provided briefings and evidence for the House of Commons Education Select Committee, and routinely provides briefings and advice to UK Government and a range of governments around the world. He is a visiting professor at the University of Leeds and a Fellow of Churchill College Cambridge. SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum Thursday 9 1130 Ioannis Miaoulis 2003 – present: President & Director of the Museum of Science, Boston (BMOS) BMOS is one of the world’s largest science centres and is New England’s most attended cultural institution, with 1.6 million visitors in 2011-12, including nearly 211,000 school children, and serving almost 97,000 more people in traveling programs. With BMOS’s Boards of Trustees and Overseers, Miaoulis spearheaded the creation of the National Center for Technological Literacy® (NCTL®) at BMOS in 2004. Supported by corporate, foundation, and federal funds, the NCTL aims to enhance knowledge of engineering and technology for people of all ages and to inspire the next generation of engineers, inventors, and scientists. BMOS is the USA’s only science museum with a comprehensive strategy and infrastructure to foster technological literacy in both science museums and schools nationwide. Through the NCTL, the Museum is creating technology exhibits and programs and integrating engineering as a new discipline in schools via standards-based K-12 curricular reform. Recognizing that a 21st century curriculum must include the humanmade world, the NCTL advances technological literacy in schools by helping states modify educational standards and assessments, by designing K-12 engineering materials, and by offering educators professional development. The NCTL’s curricula have reached over 48,000 teachers and over 4 million students in 50 US states. Its Engineering is Elementary® curriculum is now the model for a European Commission-funded initiative to introduce engineering in primary schools and museums in nine European countries and Israel. Miaoulis co-chaired the Mass. Technology/Engineering Education Advisory Board and was a member of the National Museum and Library Services Board from 2006 to 2012. He has served on the NASA Advisory Council and the NASA Education and Public Outreach Committee, receiving NASA’s Exceptional Public Service Medal in 2009. A member of Mass. Governor Deval Patrick’s Commonwealth Readiness Project Leadership Council, he also serves on the Executive Committee of Gov. Patrick’s Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Advisory Council and on the American Association for the Advancement of Science Committee on Science & Technology Engagement. Formerly Dean of School of Engineering at Tufts University Published over 100 research papers and holds two patents. He has also been honored with the Presidential Young Investigator award, the Allan MacLeod Cormack Award for Excellence in Collaborative

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Research, the William P. Desmond Award for outstanding contributions to Public Education, the Boston Jaycees Outstanding Young Leader Award, and a Mellon Fellowship. SE08 Talking science education Thursday 9 1600 Carole Willis is the Chief Executive of the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). She was formerly the Director of Research and Analysis, and Chief Scientific Adviser, at the Department for Education. Carole’s background is in economics, and she has experience of working in a range of government departments, leading teams of professional analysts and policymakers, as well as the private sector. SE09 Biology in the real world: Mighty mitochondria Friday 10 0930 Dan Tennant did his BA and MSci at Cambridge University, reading Natural Sciences. He then undertook a Ph.D. at the University of Manchester studying how the metabolic phenotype of diabetes affects peripheral nerve function. Once completed, he went to the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute in Glasgow to take up a post-doctoral fellowship. In this post, Dan spent five and a half years investigating how inadequate and dysfunctional blood vessel growth during tumour development leads to areas of hypoxia, and whether novel therapeutic agents could be developed to target this. He then moved to the University of Birmingham in April 2011 to run his own research group studying how cellular metabolism is altered in tumours and the role of oxygen in these changes. SE15 OCR Special event 2 Friday 10 1130 Dr Yan Wong, an evolutionary biologist and presenter of the BBC series ‘Bang Goes the Theory’, who will be taking audiences on a journey through the senses using demonstrations that can be used in the classroom. SE16 Biology in the real world: Natural selection as the power house of diversity Friday 10 1215 Dr Thorpe’s expertise lies in the field of ecmorphology. Her research is about understanding how organisms get to be built the way they are built, and the consequences of their design for patterns of resource use, interactions with other species, and for patterns of evolution. Specific themes in her lab at present are the evolution of human bipedalism; how animals (including humans) interact with complex habitats and the cognitive demands of complex locomotion. SE19 Biology in the real world: Drug development - the unexpected role of plants Friday 10 1445 Dr Alison Foster worked for over a decade in the pharmaceutical industry as a medicinal and subsequently a process chemist before moving into horticulture. She is now Senior Curator at the Oxford University Botanic Garden, with a particular interest in medicinal plants, and is building links between the research departments of the University (such as plant sciences, chemistry, engineering, pharmacology etc.) and the Garden.

SE26 Margaret Collis ASE Primary Science Lecture-“Reaching for the Stars” a Beginner’s Guide to the Universe Saturday 11 1230 Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock studied at Imperial College where she obtained her degree in Physics and her PhD in Mechanical Engineering. Since then she has spent her career to date making novel, bespoke instrumentation in both the industrial and academic environments. Managing multidisciplinary teams, these instruments have ranged from hand held land mine detectors to an optical subsystems for the James Webb Space Telescope, (The JWST is a joint ESA/NASA venture due to replace the Hubble Space Telescope around 2018). Until recently Maggie worked at Astrium Ltd in Portsmouth where she led the optical instrumentation group. There she managed a range of project making satellite sub-systems designed to monitor wind speeds and other variables in the Earths atmosphere. These system are made under the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Living Planet programme and are designed to improve our current knowledge of climate change. Maggie also had a science in society fellowship from the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) which enabled her to engage the public with the science work that she loves. The fellowship was held at the University College London (UCL). Through this work and since Maggie makes regular appearances on television and radio, as a space and education expert and presenting science to a general audience. To further share her love of science, Maggie has also set up her own company in Guildford Science Innovation Ltd. Through this Maggie conducts “Tours of the Universe” and other public engagement activities, these show school children and adults the wonders of space. To date she has given these talks to 100,000 people across the globe (60,000 of these have been school children in the UK) and recently produce a documentary through Science Innovation called “Space in the UK”, which features Maggie on a “Big Brother” spaceship on a journey to Mars. This is being distributed as a free DVD through schools and science festivals across the country. SE27 Forensic anthropology in the real world Saturday 11 1400 Prof S M Black OBE BSc PhD DSc FRSE FRAI HFRCPSG Professor Sue Black is Director of the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification and Deputy Principal for Public Engagement at the University of Dundee.  She is a founder and director of the Centre for International Forensic Assistance (CIFA), founder and past President of the British Association for Human Identification. She is a past President of the Association for Science Education in Scotland and advisor to the Home Office and Interpol on issues pertaining to disaster victim identification (DVI).  She is a fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Fellow of Royal College of Physicians and an honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.  She was awarded an OBE in 2001 for her services to forensic anthropology in Kosovo and the Lucy Mair medal for humanitarian services and a police commendation in 2008.

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Two day Primary Programme Building on the success of last year The ASE Primary Science Committee has planned a two-day dedicated Primary Programme at the ASE Annual Conference in Birmingham this year. Come along to be enthused and informed about changes, opportunities and possibilities for primary science in your school in 2014.  The Primary Programme begins with the inaugural Brenda Keogh Primary Science keynote lecture on Friday morning which will be delivered by ASE members who have been closely involved with the development of the new Primary National Curriculum for Science in England. Following that are two days packed full of workshops and presentations about all aspects of primary science; working scientifically, assessment, outdoor learning, practical work, early year’s science, science subject leadership and new teaching strategies and research outcomes are all included. Many well-known experts from the primary science education community will be leading workshops, and are joined by more recent members with plenty of new ideas to share.  Primary Committee members are especially delighted that space scientist Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock, who it has recently been announced will be the new presenter of the prestigious BBC Sky at Night programme, will be delivering the Margaret Collis ASE Primary Science lecture on Saturday lunchtime. Her title is -“Reaching for the Stars- a Beginner’s Guide to the Universe”. Please browse through the brief primary programme details below (and see fuller details on the listings for each day later in this handbook) and come and join us on Friday 10th January at 9.30am for the start of what promises to be an exciting, entertaining and informative primary science event. Your only problem will be choosing which workshops to go to after that. There is a great choice!

Friday 10 January 2014 SE11 The Brenda Keogh Primary Science Keynote Lecture 2014: The new primary science curriculum: origins, changes, opportunities, issues Jane Turner, Liz Lawrence, Anne Goldsworthy, Marianne Cutler, 0930-1030 Arts 120 Main LT W035 Forces: practical approach to the new curriculum Jenny Harvey, CIEC Promoting Science 1100-1200 Arts LR5 T052 Light – think it, talk it, be it, understand it Jason Harding, London Borough of Enfield 1100-1200

Arts 201

W036 Primary Engineers Caroline Alliston, Kate Blacklock, Independent consultants 1100-1200 Arts LR2 T054 Self evaluation : Are we really outstanding in science? Shân Oswald, Lynn Henfield, Myscience/National Science Learning Centre 1100-1200 Arts 120 Main LT T055 The Human Condition Project - using psychology in primary science Gareth Metcalfe, L Bianchi, AZSTT Primary Science Research &

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Innovation Hub 1100-1200

Arts LR4

BC13 Developing schemes of learning for the new Programme of Study in KS1&2 Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1100-1300 DI09 Primary Pop-Up Steve Marshall, PSQM 1230-1330

T070 Achieving fabulous primary science Guest speakers, Wellcome Trust 1400-1500

Arts LR5

Arts LR2

T071 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for Primary Jamie Buchanan-Dunlop, Dr Helen Findlay, Digital Explorer 1400-1500 Arts LT3 W042 Embracing spoken language in the primary science curriculum Tanya Shields, Debbie Eccles, Primarily Science 1400-1500 Arts LR8 W043 ESERO-UK: Using space in primary science Tom Lyons, Allan Clements, ESERO UK 1400-1500 Arts LR4 T073 SAILS – assessment of science inquiry Chris Harrison, Kings College London 1400-1500

Arts 201

W044 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth science for the new KS2 curriculum Elizabeth Devon, Peter Kennett and Chris King, ESEU/ESTA 1400-1530 Arts LR5 BC14 Microbiology for primary-small and clever! Anita Ives, Elena Setterfield, Dane Court Grammar School 1400-1530 T077 Assessment in primary science: meeting the new challenges Derek Bell, Campanula Consulting and Wynne Harlen, ASE Past President 1530-1630 Arts 120 Main LT W048 Developing enquiry skills within the new primary curriculum Nicky Waller, CIEC Promoting Science 1530-1630 Arts LR5 W049 Get out! Naomi Hiscock, Primary Science Education Consultancy 1530-1630

Arts LR2

W050 Planning for the new primary science curriculum Debbie Eccles, Hester Binge, Primarily Science 1530-1630 Arts LR8

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Friday 10 January and Saturday 11 January 2014 W051 Putting the WOW factor into the new primary curriculum Wendy Precious, Mary Darby, Entrust 1530-1630 Arts LR4

W070 Story science – science and literature Carolyn Yates, Sally Howard, Senior Teaching Fellow Primary / Early Years PGCE, Warwick University 1400-1500 Arts LR5

Saturday 11 January 2014

W071 Datalogging for Primary Science Investigations Barbara Higginbotham, Data Harvest 1400-1500 Nuffield G18

T085 Any story, any age, same activity Sarah Langford, Sphere Science Ltd 0930-1030

Arts 119

W056 Becoming a primary science specialist Tanya Shields, National Network of Science Learning Centres 0930-1030 Arts LR4 T091 Science enquiry in the new primary national curriculum Jane Turner, Emeritus Prof T J Russell, ASE Primary Science Committee and Centre for Lifelong Learning, University of Liverpool 0930-1030 Arts LR2 W059 Super scientists Hester Binge, Kate Blacklock, Primarily Science 0930-1030

Arts LR8

T092 Visitors from industry in the primary classroom Joy Parvin, CIEC Promoting Science 0930-1030 Arts LR5 T093 What’s an eyeball made of, miss? Joelle Halliday, Guest teacher, AZSTT Primary Science Research & Innovation Hub 0930-1030 Arts 201 W060 Fp7 Early years inquiry-based science Jen Shiers, Dr Sue Dale-Tunnicliffe, Pri Sci Net and St Michael’s Easthampstead C of E School, and Pri Sci Net Bracknell, Berkshire 1100-1200 Arts LR4 W061 Planning your new science curriculum? Let’s make it cross-curricular Di Stead, Lois Kelly, DiStead Science and Kelly Consulting & Training Ltd. 1100-1200 Arts LR5

T097 Evolution and genetics in the new primary national curriculum Stuart Naylor, Millgate House Education 1400-1500 Arts LR2 W072 From scientific enquiry to working scientifically Kate Blacklock, Tanya Shields, Primarily Science 1400-1500 Arts LR8 W073 Improving progress in primary science Jane Turner, Nicola Beverley, Collins Education 1400-1500

Arts LR4

T098 Resources and ideas for teaching animal behaviour Charlotte Evans, Association for the study of Animal Behaviour 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G28 SE28 Alan Dale Tunnicliffe Memorial primary workshop Kathleen Nugent, Dr Tuula Asunta, Institute of Education, London and CASTME 1530-1630 Arts LR2 T099 Animating Science Jocelyn Wishart, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol 1530-1630 Arts LT3 W080 Taking the new curriculum outside! Dr Katharine Forsey, ASE Field Officer North of England and ‘Educate Everywhere’. 1530-1630 Arts LR4 W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum Wendy Precious, Debbie McGregor, Entrust and Oxford-Brookes University 1530-1630 Arts LR5

T094 The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project Sarah Earle, Bath Spa University 1100-1200 Arts LR2 BC22 INSPIRING PRIMARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! Dr Mark Biddiss, Dr Mark’s INSPIREducation 1100-1300 SE25 Margaret Collis ASE Primary Science Lecture“Reaching for the Stars” a Beginner’s Guide to the Universe Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock 1230-1330 Arts 120 Main LT

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Sponsorship OCR Gold partners with ASE Join OCR on a voyage of science discovery at ASE 2014 Meet our Science specialists on stand A1, and discover our spectrum of qualifications from Entry Level and GCSE sciences to Cambridge Nationals, A Levels and our new Cambridge Technicals in Science. Our qualifications let you enjoy the freedom and excitement of teaching science and help you inspire students of all abilities, providing them with an ideal foundation to progress to more advanced studies and science-related careers. We’ll also be bringing Science learning to life at ASE 2014 through a dynamic programme of guest speakers and interactive activities including: Dr Yan Wong, an evolutionary biologist and presenter of the BBC series ‘Bang Goes the Theory’, who will be taking audiences on a journey through the senses using demonstrations that can be used in the classroom. Tim Oates, Group Director of Assessment Research and Development at Cambridge Assessment, who will be delivering a presentation titled ‘Coursework in public examinations; should we have it at all?’ We work with a range of education providers including schools, colleges, workplaces and other institutions. Over 13,000 centres choose our A Levels, GCSEs and vocational qualifications including Cambridge Nationals and Cambridge Technicals. Our qualifications are developed in close consultation with teachers, industry leaders and government to ensure they are relevant for learners today, and we support providers to deliver our qualifications with access to professional training, publications, and FREE online support materials. To find out more about OCR science qualifications visit www.ocr.org.uk/science

AQA Silver partners with ASE AQA Silver Partner. Every teacher has a question about the future of GCSEs and A-levels. Visit us on stand C1 where subject experts can answer your questions about the changes, including curriculum development, our updated specifications and new assessment guidelines. www.aqa.org.uk

EduLab Bronze partners with ASE Edulab has added hundreds of new products to our range for 2014. With over 100 years of curriculum experience and by listening closely to teachers, we now cover all of the British Curricula and examination requirements for practical science learning. Since developing the Microscience system we have remained at the cutting edge of science practical work. We are continually expanding our resource range to make science learning and teaching safer, more fun, more economical and more effective. Our partners in the International Scientific Group have brought a wealth of experience and innovation to the Edulab offering. Learning science means doing science. We are passionate about making it happen in schools thoughout the UK and abroad. In addition we are adding hundreds of new worksheets. Many are already available for free download. Check out www.edulab.com. Look out for our new Wi-Fi datalogging system with free software. No need to purchase a whole system, it is now possible to take remote measurements and read them on your tablet. Then there is the new computer programming system, a world first coming soon. You will see lots more on our website. Edulab can help you bring practical science alive. We do this by providing exciting activities and tools to make experiments easy to set up, leaving you with more time to teach. Working closely with the ASE as a bronze partner we will keep you up to speed throughout 2014 with our programme of ongoing development.

Oxford University Press with ASE Oxford University Press, having been a long term sponsor of various elements of the Annual Conference, including the Pocket Guide, are now proud to be Bronze partners with the ASE.

New for 2014 A new initiative for 2014, the stamp collection card, has been generously sponsored by three of our exhibitors, AQA, Practical Action and Timstar. The KindleHD prizes will be presented to the competition winners on each day of the conference.

Stand AS47

Stand AS24

Sponsorship 2014 ASE would like to thank the organisations who have sponsored various elements of the Annual Conference 2014. Without their kind support we would not be able to create a conference that is as extensive as it is: AQA (ASE’s Silver Partner) Programme Preview footer, official water distributor

Edu-Lab (ASE’s Bronze Partner) Delegate lanyards

SciChem Delegate bags

OCR (ASE’s Gold Partner) Delegate bags, Exhibition Floor Plans and Stewards’ sweatshirts

Streetsprocesscolour print & design Exhibition plans

Oxford University Press The Pocket Guide, Delegate badges and Free Exhibition Entry Badges

Stand C1

Sponsorship Reading 2015 There are many sponsorship opportunities for organisations who want to reach an enthusiastic and dedicated science education audience. The Annual Conference in Reading 2013 attracted over 2,500 visitors. If you are interested in becoming a gold, silver or bronze partner, or finding out

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TTS The Primary Room

more about what is entailed in this, please contact us to discuss how we can work together. Belinda Blakeney or Ray Hancock, ASE, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AA Tel: 01707 283000 Email: conferences@ase.org.uk

Visit us at stand D30 to see our latest science resources to support your teaching and engage your learners.

NEW for 2014! Visit us to find out more about our new KS3 science series Exploring Science: Working Scientifically. You’ll be able to try some new online activities, discover the pedagogy behind the series and even get exclusive free materials.

Have you heard the news? We’ve got free editions of our latest Exploring Science Extra Activity Pack* to give away – visit us for your copy!

EXPLORING

SCIENCE

9SWEETS EXTRA

Exploring Science Extra How Scie nce Works

Spring Flowers

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Exploring Science Extra How Science Works

Water

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A LW AY S L E A R N I NG

*available only whilst stocks last – but if you miss out, you can sign up on our stand to receive future packs delivered to your inbox for free!

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NG A LW AY S L E A R N I

Visit us at

to discover more

S974

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Frontier Science

From the University of Birmingham Academic Staff Thursday 9 January FS01 Frontier Science: How Round is Your Circle? Dr Chris Sangwin, School of Mathematics 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Mechanisms are all around us. We often take them for granted, or don't even notice they exist. Most have a long and interesting history and many rely on rotating parts. That is, one circular part which fits inside another. These need to be made very accurately to work safely, smoothly and without wearing out. This raises a basic problem which links engineering to mathematics. How do you test if something is round? I.e., how round is your "circle"? Sounds simple? The answer to this question involves the shape of the 50p coin, the NASA Space Shuttle Challenger explosion in 1986 and how to drill a square hole.... Disciplines: Research into practice FS02 Frontier Science: Humans, Holodecks, Heritage and Healthcare: Virtual Technologies for the Real World Professor Bob Stone, School of Engineering & Physical Sciences 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Since their premature debut on the international ICT stage in the 1990s, Virtual and Augmented Reality technologies have evolved into a powerful collection of tools and techniques for real-time visualisation, design and education and training. The emergence of highly accessible toolkits from the mainstream games community is now helping developers from all walks of life to develop engaging interactive 3D applications on PCs, games consoles, smartphones and tablets. This session will review some of the latest developments by the University of Birmingham’s Human Interface Technologies Team, with applications as diverse as virtual recreations of natural scenes to support patient recovery and rehabilitation, skills training for the UK Army’s latest bomb disposal robot, and maritime heritage, including the world’s first submarine disaster in 1774. Disciplines: Research into practice FS03 Frontier Science: Fossil teeth and bones: Windows into past environments? Dr James R. Wheeley, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES, University of Birmingham 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 With current concerns about the direction of climate change, a deeper understanding of the past is essential to refine predictions of future trends. The skeletons of sharks and ray-finned fish are valuable windows into deep time as they archive seawater composition during their formation, are abundant in the fossil record and have been used to reconstruct the temperatures of ancient oceans over 400 million years of Earth history. The principles and applications underpinning this area of study will be discussed, focusing on our own research (in collaboration with the Sea Life Centre network) studying natural variability within modern species in a controlled environment. Disciplines: Research into practice FS04 Frontier Science: Recreating the Big Bang with the World’s Largest Machine - The LHC at CERN Professor David Evans, School of Physics and Astronomy 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), situated under the SwissFrench boarder at CERN near Geneva, is the World's most powerful particle accelerator. Here, protons are smashed together at practically the speed of light recreating the violent particle collisions which would have existed less than a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. Lead nuclei are also accelerated and collided producing the highest temperatures and densities ever made in an experiment and recreating the exotic primordial soup which existed at the birth of our Universe. The physics behind the LHC will be explained and the latest results presented. Disciplines: Research into practice FS05 Frontier Science: Targeting the foe within: The immune response to cancer Professor Paul Moss, Cancer Sciences, MDS, University of Birmingham

1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Cancer remains a great health challenge and over one in three of us will be affected during our lifetime. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have made important contributions to care but scientists are now looking towards new approaches. Our powerful immune system has evolved to provide protection against external pathogens. For over 100 years scientists have speculated that the immune system may also play a role in controlling the growth of cancer cells. In recent years the true significance of this process has been revealed and patients with otherwise incurable disease are not obtaining excellent responses to new treatments. The biology and clinical significance of these approaches will be discussed. Disciplines: Research into practice FS06 Frontier Science: DNA damage: The cause of, and answer to, cancer development? Alexander Garvin, Cancer Sciences, MDS 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG5 Our genetic material, DNA, encodes genes that define how cells grow and multiply. When it is damaged genes can be altered leading to deregulated cell growth that can become cancer. DNA is damaged by extrinsic influences such as sunlight, tobacco smoke and pollution, but also by intrinsic elements that can’t be avoided, such as oxygen, water and the process of DNA replication itself. Fortunately our cells have evolved complex mechanisms to prevent mutation and repair damaged DNA. Without these cancer would be far more common than it is. Now we realise that an understanding of DNA repair can also be used in the treatment of cancer. Perhaps paradoxically deliberately targeting a cells ability to fix DNA can kill tumour cells. The presentation will show how this works and what the future of treatment using this knowledge might look like. Disciplines: Research into practice FS07 Frontier Science: Examining the Performance of Urban Interventions in the Far Future Professor Chris Rogers, School of Civil Engineering 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 We can use projections or predictions to plan our urban interventions with only one certainty – they are likely to be wrong in the far future. The Urban Futures project takes a different, scenarios-based approach. Based on well-established literature, it has characterised four plausible futures that lie at the extremes of where societies might end up (barring catastrophic change). We then parachute each proposed urban intervention into our four future world models and determine whether that solution is likely to be successful. This presentation will demonstrate the methodology and its underlying design principles. Disciplines: Research into practice FS08 Frontier Science: The immune system: What goes wrong to cause rheumatoid arthritis and what can be done about it? Karim Raza, Immunity and Infection, MDS 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G29 The immune system has developed to fight off infection but things sometimes go wrong and the immune system attacks ‘self’. Diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis are all examples of immune mediated diseases which develop when the normal checks that keep the immune system under control stop working. This talk will focus of rheumatoid arthritis as an example of a common condition in which recent developments in our understanding of the causes and mechanisms of disease have led to profound advances in our ability to treat patients. Disciplines: Research into practice FS09 Frontier Science: Barefoot running: back to our roots? Dr François-Xavier Li, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG5 Barefoot running is the object of a debate in various disciplines. The evolutionary perceptive is questioning if running has shaped our body to become efficient long distance runners. Biochechanics provides insights on the mechanical and anatomical constraints posed on the body whilst running and whether having heavy constraining shoes is the best way to use

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the properties of our body. Neuroscience and motor control are challenging the notion that movement control should come from the periphery, i.e. shoes, or whether a top-down organisation is more appropriate to control our actions. Evidences from these three fields will be presented. Disciplines: Research into practice FS10 Frontier Science: Fighting disease with maths Dr Sara Jabbari, School of Mathematics 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 How can mathematics be used to understand antibiotic resistance, track the dynamics of viral infections or even develop new drugs to tackle disease? As our knowledge of diseases becomes increasingly detailed and complex, more tools are required to interpret and use this information. Mathematical modelling is one such tool. Differential equations can be employed to simulate and understand disease mechanisms, venturing into places that experimental work cannot go, be that for practical, financial or even moral reasons. We explore a range of examples illustrating how maths can be used to understand disease, improve existing treatments and create entirely new ones. Disciplines: Research into practice

Friday 10 January FS11 Frontier Science: Music of the Sun and stars Professor Bill Chaplin, School of Physics and Astronomy 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 When you look up at the sky on a clear night did you know that many of the twinkling stars are also playing a stellar symphony, just like musical instruments, which belies the true structure and nature of the stars? And that the Sun is also playing its own “stellar symphony”? In this talk I will describe how the study of this “music of the stars”, the field of asteroseismology, is leading to unprecedented insights, in particular for other stellar systems with newly discovered planets; and how the associated physics can be readily taught to schoolchildren. Disciplines: Research into practice FS12 Frontier Science: What do we mean by chaos? Dr Chris Good, School of Mathematics 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 A dynamical system consists of a set of states (for example the size of a population or the position of the planets in a solar system) together with a rule (usually expressed as a function or a differential equation) that tells us how the states evolve with time. The term chaos is supposed to capture the idea that such systems might be very sensitive to initial conditions (the butterfly effect), so that even though a system is completely deterministic, long-term prediction is impossible. Lorenz expressed this eloquently, saying chaos is `when the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future. In this talk we will try to put some of these ideas onto a firm mathematical footing. In the process we will look at Sharkovskii’s beautiful theorem relating the different periods of periodic points and see that even the simplest maps exhibit chaos. Disciplines: Research into practice FS13 Frontier Science: Getting small blood cells through small gaps: What could go wrong? Professor Gerald Nash, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MDS 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Red and white blood cells are small compared to cells of all other tissues, allowing them to flow through the body's smallest blood vessels (capillaries). White cells must also be able to migrate through the vessel wall to fight infection. Specific mechanical responses underlie these capabilities. Abnormalities in red cell mechanics contribute to two of the world's most burdensome blood disorders, sickle cell disease and malaria. In the case of white cells, changes in structure can impair ability to transit capillary beds, and abnormal adhesion to vessels underlies development of atherosclerotic disease. The mechanistic studies described seek to identify ways to modify responses for therapeutic benefit. Disciplines: Research into practice

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FS14 Frontier Science: Getting to the root of the problem: using maths to feed the world Rosemary Dyson, School of Mathematics, University of Birmingham 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 If we can understand how a plant grows, we can create plants which will grow more effectively in challenging environments (for example under drought conditions). However, as with any biological system, this is extremely complex which is where mathematical modelling comes in! We will talk about using modelling to generate insights into the mechanical aspects of plant growth, drawing analogies with everyday items such as balloons and springs to represent different parts of a plant root. Disciplines: Research into practice FS15 Frontier Science: Nuclear Energy: What is the Future for the UK? Professor Martin Freer, School of Physics and Astronomy 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 The UK is about to embark on the construction of a new generation of nuclear power stations. This talk will explore the arguments for and against nuclear power, the nature of the technology and future options in terms of new generation reactors. Disciplines: Research into practice FS16 Frontier Science: Air in the Age of the City Rob Mackenzie, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG5 “The city” defines an increasingly large part of the 21st-century human condition. The creation unlocked by urban living is dazzling. It is like having tens of thousands of giant Hollywood A-listers astride the planet, tens of thousands of Clark Gables, say. According to many of his co-stars, and to his legions of fans, Clark Gable was the most attractive man who ever lived. But by some, no doubt apocryphal, accounts, Gable had very bad breath; by all accounts – and as measured by our modern chemical sensors – the breath of contemporary cities stinks. Who would kiss Marylebone Rd in London, or Broad St, Birmingham, and taste the nitrogen dioxide and particulate concentrations so high they contribute more to mortality in the UK today than environmental tobacco smoke or road traffic accidents? In all likelihood this planet will have to carry 8-10 billion people sometime in this century. Cities are our best hope for accommodating so many people, but cities will fail ultimately if we don’t investigate the processes underlying the functioning of these super-systems. There’s a lot of detailed and complicated work to undertake, and I will discuss some of the recent work from Birmingham and elsewhere that begins to fit the pieces of the puzzle together. Disciplines: Research into practice FS17 Frontier Science: How do we tackle the epidemic of liver disease in the UK? David Adams, Immunity and Infection, MDS 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 Deaths from liver disease are increasing sharply in the UK driven by dangerous levels of drinking, a marked rise in obesity and diabetes and a persisting high prevalence of viral hepatitis. This lecture will address this problem explaining how different environmental risk factors can lead to liver cirrhosis and showing how understanding the molecular pathology of liver disease can lead to new treatments. Finally we will discuss how changing the individual’s behaviour can reduce the risk of developing liver disease thereby reducing the prevalence within the community. Disciplines: Research into practice

Saturday 11 January FS18 Frontier Science: Sex, Lies and Nanotechnology Professor Jon Preece, School of Chemistry 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Nanoscale science has the capacity to revolutionise many conventional technologies from electronics to medicine, as a result of the fundamental way that at this length scale material properties can be designed to give a desired function. However, this is still a huge challenge, and hence there is a danger that nanotechnology becomes ‘overhyped’. This lecture will put

into context the power of the nanoscale through considering how biological systems work (including sexual reproduction), and how lessons from the natural world can guide ‘unnatural’ nanotechnologies. Disciplines: Research into practice FS19 Frontier Science: The Permanent Attraction of Magnets Rex Harris, Metallurgy and Materials, EPS, University of Birmingham 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 This talk will describe the phenomenon of ferromagnetism and how it originates from the spin and orbit of certain electrons in the metallic elements Fe, Co and Ni. Permanent magnets based on these elements can be considered as the world's first functional products and the talk will include a short history of their application starting with their use in compasses in early Chinese civilisations. Because of their then mysterious properties they were surrounded by myths and superstition many of which were explored and dismissed in the book Die Magnete, written by William Gilbert, a physician in the court of Elizabeth the first. The talk will go on to describe the development of the theory of ferromagnetism and the many exciting current applications such as hard disc drives in computers and high performance electric motors and large scale wind generators using magnets based on iron combined with neodymium and boron. Disciplines: Research into practice FS20 Frontier Science: Could a baby robot grow up to be a mathematician? Professor Aaron Sloman, School of Computer Science 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Since Turing discussed the possibility of intelligent machines in 1950 there have been many outstanding achievements in artificial intelligence, robotics and computational cognitive science -- including powerful logical and algebraic theorem provers and proof checkers, programs that model complex physical processes, and increasingly impressive mobile robots. Yet we don't know how to give a machine spatial reasoning abilities found in very young children and many other animals, apparently required for the discovery of the simplest truths and proofs in Euclidean geometry leading up to Euclid's Elements, for example proofs about triangles. Can we understand what's missing and how it evolved? Perhaps mathematical spatial reasoning requires new forms of computation? Disciplines: Research into practice FS21 Frontier Science: Plant adaptation to changing environments: A role for GM Dr Jeremy Pritchard, School of Biosciences 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 The aim of the exercise to use online data resources to examine the function of and relationship between some plant genes in the model plant Arabidopsis. A lecture will introduce my research using genetic modification of plants to understand plant interaction with the environment including salt tolerance and herbivore resistance. A follow up workshop will give teachers the opportunity to use some of the online line bioinformatics techniques that are used in genetic manipulation. This will provide them with an update on genetic manipulation and resources that can be taken away to use in the class room. Disciplines: Research into practice FS22 Frontier Science: Frontier Science Special: A tour of the Hydrogen Technology and Rare Earth Magnet laboratories and visit to ‘The Ross Barlow’, the University’s hydrogen powered narrow boat Dr Allan Walton, Magnetic Materials group Leader, Dr David Book, Hydrogen and Materials Group, Metallurgy and Materials, EPS, University of Birmingham 1130-1330 meet in the Aston Webb foyer There will be a laboratory visit under the supervision of Drs Allan Walton (Magnetic Materials group Leader) and David Book (Hydrogen and Materials Group). Demonstrations will include the practical demonstration of various applications rare earth magnets and hydrogen fuel cells and will also include a visit to the ZCE Canal Boat, the Ross Barlow. Disciplines: Research into practice

Dr Dave Smith, School of Mathematics 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 Reproduction is a numbers game! The average man produces over 1000 sperm every heart beat, yet only one is needed for fertilisation. Maths and engineering are being applied to understand how the millions of sperm propel themselves through the tortuous maze of the female tract. We will look at both the fluid mechanics of microswimming and migration through complex microarchitectures, including tantalising possibilities of sperm guidance and drug stimulation. Maths provides a rational way to understand the counterintuitive world that sperm encounter. The talk features high speed imaging in microscopic mazes, and ‘virtual sperm’ supercomputing simulations Disciplines: Research into practice FS24 Frontier Science: Opportunities and Challenges from nanomaterials for the Environment Iseult Lynch, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG5 Nanotechnology refers to the use of very tiny (nanoscale) materials in a range of novel ways. Nano means tiny, and nanoparticles are more than 8000 times smaller than a human hair. The small size and large surface area of nanoparticles leads to the potential for innovative solutions across a range of environmental applications, both improving (reacting to) existing environmental problems and anticipating future environmental problems (proactive approaches). Examples include energy harvesting, environmental remediation, smart and sustainable packaging materials. It is vital that applications of “nano” do not result in unanticipated longer-term consequences, so safety is addressed in parallel to development of applications. Disciplines: Research into practice FS25 Frontier Science: Egg and sperm – a chatty couple Steve Publicover, Biosciences, LES 1530-1630 Aston Webb WG5 From a sperm’s point of view fertilisation is a huge task. Finding the egg is difficult: in a reef of spawning organisms a sperm doesn’t just have to find an egg, it has to find the right one. In humans a sperm must find a minute target ‘hidden’ in a complex maze. As it swims the sperm has to perform a complex physiological transformation - if it fails to do this right then even if finds the egg it can’t fertilise! Throughout this process the sperm is guided by chemical cues on where it is and what to do. And when it arrives – the sperm must reply! This talk discusses what we know about these events, what we think we know and how we might exploit them. Disciplines: Research into practice FS26 Frontier Science: Stress is bad, Exercise is good: Are the effects on immunological health really that simple? Dr. Victoria Burns, School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham 1530-1630 Aston Webb WG12 Everyone knows that you’re more likely to get a cold when you’re stressed, and that exercise will help protect you against nasty bugs. Don’t we? This lecture will discuss to what extent these common assertions have evidence to support them, and what biological and psychosocial mechanisms might explain these effects. We’ll also discuss some situations in which a little bit of stress might be just what the doctor ordered and when you should step away from the treadmill. Disciplines: Research into practice

FS23 Frontier Science: 100 million to 1: what can maths tell us about the Great Sperm Race?

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Frontier Science

Lecturers from the University of Birmingham Recreating the Big Bang with the World's Largest Machine - The LHC at CERN Professor David Evans, School of Physics and Astronomy Professor David Evans is the UK spokesman of the CERN ALICE experiment and leads the ALICE team of physicists and engineers from Birmingham. He is a senior member of the 1300 strong international ALICE collaboration and a member of the ALICE Management Board. Humans, Holodecks, Heritage and Healthcare: Virtual Technologies for the Real World Professor Bob Stone, School of Engineering & Physical Sciences Professor Bob Stone is the Director of the Human Interface Technologies (HIT) Team at the University of Birmingham. A Chartered Psychologist, Bob joined academia in 2003, after a long and successful career in defence, robotics, surgical simulation and Virtual Reality (VR). He was involved in defence human factors research with British Aerospace for 9 years, including projects for the offshore oil and gas industry, the nuclear industry, NASA and the European Space Agency. Bob’s VR, Human Factors and robotics work has received numerous awards, including, uniquely, three from the Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors, and the MoD Chief Scientific Adviser’s Commendation in 2011 for his contribution to science and technology in defence. Nuclear Energy: What is the Future for the UK? Professor Martin Freer, School of Physics and Astronomy Professor Martin Freer is director of the Birmingham Centre for Nuclear Education and Research. He led the Birmingham Policy Commission into the Future of Nuclear Energy in the UK - which led to the publication of a report on the current and future options in nuclear energy. Sex, Lies and Nanotechnology Professor Jon Preece, School of Chemistry Jon Preece has been Professor of Nanoscale Chemistry since 2004, publishing more than 100 papers and has led two large EU research projects involving industrialist and academics from across Europe. His group carry out research in areas as diverse as fabricating functional surfaces for sensors, the effect of nanoparticles on the environment, to gene delivery for cure of disease. A common thread of the research is the understanding the material properties on the nanoscale. His research is not only of academic interest, but also has funding from the industrial sector, and he is involved in a spin-out company – Irresistible Materials. Music of the Sun and stars Professor Bill Chaplin, School of Physics and Astronomy Bill Chaplin is Professor of Astrophysics in the School of Physics and Astronomy at Birmingham. He leads the programme of the NASA Kepler Mission devoted to the asteroseismic study of Sunlike stars, working with over 200 international scientists. He

is a co-author on 200 research papers in scientific journals, in the fields of solar and stellar physics and more recently exoplanet science. He is also the co-author of a book on helioseismology. He is actively engaged in promoting solar and stellar research in both national and international media, including recent appearances on the BBC to discuss results from Kepler. How Round is Your Circle? Dr. Chris Sangwin, Senior Lecturer, Mathematics Education Centre, Loughborough University Prior to joining Loughborough University in October 2013, Dr. Chris Sangwin was a Senior Lecturer in the School of Mathematics at the University of Birmingham. From 20002011 he was seconded half time to the UK Higher Education Academy "Maths Stats and OR Network" to promote learning and teaching of university mathematics. In 2006 he was awarded a National Teaching Fellowship. His learning and teaching interests include (i) automatic assessment of mathematics using computer algebra, and (ii) problem solving using Moore method and similar student-centred approaches. He is the author of a number of books, including "How Round is Your Circle", which illustrates and investigates many links between mathematics and engineering using physical models. Could a baby robot grow up to be a mathematician? Professor Aaron Sloman, School of Computer Science Professor Aaron Sloman's first degree was in mathematics and physics in 1956. Then, seduced by philosophy, he completed a DPhil in philosophy of mathematics in 1962. Around 1969 he learnt about Artificial Intelligence and soon decided the best way to do philosophy was to build working models of increasingly complex fragments of minds. Since then, first at Sussex University, then Birmingham from 1991 he has straddled AI, philosophy, cognitive science, theoretical biology and related fields. Officially retired, he is now working on the Meta-Morphogenesis project. He learns much from his wife who used to teach biology and geology, makes maps and orienteers. Fighting disease with maths Dr. Sara Jabbari, School of Mathematics Dr. Sara Jabbari is a mathematician specialising in the modelling of networks of genes that respond to the inter-, intra- and extra-cellular signals that dictate cell behaviour. Having previously worked on such topics as cell-cell communication and optimising bacterial biofuel production, Sara was appointed a Birmingham Fellow in 2012 to focus on the modelling of medically significant microorganisms such as C. difficile, MRSA and Hepatitis C. Having previously been awarded a Biomedical Informatics Training Fellowship from the MRC, Sara is in a rare position to combine the resulting experimental training with her mathematical background, yielding an interdisciplinary approach to understanding diseases.

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What do we mean by chaos? Dr. Chris Good, School of Mathematics Dr. Chris Good is a Reader in Pure Mathematics at the University of Birmingham. He is the author of some 40 research articles in general topology, set-theoretic topology, and topological dynamics. Recently he has been interested in the structure of continuous functions. He has supervised a number of graduate students and regularly collaborates with mathematicians around the world, including colleagues from Canada, New Zealand, Oman, Poland and the US, as well as from Oxford. Chris has a long standing interest in teaching and was awarded the first Head of School’s Excellence in Teaching Award. He has played a leading role in the development of the School’s curricula and has an Academic Associate of the Higher Education Academy. 100 million to 1: What can maths tell us about the Great Sperm Race? Dr. Dave Smith, School of Mathematics Dr Dave Smith is Lecturer in Applied Mathematics at the University of Birmingham. He completed his BA in Mathematics in Oxford followed by a PhD in Birmingham. Following this, he held training fellowships jointly with Birmingham Medical School, Birmingham Women's Hospital and the Warwick University, through which he acquired skills in multidisciplinary science. Dave's research specialism is fluid mechanics on microscopic scales in biology, focusing on reproduction and development; he has a broad interest in any areas where maths and computing can help life scientists and medics, with recent research including cancer diagnosis, plastic surgery planning and synthetic biology. Barefoot running: back to our roots? Dr. François-Xavier Li, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences Dr. François-Xavier Li is interested in Movement Optimisation in a variety of contexts (competition, recreation), populations (elite to elderly) and tasks (running, cycling, golf, walking). A holistic approach to the problems tackled is adopted as a single point of view is rarely if ever providing a complete solution. Neurosciences, Motor Control and learning, and Biomechanics are brought together to understand how one can move more efficiently or more freely. The approach is adapted to a range of issues as in effect the problems faced by an elite athlete or an elderly are the same, albeit at different levels. Plant adaptation to changing environments: A role for GM Dr. Jeremy Pritchard, School of Biosciences Dr. Jeremy Pritchard is a senior lecturer in Biology at the University of Birmingham. His research focuses on plants and aphids and is actively involved in teaching, covering topics from field biology and ecology through plant biology to evolution. As Head of Education in the School of Biosciences and the Chair of various National Education committees he is keen to develop Science education at both strategic and operational levels in Birmingham and beyond. He is involved in communicating science and evolution to schools and the public, and has developed resources and techniques to help educators and learners at all levels.

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Examining the Performance of Urban Interventions in the Far Future Professor Chris Rogers, School of Civil Engineering Following three years in industry, Professor Chris Rogers has been engaged in academic research for 30 years. His research interests embrace futures cities and their sustainability (specifically utility services provision and use of underground space), trenchless technology, buried pipes, soil stabilization, road foundations and collapsing soils. He leads the multi-university Mapping the Underworld consortium, which uses shallow-surface geophysics (Time Team technologies) for locating and mapping buried utility services. He also leads the highly multi-disciplinary Liveable Cities research consortium, which follows on from the Urban Futures consortium that explored the resilience of today’s engineering and urban design solutions to future changes. Getting small blood cells through small gaps: What could go wrong? Professor Gerard Nash, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine Gerard Nash is Professor of Cardiovascular Rheology; rhelogy relates to the deformation and flow of materials, in this case the blood and the cells it contains. He trained initially in the physical sciences (BSc Physics, Manchester; PhD Biophysics, London), and worked in London and Los Angeles on the properties of red and white blood cells which affect their circulation. In Birmingham he developed flow-based models to study the mechanisms that control the adhesion of blood cells to the wall of vessels. Throughout, he has studied 'normal' physiological behaviours, as well as their disruption in diseases, ranging from malaria to atherosclerosis. Getting to the root of the problem: using maths to feed the world Dr Rosemary Dyson, School of Mathematics Rosemary Dyson is a Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and is part of the Mathematical Biology group. She undertook both her undergraduate and postgraduate work at the University of Oxford, before starting as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Centre for Plant Integrative Biology, University of Nottingham in 2007 as part of a large interdisciplinary team in which she was responsible for developing mechanical models of plant growth. Since arriving in Birmingham at the beginning of 2011 she has developed and taught three new undergraduate modules on mathematical modelling, one of which led to the award of the Head of School prize for Excellence in Teaching for the 2011-12 academic year. Opportunities and challenges from nanomaterials for the environment Dr. Iseult Lynch, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences Dr. Iseult Lynch joined the academic staff at the University of Birmingham as Lecturer in Environmental Nanosciences in March 2013. She has a very broad overview of all aspects of nanomerials safety assessment, and in particular on the interactions of nanomaterials with biomolecules and the role of the bio-nano interface in determining nanoparticle fate and behaviour. Her research focus is on understanding these interactions for environmental remediation applications and to ensure the safe implementation of the promise of nanotechnologies across all industry sectors. She is committed to education, outreach and promotion of women in science.

DNA damage: The cause of, and answer to, cancer development? Dr Alexander Garvin, School of Cancer Sciences, Institute of Biological Research Dr Alexander Garvin carried out his undergraduate degree in Molecular Biology at the University of Surrey with a year spent working at Cornell Medical College in New York, USA. He then went on to postgraduate research at the University of Nottingham where he studied interferon signalling in breast cancer. In 2010, Alex joined the group of Dr Jo Morris in the School of Cancer Sciences, University of Birmingham. Work in the Morris group focuses on further understanding mechanisms DNA repair, and exploiting that knowledge to improve diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Egg and sperm – a chatty couple Dr. Steve Publicover, School of Biosciences Dr. Steve Publicover studied zoology at Liverpool and moved to Birmingham to become a lecturer in the Department of Zoology and Comparative Physiology. His areas of research have moved from neurobiology (synaptic function and cellular mechanisms of learning) to ion channel expression and function in bone cells and for the last 15 years he has been studying the signalling events in human sperm. He remains at Birmingham (now the School of Biosciences), teaching at all undergraduate levels and studying regulation of human sperm behaviour by signals from the egg and female tract. The immune system: What goes wrong to cause rheumatoid arthritis and what can be done about it? Professor Karim Raza, School of Immunity and Infection Karim Raza is Professor of Clinical Rheumatology at the University of Birmingham. His research focuses on rheumatoid arthritis, the most common of the chronic inflammatory joint diseases and addresses pathogenic mechanisms, biomarker development and strategies to enhance clinical outcomes for patients with a new onset of disease. How do we tackle the epidemic of liver disease in the UK? Professor David Adams, School of Immunity and Infection David Adams is professor of Hepatology at the University of Birmingham and a consultant physician on the Birmingham Liver Unit. He is well known for his work on the treatment and pathogenesis of liver disease. Air in the Age of the City Professor Rob Mackenzie Rob MacKenzie is professor of atmospheric science in the School of Geography, Earth & Environmental Science. Rob is a chemist with a particular interest in the effects that different land surfaces have on the composition of the air. He has studied the effects of trees on ground-level air pollution, and this has led him to wonder about urban sustainability more generally. Fossil Teeth and Bones: Windows into Past Environments? Dr. James R. Wheeley James Wheeley is a teachingfocused lecturer in sedimentary geology and sedimentary basin analysis. His research interests lie

in carbonate sedimentology and applied micropalaeontology (especially conodont isotopes) which he is using to address deep time (Palaeozoic) palaeoclimatic and palaeoecological problems. He is currently involved with the VISE (Vertebrate ISotopes and the Environment) research project with Dr. Ivan Sansom looking into the oxygen isotopic responses of chondrichthyan phosphatic hard tissue complexes to environmental variability and sample processing, and into the controls on oxygen isotopes in teleost carbonates (otoliths). Stress is bad, Exercise is good: Are the effects on immunological health really that simple? Dr. Victoria Burns, School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences Dr. Victoria Burns is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Birmingham. She researches and teaches in the field of Exercise and Behavioural Immunology, particularly exploring the roles of stress and exercise in successful vaccination and common viral infections. She has always been interested in developing teaching excellence, in her own practice and helping others, and is currently the Director of Teaching Quality Enhancement for the College of Life and Environmental Sciences. She has been the recipient of the Head of School’s Excellence in Teaching Award and a University Teaching Fellowship Award. ‘Targeting the foe within’: The immune response to cancer Professor Paul Moss, School of Cancer Sciences Paul Moss is Head of the School of Cancer Sciences at the University of Birmingham. He has served as Deputy Chair of the Medical Research Council Infection & Immunity Board and Chair of the Cancer Research UK Clinical and Translational Research Committee. Professor Moss’s research programme is based around the immunology of cancer and viral infection. He pioneered the use of ‘HLA-peptide tetramers’ as a new approach for using cell therapy to treat viral infection in immune suppressed patients. His team has an internationally competitive position in cytomegalovirus infection; bone marrow transplantation and cancer immunology. He is a Clinical Haematologist and is currently Principal Investigator on several innovative clinical trials. The Permanent Attraction of Magnets Professor Rex Harris, School of Metallurgy and Materials Professor Rex Harris is a Materials Scientist and a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Physics and the Institute of Mining, Minerals and Materials. His research interests have focussed on the applied alloy chemistry of the rare earth metals, the use of hydrogen both as an energy vector and as a processing agent and the processing, properties and application of high performance permanent magnets based on iron and cobalt combined with the rare earth metals such as samarium (Sm) or neodymium (Nd). He is a passionate supporter of sustainable technologies and, along with his colleagues, has developed a zero-carbon emission (ZCE) canal boat based on a combination of batteries, solid state hydrogen store, fuel cell and a rare earth magnet electric motor.

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Social Programme Wednesday 8 January

Friday 10 January

Bar

Wellcome Trust Teachers’ Reception

International Dinner

1700–1900 Noble Room in Staff House Calling all teachers! We would be delighted if you would join us for drinks and light refreshments at our special Teachers’ Reception, where we will be giving away free teaching resources and discussing recent developments in science education.

1830 onwards Meet other ASE delegates for a chat and a drink in the bar of your hotel.

1900 Noble Room, Staff House, University of Birmingahm The International Dinner returns to its more traditional format, a chance to meet friends and visitors from around the world.

Thursday 9 January Members’ reception (followed by cash bar)

1700-1830 The Exhibition Marquee Held in the Exhibition Marquee, members will be able to renew old friendships and make new ones over a glass of wine. This year you can enjoy extended hours for even more conversation!

Bar

1800 onwards Meet other ASE delegates for a chat and a drink in the bar of your hotel.

Bar

1830 onwards Meet other ASE delegates for a chat and a drink in the bar of your hotel.

Pre dinner drinks

1930 Crowne Plaza, Birmingham City Centre All those attending this year’s Association Dinner are invited to predinner drinks in the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Birmingham City Centre.

Association Dinner

2000 Crowne Plaza, Birmingham City Centre This year’s dinner is being held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Birmingham City Centre.

Saturday 11 ASE Midlands Lunchtime Reception

1300-1400 venue to be confirmed Regional ASE President Professor Anthony C Hilton will give a Presidential Address to all West and East Midlands members and their colleagues.

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International Day 2014 …dedicated to science education SE01 Welcome to the Conference! ASE International Committee Organisation: ASE International Committee Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1340-1355 Arts 120 Main LT The Wednesday of the ASE Conference is traditionally when we focus on subjects of interest to both international and UK based science educators. Sessions will showcase high quality science education research and practice going on both in the UK and in other countries and also projects that work across international boundaries. Whether you are visiting from overseas or are based here in the UK, the International day will give you a stimulating and friendly introduction to the conference and enable you to meet and get to know colleagues from many countries. The International Dinner, will be held in the early evening – we hope you will be able to join us. Themes/disciplines: international Target audiences: (early years) 0-4 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors T001 Innovative pedagogy for engagement John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading Email/web: j.p.oversby@reading.ac.uk 1400-1455 Arts 201 Learning improvement will require some changes in teaching methods, especially in increases in active work by students. These changes need to be manageable in everyday classrooms and laboratories. They are deep, and known to be effective. I will structure the presentation to deal with typical lesson formats, starting with assessment of prior learning, and using the information the learners divulge. I then move on to ways of sharing control of thinking with the learners to engage them in activities. Practical work is often central to this phase, so ideas about improving the effectiveness comes next, including better ways of recording. Promoting thinking is an important next step, which is frequently done with questions. Better questioning is essential. Finally, we will want to know whether they have learned as we wished, and how to move them on. The ideas should fit all topics but the examples all come from climate change. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: ASE Research Guide W001 Outdoor inquiry-based science education: PriSciNet Dr Jenny Byrne, Willeke Rietdijk, Dr Sue Dale-Tunnicliffe Organisation: University of Southampton Email/web: www.southampton.ac.uk/education 1400-1455 Arts LR8 This workshop will introduce Pri-Sci-Net, an EU funded project promoting inquiry-based science education among primary teachers across Europe. PriSci-Net facilitates collaboration between primary science teachers in Europe and provides teacher training in delivering inquiry-based primary science. The workshop will focus on delivering inquiry based science in outdoor settings, spending part of the session outside. There will also be opportunity to explore outdoor inquiry activities developed by Pri-Sci-Net, including having a look at the Pri-Sci-Net platform which offers downloadable inquiry activities. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus international Target audiences: (early years) 0-4 5-7 7-11 W002 Waste into Energy – an interactive education project (repeated Thursday 1100) Tristan MacLean, Angela Murray Organisation: University of Birmingham Email/web: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEFhDlJ_h4U 1400-1455 Arts LR5 This hands-on session will allow teachers to find out what it is like to take part in the innovative Energy into Waste workshop. You will be able to find out how the project works, how your school can take part and discuss all aspects of its design, development, delivery and improvement. Designed for

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students aged 11-16 to experience cutting edge energy research through a series of fun, hands-on activities; to date over 550 children have participated in the workshop. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W003 EARTH SCIENCE: International Earth Science: Earthlearningidea (KS2/3/4) Elizabeth Devon, Peter Kennett and Chris King Organisation: Earthlearningidea 1500-1555 Arts LR4 Earthlearningidea brings Earth science teaching activities to classrooms across the world that have few or no resources. Earthlearningidea publishes a new activity each fortnight and there are currently more than 150 activities on the website, many in several languages, that are free to download and use. Sample some of the interactive activities yourself and see if they would work in your classroom. Themes/disciplines: practical science international Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 ITE Advisors T002 Essentials of Science – A concept of a science course focusing on the Big Ideas of Science and experience-based Scientific Inquiry and Scientific Reasoning Dr. Andreas Stockey, Cornelia Stiller Organisation: Oberstufen-Kolleg Bielefeld, University of Bielefeld Email/web: andreas.stockey1@uni-bielefeld.de 1500-1555 Arts 201 The didactical and methodical concept of a science course for year 11 of general education developed, approved and evaluated by an interdisciplinary team at the experimental school “Oberstufen-Kolleg” at Bielefeld University, Germany. Core objective is to improve stepwise the students’ methodical competences. This is achieved by teaching basic concepts of natural science connected to hands-on experiments designed, carried out, analysed and reported by the students in the framework of the hypothetical-deductive way of scientific inquiry and scientific reasoning. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 T003 Teaching content and language skills in the science classroom (repeated Thursday 1400) David Sang Organisation: Cambridge University Press Email/web: www.education.cambridge.org 1500-1555 Arts LR2 Language can be a barrier when studying subjects in another tongue. Increasing numbers of students for whom English is not their first language are studying the sciences in English. For them, communication problems can include specific terminology and definitions, word usage and sentence structure. This can lead to miscommunication and frustration by obscuring clarity of thought and expression. In this session, the authors of the Cambridge ‘Breakthrough to CLIL’ series will explore how science content can develop important language skills. Themes/disciplines: new curricula international Target audiences: 14-16 T004 Working with international trainee science teachers in English secondary schools Jim Moreland, Irena Grounds Organisation: St Mary’s University College Email/web: james.moreland@smuc.ac.uk 1500-1555 Arts LR8 The session will share the experiences of working with trainee science teachers from Malaysia who have successfully completed school placements in London schools over the last four years. The trainees return to teach in Malaysia having learnt various pedagogical skills. There will be an opportunity to hear how the trainees progressed and the impact they had on pupil learning. The session will consider some of the lessons that may be learnt from working with this distinctive group of trainee teachers.

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practice in its international context Themes/disciplines: international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors T005 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeated Thursday 1600 as a booked course) Alessio Bernardelli Organisation: IoP Network Coordinator and Independent Consultant Email/web: aso.ber@ntlworld.com 1635-1730 Arts LR8 Discover the power of effective memory techniques and Mind Mapping! Come and see how these strategies go beyond just aiding revision, but develop a variety of skills ranging from Problem Solving, Creative Thinking, Literacy and many more. Mind Mapping is a creative and enjoyable process that provides more natural and effective ways to recall information, organise ideas and key points, plan projects, solve problems and record and communicate findings. Examples of learners’ work and digital mind mapping tools will be provided. Themes/disciplines: new curricula international using technology creatively Target audiences: (early years) 0-4 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/ SFC ITE Advisors T006 Science Resources for Global Learning Marianne Cutler and Philippa Hulme, with a contribution from Egbert Weisheit (Science Across the World, Germany) Organisation: ASE DfID, Royal Geographical Society, Pearson Publishing Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1635-1730 Arts LR4 This session focuses on how science supports achieving the Millennium Development Goals, which we illustrate with teaching resources (for students aged 7-11 and 11-14 years) from ASE and partners. We will also outline some new resources which we are developing, and would welcome feedback from delegates to refine their development. This session is part of a new Global Learning project, which is funded by the Department for International Development. For further information on the Global Learning project visit www.glp-e.org.uk. Themes/disciplines: international T007 New Microscale Chemistry – International schools continue to teach the UK Bob Worley Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1635-1730 Arts LR2 Practical procedures for pupils using conventional equipment are often timeconsuming and left out of teaching, consequently lowering pupil expectations of secondary school science. Small-scale chemistry is quick, saves on chemicals and offers variety in presentation. The course covers indicators, precipitation, salt preparation, reaction kinetics, iron/sulfur reactions, working with toxic gases and carrying out small-scale vigorous reactions. Themes/disciplines: international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16

Wednesday 8 January T009 Science and cultural contexts (repeated Friday 0930) Christopher Parkin, Jane Essex Organisation: Universities of Keele and Worcester Email/web: j.e.essex@keele.ac.uk 1735-1830 Arts LR8 Teachers’ Standards, OfSTED and exam boards expect cultural understanding (or equivalent) in Science lessons. Jane Essex (Keele University), Chris Parkin (Museum of History of Science), Phil Collins and Sue Howarth (both University of Worcester) provide curriculum-relevant examples of scientists and their ideas from beyond the Western world. Find out about the contributions of Chinese, Arabic, Islamic and other scientists to help broaden crosscultural understanding and inclusion in your Biology, Chemistry and Physics lessons for students aged 11-16+ Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors T010 Talking science- Mothers in Bangladesh, a CASTME project Dr Tunnicliffe Organisation: CASTME and ICASE Email/web: s.tunniclife@ioe.ac.uk 1735-1830 Arts LR4 The objective of this CASTME project was to assist destitute, poorly educated, often illiterate women learn a trade so they could in future support their families. It was also about realising the science of everyday life and how much they knew, as well as enhancing their self esteem and communication with their children, mostly of pre school age, hence introducing them to the world of science in their everyday lives. Themes/disciplines: international Target audiences: (early years) 0-4 5-7 7-11 Advisors W004 The Jurassic Coast: Cross-curricular approaches to teaching earth science Dr Anjana Ford, Naomi Capell Organisation: Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site Email/web: www. Jurassiccoast.org 1735-1830 Arts LR2 The Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site is home to some of the most spectacular geology and varied coastal landforms and landscapes in the world. The different rocks tell a fascinating story from ancient deserts to tropical seas throughout the Mesozoic era, between 250 million and 65 million years ago. In this workshop we will explore the science behind the rocks and fossils of the Jurassic Coast and how it can enhance cross curricular learning at EYFS and Primary level. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus international Target audiences: (early years) 0-4 5-7 7-11

T008 Supporting Scotland’s STEM Education and Culture Stuart Farmer Organisation: Robert Gordon’s College 1635-1730 Arts 201 Scotland’s education system is undergoing curriculum, assessment and pedagogy changes due to Curriculum for Excellence. In parallel with this a number of significant reports and policy decisions are affecting initial teacher education, continuing professional development for teachers and STEM education and its place in Scotland’s culture. In this session Stuart Farmer will draw together their principal themes and assess their impact on Scotland’s already distinctively different education system. Themes/disciplines: new curricula international Target audiences: (early years) 0-4 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors

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ITE events 2014 Wednesday 8 January SE01 Welcome to the Conference! ASE International Committee 1340 - 1355 Arts 120 Main LT T001 Innovative pedagogy for engagement, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1400 - 1455 Arts 201 T004 Working with international trainee science teachers in English secondary schools, Jim Moreland, St Mary’s University College 1500 - 1555 Arts LR8 T005 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeated Thursday 1600 as a booked course), Alessio Bernardelli, IoP Network Coordinator and Independent Consultant 1635 - 1730 Arts LR8

T033 BERG: Becoming a biologist through a field visit., Paul Davies, Institute of Education, University of London 1400 - 1430 Muirhead Tower 109

T065 The structure triangle: a periodic table which includes compounds, Dr Keith Ross, 1130 - 1230 BioSciences lab 201

T034 Getting to grips with lesson planning, Anne Scott, University of York Science Education Group 1400 - 1500 Arts LR8

T066 Wonderfully helpful animation to develop understanding in organic chemistry, Roger Frost, “Roger Frost’s Organic Chemistry” 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 112

T038 BERG: Teaching science for health literacy: how the LifeLab project is changing pupils’ attitudes to health issues, Marcus Grace, University of Southampton 1430 - 1500 Muirhead Tower 109 T041 Dramatic Science: Exploring how drama can help children understand science at KS 2, Deb McGregor, Oxford Brookes 1600 - 1700 Arts LR2 T042 Putting the context into the KS3 draft curriculum, Dr Keith Ross, 1600 - 1700 BioSciences lab 201

T008 Supporting Scotland’s STEM Education and Culture, Stuart Farmer, Robert Gordon’s College 1635 - 1730 Arts 201

T043 Young Scientists Journal Part 2 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal, Christina Astin, Young Scientists Journal 1600 - 1700 Arts LT3

T009 Science and cultural contexts ( repeated Friday 0930), Christopher Parkin, Universities of Keele and Worcester 1735 - 1830 Arts LR8

W006 Research: How should I do it? Prof Deb McGregor, Oxford Brookes University 0930 - 1030 Muirhead Tower 113

W003 EARTH SCIENCE: International Earth Science: Earthlearningidea (KS2/3/4), Elizabeth Devon, Earthlearningidea 1500 - 1555 Arts LR4

W009 Research: Where should I start? : Setting about your Literature Review, Dr Fiona Woodhouse, University of Huddersfield 1100 - 1200 Muirhead Tower 113

Thursday 9 January

W015 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth Science for the new KS3 curriculum, Elizabeth Devon, ESEU/ESTA 1130 - 1300 BioSciences lab 201

BC05 Making animations for teaching and learning science, Jocelyn Wishart, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol 1100 - 1300 BC08 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeat), Alessio Bernardelli, IoP Network Coordinator and Independent Consultant 1600 - 1700 DI03 Preparing for terminal assessment in GCSE sciences, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1400 - 1500 Muirhead Tower 121 DI05 Developing numeracy skills in science, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1600 - 1700 Muirhead Tower 121 FS09 FS: Barefoot running: back to our roots? Dr FrançoisXavier Li, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences 1600 - 1700 Aston Webb WG5 SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum, Ioannis Miaoulis, Museum of Science, Boston, USA 1130 - 1230 Mechanical Engineering G31 SE05 Chemical Magic, Dr Ray Plevey and Dr Rosemary Plevey 1600 - 1700 Haworth 203 SE06 Science education in 2043 – a vision for the future, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1600 - 1700 Muirhead Tower G15

W018 EARTH SCIENCE: Earth science out of doors (KS2/3/4), Elizabeth Devon, ESEU 1400 - 1500 BioSciences lab 201 W019 Explore the National STEM Centre eLibrary, Tom Lyons, National STEM Centre 1400 - 1500 Learning Centre UG08 W023 Teachers improving learning through diagrams, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading| 1400 - 1500 Muirhead Tower 113

Friday 10 January BC13 Developing schemes of learning for the new Programme of Study in KS1&2, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1100 - 1300 DI10 Developing literacy skills in science, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1400 - 1500 Muirhead Tower 121 DI15 Working scientifically at KS3, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1600 - 1700 Muirhead Tower 121 SE16 Biology in the real world: Natural selection as the power house of diversity, Dr Susannah Thorpe, The British Ecological Society and the Association for Study of Animal Behaviour 1215 - 1300 Biosciences 301

T078 AQA: Supporting mathematics in science, Stella Paes, AQA 1600 - 1700 Mechanical Engineering G36 W030 ASE Research seminar series: Ontological and epistemological tensions in the teaching and learning of school science investigations, Prof Deb McGregor, Oxford Brookes University 0930 - 1000 Muirhead Tower 113 W033 Remember the egg race, Geoff Auty, School Science Review 0930 - 1030 Poynting Physics lab P02 W034 Using the new technologies to enhance science teaching, Dr Glenys Hart, 0930 - 1030 Learning Centre UG08 W044 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth science for the new KS2 curriculum, Elizabeth Devon, ESEU/ESTA 1400 - 1530 Arts LR5 W051 Putting the WOW factor into the new primary curriculum, Wendy Precious, Entrust 1530 - 1630 Arts LR4 W054 Using history and philosophy in science classes, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1600 - 1700 Muirhead Tower 118

Saturday 11 January BC20 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils, ESTA Primary Representatives, ESTA 0930 - 1100 BC21 Astrophysics in the Sixth Form – Examined and Nonexamined, Alan C Pickwick, Association for Astronomy Education 1100 - 1300 DI19 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils – drop in session, ESTA Primary Representatives, ESTA 1130 - 1230 BioSciences lab N202 DI21 What – no levels? Assessment and tracking at KS3, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 121 DI23 Tablets for the science teacher, Ed Walsh, Cornwall Learning 1400 - 1500 Muirhead Tower 121 SE25 Supporting science teachers with disabilities ~ forum, Dr Lyn Haynes, Canterbury Christ Church University & University of York 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 118 SE27 Forensic anthropology in the real world, Professor Sue Black, Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification, University of Dundee 1400 - 1500 Muirhead Tower G15

SE18 ASE Presidential Address, Professor Alice Roberts, ASE President, 1400 - 1500 University Centre Avon Room

T086 If it doesn’t work, it’s physics, Geoff Auty, School Science Review 0930 - 1030 Poynting Physics lab P02

T012 BERG: Opening up biology inquiry, Dr Chris Harrison, King’s College London 0930 - 1030 Muirhead Tower 109

SE21 EARTH SCIENCE: ESTA/ESEU Distinguished speaker: Devastating earthquakes, James Jackson, FRS, Professor of Active Tectonics and Head of Bullard Laboratories, Department of Earth Sciences, Cambridge University 1600 - 1700 BioSciences NG08

T087 IOP: Using evidence to inform your teaching, Charles Tracy, Institute of Physics 0930 - 1030 Muirhead Tower 112

T014 IOP: Girls in Physics, Clare Thomson, Institute of Physics 0930 - 1030 Muirhead Tower 112

SE22 ASE AGM 1700 - 1800 Muirhead Tower G15

T021 BERG: Making and using slowmation films to help explain biology concepts, Sandra Campbell, Institute of Education, University of London 1100 - 1130 Muirhead Tower 109

T045 “What’s a stragedy [sic]?” - Techniques, tactics and strategies for conceptual change in school science, John-Paul Riordan, Canterbury Christ Church University 0930 - 1030 Mechanical Engineering G33

T024 A South African adventure: the flora (and fauna) of the Western Cape, Dr Susan Burr, 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 112

T047 Science and cultural contexts (repeat), Christopher Parkin, Universities of Keele and Worcester 0930 - 1030 Mechanical Engineering B23

T026 Concepts before language in primary school science lessons, Jon James, University of Bristol 1130 - 1230 Arts 201

T052 Light – think it, talk it, be it, understand it, Jason Harding, London Borough of Enfield 1100 - 1200 Arts 201

T027 Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Part 1 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal, Christina Astin, Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 122

T061 EARTH SCIENCE: Amazing planet – action-packed classroom science, Elizabeth Devon, Earthlearningidea 1130 - 1230 BioSciences NG08

T032 BERG: Drawing inspiration: a fresh look at biological diagrams, Sue Howarth, University of Worcester 1200 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 109

T063 How to complete your Rsci, RSciTech and CSciTeach application and CPD record, John Lawrence, ASE 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 121

SE08 Talking science education, Chaired by Carol Willis, Chief Executive of the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). National network of Science Learning Centres, Wellcome Trust and The Royal Society 1600 - 1800 Nuffield G17

T062 EARTH SCIENCE: Detecting earthquakes and nuclear explosions, Dr Cyril Isenberg, University of Kent 1130 - 1230 Physics West 117

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T093 What’s an eyeball made of, miss? Joelle Halliday, AZSTT Primary Science Research & Innovation Hub 0930 - 1030 Arts 201 T099 Animating Science, Jocelyn Wishart, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol 1530 - 1630 Arts LT3 W057 Great ideas that work: Novel science activities for 11-16 year olds, Sue Howarth, University of Worcester 0930 - 1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 W061 Planning your new science curriculum? Let’s make it cross-curricular, Di Stead, DiStead Science; Kelly Consulting & Training Ltd. 1100 - 1200 Arts LR5 W064 Developing formative assessment in practice, Mary Whitehouse, University of York Science Education Group 1100 - 1300 Muirhead Tower 122 W068 Teaching the nature of science through climate change, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1130 - 1230 Muirhead Tower 113 W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum, Wendy Precious, Entrust and OxfordBrookes University 1530 - 1630 Arts LR5

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Research Events 2014 Wednesday 8 January

1600 – 1800 Arts LR5

T001 Innovative pedagogy for engagement, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1400 – 1455 Arts 201

T012 BERG: Opening up biology inquiry, Dr Chris Harrison, King’s College London

Thursday 9 January An Open Meeting with the Research Specialist Group, especially for potential members, John Oversby, 1300 – 1330 Muirhead Tower 113 FS01 FS: How Round is Your Circle? Dr Chris Sangwin, School of Mathematics 0930 – 1030 Aston Webb WG12 FS02 FS: Humans, Holodecks, Heritage and Healthcare: Virtual Technologies for the Real World, Professor Bob Stone, School of Engineering & Physical Sciences 0930 – 1030 Aston Webb WG5 FS03 FS: Fossil teeth and bones: Windows into past environments? Dr James R. Wheeley, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES, University of Birmingham 1130 – 1230 Aston Webb WG12 FS04 FS: Recreating the Big Bang with the World’s Largest Machine - The LHC at CERN, Professor David Evans, School of Physics and Astronomy 1130 – 1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 FS05 FS: Targeting the foe within: The immune response to cancer, Professor Paul Moss, Cancer Sciences, MDS, University of Birmingham 1130 – 1230 Aston Webb WG5 FS06 FS: DNA damage: The cause of, and answer to, cancer development? Alexander Garvin, Cancer Sciences, MDS 1400 – 1500 Webb WG5 FS07 FS: Examining the Performance of Urban Interventions in the Far Future, Professor Chris Rogers, School of Civil Engineering 1400 – 1500 Aston Webb WG12 FS08 FS: The immune system: What goes wrong to cause rheumatoid arthritis and what can be done about it? Karim Raza, Immunity and Infection, MDS 1400 – 1500 Mechanical Engineering G29 FS09 FS: Barefoot running: back to our roots? Dr François-Xavier Li, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences 1600 – 1700 Aston Webb WG5 FS10 FS: Fighting disease with maths, Dr Sara Jabbari, School of Mathematics 1600 – 1700 Aston Webb WG12 SE07 Higgs and the LHC: News from the Energy Frontier, Becky Parker, Langton Star Centre

0930 – 1030 Muirhead Tower 109 T021 BERG: Making and using slowmation films to help explain biology concepts, Sandra Campbell, Institute of Education, University of London 1100 – 1130 Muirhead Tower 109 T023 BERG: Relating science and religion and perceptions about the theory of evolution, Shagufta Arthur, University of Glasgow 1130 – 1200 Muirhead Tower 109 T026 Concepts before language in primary school science lessons, Jon James, University of Bristol 1130 – 1230 Arts 201 T027 Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Part 1 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal, Christina Astin, Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) 1130 – 1230 Muirhead Tower 122 T028 Neuroscience and education: what’s the potential? Anna Simmonds, Wellcome Trust 1130 – 1230 Arts LT1 T032 BERG: Drawing inspiration: a fresh look at biological diagrams, Sue Howarth, University of Worcester 1200 – 1230 Muirhead Tower 109 T033 BERG: Becoming a biologist through a field visit., Paul Davies, Institute of Education, University of London 1400 – 1430 Muirhead Tower 109 T035 Science teaching: What works? Stuart Naylor, Millgate House Education 1400 – 1500 Arts LR8 T038 BERG: Teaching science for health literacy: how the LifeLab project is changing pupils’ attitudes to health issues, Marcus Grace, University of Southampton 1430 – 1500 Muirhead Tower 109 T039 An update on all things STEM from the CSE! Pat Morton, Centre for Science Education, Sheffield Hallam University 1600 – 1700 Muirhead Tower 122

University 0930 – 1030 Muirhead Tower 113 W009 Research: How should I do it? Dr Fiona Woodhouse, University of Huddersfield 1100 – 1200 Muirhead Tower 113 W016 Research: Drawing valuable conclusions from data? John Oversby, 1200 – 1300 Muirhead Tower 113 W023 Teachers improving learning through diagrams, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1400 – 1500 Muirhead Tower 113 W027 Update on resources for particle physics: the particle zoo and Feynman diagrams, Dr Cristina Lazzeroni, University of Birmingham 1400 – 1600 Physics West 103 W029 Regenerate! Will stem-cell biologists make Time Lords of us all? Emma Kemp, EuroStemCell: Europe’s stem cell hub, MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, The University of Edinburgh 1600 – 1700 Arts LR8

Friday 10 January BC11 IDEA- Inquiry in Dye Electrohporesis, Ingrid Miller, Bio-Rad Laboratories 0930 - 1030 FS11 FS: Music of the Sun and stars, Professor Bill Chaplin, School of Physics and Astronomy 0930 – 1030 Aston Webb WG5 FS12 FS: What do we mean by chaos? Dr Chris Good, School of Mathematics 0930 – 1030 Aston Webb WG12 FS13 FS: Getting small blood cells through small gaps: What could go wrong? Professor Gerald Nash, Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MDS 1130 – 1230 Aston Webb WG5 FS14 FS: Getting to the root of the problem: using maths to feed the world, Rosemary Dyson, School of Mathematics, University of Birmingham 1130 – 1230 Aston Webb WG12 FS15 FS: Nuclear Energy: What is the Future for the UK? Professor Martin Freer, School of Physics and Astronomy 1130 – 1230 Mechanical Engineering G29

FS16 FS: Air in the Age of the City, Rob Mackenzie, Geography, Earth and T043 Young Scientists Journal Part 2 Environmental Sciences, LES of Science communication for schools: 1600 – 1700 Aston Webb WG5 Geoset and Young Scientists Journal, FS17 FS: How do we tackle the epiChristina Astin, Young Scientists Journal demic of liver disease in the UK? David 1600 – 1700 Arts LT3 Adams, Immunity and Infection, MDS W006 Research: Where should I 1600 – 1700 Aston Webb WG12 start? : Setting about your Literature Review, Prof Deb McGregor, Oxford Brookes

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Research Events 2014 SE09 Biology in the real world: Mighty mitochondria, Dr Daniel Tennant, The Physiological Society, the Biochemical Society and the British Pharmacological Society. 0930 – 1015 Biosciences 301

T067 ASE Research seminar series: A case study of teachers’ thinking about diagrams, Laura Vogliotti,PALAVA, University of Reading 1200 – 1230 Muirhead Tower 113

SE16 Biology in the real world: Natural selection as the power house of diversity, Dr Susannah Thorpe, The British Ecological Society and the Association for Study of Animal Behaviour 1215 – 1300 Biosciences 301

T068 ASE Research seminar series: Fifteen year old London school students’ perceptions and experiences of their physics education, Tamjid Mujtaba, Institute of Education, University of London, London LearningforLondon@IOE 1200 – 1230 Muirhead Tower 118

SE20 Biology in the real world: High pressure plants, Dr Jeremy Pritchard, Society of Biology/Society for Experimental Biology 1530 – 1615 Biosciences 301 T044 ASE Research seminar series: Collaborative study in diagrams with a teacher-researcher group, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 0930 – 1000 Muirhead Tower 118 T045 “What’s a stragedy [sic]?” Techniques, tactics and strategies for conceptual change in school science, John-Paul Riordan, Canterbury Christ Church University 0930 – 1030 Mechanical Engineering G33 T050 ASE Research seminar series: Do pre-service Secondary Science Teachers know what they are talking about? Jane Fieldsend, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1000 – 1030 Muirhead Tower 118 T051 ASE Research seminar series: Science teachers’ access to physicsspecific CPD: the current picture, Anne Bowker, King’s College, London 1000 – 1030 Muirhead Tower 113 T055 The Human Condition Project using psychology in primary science, Gareth Metcalfe, AZSTT Primary Science Research & Innovation Hub 1100 – 1200 Arts LR4 T056 ASE Research seminar series: Developing a Profiling Tool for Measuring the Impact of STEM Enrichment Programmes, Wai Yi Feng, University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education 1130 – 1200 Muirhead Tower 118 T057 ASE Research seminar series: How has SKE developed the trainees’ subject knowledge so that they are well prepared to teach their subject in the classroom? Jude Sanders, Hibernia College UK (HCUK) 1130 – 1200 Muirhead Tower 113

T073 SAILS – assessment of science inquiry, Chris Harrison, Kings College London 1400 – 1500 Arts 201 W030 ASE Research seminar series: Ontological and epistemological tensions in the teaching and learning of school science investigations, Prof Deb McGregor, Oxford Brookes University |0930 – 1000 Muirhead Tower 113 W047 Teaching resources for particle physics: particle detectors, Dr Lynne Long, University of Birmingham 1400 – 1600 Physics West 103 W054 Using history and philosophy in science classes, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1600 – 1700 Muirhead Tower 118

Saturday 11 January BC24 Writing for ASE Publications, Bob Kibble, ASE 1100 - 1300

FS22 FS: Frontier Science Special: A tour of the Hydrogen Technology and Rare Earth Magnet laboratories and visit to ‘The Ross Barlow’, the University’s hydrogen powered narrow boat, Dr Allan Walton, Magnetic Materials group Leader, Metallurgy and Materials, EPS, University of Birmingham 1130 – 1330 Aston Webb foyer FS23 FS: 100 million to 1: what can maths tell us about the Great Sperm Race? Dr Dave Smith, School of Mathematics 1400 – 1500 Aston Webb WG12 FS24 FS: Opportunities and Challenges from nanomaterials for the Environment, Iseult Lynch, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES 1400 – 1500 Aston Webb WG5 FS25 FS: Egg and sperm – a chatty couple, Steve Publicover, Biosciences, LES 1530 – 1630 Aston Webb WG5 FS26 FS: Stress is bad, Exercise is good: Are the effects on immunological health really that simple? Dr. Victoria Burns, School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham 1530 – 1630 Aston Webb WG12 SE25 Supporting science teachers with disabilities forum, Dr Lyn Haynes, Canterbury Christ Church University & University of York 1130 – 1230 Muirhead Tower 118 T087 IOP: Using evidence to inform your teaching, Charles Tracy, Institute of Physics 0930 – 1030 Muirhead Tower 112

BC27 Exploring Bioenergy – class discussion with practicals, Adelia de Paula, Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) 1400 - 1630

T093 What’s an eyeball made of, miss? Joelle Halliday, AZSTT Primary Science Research & Innovation Hub 0930 – 1030 Arts 201

FS18 FS: Sex, Lies and Nanotechnology, Professor Jon Preece, School of Chemistry 0930 – 1030 Aston Webb WG12

T099 Animating Science, Jocelyn Wishart, Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol 1530 – 1630 Arts LT3

FS19 FS: The Permanent Attraction of Magnets, Rex Harris, Metallurgy and Materials, EPS, University of Birmingham 0930 – 1030 Aston Webb WG5

W068 Teaching the nature of science through climate change, John Oversby, Institute of Education, University of Reading 1130 – 1230 Muirhead Tower 113

FS20 FS: Could a baby robot grow up to be a mathematician? Professor Aaron Sloman, School of Computer Science 1130 – 1230 Aston Webb WG5 FS21 FS: Plant adaptation to changing environments: A role for GM, Dr Jeremy Pritchard, School of Biosciences 1130 – 1230 Aston Webb WG12

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W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum, Wendy Precious, Entrust and Oxford-Brookes University 1530 – 1630 Arts LR5

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Thursday 9 January Open Conference Timetable 10 10

Gaia Science, Neil Herrington, University of East London and Peter Hornton, Gaia's Company

11 30

Dialogue in Science, Jane Thomson, Biochemical Society

12 10

The Challenge of Outdoor Education: A brief talk with some suggestions for the school garden and beyond. Free Organic pumpkin/squash/sweet corn/bean seeds available, Greg Klaes

13 10

Solar STEM after-school activities - Plugging into the sun, David Garlovsky, Solar-Active.com

14 10

15 STEM related project ideas in 15mins - featuring the newly launched CREST Discovery Award, Adrian Fenton, Young People's Programme Manager, British Science Association

14 50

Improving the quality of pupils' response in science inquiry teaching; a participatory action research, Syafiq Aiman

Codes for Session Types

All sessions in the Open Conference last 15 or 30 minutes. Several slots are still available; see the Open Conference manager on the stand (D1) to book your slot when you arrive at the conference.

BC Booked Course DI Drop-in Session FS Frontier Science SE Special Events T Talk/Discussion/ Demonstration W Workshop

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All Thursday Sessions Booked Courses If you wish to book a Booked Course, please go to the Registration Desk in the Great Hall of the Aston Webb Building to check availability and venue details.

to this question involves the shape of the 50p coin, the NASA Space Shuttle Challenger explosion in 1986 and how to drill a square hole.... Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: all

FS02 FS: Humans, Holodecks, Heritage and Healthcare: Virtual Technologies for the Real World Professor Bob Stone T011 Augmented reality teaching Organisation: School of Engineering & Physical Sciences Dr Francisco Perez Garcia Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk Organisation: Institut Pompeu Fabra 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 Email/web: http://blocs.xtec.cat/pile 0930-1030 Arts LT3 Since their premature debut on the international ICT stage in the Processing is an open source programming language with augment- 1990s, Virtual and Augmented Reality technologies have evolved into ed reality capabilities, enabling the integration of digital information a powerful collection of tools and techniques for real-time visualisawith live video. A portable application with processing along with tion, design and education and training. The emergence of highly several libraries (GSVideo, NyAR4psg, OBJloader) and other neces- accessible toolkits from the mainstream games community is now sary software will be presented. Several included examples will be helping developers from all walks of life to develop engaging intershown using printed markers and a computer with webcam. It will be active 3D applications on PCs, games consoles, smartphones and also explained how to find and how to create markers for augmented tablets. This session will review some of the latest developments by the University of Birmingham’s Human Interface Technologies Team, reality and 3D objects to teach in the classroom. with applications as diverse as virtual recreations of natural scenes to Themes/disciplines: using technology creatively support patient recovery and rehabilitation, skills training for the UK Target audiences: post 16 Army’s latest bomb disposal robot, and maritime heritage, including the world’s first submarine disaster in 1774. T012 BERG: Opening up biology inquiry Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Dr Chris Harrison, Ms Melissa Glackin Target audiences: all Organisation: King’s College London Email/web: www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/education 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 T014 IOP: Girls in Physics Informed from the current European project SAILS - www.sails- Clare Thomson project.eu - this session focuses on biology inquiry and how it might Organisation: Institute of Physics be used to motivate students whilst developing their conceptual Email/web: www.iop.org/girlsinphysics Muirhead Tower 112 understanding. Come ready to think about what biology has to offer 0930-1030 This session will look at the work the Institute has been doing since scientific inquiry, and try out and re-write some activities. the publication of its report ‘It’s Different for Girls’ in October 2012. Themes/disciplines: research into practice The focus is particularly on co-ed schools and what they should be Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE doing to challenge gender stereotyping. It will be looking at sugASE Books associated with this session: gested interventions and resources to help with this work both at the whole school level and in the physics classroom. T013 Classroom activities for Dark Matter Themes/disciplines: new curricula Greg Dick, Miles Hudson Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors Organisation: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics Email/web: www.perimeterinstitute.ca 0930-1030 Physics West 103 T015 Planning a science curriculum: AQA’s Post-16 offer Are you looking for ways to connect your students to the true nature Matthew Bennett of our mysterious universe? Join us as we explore how uniform Organisation: AQA 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 circular motion can be used to introduce students to dark matter. A-levels are changing from 2015. In this session for Heads of Themes/disciplines: practical science Science, Curriculum Deputy Heads and Science Advisors, we will Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 discuss our new A-level qualifications. AQA offer a number of pathways for different types of students, each leading somewhere; FS01 FS: How Round is Your Circle? whether this is employment or university. Learn how our panels of Dr Chris Sangwin experts have helped to design our qualifications. Find out about the Organisation: School of Mathematics differences between the current and new specifications and the skills Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 our specifications will help your students to develop. Mechanisms are all around us. We often take them for granted, or Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment don’t even notice they exist. Most have a long and interesting history Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC and many rely on rotating parts. That is, one circular part which fits inside another. These need to be made very accurately to work safely, W005 Presenting ‘DNA and Genome Sequencing’ to a smoothly and without wearing out. This raises a basic problem which sixth form audience links engineering to mathematics. How do you test if something is Karen Stephens round? I.e., how round is your “circle”? Sounds simple? The answer Organisation: National network of Science Learning Centres and

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Thursday 9 January National STEM Centre Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B01 This session explores activities for teaching DNA and Genome Sequencing to Sixth Form students. It provides: 1. Background to the Human Genome Project 2. Current, relevant examples of how genome sequencing can prevent the spread of MRSA and help treat breast cancer 3. Modelling activities to help students understand Sanger sequencing, a ‘next generation’ method of sequencing and the vital role of bioinformatics Resources have been developed thanks to funding from RCUK and are available for free. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: post 16

Email/web: www.schoolphytsics.co.uk 0930-1030 Physics West 117 If you enjoy Physics experiments, or would like to see some more fun and informative demonstrations then this talk is for you. There will be about thirty experiments demonstrated from jellies, simulated lunar craters and a wolf whistling rodent! There is lots of audience participation so come and play the saw, see forces at work and defy gravity with a paper clip! You will certainly go away with some new ideas to help the teaching of physics in your school. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical scienceinternational Target audiences: 07-Nov 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: ‘The New Resourceful Physics Teacher’ by Keith Gibbs

W006 Research: Where should I start?: Setting about your Literature Review Prof Deb McGregor Organisation: Oxford Brookes University Email/web: dmcgregor@brookes.ac.uk 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 113 This workshop will explore some of the key aspects of thinking about and planning to do research in classrooms or other science environments. It will give you some practical advice and suggestions as to how to start and how to think about the research process. It can be followed with subsequent sessions which take you further into the research process or used just to get you thinking about this important aspect of science education to develop your own pedagogy. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-1111-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors ASE Books associated with this session:

T018 What On Earth? – connecting the curriculum through Big Science Christopher Lloyd Organisation: What On Earth Publishing Ltd Email/web: www.whatonearthbooks.com 0930-1030 Arts LR6 Christopher Lloyd, founder of What on Earth Publishing, shows how by using timelines, everyday objects and visual narratives, it is possible to promote and integrate science teaching right across the curriculum from art and literacy to maths, music and even religious studies! Using a giant edition of the brand new What on Earth Wallbook of Science & Engineering timeline, published in collaboration with the ASE, the Science Museum and the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Christopher will demonstrate how BIG science can engage pupils of all abilities, ages and learning styles. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: The What On Earth Wallbook of Science and Engineering. Co-published with The Science Museum, The Institute of Mechanical Engineers and endorsed by The Association for Science Education. Available on the ASE stand.

W007 Smarter Science for Key Stage 3 Smart Science authors- Aidan Gill, David Sang and Gary Skinner Organisation: Smart Learning Ltd Email/web: www.smart-learning.co.uk/science 0930-1030 Arts LR2 With the new curriculum focusing on facts, how can we ensure Key Stage 3 students develop their scientific and learning skills in interesting contexts? This practical workshop will look at developing data handling, literacy and research skills at Key Stage 3. We will also look at ways we can use novel topics and contexts to inspire our students to look at their world in new, scientific ways. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 T016 Teaching the new curriculum with Switched On Science Danny Nicholson, Shan Oswald Organisation: Rising Stars 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 122 Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical scienceprimary focususing technology creatively Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 T017 The Spinning Jelly and other fun physics experiments Keith Gibbs Organisation: Schoolphysics

W008 Working scientifically , ideas and activities to promote learning Hellen Ward, Keith Remnant Organisation: Canterbury Christ Church University: Putting learning first Email/web: Hellen.ward@canterbury.ac.uk 0930-1030 Arts LR4 Working in a scientific way is a central part of science. However what does this involve? The workshop will look at the role of practical science for learners within the primary phase and share great ideas for practical activities, recording and assessing. There will be mess so be prepared to take part! Themes/disciplines: practical scienceprimary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: A range of books will be used. T019 WRL - The Wallace Resource Library - a free science resource Dr Roger HC Poland Organisation: Operation Wallacea Email/web: www.opwall.com 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G33

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Thursday 9 January There is now a wonderful new free science resource to help post-16 science and environmental science teachers by providing novel and exciting data-sets for the classroom. The Wallace Resource Library is a series of modular topics such as Animal Behaviour, Ecosystems, Ecological Survey Techniques and many others which are especially relevant to teaching. These data-sets originate directly from Operation Wallacea research sites from around the world and are uniquely processed and produced by the actual scientists involved in the research. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: post 16 T020 ZSL London Zoo – Engaging schools through authenticity Rachel Haydon Organisation: ZSL London Zoo Email/web: www.zsl.org/zsl-london-zoo/schools 0930-1030 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Discovery & Learning at ZSL London Zoo aims to enrich your science teaching and engage students in innovative workshops and activities. At ZSL London and Whipsnade Zoos students will have the opportunity to develop skills and explore concepts around evolution, biodiversity, climate change and conservation with unique resources and learning environments. Learn more about what is available at ZSL in this session and have your say about what onsite and digital resources you would like for your class. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-1111-14 14-16 post 16 ASE Books associated with this session: BC01 Practical challenges linking science with design and technology Bridget Holligan, Natalie Ford Organisation: Science Oxford Email/web: www.scienceoxford.com 0930-1230 Science Oxford is the UK partner for an exciting EU-funded project called ENGINEER. Ten European science museums or centres have worked with ten partner primary schools to develop ten practical design challenges, set in context, that enable pupils to apply their scientific skills and knowledge. For each design challenge pupils follow the Engineering Design Process (Ask, Imagine, Plan, Create & Improve) to solve a problem – and topics include gliders, musical instruments, footwear and floating platforms . This hands-on course lets teachers try out the resource for themselves. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical scienceprimary focusinternational Target audiences: 7-11 T021 BERG: Making and using slowmation films to help explain biology concepts Sandra Campbell, Organisation: Institute of Education, University of London Email/web: s.campbell@ioe.ac.uk 1100-1130 Muirhead Tower 109 Modern easy-to-use technology gives us new opportunities for classroom practice. As part of their PGCE course Student Teachers at IOE have made slow (stop-motion) animations using, for example, Windows Movie Maker. This has helped them to focus on improving the quality of their biological explanations in key areas such as photosynthesis and evolution. In this talk research findings will be discussed alongside practical tips for making these simple and effec-

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tive animations in the classroom. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE W009 Research: How should I do it? Dr Fiona Woodhouse Organisation: University of Huddersfield Email/web: f.j.woodhouse@hud.ac.uk 1100-1200 Muirhead Tower 113 This workshop will explore and elaborate on the key dilemmas facing beginning researchers when setting about their literature review. There are different ways that a literature review can be carried out and then written up. The pros and cons of different review and critique strategies will be discussed and considered. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: FE/SFC ITE Advisors W010 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills Matt Endean Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 A chance to get hands on and try out new and interesting practical activities covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Many of these are based on the reduced scale principle. Also you can make your own equipment which you get to take back to school with you. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors BC02 DNA Fingerprinting Sherri Andrews, Ingrid Miller Organisation: Bio-Rad Laboratories Email/web: Explorer.bio-rad.com 1100-1300 Bio-Rad. Forensic DNA Fingerprinting Kit (2 hrs) Use molecular scissors to create a DNA Fingerprint. Restriction enzyme digestion and DNA gel electrophoresis are used to help determine which suspect committed the crime. Extend this kit with a plasmid mapping activity using the plasmid DNA restriction patterns from the experiment. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessmentpractical scienceusing technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians BC03 Fantastic Forensics on a low budget. Highly evaluated course Elena Setterfield, Anita Ives Organisation: Freelance 1100-1300 Hands-on crime scene workshop that stimulates student interest in school science, but at a low cost to set up. Presented by a teacher and laboratory technician, both experienced in practical forensics for exam courses, forensic events, school projects and are published authors of club forensics. A lively and professionally fulfilling 2 hours of blood spatter, trace evidence, hair and fibre analysis, latent prints, imprints and crime scene analysis. Comprehensive forensic workbook provided. Early booking recommended for these popular presenters. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians Advisors

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Thursday 9 January BC04 IOP: Live Sounds - The Physics of Sound Richard Bonella, Dan Cottle Organisation: Institute of Physics Email/web: www.iop.org/education 1100-1300 Teaching the physics of sound through the human voice, animal sounds and musical instruments Explore: physics concepts related to sound teaching approaches that engage pupils Voicebox: free teaching and learning resources on the physics of speech Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 BC05 Making animations for teaching and learning science Jocelyn Wishart Organisation: Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol Email/web: www.bristol.ac.uk/education 1100-1300 Making stop-motion animations as a means of teaching in school science has been found to be very engaging, both prompting peer discussion about the science and showing up students’ misconceptions for the teacher to act upon. Students reported the discussions to be most help to understanding the science and enjoyed modelling or drawing the most. Participants in this workshop will trial making an animation for themselves and learn more about the benefits of and challenges to teaching in this way. Themes/disciplines: new curricula using technology creatively Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE T022 Top GCSE grades by teaching outstanding OFSTED lessons. Martin Reece, Stuart Sherman Organisation: Advance Education Email/web: martinjreece@aol.com 1100-1300 Arts LR8 Participants will hear the very latest OFSTED updates and advice about how science teaching can be outstanding. Colleagues will experience a wide range of activities that will engage high ability pupils, develop their higher level thinking, nurture independence, and enhance literacy and numeracy skills, hence helping to ensure they achieve the highest grades and are suitably prepared for further study. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors W011 Waste into Energy – an interactive education project (repeat) Tristan MacLean, Angela Murray Organisation: University of Birmingham Email/web: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LEFhDlJ_h4U 1100-1300 Arts LR5 This hands-on session will allow teachers to find out what it is like to take part in the innovative Energy into Waste workshop. You will be able to find out how the project works, how your school can take part and discuss all aspects of its design, development, delivery and improvement. Designed for students aged 11-16 to experience cutting edge energy research through a series of fun, hands-on activities; to date over 550 children have participated in the workshop. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16

T023 BERG: Relating science and religion and perceptions about the theory of evolution Shagufta Arthur Organisation: University of Glasgow 1130-1200 Muirhead Tower 109 Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: post 16 T024 A South African adventure: the flora (and fauna) of the Western Cape Dr Susan Burr Email/web: Susanburr952@btinternet.com 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 112 A photographic visit to see the desert of Namaqualand bloom and the familiar and unfamiliar plants of the Cape. Themes/disciplines: international Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE T025 Concept Cartoons: reaching the places that other strategies don’t reach Jo Moules, Stuart Naylor Organisation: Millgate House Education Email/web: www.millgatehouse.co.uk 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 121 Concept Cartoons have been around for a long time, but only covered a small proportion of the secondary curriculum. Now that gap is filled with a new set of Concept Cartoons specifically for KS4 and KS3. In this interactive session we will share recent developments in Concept Cartoons and explore different ways of using them in science classrooms. Whether or not you have used Concept Cartoons before, this workshop will give you something new. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: Science Concept Cartoons: Set 2 T026 Concepts before language in primary school science lessons Jon James Organisation: University of Bristol Email/web: Jon.James@bristol.ac.uk 1130-1230 Arts 201 Many children, not just those with literacy difficulties, find mastering the language of science difficult and hence do not make the progress that they could. The draft national curriculum for science appears to place an even greater emphasis on the need to use the “correct” words. However this session will give practical details of a project that looked at reducing the use of scientific terminology in primary school science lessons and focusing instead on the concepts. . Themes/disciplines: primary focus research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE Advisors FS03 FS: Fossil teeth and bones: Windows into past environments? Dr James R. Wheeley Organisation: Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 With current concerns about the direction of climate change, a deeper

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Thursday 9 January understanding of the past is essential to refine predictions of future trends. The skeletons of sharks and ray-finned fish are valuable windows into deep time as they archive seawater composition during their formation, are abundant in the fossil record and have been used to reconstruct the temperatures of ancient oceans over 400 million years of Earth history. The principles and applications underpinning this area of study will be discussed, focusing on our own research (in collaboration with the Sea Life Centre network) studying natural variability within modern species in a controlled environment. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS04 FS: Recreating the Big Bang with the World’s Largest Machine - The LHC at CERN Professor David Evans Organisation: School of Physics and Astronomy Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), situated under the Swiss-French boarder at CERN near Geneva, is the World’s most powerful particle accelerator. Here, protons are smashed together at practically the speed of light recreating the violent particle collisions which would have existed less than a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. Lead nuclei are also accelerated and collided producing the highest temperatures and densities ever made in an experiment and recreating the exotic primordial soup which existed at the birth of our Universe. The physics behind the LHC will be explained and the latest results presented. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: all FS05 FS: Targeting the foe within: The immune response to cancer Professor Paul Moss Organisation: Cancer Sciences, MDS, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Cancer remains a great health challenge and over one in three of us will be affected during our lifetime. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy have made important contributions to care but scientists are now looking towards new approaches. Our powerful immune system has evolved to provide protection against external pathogens. For over 100 years scientists have speculated that the immune system may also play a role in controlling the growth of cancer cells. In recent years the true significance of this process has been revealed and patients with otherwise incurable disease are not obtaining excellent responses to new treatments. The biology and clinical significance of these approaches will be discussed. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all T027 Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Part 1 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal Christina Astin, Colin Byfleet Organisation: Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) Email/web: www.geoset.info 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 122 GEOSET (www.geoset.info) is a searchable Internet gateway to a growing cache of SET and related educational material.

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UK schools and colleges are invited not only to explore the material already on offer, but to encourage their students to become active creators. Together with a ‘virtual’ Sir Harry Kroto, FRS, project contributors Colin Byfleet and Christina Astin will explain how your students could be making short videos about their experiments/ coursework/research to enhance their presentation skills, or for you to assess, to share with partner schools across the globe, or simply to add to this fantastic wiki, to share with the global educational community. Themes/disciplines: international using technology creatively research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors W012 Hands-on wave-particle duality Greg Dick, Miles Hudson Organisation: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics Email/web: www.perimeterinstitute.ca 1130-1230 Physics West 103 The wave-particle duality is one of the deepest mysteries of quantum mechanics. Come explore hands-on activities that introduce students to concepts involved in the wave-particle duality of light. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 W013 Heat control, sweating and keeping cool Barry Hawkins Organisation: Data Harvest 1130-1230 Nuffield G18 Practical demonstrations of the processes behind keeping cool and sweating. Visualise the production of sweat, model the cooling effect of evaporation and consider why we sweat and the types of sweat. A demostration of a practical based unit on homeostasis. Themes/disciplines: practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W014 Jelly baby waves at egg parachute and bouncy custard balls post a pringle to an alien zoo Katy Sparrow, Jemeela Quraishi Organisation: STEMNET Email/web: WWW.STEMNET.ORG.UK 1130-1230 Arts LR4 Silly title? Maybe! It’s a compilation of the practical activities which have already been delivered in STEMClubs across the UK. In this workshop you will see practical activities, get to talk to people who know how to set up or develop a STEMClub and more! If you want to deliver fun and rewarding ways to boost enjoyment and learning across STEM outside of the classroom, then this is the workshop for you! Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 T028 Neuroscience and education: what’s the potential? Anna Simmonds Organisation: Wellcome Trust Email/web: a.simmonds@wellcome.ac.uk 1130-1230 Arts LT1 We believe that the interface between neuroscience and education has real potential to improve education. In this session we will present findings from our surveys identifying what teachers, parents and students already do to improve learning, based upon their understanding of neuroscience. We will present the educational impacts of initiatives that have, or claim to have, their roots in neuroscience. We

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Thursday 9 January will also discuss the readiness of neuroscience to shape education and potential developments of educational interventions. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 SE02 OCR Special event 1: Coursework in public examinations; should we have it at all? Tim Oates, Director of Assessment Research and Development Cambridge Assessment Organisation: University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower G15 Themes/disciplines: developing assessment Target audiences: all T029 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work (repeated Friday 1130) Bob Worley Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1130-1230 BioSciences lab E204 Practical procedures for pupils using conventional equipment are often time-consuming and left out of teaching, consequently lowering pupil expectations of secondary school science. Small-scale chemistry is quick, saves on chemicals and offers variety in presentation. The course covers indicators, precipitation, salt preparation, reaction kinetics, iron/sulfur reactions, working with toxic gases and carrying out small-scale vigorous reactions. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical scienceinternational Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors SE03 Re-engineering the curriculum Ioannis Miaoulis Organisation: Museum of Science, Boston, USA Email/web: imiaoulis@mos.org 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G31 Although humans make the majority of the objects we interact with and use during our day-to-day lives, the current school curriculum focuses very little on how our human-made, or designed world, is made. Children spend enormous amounts of time learning things that are totally irrelevant to their lives and become adults who are technologically illiterate. Ioannis (Yannis) Miaoulis, President and Director of the Museum of Science in Boston will discuss how our educational systems have missed the point and talk about a major initiative to introduce the human made world and engineering in schools worldwide. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE

Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 T031 STEM collaboration in North Tyneside Julian Clarke Organisation: National STEM Centre Email/web: julian@jcent.co.uk 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering B01 Increasingly, clusters of schools and colleges are collaborating to provide a comprehensive range of curriculum provision and information about STEM career opportunities for their pupils. This session will provide an opportunity to hear about the work being done by the North Tyneside Learning Trust with support from the National STEM Centre. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors W015 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth Science for the new KS3 curriculum Elizabeth Devon, Chris King and Peter Kennett Organisation: ESEU/ESTA 1130-1300 BioSciences lab 201 Now that the new KS3 science curriculum has been finalised, we know that the rock cycle will form a central part of the Earth science section. But how can you teach this abstract cycle in interactive and engaging ways, that pupils will find relevant? Come and test a range of activities designed to ‘bring the cycle to life’ for pupils and to ensure dynamic teaching. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 ITE Advisors T032 BERG: Drawing inspiration: a fresh look at biological diagrams Sue Howarth Organisation: University of Worcester Email/web: s.howarth@worc.ac.uk 1200-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 Does the way in which diagrams are drawn to instruct pupils differ between teachers, is there a pattern and does it matter? Results may cause you to re-think your usual technique. Some ‘classic’ diagrams are also re-examined and some questions asked! Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors

W016 Research: Drawing valuable conclusions from data? John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading Email/web: www.reading.ac.uk 1200-1300 Muirhead Tower 113 What is the process for drawing conclusions? How is it done? How T030 Science Magic do we test for validity and reliability? In this session I will deal with Dr Matt Pritchard two kinds of small scale study. The first involves investigations of Organisation: Science magic shows student learning. Email/web: www.sciencemagicshows.co.uk Most investigations of this kind are mixed methods, that is they have 1130-1230 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 some quantitative data, perhaps test results or Likert-type results of Join Dr Matt Pritchard an Associate of the Inner Magic Circle and opinions or motivation, and some qualitative results, such as videos, science communicator as he performs and explains a wealth of sci- audio-recordings, drawings, journal diaries. Using real examples, I ence sorcery and maths magic. These simple yet effective illusions will deal with making information from the data to answer the queswill be easy to implement in your classroom at no cost. The tricks tions asked at the outset. In addition, the interpretations have to are designed to boost both engagement and critical thinking in the take account of the existing literature, a way of confirming a kind of students. validity. The second refers to data collected as part of action research

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Thursday 9 January that looks at the effect of a teacher’s work, and consequently the effect on the teacher’s feelings and motivation, and then to further actions in future lessons. This will be very practical and interactive, dealing with lots of challenges and successes on the way. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all DI01 Wellcome Trust funding surgery Tom Anthon Organisation: Wellcome Trust Email/web: www.wellcome.ac.uk 1230-1430 Arts LR2 Do you have exciting education project idea but need funding to make it happen? Come and talk to an adviser from the Wellcome Trust to see if we might be able to help you. We can also advise you on how to put together the a strong funding application. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Advisors An Open Meeting with the Research Specialist Group, especially for potential members John Oversby, Fiona Woodhouse and Debbie McGregor 1300-1330 Muirhead Tower 113 Please come along and share your views. T033 BERG: Becoming a biologist through a field visit. Paul Davies, Ruth Amos Organisation: Institute of Education, University of London Email/web: www.ioe.ac.uk 1400-1430 Muirhead Tower 109 This session considers the role that non-formal learning environments play in the development of students’ conceptual understanding of ecology. We will draw on our research into the effect that a post-16 biology field visit had on student understanding about, and response to the living world: what we term ‘becoming a biologist’. We will consider the importance of authenticity in non-formal learning and role that visits play in providing an environment where creativity affords unique learning opportunities. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE W017 Can STEM change the world? Alex Marsh, Mark Prime Organisation: Philip Harris Education Email/web: www.philipharris.co.uk 1400-1500 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 STEM clubs need funding, but some STEM activities could be turned into money-makers. If your STEM club has ideas for better ways to teach something – in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths – bring them along to this drop-in session. We will be showing examples of products that were suggested by teachers and students – inventions by the people for the people! Your idea could become a product too, and earn royalties – funding your next invention. Who knows, your invention could be in every science department in the UK. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 FE/SFC Technicians

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W018 EARTH SCIENCE: Earth science out of doors (KS2/3/4) Elizabeth Devon, Peter Kennett and Chris King Organisation: ESEU 1400-1500 BioSciences lab 201 Have you ever asked yourself, ‘How can I use the area outside the door of my classroom to teach Earth science principles’? If you have, some of the answers will be revealed on the Birmingham Campus using opportunities available around many schools. So, bring your coat and be ready to be involved in teasing out Earth science principles from outdoor things that many people take for granted. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 ITE Advisors W019 Explore the National STEM Centre eLibrary Tom Lyons, Karen Hornby Organisation: National STEM Centre Email/web: www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk 1400-1500 Learning Centre UG08 Explore the National STEM Centre eLibrary and discover over 7000 free resources. Find out about our resource packages for the new curriculum and learn how to create your own. The National STEM Centre was established in 2008 with funding from the Gatsby Charitable Foundation. The main aims of the National STEM Centre are to promote STEM subjects and provide teachers of STEM subjects access to a ‘British Library’ of teaching resources. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors FS06 FS: DNA damage: The cause of, and answer to, cancer development? Alexander Garvin Organisation: Cancer Sciences, MDS Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG5 Our genetic material, DNA, encodes genes that define how cells grow and multiply. When it is damaged genes can be altered leading to deregulated cell growth that can become cancer. DNA is damaged by extrinsic influences such as sunlight, tobacco smoke and pollution, but also by intrinsic elements that can’t be avoided, such as oxygen, water and the process of DNA replication itself. Fortunately our cells have evolved complex mechanisms to prevent mutation and repair damaged DNA. Without these cancer would be far more common than it is. Now we realise that an understanding of DNA repair can also be used in the treatment of cancer. Perhaps paradoxically deliberately targeting a cells ability to fix DNA can kill tumour cells. The presentation will show how this works and what the future of treatment using this knowledge might look like. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS07 FS: Examining the Performance of Urban Interventions in the Far Future Professor Chris Rogers Organisation: School of Civil Engineering Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 We can use projections or predictions to plan our urban interventions with only one certainty – they are likely to be wrong in the far future. The Urban Futures project takes a different, scenarios-based approach. Based on well-established literature, it has characterised

The future of science depends on the quality of science education today. We believe that the essence of education is teaching. Join the Education and Learning team throughout the ASE conference, and hear about the breadth of our support for excellent science teaching. Neuroscience and Education: What’s the potential? Exploring what neuroscience can teach education and vice versa. Thursday 9 January, 11.30–12.30 Arts Building LT1 Wellcome Trust Funding Surgery Pop in to discuss funding ideas and opportunities. Thursday 9 January, 12.30–14.30 Arts Building LR2 Talking Science Education Join us for a glass of wine and a topical debate on evidence in education. Thursday 9 January, 16.00–18.00 Nuffield Building G17 Biology in the Real World: Powering life Get new ideas for bringing cutting-edge biology into the classroom, direct from science researchers. Friday 10 January, 09.30–16.15

Biosciences 301 Achieving Fabulous Primary Science Join us to discuss research and case studies that explore how our workforce is used to its best advantage. Friday 10 January, 14.00–15.00 Arts Building LR2 Special Event: Wellcome Trust Teachers’ Reception Calling all teachers! We would be delighted if you would join us for a drinks and nibbles reception, where we will be giving away free teaching resources and discussing our work. Friday 10 January, 17.00–19.00 Venue: Noble Room, Staff House, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, B15 2TT Stay in touch education@wellcome.ac.uk @WTeducation

wellcome.ac.uk/education

A frustule. Annie Cavanagh/Wellcome Images

Wellcome Trust – ASE Annual Conference 2014

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Thursday 9 January four plausible futures that lie at the extremes of where societies might end up (barring catastrophic change). We then parachute each proposed urban intervention into our four future world models and determine whether that solution is likely to be successful. This presentation will demonstrate the methodology and its underlying design principles. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: all FS08 FS: The immune system: What goes wrong to cause rheumatoid arthritis and what can be done about it? Karim Raza Organisation: Immunity and Infection, MDS Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G29 The immune system has developed to fight off infection but things sometimes go wrong and the immune system attacks ‘self’. Diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis are all examples of immune mediated diseases which develop when the normal checks that keep the immune system under control stop working. This talk will focus of rheumatoid arthritis as an example of a common condition in which recent developments in our understanding of the causes and mechanisms of disease have led to profound advances in our ability to treat patients. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all T034 Getting to grips with lesson planning Anne Scott, Mary Whitehouse Organisation: University of York Science Education Group Email/web: yorkscience.org.uk 1400-1500 Arts LR8 Trainee teachers often struggle to plan lessons which incorporate AfL activities that really shows whether students ‘get it’. They need an understanding of learning intentions, what the successful outcome of learning will look like, and also what to do with evidence collected. As part of the York Science Project, PGCE science trainees at York have been introduced to a backward design approach to lesson planning. The approach could be used to develop trainee teachers’ use of embedded formative assessment. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: ITE Advisors W020 Making Molecules Real: a Molecular Mass Meter and what’s inside it Prof Neil A. Downie Organisation: Air Products & University of Surrey Email/web: www.saturdayscience.org 1400-1500 BioSciences N202 You can stub your toe on a house brick, but you can’t stub your toe on a molecule, although it is just as real. The Molecular Mass Meter is a simple device which makes molecules real by allowing us to read out molecular mass of a gas on a multimeter as easily as we measure a voltage. Here is how to make one and whole lot of fun demonstrations from Saxotrons to Underwater Bells which show how it works. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 Technicians DI02 Outdoor Education Drop-In Session Dr Katharine ForseyOrganisation: ASE Field Officer North of England and ‘Educate Everywhere’ Email/web: www.ase.org.uk

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1400-1500 Exhibition Marquee ASE stand DS2 Come and see me on the ASE stand (DS2) for advice on developing outdoor learning in your own settings, including teaching resources, apps, tips on managing groups outdoors, curriculum links/enrichment, links to numeracy, literacy, risk assessment and more! Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 5-7 7-11 W021 Post-16 chemistry learning resources using 3D crystal structures Dr Peter Hoare, Dr Susan Henderson Organisation: Newcastle University / Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre Email/web: peter.hoare@ncl.ac.uk 1400-1500 Learning Centre LG15 This workshop will introduce the free WebCSD platform and our worksheets which use it to teach fundamental chemical concepts for UK A-level and equivalent courses and also in foundation and early years undergraduate chemistry courses. The worksheets were produced by Nuffield Bursary students and an MChem project student and there are further worksheets and new topics planned. The resources were widely trialled in the UK and abroad and the feedback has been overwhelmingly positive from both students and teachers. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC DI03 Preparing for terminal assessment in GCSE sciences Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 121 The phasing out of modular assessment and the move towards external examinations at the end of GCSE science courses presents teachers with a number of challenges. This workshop will explore how teachers can plan for the periodic revisiting of topics and provide students with opportunities to refresh their understanding of key ideas. A number of classroom strategies will be tried out. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment Target audiences: 14-16 ITE Advisors T035 Science teaching: What works? Stuart Naylor Organisation: Millgate House Education Email/web: www.millgatehouse.co.uk 1400-1500 Arts LR8 The research evidence about what makes teaching effective is becoming increasingly secure. This thought-provoking session lifts the lid on what really works in the classroom. It draws on extensive research evidence, but focuses on the practicalities of science teaching and learning. This is what you need to know about evidencebased teaching. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 Advisors T036 Supporting effective teaching and learning: established teachers Guest speakers Organisation: National Network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering B01 Myscience, through the network of Science Learning Centres and

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Thursday 9 January the National STEM Centre supports teachers throughout their career. This session will look at how we can enhance and develop your practice, through a range of specialist courses, as well as giving support for those looking to take greater responsibility within science teaching. You will have time to discuss your career development with professional development leaders and identify points where we can actively support you further. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 W022 Supporting teachers through GCSE reform – an overview for Heads of Science and advisors Cris Edgell Organisation: AQA Email/web: www.aqa.org.uk 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G36 The session aims to give a clear overview of how GCSE reform will affect AQA GCSE science. A short explanation will be given on our ‘science for all’ and ‘science for scientists’ offers and then you will have the opportunity on what would really benefit your students. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 Advisors THIS SESSION IS NOW ON FRIDAY AT 1130 IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING G36 W023 Teachers improving learning through diagrams John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading Email/web: j.p.oversby@reading.ac.uk 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 113 The Reading Teacher Researcher Group, PALAVA, regularly adopts of collaborative project as its core activity over a year. Its recent project is to explore the place of diagrams in learning. This session will focus on two aspects. The first is to share our construction of an understanding of what a diagram is in the context of science education. Our method was a desk study of existing materials (largely in computing and engineering) and extracting from these and philosophical writings, clarification of the concept of diagram that distinguishes it from illustration, painting and other visual representations. The draft clarification was subject to scrutiny within PALAVA, until agreement was reached. The second phase was to explore, within PALAVA meetings consisting of around 6-10 teachers and educators, what research questions might prove productive and interesting. These were filtered through searches of existing research, until a core of questions remained to be tackled by the group. This research exemplifies the processes and contributions of an existing research group in defining their research activity. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: ASE Research Guide Teaching chemistry, ASE Research Guide T037 Teaching content and language skills in the science classroom (repeat) David Sang Organisation: Cambridge University Press Email/web: www.education.cambridge.org 1400-1500 Arts LR4 Language can be a barrier when studying subjects in another tongue. Increasing numbers of students for whom English is not their first language are studying the sciences in English. For them, commu-

nication problems can include specific terminology and definitions, word usage and sentence structure. This can lead to miscommunication and frustration by obscuring clarity of thought and expression. In this session, the authors of the Cambridge ‘Breakthrough to CLIL’ series will explore how science content can develop important language skills. Themes/disciplines: new curricula international Target audiences: 14-16 W024 The effects of exercise Barry Hawkins Organisation: Data Harvest 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Examine metabolism, and the physiology of gas exchange and transport in the body. Calculate the real cost of the chocolate biscuit (supplied!), and how we measure the response to increased demand for energy. Themes/disciplines: practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W025 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills Matt Endean Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 A chance to get hands on and try out new and interesting practical activities covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Many of these are based on the reduced scale principle. Also you can make your own equipment which you get to take back to school with you. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors W026 Biology Practicals that Work – hands-on drop-in session Dan Jenkins Organisation: Science and Plants for Schools Email/web: Saps@hermes.cam.ac.uk 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Looking for reliable new biology practicals? We’ve got a lab full of ideas for you, with engaging and affordable practicals on a range of key curriculum topics. We’ll be troubleshooting your old favourite practicals, and introducing new ones developed over the last year. Whether you stay for 10 minutes or two hours, inspiration is guaranteed! Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians BC06 Bringing science lessons to life Elizabeth Roche Organisation: Royal Observatory Greenwich Email/web: www.rmg.co.uk/schools/royal-observatory 1400-1600 This workshop is packed full of ideas of how to use cutting edge science and real scientific data to deliver challenging sections of the secondary science curriculum. It will show how to use innovative and engaging techniques that help students see the relevance of space science to the world around them. It will use ROG resources as examples and will aim to equip participants with the tools to modify them and other resources themselves to suit their students. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16

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Thursday 9 January BC07 Developing language and literacy skills in science Sadyia Kazmi, Sofia Ali Organisation: London Borough of Enfield; The Royal Borough of Kingston Upon Thames Email/web: Sadyia.Kazmi@enfield.gov.uk 1400-1600 This session is about improving the approach and strategies used in science lessons to literacy. Through using this approach the data shows greater progress of average to high ability pupils particularly bilinguals. Using Assessment for Learning techniques alongside key literacy approaches such as paraphrasing, annotation, modelling, peer assessment and reflection time we will share how the current barriers to learning for pupils can be overcome with a literacy focus approach to science lessons. This approach can be cross phase as well cross curricular as it is the enhanced pedagogical approach which has the impact on attainment and progress as evidenced by external and internal assessment carried out as part of the evaluative process. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 Advisors BC09 IOP: Thinking on Your Feet: Football and Physics Dr Lawrence Cattermole Organisation: Institute of Physics Email/web: www.iop.org/education 1400-1600 A joint project between the Institute of Physics and Arsenal Football Club, this resource uses football as a way of getting children to engage with physics and improve their football skills at the same time. Come and explore the resources and activities which can be used with pupils of all abilities, aged 11-16. Forces and motion, energy, sound and waves will be covered. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors DI04 Practical microbiology: eats, soils and leaves Dr John Grainger Organisation: Microbiology in Schools Advisory Committee (MiSAC) Email/web: www.misac.org.uk 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 ‘Cheap and cheerful’ microbiology practicals for secondary level using microscopical and selective culture methods for studying protists, fungi and bacteria from natural sources such as plant leaves, soil, and hay infusions. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians ASE Books associated with this session: Topics in Safety 3rd edition 2001 W027 Update on resources for particle physics: the particle zoo and Feynman diagrams Dr Cristina Lazzeroni, Dr Lynne Long Organisation: University of Birmingham Email/web: c.lazzeroni@bham.ac.uk 1400-1600 Physics West 103 The classification of elementary particles will be reviewed, including the concepts of baryon, hadron, meson, strangeness and the quark model. The theory of Feynman diagrams and their usage for A-level particle physics will be revisited, with particular attention to the idea of propagators and virtual particles.

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Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Advisors T038 BERG: Teaching science for health literacy: how the LifeLab project is changing pupils’ attitudes to health issues Marcus Grace Organisation: University of Southampton Email/web: mmg1@soton.ac.uk 1430-1500 Muirhead Tower 109 LifeLab is a hospital-based classroom and science education programme for teenagers to learn about health issues. Over 1500 students and 100 science teachers have now taken part in LifeLab. It has significantly increased students’ appreciation that their current lifestyle can affect their long-term health, and their interest in studying post-compulsory science and in considering science and healthcare career options. This session presents findings from the project. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE SE04 ASE Science Education Policy Lecture Guest speaker Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1500-1600 University Centre Avon Room Themes/disciplines: policy into practice Target audiences: all W028 A-level Chemistry: Plan ahead with AQA Chris Hancock Organisation: AQA Email/web: www.aqa.org.uk 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering G36 New specifications will be released in Spring 2014, for first teaching in 2015. This workshop session will allow Heads of Department, teachers and advisors to: - Plan ahead by getting first sight of the new specifications. - Try out some of the new question types. - Share ideas on practical tasks and assessment. - Meet the development team. - Sign up for preview copies of materials, so you can start trying them out in school. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC THIS SESSION IS NOW ON FRIDAY AT 1600 IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING G36 T039 An update on all things STEM from the CSE! Pat Morton, Jill Collins Organisation: Centre for Science Education, Sheffield Hallam University Email/web: cse@shu.ac.uk 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 122 Find out more about current projects to help develop STEM across your secondary school, sixth form or FE college. The workshop will help to align STEM interventions with core priorities in schools and colleges. We will be profiling the STEM Leadership Qualification Level 3 pilot project, professional development opportunities offered with the Science Learning Centres STEM Study Visit programme, widening participation and other STEM Careers activity. This workshop will allow you to ask questions and discuss approaches and outcomes.

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Thursday 9 January Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Advisors T040 Bridge building workshop Dr Ian Jefferson Organisation: School of Civil Engineering, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmningham.ac.uk 1600-1700 Arts LR4 Bridges and other structures stand for a number of reasons and engineers must understand the complex interactions involves to ensure any structure remain standing and operate safely for user over periods of many years. The hands on exercise will demonstrate the principle involves, allowing participant a chance to build a scale model suspension bridge, which if successful, they can walk across. This will enable team working and key principles associated with Civil and Structural Engineering to be illustrated. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC SE05 Chemical Magic Dr Ray Plevey, Mrs Rosemary Plevey Email/web: r.g.plevey@bham.ac.uk 1600-1700 Haworth 203 Can anyone match this for a little light entertainment? Reactions and principles which might feature in your lessons. A visual presentation, a kaleidoscope of chemical reactions demonstrated in a light-hearted manner. A melange of observations, sometimes old, maybe something blue (a quick flash perhaps) etc pass before the eyes. Results predictable or unexpected create an atmosphere of magic to the uninitiated but to those in the know - it’s just chemistry, a collection of elements which compounded together make us and our world. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors DI05 Developing numeracy skills in science Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 121 There is a growing emphasis in KS3 and KS4 courses upon the role of numeracy. Students are expected to be competent and confident in using and applying numerical concepts such as calculations, graphs and sense of scale. This workshop will explore some practical classroom strategies that can be used to develop these skills; participants will be able to try some approaches out that they can then take away and use. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 ITE Advisors T041 Dramatic Science : Exploring how drama can help children understand science at KS 2 Deb McGregor, Wendy Precious Organisation: Oxford Brookes Email/web: www.azteachscience.co.uk 1600-1700 Arts LR2 This workshop will show how you can employ more active, engaging, participatory and exciting ways to use drama to involve and engage your children in learning through and about science. There will be the opportunity to try some of the techniques so you can judge for

yourself whether they are appropriate for your children. It will also be explained how successful the approach has been in various primary classrooms in the Midlands. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE Advisors BC08 Effective mind mapping and memory techniques in science education (repeat) Alessio Bernardelli Organisation: IoP Network Coordinator and Independent Consultant Email/web: aso.ber@ntlworld.com 1600-1700 Discover the power of effective memory techniques and Mind Mapping! Come and see how these strategies go beyond just aiding revision, but develop a variety of skills ranging from Problem Solving, Creative Thinking, Literacy and many more. Mind Mapping is a creative and enjoyable process that provides more natural and effective ways to recall information, organise ideas and key points, plan projects, solve problems and record and communicate findings. Examples of learners’ work and digital mind mapping tools will be provided. Themes/disciplines: new curricula international using technology creatively Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors FS09 FS: Barefoot running: back to our roots? Dr François-Xavier Li Organisation: School of Sport and Exercise Sciences Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG5 Barefoot running is the object of a debate in various disciplines. The evolutionary perceptive is questioning if running has shaped our body to become efficient long distance runners. Biochechanics provides insights on the mechanical and anatomical constraints posed on the body whilst running and whether having heavy constraining shoes is the best way to use the properties of our body. Neuroscience and motor control are challenging the notion that movement control should come from the periphery, i.e. shoes, or whether a top-down organisation is more appropriate to control our actions. Evidences from these three fields will be presented. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors FS10 FS: Fighting disease with maths Dr Sara Jabbari Organisation: School of Mathematics Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 How can mathematics be used to understand antibiotic resistance, track the dynamics of viral infections or even develop new drugs to tackle disease? As our knowledge of diseases becomes increasingly detailed and complex, more tools are required to interpret and use this information. Mathematical modelling is one such tool. Differential equations can be employed to simulate and understand disease mechanisms, venturing into places that experimental work cannot go, be that for practical, financial or even moral reasons. We explore a range of examples illustrating how maths can be used to understand disease, improve existing treatments and create entirely new ones. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: all

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Thursday 9 January T042 Putting the context into the KS3 draft curriculum Dr Keith Ross Email/web: www.scienceissues.org.uk 1600-1700 BioSciences 201 Most of our students in school will not be career scientists but they will be voting citizens who need to understand how the world they live in works so they can care for it. The d(r)aft proposals for the new KS3 science curriculum say almost nothing about climate change and other environmental issues. This talk and discussion suggests how these contextual issues can be integrated into our teaching and can provide the rationale for including science in the curriculum. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 ITE W029 Regenerate! Will stem-cell biologists make Time Lords of us all? Emma Kemp, Ingrid Heersche Organisation: MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh Email/web: www.eurostemcell.org 1600-1700 Arts LR8 “Regeneration is a swift but volcanic experience, a sort of violent biological eruption in which the body cells are displaced, changed, renewed and rearranged.” - Doctor Who. Will stem-cell biologists make Time Lords of us all? Come away with the answer to this question, an overview of the current state of stem cell biology and a better understanding of the process that takes basic science through to working therapies. Be inspired and test our FREE teaching resources, available on EuroStemCell.org Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16

T043 Young Scientists Journal Part 2 of Science communication for schools: Geoset and Young Scientists Journal Christina Astin Organisation: Young Scientists Journal Email/web: www.ysjournal.com 1600-1700 Arts LT3 • Have your students done research which deserves publishing? • Do you want to improve your students’ science communication skills? Young Scientists (www.ysjournal.com) is an online journal, written and edited by students aged 12-20 from all over the world. Thirteen issues have been published, and articles commonly get >30k hits online. Christina Astin, co-founder and mentor, guides us through how to use the journal as a homework resource, coursework or research-publisher, or international project for ambitious young scientists of the future. Themes/disciplines: international research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE

DI06 Teachmeet STEM Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1600-1730 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 It is an informal and enjoyable gathering of those curious about teaching and learning. Anyone can share great ideas they’ve trialled in their classrooms, a teaching resource they love, a great website, a classroom activity - whatever you like! You can ask questions or simply turn up to soak up all the great ideas and enthusiasm. It is about being engaged and inspired by our immediate colleagues and gaining a lot of networking to boot! You can just come along and be a member of the audience if you SE06 Science education in 2043 – a vision for the future like, you can give a two minute nano-presentation on one of your John Oversby favourite science teaching ideas, or you can give a seven minute Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading micro-presentation on an aspect of classroom science teaching. You Email/web: j.p.oversby@reading.ac.uk don’t have to be an ASE member, but if you’re not, we might try to 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower G15 persuade you to join! Drawing on his lifetime of experience in science education, John As the Teachmeet is being held in a room in the Exhibition Marquee will focus on some current issues such as the structure of science you need to go to the Registration desk to register for the free exhibieducation and its links to the sciences, communication technologies, tion only. This will give you the opportunity to visit the exhibitors and practical work, science for citizenship and the role of the teacher see what the Annual conference involves. You may wish to consider of the sciences. Perspectives of the future are informed by under- coming to the conference on another day, but do find out about what standing the past, so John will weave into each issue a review of is happening! the recent past. As a champion of teachers of the sciences in the Themes/disciplines: new curricula UK and internationally, he recognises the strengths that teachers of Target audiences: all the sciences have and will have to develop to change. 30 years is a generation away. By that time, commercial science will be more in SE07 Higgs and the LHC: News from the Energy Frontier niche small enterprises, requiring both understanding and flexibility. Professor Jonathan Butterworth, Becky Parker Citizens who are not scientists will benefit from greater opportunities Organisation: Langton Star Centre to learn in communities and individually. New technologies will affect Email/web: http://cernatschool.web.cern.ch/ the role of the teacher away from dominant ‘the sage on the stage’ of 1600-1800 Arts LR5 today. The place of effective training for teachers and for research Professor Jon Butterworth will speak about the hunt for the Higgs Boson that identifies needs and productive methods of teacher learning and update the audience on the latest news from the LHC. This will be will be more important than ever. This vision for the future will be followed by a panel discussion on the CERN@school project. CERN@ practical, manageable and exciting. There will be ample opportunity school is a project that brings detector chips, developed at CERN, into for delegates to share their thinking too. the classroom, allowing pupils to carry out real nuclear and particle Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors physics research. The data from this project will all be available online ASE Books associated with this session: ASE Research Guide for any school to use. In this session, students from different schools who have taken part will be talking about their experiences, showcasing their projects and explaining the impact it has had on them. Themes/disciplines: practical science research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16

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Thursday 9 January SE08 Talking science education Chaired by Carol Willis , Chief Executive of the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) and Guest panellists Organisation: National network of Science Learning Centres, Wellcome Trust and The Royal Society Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1600-1800 Nuffield G17 Carol Willis chairs a debate on topical issues in science education. Carole Willis is the Chief Executive of the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). She was formerly the Director of Research and Analysis, and Chief Scientific Adviser, at the Department for Education. Carole’s background is in economics, and she has experience of working in a range of government departments, leading teams of professional analysts and policymakers, as well as the private sector. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors

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Friday 10 January Open Conference Timetable 09 55

'Pearson's Exploring Science: Working Scientifically', Mark Levesley, Series Editor

10 30

e-Bug educational resources, Dr Vicki Young, Public Health England

11 10

Educational Video Conferencing made simple, Richard Sedding, Janet Videoconferencing Services Manager, Jisc Collections and Janet and Paul Gross, JVCS content provider

12 10

The Challenge of Outdoor Education: A brief talk with some suggestions for the school garden and beyond. Free Organic pumpkin/squash/sweet corn/bean seeds available, Greg Klaes

12 50

Educational Video Conferencing made simple, Richard Sedding, Janet Videoconferencing Services Manager, Jisc Collections and Janet and Paul Gross, JVCS content provider.

13 10

Solar STEM after-school activities - Plugging into the sun, David Garlovsky, Solar-Active.com

13 50

Educational Video Conferencing made simple, Richard Sedding, Janet Videoconferencing Services Manager, Jisc Collections and Janet and Paul Gross, JVCS content provider.

14 30

CoDeS - Collaboration of schools and communities for sustainable development, Margaret Fleming, NAIGS member

14 50

Improving science attainment and engagement in multicultural schools, Melissa Butt, Silverdale School

15 10 Pearson's Exploring Science: Working Scientifically', Mark Levesley, Series Editor 15 30 The CLEAPSS Technician Training Programme, based in Leeds, find out more, Jane Nickless - CLEAPSS

Codes for Session Types BC Booked Course DI Drop-in Session FS Frontier Science SE Special Events T Talk/Discussion/ Demonstration W Workshop

All sessions in the Open Conference last 15 or 30 minutes. Several slots are still available; see the Open Conference manager on the stand (D1) to book your slot when you arrive at the conference.

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All Friday Sessions Booked Courses If you wish to book a Booked Course, please go to the Registration Desk in the Great Hall of the Aston Webb Building to check availability and venue details.

T044 ASE Research seminar series: Collaborative study in diagrams with a teacher-researcher group John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading 0930-1000 Muirhead Tower 118 We used Case Study with two research questions. A. What is the role of diagrams in learning science in schools? B. What particular contributions does a teacher-researcher group bring to elaboration of a research question and its exploration in the contexts of each individual member? A range of data from reports to literature reviews was collected. I will present data that refers specifically to collaborative work for carrying out research. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all W030 ASE Research seminar series: Ontological and epistemological tensions in the teaching and learning of school science investigations Prof Deb McGregor Organisation: Oxford Brookes University Email/web: dmcgregor@brookes.ac.uk 0930-1000 Muirhead Tower 113 This paper will explore ontological and epistemological dilemmas inherent in school science investigations. Different examples of ways that enquiries are carried out will be considered to illustrate how processes and outcomes vary depending on the teaching approach applied. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 FE/SFC ITE Advisors SE09 Biology in the real world: Mighty mitochondria Dr Daniel Tennant Organisation: The Physiological Society, the Biochemical Society and the British Pharmacological Society. Email/web: www.physoc.org 0930-1015 Biosciences 301 Mitochondria are cellular organelles that act as energetic hubs, integrating oxygen tension, cellular metabolism, and mitochondrial-dependent cell death (apoptosis). This talk will describe our current understanding of how oxygen levels and cellular metabolism are integrated by the mitochondria, and why preservation of mitochondrial metabolism, however abnormal, is central to cells staying viable. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Advisors

T045 “What’s a stragedy [sic]?” - Techniques, tactics and strategies for conceptual change in school science John-Paul Riordan Organisation: Canterbury Christ Church University Email/web: www.john-paul.org.uk 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G33 Conceptual change in children’s scientific thinking, learning methods and teaching strategies have each been extensively explored. In this complex context, how do science teachers help children get through different types of conceptual change? Detailed examination of Advanced Skills Teachers’ practice in science, investigates how they use teaching techniques to influence children’s conceptual change and learning methods. Complicated ‘strategic profiles’ emerge. Tactical and strategic ways in which each teacher uses teaching techniques when supporting children’s scientific learning are described. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 ITE SE10 A Key Stage 3 assessment model for the new curriculum (repeated Saturday 0930) Dr Andy Chandler-Grevatt Organisation: Consultant Assessment Expert for Oxford University Press Email/web: www.oup.com 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 121 The new KS3 curriculum has brought with it challenges for assessment. This session explores a flexible assessment model for the new curriculum that meets the needs of your department. This model has been adopted by OUP’s scheme Activate. The Assessment Editor will explain how you can ensure your pupils have a secure understanding of key concepts and are ready to progress from KS3. The model is adaptable for formative and summative approaches, and for those who wish to use levels, grades or comments. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: 11-14 W031 A-level Physics: Plan ahead with AQA Paul Duffy Organisation: AQA Email/web: www.aqa.org.uk 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 New specifications will be released in Spring 2014, for first teaching in 2015. This workshop session will allow Heads of Department, teachers and advisors to: - Plan ahead by getting first sight of the new specifications. - Try out some of the new question types. - Share ideas on practical tasks and assessment. - Meet the development team. - Sign up for preview copies of materials, so you can start trying them out in school. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC

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Friday 10 January W032 Beyond the atom: Particle Physics Greg Dick, Miles Hudson Organisation: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada Email/web: www.perimeterinstitute.ca 0930-1030 Physics West 103 Come learn how you can easily introduce secondary students to some of the fundamental ideas of particle physics. Participate in activities that engage your students in the journey from Rutherford scattering through to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 BC10 Do you upcycle? Thought-provoking sustainable core science for juniors Elena Setterfield Organisation: Sponsored by Henkel Ltd 0930-1030 Rubbish science is an intellectually exciting 2 year practical junior course that covers the fundamentals in Biology, Physics and Chemistry. It promotes exploratory and investigative science. The difference to conventional teaching is that materials, containers, magazines etc. are from school recycle bins. Sustainable, low costs practicals with a very low carbon footprint; but with a high level learning outcome. Innovative workshop run by Author (Elena Setterfield) Variety of practical tasks. Recommended for cost-cutting school budgets and deprived areas. Text book included. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 Technicians Advisors FS11 FS: Music of the Sun and stars Professor Bill Chaplin Organisation: School of Physics and Astronomy Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 When you look up at the sky on a clear night did you know that many of the twinkling stars are also playing a stellar symphony, just like musical instruments, which belies the true structure and nature of the stars? And that the Sun is also playing its own “stellar symphony”? In this talk I will describe how the study of this “music of the stars”, the field of asteroseismology, is leading to unprecedented insights, in particular for other stellar systems with newly discovered planets; and how the associated physics can be readily taught to schoolchildren. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS12 FS: What do we mean by chaos? Dr Chris Good Organisation: School of Mathematics Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 A dynamical system consists of a set of states (for example the size of a population or the position of the planets in a solar system) together with a rule (usually expressed as a function or a differential equation) that tells us how the states evolve with time. The term chaos is supposed to capture the idea that such systems might be very sensitive to initial conditions (the butterfly effect),

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so that even though a system is completely deterministic, longterm prediction is impossible. Lorenz expressed this eloquently, saying chaos is `when the present determines the future, but the approximate present does not approximately determine the future. In this talk we will try to put some of these ideas onto a firm mathematical footing. In the process we will look at Sharkovskii’s beautiful theorem relating the different periods of periodic points and see that even the simplest maps exhibit chaos. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all BC11 IDEA- Inquiry in Dye Electrohporesis Ingrid Miller, Sherri Andrews Organisation: Bio-Rad Laboratories Email/web: Explorer.bio-rad.com 0930-1030 Bio-Rad. IDEA Kit (1 hr) What’s in your candy? In this hands on workshop extract colorful food dyes from hard shell candy, separate and identify them using a STEM integrated do-it-yourself electrophoresis box. This inquiry based activity is a great way to introduce pipetting, electrophoresis, and solution making skills in addition to chemistry, physics and engineer¬ing concepts. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment using technology creatively research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians T046 Problem based learning course for prospective medical students Dr Vim Jesudason, Mrs Pauline Lowrie Organisation: Sir John Deane’s Sixth Form College Email/web: jesudason_v@sjd.ac.uk 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Problem based learning forms the basis of medical undergraduate teaching in a growing number of universities worldwide. This PBL course has been running at Sir John Deane’s Sixth form College for the past year involving lower and upper sixth groups. The lecture will give details of 1. Learning objectives 2. Learning outcomes 3. Tutorial structure 4. Role of the tutor 5. Materials required 6. Student Evaluation of the course Delegates will have the opportunity to work through an example problem. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC W033 Remember the egg race Geoff Auty Organisation: School Science Review Email/web: gnv.auty@gmail.com 0930-1030 Poynting Physics Lab P02 There have been many Science/Technology competitions, but the best remembered title is the Great Egg Race. Ideas will be offered (as described in “Primary Science” earlier this year) which can be adapted to suit ALL levels of education, to illustrate how short competitions using simple materials can be

Free resources at the Biology Stand Organised by NUCLEUS*, the Biology Stand (B10) will offer a wide range of free biology resources, practicals and more to enhance your lessons. Representatives of NUCLEUS will be on hand throughout the conference, so please visit us to find out more!

Biology in the Real World: Powering Life Our popular series of lectures returns on Friday 10 January in the Biosciences Building, Room 301 9:30

Mighty Mitochondria Dr Daniel Tennant, University of Birmingham

10:15 Waste into Energy Dr Angela Murray, University of Birmingham 11:30 Metabolism and Energy Balance Professor Julian Hamilton, University of Bristol 12:15 Natural selection as the power house of diversity: adaptation of form and behaviour to the environment Dr Susannah KS Thorpe, University of Birmingham 14:00 Life without Light Dr Rich Boden, Plymouth University 14:45 Drug Development: the unexpected role of plants Dr Alison Foster, University of Oxford 15:30 Plants and Pressure Dr Jeremy Prichard, University of Birmingham

Download the presentations from www.societyofbiology.org/bitrw or scan the QR code Join the discussion on twitter: #BITRW *NUCLEUS is a group of bioscience learned societies and similar not-for-profit organisations.

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Friday 10 January used to promote practical and thinking skills (and be good fun). Most time will be spent trying some items for yourself. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors T047 Science and cultural contexts (repeat) Christopher Parkin, Jane Essex Organisation: Universities of Keele and Worcester Email/web: j.e.essex@keele.ac.uk 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 Teachers’ Standards, OfSTED and exam boards expect cultural understanding (or equivalent) in Science lessons. Jane Essex (Keele University), Chris Parkin (Museum of History of Science), Phil Collins and Sue Howarth (both University of Worcester) provide curriculum-relevant examples of scientists and their ideas from beyond the Western world. Find out about the contributions of Chinese, Arabic, Islamic and other scientists to help broaden cross-cultural understanding and inclusion in your Biology, Chemistry and Physics lessons for students aged 11-16+ Themes/disciplines: new curricula ractical science international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors DI07 Successful subject leader networks Guest speakers Organisation: National network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B01 Our research and feedback from teachers consistently highlights their desires to share ideas and effective practice and be able to work together with their peers to continually improve, develop and support their practice. This workshop draws on examples of successful networks and looks at how science subject leader networks can be dynamic and self directed to meet the needs of members. Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 T048 Technically speaking: a guide to what’s going on for science technicians Simon Quinnell Organisation: ASE Laboratory Technicians Committee Email/web: s.quinnell@slcs.ac.uk 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 This interactive talk will discover what the ASE is doing for technicians including the RsciTech award and a preview of the ASE/NSLC National Technicians Conference. We will also have updates from SCORE and GATSBY on practical work and the latest in technician’s development along with other exciting news and information for science technicians. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: Technicians SE11 The Brenda Keogh Primary Science Keynote Lecture 2014: The new primary science curriculum: origins, changes, opportunities, issues Jane Turner, Liz Lawrence, Anne Goldsworthy, Marianne Cutler Organisation: ASE Primary Science Committee Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 0930-1030 Arts 120 Main LT

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When ASE Primary Science Committee members planned the conference Primary Programme for January 2014 it was easy to agree who should deliver the Opening Primary Keynote Lecture. Brenda Keogh, a hard working member of the committee, known across the world for innovative classroom materials such as Concept Cartoons, Active Assessment, Puppets and It’s Not Fair, as well as her influential research and CPD, had been nominated by ASE as an expert reviewer and writer for the new Primary National Curriculum for Science. During 2013 Brenda, along with Anne Goldsworthy, worked tirelessly to reshape the draft Programme of Study so that it represented ASE members combined experience and expertise in effective and exciting primary science teaching and learning. As a result the new Primary National Curriculum for science is a significantly improved document from the draft that was first published. It therefore was appropriate that Brenda Keogh should open the ASE Conference Primary Programme with a lecture to tell members and delegates about ASE’s role in shaping the curriculum, outline the influences on it and how it has change, describe the opportunities and issues that it presents for primary teachers and answer any questions. It was with deep sadness and shock that Primary Science Committee members and Brenda’s many, many friends in ASE and the science education community across the world heard of her untimely death from cancer in October. Brenda was an inspiration to all of those involved in primary science education. We all miss her terribly, and always will. The last conversation that Primary Science Committee members had with Brenda was a few days before she died and was about the primary conference programme. Brenda loved ASE conference. Primary Science Committee members and Brenda’s husband Stuart Naylor are delighted that from 2014 the Annual Primary Keynote lecture will be renamed the Brenda Keogh Primary Science Lecture and therefore become part of Brenda’s substantial legacy to primary science education. This year it will be delivered by ASE colleagues who worked closely with Brenda and will be about the new Primary Curriculum for Science, just as Brenda planned. In future years other ASE members who have had an influence in some way on primary education will be invited to present this prestigious lecture. In this way Brenda’s passion for primary science education, her love of ASE and her strong commitment to encouraging others will live on. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 BC12 Toys – Science, History and Technology Dr David Ward, Sarah Ward Organisation: The Greater Manchester STEM Centre Email/web: www.stemsalford.org 0930-1030 This session has run for a number of years – although it has evolved and developed since its inception. Toys demonstrate most scientific concepts and principles. Do children take toys as everyday objects? Can you enlighten them to think about how they are made? Our traditional toys are usually wooden, but as the industrial revolution happened we see a transformation to metal but only in the last 50 years has plastic dominated the non computer toys. Computer based toys is still a new world. One part of the session is devoted to the construction of a simple

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Friday 10 January wooden toy that illustrates the transfer of kinetic energy to movement and potential energy. Our organisation runs sessions in schools to get students to think science in their toys. Participants will receive a bag of toys to use back in school but hopefully with a fresh perspective. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 Technicians T049 Transition to Post 16 Science (and not just A level) Lorna Monroe, Frances Evans Organisation: 11-19 Committee Email/web: David.Swinscoe@candi.ac.uk 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 122 Too many students start their post 16 science course thinking they were good at science only to drop out or lose motivation in the first term. Either that or they are discouraged from pursuing a course in science because they think it will be too hard. This session aims to look at how we can attract students on the correct type of post 16 course in science, keep them motivated through innovative teaching and learning strategies and help them to manage the change. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC W034 Using the new technologies to enhance science teaching Dr Glenys Hart, Rosie Beach Email/web: Glenys.hart@googlemail.com 0930-1030 Learning Centre UG08 The session provides stimulating ideas and challenges which will motivate young people using the new technologies which are available at no cost and which a classroom practitioner can just “pick up” and take into the classroom. The course leaders have researched and cite examples of cutting edge schools across the world that are already employing these ideas including Googledocs, Skype, Tagxedo, Wordle and Twitter and explain how you too can access first class international (collaborative) c-CPD when you get back to school. Themes/disciplines: using technology creatively Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors T050 ASE Research seminar series: Do pre-service Secondary Science Teachers know what they are talking about? Jane Fieldsend, John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading 1000-1030 Muirhead Tower 118 We used a mixed methods based on written responses to GCSE questions, and individual audio recorded Think Aloud individual responses to GCSE questions. We had three research questions: A. How do pre-service science teachers perform on pupil assessments used at age 16+? B. Do specialists perform differently from non-specialists on questions used for pupil assessment at age 16+? C. What methods do these teachers use to answer such questions? Written responses indicate significant improvement by the end of

the one year course, compared with the start, and that the physical sciences graduates generally performed better than life sciences graduates, despite the better degrees of the latter. The Think Aloud method provided an insightful probe into what knowledge the graduates drew on while answering individual questions with some surprising results. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 T051 ASE Research seminar series: Science teachers’ access to physics-specific CPD: the current picture Anne Bowker Organisation: King’s College, London 1000-1030 Muirhead Tower 113 This research builds on the recommendation for STEM subjectspecific CPD in the Royal Society’s ‘State of the Nation’ reports, by developing the Teachers of Physics (ToP) survey to establish: A. What aspects of physics-specific CPD are identified by teachers of physics as important for their own professional development and how this relates to their background; and B. To what extent teachers believe their schools are able and inclined to resource or support these identified aspects. I used a double-Likert scale: for each questionnaire statement respondents rated both the importance of the statement and the degree to which they thought the statement was true for their school. There were also opportunities for teachers to add comments and give background information including degree subject, training, and length of service to provide context for analysis. The data was used to map ‘teacher-perceived needs’ against ‘school inclination and ability to resource teacher-perceived needs’ for different aspects of physics-specific CPD. Emergent patterns associated with demographics of teachers and schools were also explored. The analysed data, in turn, are being used to develop a tool for senior teachers to assess different professional development needs of the teachers in their school. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 SE12 Biology in the real world: Waste into energy Angela Murray Organisation: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)/ Society of General Microbiology (SGM)/ Microbiology in Schools Advisory Committee (MiSAC) Email/web: www.bbsrc.ac.uk/society 1015-1100 Biosciences 301 The Unit of Functional Bionanomaterials at Birmingham is a highly interdisciplinary team researching integrated, innovative ways of turning wastes from today’s society into energy and other high value products (such as supported nanoparticles, catalysts and bio-plastics). This talk will discuss several of the technologies currently under development; namely manufacture of biocatalysts from waste precious metals, production of clean hydrogen from food waste and the use of biominerals for wastewater remediation and their trial application to current real world problems. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 post 16

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Friday 10 January DI08 Outdoor Education Drop-In Session Dr Katharine Forsey Organisation: ASE Field Officer North of England and ‘Educate Everywhere’ Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1030-1130 Exhibition Marquee ASE stand DS2 Come and see me on the ASE stand (DS2) for advice on developing outdoor learning in your own settings, including teaching resources, apps, tips on managing groups outdoors, curriculum links/enrichment, links to numeracy, literacy, risk assessment and more! Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: all SE13 Timstar’s Bright Idea campaigns finalists Guest speaker Organisation: TIMSTAR Email/web: www.timstar.co.uk 1030-1200 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Over the last 10 months Timstar have been seeking innovative product ideas from science teachers and technicians. Inspiring young people to work scientifically. Entries will be regionally short-listed by Timstar’s curriculum panel of experts, and will present their ideas in front of Timstar’s curriculum panel of experts at the ASE annual conference before a winner is selected. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science W035 Forces: practical approach to the new curriculum Jenny Harvey Organisation: CIEC Promoting Science Email/web: www.ciec.org.uk 1100-1200 Arts LR5 Who would land first from a fall, Barbie or Ken? Why? Can air exert a force? What is upthrust? Why have my magnets lost their force? How strong is the force of water? In this workshop, you will work on some innovative ways to explore forces with primary children. You will also gain the background knowledge and understanding about forces. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 7-11 T052 Light – think it, talk it, be it, understand it Jason HardingOrganisation: London Borough of Enfield 1100-1200 Arts 201 In this session we will explore how several methods have been used to help pupils understand the concept light through a creative curriculum topic. Speaking as an expert, kinaesthetic models,modelling and written explanations will all be explored and explained. Participants will leave with a pack of resources and our teaching and learning cycle rational specifically related to the context of teaching ‘Light’. Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE Advisors

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T053 NAIGS day: Assessment Update Joanna Conn, Chair of NAIGS, Panel of guest speakers Organisation: National Advisers and Inspectors Group for science (NAIGS) Email/web: joanna.conn@hertscc.gov.uk 1100-1200 Nuffield G17 Pupils’ progress will need to be assessed in the new National Curriculum from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 3 without referring to levels. Our panel of science educators and practicing teachers will talk about the practicalities of how this assessment will occur without levels. You will be invited to ask questions and contribute to the discussion. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 Advisors W036 Primary Engineers Caroline Alliston, Kate Blacklock Organisation: Independent consultants 1100-1200 Arts LR2 In this practical workshop you will try out exciting design and build projects that can be used successfully in primary schools linking science and technology in Key Stages 2 and 3. The designs are made from cheap and recycled materials and include happy hovercraft, balloon buggies, teddy zip wires, CD racers, chair-o-planes and much more. Discover how these projects could run in your schools and take away the models you have made with free samples of instructions. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 Advisors T054 Self evaluation: Are we really outstanding in science? Shân Oswald, Lynn Henfield Organisation: Myscience/National Science Learning Centre Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1100-1200 Arts 120 Main LT Have you ever wondered how to use the process of self-evaluation effectively to really move your department forward? The Science Learning Centres have developed an online selfevaluation tool linked to the Ofsted framework and Teachers’ Standards to: • judge provision in a range of aspects • identify the next steps in developing those aspects • locate resources, CPD and ideas of how to move to the next step Come along and find out more! Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 Advisors T055 The Human Condition Project - using psychology in primary science Gareth Metcalfe, L Bianchi Organisation: AZSTT Primary Science Research & Innovation Hub Email/web: l.m.bianchi@shu.ac.uk 1100-1200 Arts LR4 This workshop provides insight into the Human Condition project. This project results from an AZSTT teacher secondment activity 2012-13 and is fascinating in the way it engaged Year 6 pupils as investigators of human activity and response within school. Working with Manchester Metropolitan University and

Royal Society Partnership Grants Explore new worlds Do you have a great idea for bringing science alive in schools? Grants of up to £3,000 are available for teachers and scientists or engineers to work together on exciting investigations for 5 – 19 year olds. For more information, please visit royalsociety.org/partnership or contact education@royalsociety.org or +44 20 7451 2574.

Image: The Hinotori spacecraft published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A, 1991. Registered Charity No 207043

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Friday 10 January Sheffield Hallam University Gareth Metcalfe (Bradshaw Hall Primary School) shares the outcomes of the project. Discussion time about the place for such activity within the new curriculum will be chaired by Dr Lynne Bianchi. Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 Advisors W037 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills Matt Endean Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 A chance to get hands on and try out new and interesting practical activities covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Many of these are based on the reduced scale principle. Also you can make your own equipment which you get to take back to school with you. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors BC13 Developing schemes of learning for the new Programme of Study in KS1&2 Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1100-1300 The new Programme of Study for Science at KS1&2 presents challenges and opportunities. This course will explore how ‘Working Scientifically’ can be integrated across topics and used to develop pupil participation and engagement. It also looks at ways of approaching some of the more challenging aspects, such as astronomy and evolution. Furthermore, in the absence of levels, it proposes how the development of learning outcomes can not only facilitate the tracking of progress but can inform effective planning and teaching. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE Advisors BC17 IOP: Electromagnetic Spectrum Nicky Thomas, Richard Bonella Organisation: Institute of Physics Email/web: www.iop.org/education 1100-1300 This is a hands-on workshop most suitable for anyone teaching the electromagnetic spectrum at KS4 or KS5. The workshop introduces strategies for teaching about the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio waves to x-rays, and practical activities, demonstrations, and computer resources to help you make the topic relevant and interactive for pupils. It will touch on aspects of medical physics and communications as well as some A level material. We will also discuss misconceptions and other teaching issues. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: post 16

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T056 ASE Research seminar series: Developing a Profiling Tool for Measuring the Impact of STEM Enrichment Programmes Wai Yi Feng Organisation: University of Cambridge, Faculty of Education 1130-1200 Muirhead Tower 118 This paper presents work-in-progress from a study that is developing: • a framework for understanding the impact of enrichment programmes from across STEM fields; and • a questionnaire instrument for measuring the impact of enrichment in its various forms, and thence, creating profiles of impact for a variety of enrichment programmes. As a result of work based on an extensive literature review, five types of positive impact on students were identified: • Support for learning in school; • Enhanced understanding of STEM topic(s)/discipline(s) linked to improved perceptions and attitudes; • Development of skills and learning processes; • Personal and social development; and • Insights into STEM-related study/careers leading to an increased likelihood of participation. The presentation will give insights into how the Likert-type questionnaire instrument has been generated to characterise impact of enrichment programmes. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) T057 ASE Research seminar series: How has SKE developed the trainees’ subject knowledge so that they are well prepared to teach their subject in the classroom? Jude Sanders Organisation: Hibernia College UK (HCUK) 1130-1200 Muirhead Tower 113 I use a case study approach to examine in detail the progress of trainees with ‘good’ degrees and third class degrees both in terms of their improving subject knowledge and evidence of their emerging skills in the classroom with a view to determining the impact of the reflective cycle approach for developing subject knowledge on trainees ability to teach their specialist subject. I have also used narrative research to formulate my learning as a teacher educator. Preliminary results show that trainee outcomes from these courses is good and produce a better than expected number of trainees graded good to outstanding in the classroom. Through designing and running this course I have gained new understandings about how to develop trainees’ critical reflection skills from simply descriptive evaluations of their teaching to analysing how and why they had an impact on pupils’ learning. More importantly I have learned more about how this ability can be transferred to trainees work in the classroom. I believe that many features of this approach are equally suited to the face to face context and should provide insights for colleagues both working in schools as mentors, ITT providers working in a Schools Direct context and HEI providers working in a traditional face to face environment. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years)

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Friday 10 January SE14 Biology in the real world: Metabolism and energy balance Professor Julian Hamilton-Shield Organisation: The Society for Endocrinology and the Wellcome Trust Email/web: www.endocrinology.org 1130-1215 Biosciences 301 Professor Julian Hamilton-Shield from the Bristol Biomedical Research Unit in Nutrition will describe energy balance and metabolism in the context of the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. The audience will hear the latest research into how the body uses sugar and why diabetes is becoming more common. The short and long term implications of the obesity epidemic in British children will also be discussed. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 T058 AQA: Supporting practical science Stella Paes Organisation: AQA 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G36 This session will outline expectations for GCSE practical work and suggest useful and motivating ways to develop and track your students’ practical competences at KS3. Let the assessment experts give you an insight into how you can use simple tools to support practical progress so that your students make a flying start at GCSE. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 THIS SESSION IS NOW ON THURSDAY AT 1400 IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING G36 T059 Building success in linear GCSE Janet Hallett, Laura Garcia Organisation: Hackney Learning Trust Email/web: janet.hallett@learningtrust.co.uk 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 This talk reflects on the positive outcomes of modular science in terms of in terms of inclusion and building success and motivation at the time of the introduction of broad and balanced science as a core subject. Now our task is to continue to promote high standards, inclusion and science for all in the new linear landscape. Come and find out how Hackney schools are approaching this new challenge to engage and motivate students and the opportunities it brings. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W038 Curved space-time in the classroom Greg Dick, Miles Hudson Organisation: Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Canada Email/web: www.perimeterinstitute.ca 1130-1230 Physics West 103 Bring Einstein’s curved space-time model for gravity into your classroom using tape and balloons to explain free fall and predict time dilation, as observed in GPS calculations. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16

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T060 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for KS3 Jamie Buchanan-Dunlop, Debbie Winton Organisation: Digital Explorer Email/web: digitalexplorer.com 1130-1230 Arts LT3 You will hear from marine scientists and experts and learn how to bring science from the extremes to life in your classroom. Two free units of work – one on the Arctic and the other on Coral Reefs, will be the basis for an exploration on using technology in the classroom, simple practical experiments for specialists and virtual diving for the classroom as well as how to video conference with explorers. Preview the resources at http://oceans.digitalexplorer. com/resources, and learn directly from expedition team members. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 Advisors T061 EARTH SCIENCE: Amazing planet – action-packed classroom science Elizabeth Devon, Peter Kennett and Chris King Organisation: Earthlearningidea 1130-1230 BioSciences NG08 When we asked ourselves, ‘How can we bring our wide range of Earthlearningidea activities in a dynamic interactive way to the largest possible audience at the ASE conference?’ – the lecturetheatre presentation of ‘Amazing planet – action-packed science’ idea was born – with you as an interactive audience. Will this be successful? How many lecture-sized practical ideas for teaching about the Earth can we squeeze into 60 minutes? How will you be involved? Come and find out for yourselves. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 ITE Advisors T062 EARTH SCIENCE: Detecting earthquakes and nuclear explosions Dr Cyril Isenberg Organisation: University of Kent 1130-1230 Physics West 117 LT The science of seismology is just over 100 years old. In this time the study of seismic waves has enabled us to determine the solid-liquid-solid structure of the earth and a method of exploring for minerals in the earth’s surface. Seismic waves enables us to detect underground nuclear explosion and to distinguish them from earthquakes. Seismometers have been set up on the Moon and Mars to determine their internal structure. This is a demonstration lecture. Themes/disciplines: practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC ITE FS13 FS: Getting small blood cells through small gaps: What could go wrong? Professor Gerald Nash Organisation: Clinical and Experimental Medicine, MDS 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Red and white blood cells are small compared to cells of all other tissues, allowing them to flow through the body’s smallest blood vessels (capillaries). White cells must also be able to migrate through the vessel wall to fight infection. Specific mechanical responses underlie these capabilities. Abnormalities in red cell

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Friday 10 January mechanics contribute to two of the world’s most burdensome blood disorders, sickle cell disease and malaria. In the case of white cells, changes in structure can impair ability to transit capillary beds, and abnormal adhesion to vessels underlies development of atherosclerotic disease. The mechanistic studies described seek to identify ways to modify responses for therapeutic benefit. Themes/disciplines: research into practice

Demonstration of why ticker timers should be consigned to history. Get more from your time with time and motion. Less time making it work, more time showing why. More practical for less time, better results for less apparatus, better learning from focused teaching. Themes/disciplines: practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16

FS14 FS: Getting to the root of the problem: using maths to feed the world Rosemary Dyson Organisation: School of Mathematics, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 If we can understand how a plant grows, we can create plants which will grow more effectively in challenging environments (for example under drought conditions). However, as with any biological system, this is extremely complex which is where mathematical modelling comes in! We will talk about using modelling to generate insights into the mechanical aspects of plant growth, drawing analogies with everyday items such as balloons and springs to represent different parts of a plant root. Themes/disciplines: research into practice

SE15 OCR Special event 2 Dr Yan Wong Organisation: Evolutionary biologist and presenter of the BBC series ‘Bang goes the theory’ 1130-1230 Haworth 101 Themes/disciplines: developing assessment Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) ASE Books associated with this session:

FS15 FS: Nuclear Energy: What is the Future for the UK? Professor Martin Freer Organisation: School of Physics and Astronomy 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering G29 The UK is about to embark on the construction of a new generation of nuclear power stations. This talk will explore the arguments for and against nuclear power, the nature of the technology and future options in terms of new generation reactors. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) T063 How to complete your Rsci, RSciTech and CSciTeach application and CPD record John Lawrence Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 121 Have you ever thought about applying for registered or chartered status but didn’t know where to start? This session is for technicians and teachers. Members of the Registration Board will be on hand to help you understand the requirements and complete the application form. Or have a go beforehand and bring along your draft to update during the session and save time! Similarly this drop in workshop is for anyone unsure of how to complete their CPD record online. Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors W039 Mechanics and Advanced Mechanics. Time, speed acceleration and momentum in an hour! Barry Hawkins, Organisation: Data Harvest 1130-1230 Nuffield G18

T064 Reduced Scale Science – A new way to improve practical work Bob Worley, Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1130-1230 BioSciences lab 204 Practical procedures for pupils using conventional equipment are often time-consuming and left out of teaching, consequently lowering pupil expectations of secondary school science. Smallscale chemistry is quick, saves on chemicals and offers variety in presentation. The course covers indicators, precipitation, salt preparation, reaction kinetics, iron/sulfur reactions, working with toxic gases and carrying out small-scale vigorous reactions. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors T065 The structure triangle: a periodic table which includes compounds Dr Keith Ross Email/web: www.scienceissues.org.uk 1130-1230 BioSciences 201 The periodic table lists the elements but the world is made up mostly of compounds. By looking at all possible combinations of elements a simple system arises for understanding the structure of elements and compounds. The ‘structure triangle’ develops just 5 different ways materials can be bonded: metals, volatiles, life-polymers, rocks and ionic, and provides a much neater and comprehensive system than the simple solid, liquid and gas classification we often use. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 ITE T066 Wonderfully helpful animation to develop understanding in organic chemistry Roger Frost Organisation: “Roger Frost’s Organic Chemistry” Email/web: chemistry@rogerfrost.com 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 112 This demonstration offers a fast tour of lots of animation to teach organic chemistry. You will see ways to develop understanding of

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Friday 10 January isomerism; mechanisms; inductive effects; NMR and pretty much everything for ages 16-18, You will see challenging animation that is also enjoyably easy to use. You will also see a resource that is perfect for International courses and GCSE, IGCE, IB or GCE. Themes/disciplines: new curricula using technology creatively Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC ITE T067 ASE Research seminar series: A case study of teachers’ thinking about diagrams Laura Vogliotti,PALAVA, John Oversby, Institute of Education, Organisation: University of Reading 1200-1230 Muirhead Tower 113 After a preliminary questionnaire, a semi-structured interview was used to collect data on these questions: A. How do teachers use diagrams? B. What is the role of diagrams in basic chemical education? Results show that teachers consider diagrams useful: • to enhance teachers’ and students’ working abilities • to overcome communication problems since they are based on visual language rather than on written words • to overcome the difficulties connected to the use of scientific language • to promote a positive attitude towards knowledge because they represent a more practical approach to theory • to understand concepts and to promote learning • to enhance memory The interviews pointed out that teachers don’t make great use of diagrams as teaching tools: they use them to summarize or to revise concepts, but they prefer a traditional lecture with dominance of text, rather than approaching the topic directly through the diagram. We will discuss why this is. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) T068 ASE Research seminar series: Fifteen year old London school students’ perceptions and experiences of their physics education Tamjid Mujtaba, Michael Reiss and Ann Hodgson Organisation: Institute of Education, University of London, London LearningforLondon@IOE 1200-1230 Muirhead Tower 118 Within England and many other industrialised countries (e.g. Australia, France, USA), there is a concern in education policy circles about the low rates of progression into further and higher education in the sciences with a recognition, in particular, that females still lag behind males in participation in post-compulsory education physics courses. Despite a requirement for all girls and boys to be taught the sciences till the end of compulsory education, girls are less likely to continue with physics in postcompulsory education. The analysis within this paper draws on data on the experiences of 15 year olds of their physics education across schools in the UK. The data were collected within the Understanding Participation Rates in Mathematics and Physics project, In this summary we report some differences between girls and boys and how students are more positive about their physics education in year 8 (age thirteen) than when they are in year 10 (age fifteen). We found that the encouragement individual students receive from their teachers was a key factor associated with aspirations to continue with physics for both thirteen and fifteen year

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olds. Within the London-based analysis, girls were as positive as boys about some aspects of their perceptions of physics education. These will be further discussed in our presentation. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 T069 NAIGS day: Ofsted Update - Maintaining Curiosity Brian Cartwright, National Advisor for Science, Organisation: OfStEd 1200-1300 Nuffield G17 Brian Cartwright, National Advisor for Science, will present the latest examples of best practice in science education collected during subject inspections of primary and secondary schools. SE16 Biology in the real world: Natural selection as the power house of diversity Dr Susannah Thorpe Organisation: The British Ecological Society and the Association for Study of Animal Behaviour Email/web: http://www.biosciences-labs.bham.ac.uk 1215-1300 Biosciences 301 Humans, along with chimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans are great apes. We share many anatomical and behavioural similarities with our ape cousins, but there are also significant differences, many of which are associated with the evolution of our unique form of locomotion, bipedalism. The other great apes are, for example, many times stronger than even the strongest humans but we are the only great ape to be able to hold a pencil between our thumb and index finger or to be able to play the piano. In this seminar we will explore some of the key similarities and differences among the apes and reveal how these relate to the evolution of locomotion. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE

W040 Investigating and identifying wildlife in the school grounds Lynette Merrick, Organisation: Gatekeeper Educational Ltd. Email/web: www.gatekeeperel.co.uk 1230-1330 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 The complete package of how to carry out Science Projects using common UK wildlife. Objectives, equipment, organisation, sampling, identifying, recording, using ICT and art and analysis of results. Delegates will receive sets of Pupil’s Activity sheets related to the Projects and be able to choose a free Gatekeeper Wildlife Identification Guide from a selection of eleven titles. A.Planning National Curriculum Science investigations of land and water invertebrates in the school grounds or local environment. B. Mastering the steps to easy wildlife identification. C. Reinforcing learning by encouraging pupils to record their findings from investigations through their own drawings, paintings and wildlife sculptures. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: Gatekeeper Educational Ltd.

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Friday 10 January A3 laminated Identification Guides of common UK wildlife. Eleven titles of plant and animal life. DI09 Primary Pop-Up Steve Marshall, Organisation: PSQM Email/web: stevethedoc@hotmail.com 1230-1330 Arts LR5 A new style format. Meet the writers of some recent Primary Science articles, meet some names of Primary Science, lots of window shopping opportunities, chances to try a variety of activities, a wealth of inspiration, come for 5 minutes, come for the hour. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 ASE Books associated with this session: It’s not fair or is it? Be safe! Primary handbook SE17 Biology in the real world: Life without light Rich Boden Organisation: The Linnean Society of London Email/web: www.linnean.org 1400-1445 Biosciences 301 Dr Rich Boden was the first UK scientist to enter Movile Cave, Romania in 2010. This is one of the most fascinating and unique ecosystems on Earth. The cave has no natural entrance and yet is full of living organisms from Bacteria and Archaea up to large Eukarya. Without light, all primary productivity in the Cave is based on chemosynthesis and is performed by vast “mats” of microbes which float on the groundwaters of the Cave’s submerged galleries. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC T070 Achieving fabulous primary science Guest speakers Organisation: Wellcome Trust Email/web: www.wellcome.ac.uk 1400-1500 Arts LR2 Young people tell us that good science teaching inspires them to continue learning science. How do schools achieve success in science? How can schools make sure science skills are up to date and leadership of science is fresh and inspiring? Do you need to be an expert – or just passionate? Join us to discuss research and case studies that explore how our workforce is used to its best advantage. Is there one model which is better than all the others? Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 SE18 ASE Presidential Address Professor Alice Roberts, ASE President Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1400-1500 University Centre Avon Room Alice, in her Presidential Address at ASE’s conference, will be taking the long view of teaching and sharing ideas. Alice comments,

“We are very good at copying, and learning from others. However, while many animals learn from each other, teaching seems to be a uniquely human attribute.” Alice will examine the earliest evidence for teaching and she says “look at how teaching involves an exceptional ability for “mind reading”. We live in an amazing era where ideas can be shared more quickly and more widely than ever before. We shouldn’t be afraid of technology rewiring our brains - the technology we produce is (and always has been) part of the environment that we adapt to. Our hands have been shaped by the invention of stone tools. Our brains will be shaped by the way we share ideas with each other. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors DI10 Developing literacy skills in science Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 121 KS4 science courses involve students in producing extended written responses and for this to be successful approaches need to be embedded in KS3. This workshop features a number of practical classroom strategies to support students in producing written outcomes that are both more detailed and of higher quality. Participants will be encouraged to try these out, discuss their impact and take details away to enable them to use the approaches in their own lessons. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 ITE Advisors T071 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for Primary Jamie Buchanan-Dunlop, Dr Helen Findlay Organisation: Digital Explorer Email/web: digitalexplorer.com 1400-1500 Arts LT3 You will hear from marine scientists and experts and learn how to bring science from the extremes to life in your classroom. Two free units of work – one on the Arctic and the other on Coral Reefs, will be the basis for an exploration on using technology in the classroom, simple practical experiments for specialists and non-specialists as well as how to video conference with explorers. Preview the resources at http://oceans.digitalexplorer.com/ resources, and learn directly from expedition team members. Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus Target audiences: 7-11 Advisors DI11 Edexcel A level Science 2015 update Damian Riddle Organisation: Senior Product Manager - A level Sciences, Pearson Edexcel 1400-1500 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Information on the progress of the re-development of our science qualifications, including AS and A levels in Biology, Chemistry and Physics for 2015. This is an opportunity to ask questions about the re-development and timeline. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: post 16

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Friday 10 January W041 Electrical data logging Barry Hawkins Organisation: Data Harvest 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Classic physics practical made simple. Physics tells us what happens, but far too often the practical undermines the teachng, with appropriate controlled kit get results that match the teaching. Gain time to extend the learning. Themes/disciplines: practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W042 Embracing spoken language in the primary science curriculum Tanya Shields, Debbie Eccles Organisation: Primarily Science 1400-1500 Arts LR8 ‘The National Curriculum for science reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum – cognitively, socially and linguistically.’ This practical workshop outlines how to develop children’s scientific language through speaking and listening activities in science lessons. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors W043 ESERO-UK: Using space in primary science Tom Lyons, Allan Clements Organisation: ESERO UK Email/web: www.esero.org.uk 1400-1500 Arts LR4 ESERO-UK (aka the UK Space Education Office) uses space as a context for teaching Science Technology Mathematics and Engineering subjects. ESERO-UK are working with primary schools to assess the impact on students’ engagement and enjoyment of STEM subjects, and awareness of STEM careers. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 7-11 T072 NAIGS day: Curriculum - Primary Update Zoë Crompton, Nicola Beverley, Joanna Conn, Chair of NAIGS Organisation: National Advisers and Inspectors Group for science (NAIGS) Email/web: Z.Crompton@education.leeds.ac.uk 1400-1500 Nuffield G17 The National Curriculum has been constant in primary science for 14 years and it’s time for a change. This session will highlight what’s in and what’s out of the new programme of study for Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 and the implications in terms of transition for Key Stage 3. Primary Science Consultants and Advisers will lead a discussion of how to support schools to implement the new programmes of study in a topic/theme based ‘creative curriculum’. We’ll also discuss what the new curriculum will look like in the classroom. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors

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T073 SAILS – assessment of science inquiry Chris Harrison Organisation: Kings College London Email/web: Sails-projsct.eu 1400-1500 Arts 201 Effective learning requires that students link and connect ideas while looking for abstractions and reflecting on alternatives (diSessa & Minstrell, 1995; Linn et ah, 1994a, b). Tests often provide a very idiosyncratic or incomplete assessment of this skill. (Linn 1995). Given this complexity, researchers are calling for assessments that require sustained work, engage students as both investigators and critics, and align performance with expectations for success in the field. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment practical science research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 W044 EARTH SCIENCE: Interactive Earth science for the new KS2 curriculum Elizabeth Devon, Peter Kennett and Chris King Organisation: ESEU/ESTA 1400-1530 Arts LR5 How can you teach the Earth science content of the new KS2 science curriculum, making sure it is appropriate for Year 3 pupils? Our ESEU workshop offers a range of interactive practical activities that have been tried and tested through ESEU’s primary workshops across the UK. These not only help you to develop your own understanding of the KS2 Earth science content – but involve you in ‘off the shelf’ activities that you could easily use in your classroom next week. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 ITE Advisors BC14 Microbiology for primary-small and clever! Anita Ives, Elena Setterfield Organisation: Dane Court Grammar School 1400-1530 Hands on practical ideas to use in the classroom, including spore prints, growing fungi, and making a winogradsky column- also the spread of microbes, the bodies defences and how to catch them. We share our classroom knowledge and enthusiasm to stimulate children’s interest in microbes, using inexpensive everyday items to create fascinating practical tasks. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus Target audiences: 7-11 Technicians Advisors W045 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills Matt Endean Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 A chance to get hands on and try out new and interesting practical activities covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Many of these are based on the reduced scale principle. Also you can make your own equipment which you get to take back to school with you. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors

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Friday 10 January W046 Biology Practicals that Work – hands-on drop-in session Dan Jenkins Organisation: Science and Plants for Schools Email/web: Saps@hermes.cam.ac.uk 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 Looking for reliable new biology practicals? We’ve got a lab full of ideas for you, with engaging and affordable practicals on a range of key curriculum topics. We’ll be troubleshooting your old favourite practicals, and introducing new ones developed over the last year. Whether you stay for 10 minutes or two hours, inspiration is guaranteed! Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians BC15 IOP: Toys for Forces Helen Reynolds, John Roden Organisation: Institute of Physics Email/web: www.iop.org/education 1400-1600 In these sessions you will have a chance to explore ways to make the teaching of forces fun by using toys and everyday objects. It will introduce the idea of ‘using force spectacles’ and also give you an opportunity to think about common misconceptions about forces and ways to address them. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 DI12 Practical microbiology: eats, soils and leaves Dr John Grainger Organisation: Microbiology in Schools Advisory Committee (MiSAC) Email/web: www.misac.org.uk 1400-1600 BioSciences lab 202 ‘Cheap and cheerful’ microbiology practicals for secondary level using microscopical and selective culture methods for studying protists, fungi and bacteria from natural sources such as plant leaves, soil, and hay infusions. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians ASE Books associated with this session: Topics in Safety 3rd edition 2001 BC16 Success with STEM Sue Howarth, Linda Scott Organisation: University of Worcester Email/web: s.howarth@worc.ac.uk 1400-1600 Do you want to improve your department’s capacity to offer students exciting and enriching science experiences? We will explain, in an interactive way: why STEM matters in schools and the role of a STEM Coordinator; how to enhance and enrich Science lessons; how to start and extend a STEM/Science Club; how to embed Science careers information in lessons; where to find funding, resources and ideas for practical activities. We will also give you a recently published book ‘Success with STEM’ Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Technicians Advisors

W047 Teaching resources for particle physics: particle detectors Dr Lynne Long, Dr Cristina Lazzeroni Organisation: University of Birmingham Email/web: c.lazzeroni@bham.ac.uk 1400-1600 Physics West 103 This is an opportunity to collect data using a cloud chamber and a cosmic telescope, to perform real physics experiments that can be repeated in a classroom. The experiments involve radioactive decays, and the detection of cosmic rays, and include statistical data analysis and a comparison with predictions based on calculations. Both sets of equipment are available for short term loans for local UK schools. There will be also an opportunity to discuss how schools may build their own cloud chamber. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Advisors T074 Developing expertise in teaching organic chemistry David Everett, Mark Leahy Organisation: Royal Society of Chemistry Email/web: www.rsc.org/education 1400-1700 BioSciences lab E204 Participants will: • appreciate the ‘thread’ of key ideas crucial to students’ understanding of organic chemistry • learn about some of the ‘misconceptions’ that can arise when teaching this topic and explore ways of dealing with them in the classroom • try out a range of engaging and relevant practicals and demonstrations • share views about effective strategies for supporting and enhancing the teaching and learning of organic chemistry • learn more about the range of resources and support available from the RSC Themes/disciplines: practical science T075 Evaluating your department - workshop Alastair Gittner, John Charlesworth Organisation: ASE 11 – 19 Committee Email/web: jcharlesworth@sibfordschool.co.uk 1430-1600 Mechanical Engineering G26 This workshop will look at the benefits of department evaluation and examine some of the techniques used drawing on the experience of members of the 11-19 committee. The workshop will allow delegates to share their experiences and allow time to look consider and try out some practical ideas. Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Advisors SE19 Biology in the real world: Drug development - the unexpected role of plants Dr Alison Foster Organisation: Science and Plants for Schools,Oxford Botanic Garden Email/web: www.saps.org.uk 1445-1530 Biosciences 301 Dr Alison Foster shares her experience from the pharmaceutical industry and the world of plant science. We all know how many

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Friday 10 January common drugs were originally sourced from plants - but what role do plants play in the discovery, development and testing of new medicines today? Why do plants produce chemicals that have such dramatic effects on the human body? And could drugs of the future be grown in genetically engineered plants? Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 T076 IOP: The Physics of Music Christopher Embrey Organisation: IOP Email/web: ceembrey@yahoo.co.uk 1500-1700 Poynting Physics P02 This talk, with practical demonstrations, will explore the physics behind musical sounds in stringed, pipe and percussion instruments. Ideas of isochronous vibrations and standing waves will be developed to explain how different instruments can be played. We will explore how using the higher (harmonic) frequencies leads to the distinctive ‘timbre’ we associate with each instrument, as well as the historical development of ‘equal temperament’ in keyboard instruments. Involving members attending, the session will end with a short challenge, and a prize for the winning entry! Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 SE20 Biology in the real world: High pressure plants Dr Jeremy Pritchard Organisation: Society of Biology/Society for Experimental Biology Email/web: www.societyofbiology.org/education 1530-1615 Biosciences 301 Plants and pressure Plants are often seen as seen as boring in comparison ‘exciting’ animals so this presentation presents plant as dynamic hydraulic machines. A range of pressure driven processes in plants are presented. The underlying osmotic mechanisms are touched on. With the help of the audience we see what pressures human lungs can generate lungs and compare these to pressurised systems in everyday life and in plants. The ways in which high pressure plant systems such as the phloem transport pathway can protect themselves from damage in a similar way to the clotting of Blood is presented as well as the circulation system in plants which through the xylem and regulated by the stomata, moves sap around the plant. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC T077 Assessment in primary science: meeting the new challenges Derek Bell, Campanula Consulting and Wynne Harlen, ASE Past President Organisation: Campanula Consulting Email/web: derek@campanulaconsulting.co.uk 1530-1630 Arts 120 Main LT The arrangements for assessment in primary science are changing. The government have consulted and the clear message is that schools are to develop their own approaches for formative assessment, recording and reporting pupil progress. Building on the work reported last year on a model for assessment in primary

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science, this session will reflect on the new environment and explore how existing good practice can be built on to support high quality teaching and learning but at the same time meet external requirements. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors W048 Developing enquiry skills within the new primary curriculum Nicky Waller Organisation: CIEC Promoting Science Email/web: www.ciec.org.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR5 In this session you will develop a greater awareness of the new age appropriate standards of expectation embedded within ‘Working Scientifically’. You will use familiar children’s stories and engaging contexts from CIEC Promoting Science to plan whole school themes whereby all year groups have expected progress clearly outlined, ensuring adequate challenge and progression from Early Years to Year Six. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 W049 Get out! Naomi Hiscock Organisation: Primary Science Education Consultancy Email/web: www.primary-science.co.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR2 Within the new curriculum there is a greater focus on children learning beyond the classroom boundaries. This session will explore the strategies used by teachers to encourage this. The ideas and resources that will be shared have been developed and trialled by teachers from inner city London schools as part of a project funded by AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 7-11 W050 Planning for the new primary science curriculum Debbie Eccles, Hester Binge Organisation: Primarily Science Email/web: info@primarilyscience.co.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR8 This workshop aims to help teachers identify the changes to the primary science curriculum from September 2014 with practical guidance on implementing the changes in their schools. Both single age and mixed age planning will also be addressed in the workshop. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors W051 Putting the WOW factor into the new primary curriculum Wendy Precious, Mary Darby Organisation: Entrust Email/web: wendy.precious@entrust-ed.co.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR4 Are you inspired with the new curriculum? This practical workshop looks at developing children’s curiosity and understanding

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Friday 10 January of some of the Science in the new primary curriculum. See the extraordinary in the ordinary and get children working and thinking scientifically. Minds-on, hands-on. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE DI13 Teachmeet secondary Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1530-1700 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 It is an informal and enjoyable gathering of those curious about teaching and learning. Anyone can share great ideas they’ve trialled in their classrooms, a teaching resource they love, a great website, a classroom activity - whatever you like! You can ask questions or simply turn up to soak up all the great ideas and enthusiasm. It is about being engaged and inspired by our immediate colleagues and gaining a lot of networking to boot! You can just come along and be a member of the audience if you like, you can give a two minute nano-presentation on one of your favourite science teaching ideas, or you can give a seven minute micro-presentation on an aspect of classroom science teaching.

You don’t have to be an ASE member, but if you’re not, we might try to persuade you to join! As the Teachmeet is being held in a room in the Exhibition Marquee you need to go to the Registration desk to register for the free exhibition only. This will give you the opportunity to visit the exhibitors and see what the Annual conference involves. You may wish to consider coming to the conference on another day, but do find out about what is happening! Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: all T078 AQA: Supporting mathematics in science Stella Paes Organisation: AQA 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering G36 This session will address many of the concerns linked to the use and application of Mathematics in Science. Working with the ASE and teachers we believe we have pinned this down! Come and find out more about the development of this important resource for teachers.

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Friday 10 January Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors THIS SESSION IS NOW ON THURSDAY AT 1600 IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING G36

introduction to a Caribbean case study on the impact of water quality and pollution. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 14-16 Advisors

T079 Developing talk at KS4 Jo Horlock, Jo Moules Organisation: Millgate House Education Email/web: www.millgatehouse.co.uk 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 113 Discussion is an important element of science teaching from KS1 to KS3, but why does it have to stop? We’ll consider ways of engaging students with talk to highlighting misconceptions, for formative assessment, and saving time with things that are already well understood. Stimulus materials are important factors in getting the more reluctant to express themselves. We will look at some new resources and more familiar ones, think about how to use them and have some fun on the way. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors

SE20 EARTH SCIENCE: ESTA/ESEU Distinguished speaker: Devastating earthquakes James Jackson, FRS Organisation: Professor of Active Tectonics and Head of Bullard Laboratories, Department of Earth Sciences, Cambridge University 1600-1700 BioSciences NG08 High-profile earthquakes in the last decade have revealed that rich nations have become very resilient in terms of loss-of-life, while much smaller earthquakes have killed up to 30% of urban populations in countries that are far less well prepared. This contrast is related to wealth, development and education, but also to the geological setting and the nature of the hazard involved. This talk will examine what is behind the sombre conclusion that ‘the rich pay and the poor die’. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors

T080 Digital Explorer Ocean Science for GCSE Jamie Buchanan-Dunlop, Dr Ceri Lewis Organisation: Digital Explorer Email/web: digitalexplorer.com 1600-1700 Arts LT3 Part subject-knowledge update, part exploration of free resources, this session will help you bring the latest ocean science to your classroom. Participants will hear from an Arctic researcher and have access to GCSE resources based on recently published science on the impact of carbon dioxide on the polar ecosystem. There will also be a brief introduction to coral reef ecology and

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FS16 FS: Air in the Age of the City Rob Mackenzie Organisation: Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG5 “The city” defines an increasingly large part of the 21st-century human condition. The creation unlocked by urban living is dazzling. It is like having tens of thousands of giant Hollywood

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Friday 10 January A-listers astride the planet, tens of thousands of Clark Gables, say. According to many of his co-stars, and to his legions of fans, Clark Gable was the most attractive man who ever lived. But by some, no doubt apocryphal, accounts, Gable had very bad breath; by all accounts – and as measured by our modern chemical sensors – the breath of contemporary cities stinks. Who would kiss Marylebone Rd in London, or Broad St, Birmingham, and taste the nitrogen dioxide and particulate concentrations so high they contribute more to mortality in the UK today than environmental tobacco smoke or road traffic accidents? In all likelihood this planet will have to carry 8-10 billion people sometime in this century. Cities are our best hope for accommodating so many people, but cities will fail ultimately if we don’t investigate the processes underlying the functioning of these super-systems. There’s a lot of detailed and complicated work to undertake, and I will discuss some of the recent work from Birmingham and elsewhere that begins to fit the pieces of the puzzle together. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS17 FS: How do we tackle the epidemic of liver disease in the UK? David Adams Organisation: Immunity and Infection, MDS Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1600-1700 Aston Webb WG12 Deaths from liver disease are increasing sharply in the UK driven by dangerous levels of drinking, a marked rise in obesity and diabetes and a persisting high prevalence of viral hepatitis. This lecture will address this problem explaining how different environmental risk factors can lead to liver cirrhosis and showing how understanding the molecular pathology of liver disease can lead to new treatments. Finally we will discuss how changing the individual’s behaviour can reduce the risk of developing liver disease thereby reducing the prevalence within the community. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all W052 IOP: Investigative Practical Work through the Extended Project Qualification Dr Elizabeth Swinbank, Dr John Taylor Organisation: Institute of Physics Email/web: www.iop.org/education 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 112 The level 3 Extended Project Qualification (EPQ), equivalent to 0.5 of an A-level, is fast growing in popularity. It gives students the opportunity to explore a topic of their own choosing, and develop a range of research, critical thinking and communication skills. An EP involving a practical investigation or field study makes an excellent complement to A-level work in the sciences. This session will look at ways of implementing EPQs in schools with case studies as exemplars, as well as sample projects. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment practical science Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC

T081 Physics Demos with Maximum Impact Neil Monteiro Email/web: www.neilmonteiro.com 1600-1700 Poynting Physics Small Lecture theatre In this talk, we’ll not only see the most awe-inspiring demonstrations in Physics but also delve into what makes a demo most effective. We’ll look at how to design an effect to amaze an audience, inspire them or provoke thought – and we’ll see how that affects the physics communicated too. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians W053 Project based learning in FE - improving outcomes for STEM students Guest speaker Organisation: Next Steps in STEM Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/nat/STEMfe 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering B04 Employers say they want confident young people that are able to manage sideways, sensitively critique each others’ work and be proactive when approaching problems. Project based learning methodologies are not new but Myscience has been trialling an inspiring version developed in San Diego by the charter chain High Tech High. High Tech High does all of its teaching through project work. We have trialled this approach in five colleges with help from the Innovation Unit that brought the methodology to the UK. Based on the experiences of the colleges, this session gives an overview of the methodology and what we have discovered during the pilot phase Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC T082 Project-based learning developments at School 21 Julian Clarke, Heather Birtwistle Organisation: Julian Clarke Enterprises Ltd Email/web: julian@jcent.co.uk 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 122 This talk will provide an opportunity to hear how Project Based Learning has been implemented in science at School 21, a free school which opened in Newham, London in 2012. The session will explore the principles behind project based learning and how these link to the ethos of the school. There will be an opportunity to hear about some of the projects which have been carried out by pupils, the difficulties that were encountered along the way and how these were overcome. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 Advisors T083 Science and food production Dr Kostas Gkatzionis Organisation: University of Birmingham & Institute of Food Science & Technology – IFST Email/web: www.ifst.org 1600-1700 BioSciences E102 School students need to be encouraged to consider entering higher education in the food area and subsequently entering the food profession. Teachers need to be aware of the science of food so that they can use food examples to illustrate their teaching and

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Friday 10 January also be aware of the career opportunities in the food profession. This presentation explains (to non-scientists) how cutting-edge research in microbiology, molecular biology, chemistry, physics, sensory, is utilised in the production of everyday foods. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 Technicians DI14 Supporting effective teaching and learning: science subject leaders Guest speakers Organisation: National Network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1600-1700 Mechanical Engineering B01 Myscience, through the network of Science Learning Centres and the National STEM Centre supports teachers throughout their career. This session will look at how we can support those who are in post already as a head of department, or those who are aspiring to move into a leadership role with their school or college. You will have the opportunity to discuss with those involved in the delivery of our “New and Aspiring Heads of Science” course and previous participants. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 BC18 Things that Fly Dr David Ward, Rik Whittaker Organisation: The Greater Manchester STEM Centre Email/web: www.stemsalford.org 1600-1700 The session offers ideas to make simple things that fly. The models are ideal for quick short inputs for STEM Clubs and lesson stretchers. The paper and card models are included in a collection of templates that build up from the most simplest of ideas. Not all of the ‘things’ look like aeroplanes. The session is based on hands-on lessons run in schools across the North West of England. The art and science of flying paper planes in classrooms is disappearing. Help to bring it back! Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 W054 Using history and philosophy in science classes John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading Email/web: j.p.oversby@reading.ac.uk 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 118 Typically, many teachers will have had little training in embedding historical work in science lessons. Doing so brings benefits to developing Science at Work ideas, shows how science culture has progressed, can involve learners in creativity as they interpret historical events, and can highly motivate them to learn more, often independently. This workshop is based on the outcomes of the European Project History and Philosophy in Science Teaching (HIPST), with materials that have been trialled in UK schools. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: ASE Research Guide ASE Research Guide ,Teaching chemistry

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DI15 Working scientifically at KS3 Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 121 The new Programme of Study for Science at KS3 includes ‘Working Scientifically’ – a clearly defined set of enquiry skills that are required to be delivered throughout the course. Teachers will also want to be developing these skills in preparation for courses at KS4. This workshop will explore ways in which these skills can be effectively incorporated in planning and delivery, and used to engage students in understanding how scientific enquiry works. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 ITE Advisors T084 World Friendly Science Sarah Langford Organisation: Sphere Science Ltd Email/web: www.spherescience.co.uk 1600-1700 Muirhead Tower 109 A variety of KS2 investigative activities each of which help pupils to explore the world around them, and to consider the environmental aspects. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 7-11 SE22 ASE AGM Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1700-1800 Muirhead Tower G15 Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors

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Saturday 11 January Open Conference Timetable 09 50

Switched on Science: Deliver the new primary curriculum for science with confidence, Mr Danny Nicholson and Ms Karen Griffith, Rising Stars

12 30

Science Leaders Hub publication, Helen Harden

12 50

CLEAPSS / Gratnells Primary Science Competition Awards and Prize Giving, Mary Philpott - CLEAPSS

All sessions in the Open Conference last 15 or 30 minutes. Several slots are still available; see the Open Conference manager on the stand (D1) to book your slot when you arrive at the conference.

All Saturday Sessions Booked Courses If you wish to book a Booked Course, please go to the Registration Desk in the Great Hall of the Aston Webb Building to check availability and venue details.

SE23 A Key Stage 3 assessment model for the new curriculum Dr Andy Chandler-Grevatt Organisation: Consultant Assessment Expert for Oxford University Press Email/web: www.oup.com 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 121 The new KS3 curriculum has brought with it challenges for assessment. This session explores a flexible assessment model for the new curriculum that meets the needs of your department. This model has been adopted by OUP’s scheme Activate. The Assessment Editor will explain how you can ensure your pupils have a secure understanding of key concepts and are ready to progress from KS3. The model is adaptable for formative and summative approaches, and for those who wish to use levels, grades or comments. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: 11-14 W055 A-level Biology: Plan ahead with AQA Matthew Bennett Organisation: AQA Email/web: www.aqa.org.uk 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering G36 New specifications will be released in Spring 2014, for first teaching in 2015. This workshop session will allow Heads of Department, teachers and advisors to: - Plan ahead by getting first sight of the new specifications. - Try out some of the new question types. - Share ideas on practical tasks and assessment. - Meet the development team. - Sign up for preview copies of materials, so you can start trying them out in school. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC

T085 Any story, any age, same activity Sarah Langford Organisation: Sphere Science Ltd Email/web: www.spherescience.co.uk 0930-1030 Arts 119 A wide variety of activities which can be adapted quite easily across the whole of the primary age range. These are all activities designed to support Science Enquiry. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 W056 Becoming a primary science specialist Tanya Shields Organisation: National network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 0930-1030 Arts LR4 This practical workshop will give primary teachers the opportunity to find out how to become a Science Learning Centre - Primary Science Specialist. You will be able to explore some of the practical strategies used to tackle common misconception and develop teachers’ subject knowledge. Teachers who have successfully become Primary Science Specialist will describe how this CPD has changed their practice and in-turn improved pupils’ progress in science. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 FS18 FS: Sex, Lies and Nanotechnology Professor Jon Preece Organisation: School of Chemistry Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG12 Nanoscale science has the capacity to revolutionise many conventional technologies from electronics to medicine, as a result of the fundamental way that at this length scale material properties can be designed to give a desired function. However, this is still a huge challenge, and hence there is a danger that nanotechnology becomes ‘overhyped’. This lecture will put into context the power of the nanoscale through considering how biological systems work (including sexual reproduction), and how lessons from the natural world can guide ‘unnatural’ nanotechnologies. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all

Codes for Session Types BC Booked Course DI Drop-in Session FS Frontier Science SE Special Events T Talk/Discussion/ Demonstration W Workshop

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Saturday 11 January FS19 FS: The Permanent Attraction of Magnets Rex Harris Organisation: Metallurgy and Materials, EPS, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 0930-1030 Aston Webb WG5 This talk will describe the phenomenon of ferromagnetism and how it originates from the spin and orbit of certain electrons in the metallic elements Fe, Co and Ni. Permanent magnets based on these elements can be considered as the world’s first functional products and the talk will include a short history of their application starting with their use in compasses in early Chinese civilisations. Because of their then mysterious properties they were surrounded by myths and superstition many of which were explored and dismissed in the book Die Magnete, written by William Gilbert, a physician in the court of Elizabeth the first. The talk will go on to describe the development of the theory of ferromagnetism and the many exciting current applications such as hard disc drives in computers and high performance electric motors and large scale wind generators using magnets based on iron combined with neodymium and boron. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all W057 Great ideas that work: Novel science activities for 11-16 year olds Sue Howarth, Phil Collins Organisation: University of Worcester Email/web: s.howarth@worc.ac.uk 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B23 An exciting and engaging mixture of Biology, Chemistry and Physics activities, trialled by current and former Science PGCE/GTP students from the University of Worcester and partner school mentors. Novel twists on familiar protocols and some entirely new activities – if you don’t go away with at least two new ideas we will give you chocolate! We might anyway. As well as a booklet of Wow! Factors in Science lessons to use with 11-16 year olds Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science international Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Technicians Advisors T086 If it doesn’t work, it’s physics Geoff Auty Organisation: School Science Review Email/web: gnv.auty@gmail.com 0930-1030 Poynting Physics Lab P02 Practical work in physics is often regarded as difficult. Should we avoid demonstrations or class practical work for fear of failure? This session will show nearly two dozen effective practical items from various areas of physics. Many have been described in the ASE’s School Science Review (SSR). This follows similar sessions at recent ASE conferences but with many different topics, including a “driving lesson” on the cathode ray oscilloscope. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors T087 IOP: Using evidence to inform your teaching Charles Tracy, Guest speaker Organisation: Institute of Physics Email/web: www.iop.org/education 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 112 Through the PIPER (Practical Implications of Physics Education Research) project, we are working to link practitioners (teachers, trainers and CPD providers) with research in physics education. At this workshop, we will present our findings so far and explore how we might effectively engage and involve practitioners. Themes/disciplines: new curricula research into practice Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE Advisors

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T088 Learn chemistry – Exploring new resources Duncan McMillan Organisation: Royal Society of Chemistry Email/web: www.rsc.org/learn-chemistry 0930-1030 Learning Centre UG08 Attendees will be able to explore the wealth of chemistry teaching resources and information on Learn Chemistry, the RSC’s home for chemistry education on the web. We’ll showcase some of our latest developments and resource updates, and help delegates get the most out of our popular education sites, including the interactive Periodic Table, On This Day in Chemistry calendar, Faces of Chemistry video site, and more. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 W058 Learning science with tablets and phones Guest speakers Organisation: National Network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 0930-1030 Mechanical Engineering B01 A look at how teachers can use tablets and smartphones successfully within science to support teaching and learning. Discover new apps and their uses, look at how other schools are successfully rolling out this technology. Themes/disciplines: using technology creatively Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 T089 Let’s talk about science Wendy Roslow CSciTeach Organisation: Education Central, Wolverhampton University Email/web: w.roslow@wlv.ac.uk 0930-1030 Muirhead Tower 109 Are your pupils good at sharing their understanding? Are they able to explain their ideas to others? This workshop will show you a variety of activities that encourage pupil talk and peer teaching. Participants will be able to try some activities and leave with resources that can be used in the classroom. Based on the results of an Action Research study carried out with post-16 students. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 T090 NAIGS: Making cross-curricular links with science Andrea Mapplebeck, Chris Banbury Organisation: National Advisers and Inspectors Group for science (NAIGS) Email/web: Z.Crompton@education.leeds.ac.uk 0930-1030 Nuffield G17 Find out new ideas for teaching science within a cross-curricular topic. Primary and Secondary Science Consultants and Advisers will demonstrate exciting practical activities that capture pupils’ interest through meaningful and relevant real-life contexts for their science lessons. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 Advisors BC19 Optical Fibre Technology Dr David Ward, Rik Whittaker Organisation: The Greater Manchester STEM Centre Email/web: www.stemsalford.org 0930-1030 The course takes participants through the principles of optical fibre technology in telecommunications. Participants will commence the assembly of a demonstration working kit that illustrates the transmission of sound down an optical cable. Participants will receive all of the necessary components to construct a transmitter and a receiver.

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Saturday 11 January The course is listed as 1 hour but folks with no experience of soldering are asked to arrive 30 mins early. Participants who wish to complete their kit at the conference can return in the afternoon - some 2-3 hours construction time is required. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians T091 Science enquiry in the new primary national curriculum Jane Turner, Emeritus Prof T J Russell Organisation: ASE Primary Science Committee and Centre for Lifelong Learning, University of Liverpool Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 0930-1030 Arts LR2 If you think that a fair test is the only way to get children to carry out science enquiries, then think again. The biggest change in the new primary national curriculum is in the nature of science enquiry. Children will be expected to use a bigger range of types of science enquiry. This session tells you all that you need to know about the new curriculum, the implications for what children do and the preparation that you need to do. Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: It’s Not Fair

BC20 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils ESTA Primary Representatives Organisation: ESTA 0930-1100 Try sorting minerals by devising and discussing criteria, then use the knowledge gained to work through rock identification at different levels with the ESTA kit of 15 rocks. Test rock porosity and make your own well. Look at rock erosion and its place in the rock cycle. Consider the formation of fossils, how they provide information relating to previously living things and their place as evidence of evolution. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE Advisors

W059 Super scientists Hester Binge, Kate Blacklock Organisation: Primarily Science Email/web: info@primarilyscience.co.uk 0930-1030 Arts LR8 The study of famous scientists is a new element of the revised primary curriculum in England. This practical workshop encourages teachers to engage and develop children’s research skills by investigating famous scientists and their inventions and discoveries. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors

DI16 Teachmeet primary Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1030-1200 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 It is an informal and enjoyable gathering of those curious about teaching and learning. Anyone can share great ideas they’ve trialled in their classrooms, a teaching resource they love, a great website, a classroom activity - whatever you like! You can ask questions or simply turn up to soak up all the great ideas and enthusiasm. It is about being engaged and inspired by our immediate colleagues and gaining a lot of networking to boot! You can just come along and be a member of the audience if you like, you can give a two minute nano-presentation on one of your favourite science teaching ideas, or you can give a seven minute micro-presentation on an aspect of classroom science teaching. You don’t have to be an ASE member, but if you’re not, we might try to persuade you to join! As the Teachmeet is being held in a room in the Exhibition Marquee you need to go to the Registration desk to register for the free exhibition only. This will give you the opportunity to visit the exhibitors and see what the Annual conference involves. You may wish to consider coming to the conference on another day, but do find out about what is happening! Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 5-7 7-11

T092 Visitors from industry in the primary classroom Joy Parvin Organisation: CIEC Promoting Science Email/web: www.ciec.org.uk 0930-1030 Arts LR5 CIEC Promoting Science have a wide range of freely available resources to support ‘ambassadors from industry’ working with primary schools. We will highlight activities from these resources; show you how to access the whole set yourself; and provide valuable tips and guidance on how to create and nurture effective relationships with industrial scientists and engineers, whilst meeting the needs of the current and new National Curriculum for Science. We will also demonstrate how children can meet ‘virtual’ scientists and engineers. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11

W060 Fp7 Early years inquiry-based science Jen Shiers, Dr Sue Dale-Tunnicliffe Organisation: Pri Sci Net and St Michael’s Easthampstead C of E School, and Pri Sci Net Bracknell, Berkshire Email/web: www.prisci.net 1100-1200 Arts LR4 This workshop will introduce Pri-Sci-Net, an EU funded project promoting inquiry-based science education among primary teachers across Europe. Pri-Sci-Net facilitates collaboration between primary science teachers in Europe and provides teacher training in delivering inquirybased primary science. The workshop will focus on discususing and trying out some early years inquiry based science e The Pri-Sci-Net platform offers downloadable inquiry activities and samples will be shown.. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus international Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11

T093 What’s an eyeball made of, miss? Joelle Halliday, Guest teacher Organisation: AZSTT Primary Science Research & Innovation Hub Email/web: l.m.bianchi@shu.ac.uk 0930-1030 Arts 201 2 projects that really use the children’s questions as authentic starting points for curriculum design - come and find out more about Working Wonders in primary science and Scientific Weaving. Funded by AZSTT from 2012-13 these projects have truly opened our eyes to science (you’ll see what we mean!), and specifically Chemistry in primary schools. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 ITE Advisors

DI17 Outdoor Education Drop-In Session Dr Katharine Forsey Organisation: ASE Field Officer North of England and ‘Educate Everywhere’ Email/web: ww.ase.org.uk 1100-1200 Exhibition Marquee ASE stand DS2 Come and see me on the ASE stand (DS2) for advice on developing outdoor learning in your own settings, including teaching resources, apps, tips on managing groups outdoors, curriculum links/enrichment, links to numeracy, literacy, risk assessment and more! Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 5-7 7-11

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Saturday 11 January W061 Planning your new science curriculum? Let’s make it cross-curricular Di Stead, Lois Kelly Organisation: DiStead Science and Kelly Consulting & Training Ltd. Email/web: disteadscience@gmail.com 1100-1200 Arts LR5 This workshop aims to provide ideas for enlivening the new science curriculum. How can we provide opportunities to follow children’s interests, and set science in relevant and interesting contexts? Participants will explore how links with a broad range of subjects, such as history or RE as well as literacy and art can enhance teaching and learning in science. Examples of how schools have used a cross-curricular approach to develop their science curriculum will be discussed. Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE T094 The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project Sarah Earle Organisation: Bath Spa University Email/web: s.earle@bathspa.ac.uk 1100-1200 Arts LR2 The Teacher Assessment in Primary Science (TAPS) project is a 3 year study considering how teachers can be supported with teacher assessment in primary schools. The project is based the Centre for Early Scientific Learning at Bath Spa University and is funded by the Primary Science Teaching Trust. Early findings will be shared from work with the project schools, the Primary Science Quality Mark database and the Primary Science Teaching College. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 T095 Literacy and numeracy in science Chris Colcough, Nick O’Brien Organisation: ASE 11 – 19 Committee Email/web: jcharlesworth@sibfordschool.co.uk 1100-1230 Mechanical Engineering G26 An update from members of the 11-19 committee on how to ensure that students have the appropriate literacy and numeracy skills to allow them to fully access the science curriculum and make good progress. This session will draw on and give examples of good classroom practice to help delegates ensure that their pupils gain appropriate literacy and numeracy skills. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 BC21 Astrophysics in the Sixth Form – Examined and Nonexamined Alan C Pickwick Organisation: Association for Astronomy Education 1100-1300 Easy enough for the beginner, tough enough for the accomplished teacher, the workshop will cover the Astronomy and Cosmology found at A-level. It will emphasise daytime laboratory work and provide worksheets. You can view printed resources and excellent downloadable software. There will be a critical appraisal of the UK robotic telescopes and a chance to share experiences. A small Meade “goto” telescope will be available to experiment with – the ideal school “£1000” project. Come along. No question too simple! Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors

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W062 Better practicals, better learning; improve your skills Matt Endean Organisation: CLEAPSS Email/web: www.cleapss.org.uk 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 A chance to get hands on and try out new and interesting practical activities covering Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Many of these are based on the reduced scale principle. Also you can make your own equipment which you get to take back to school with you. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 4-16 post 16 FE/SFC Technicians Advisors W063 Biology Practicals that Work – hands-on drop-in session Dan Jenkins Organisation: Science and Plants for Schools Email/web: Saps@hermes.cam.ac.uk 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 Looking for reliable new biology practicals? We’ve got a lab full of ideas for you, with engaging and affordable practicals on a range of key curriculum topics. We’ll be troubleshooting your old favourite practicals, and introducing new ones developed over the last year. Whether you stay for 10 minutes or two hours, inspiration is guaranteed! Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians W064 Developing formative assessment in practice Mary Whitehouse, Robin Millar Organisation: University of York Science Education Group Email/web: yorkscience.org.uk 1100-1300 Muirhead Tower 122 Good formative assessment needs good assessment items that will show evidence of learning. The York Science Project has been developing such items. In this workshop we will show how you can use the examples and strategies from the project to develop more similar items of your own. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 ITE Advisors BC22 INSPIRING PRIMARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! Dr Mark Biddiss Organisation: Dr Mark’s INSPIREducation Email/web: www.Dr-Mark.co.uk 1100-1300 ‘Dr Mark’ is back again! This lively and “inspirational” session - especially for PRIMARY teachers - is packed full of simple, novel ‘hands-on’ science experiments from across the science curriculum. The activities will help you put a ‘WOW!-Factor’ into your science lessons, and more fully engage your pupils! Featured on Teachers’ TV, Dr Mark’s activities will stimulate ‘creative thinking’, and get your pupils thinking and talking ‘scientifically’! The resources provided are worth £200, and include full details of about 150 experiments! Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 Advisors BC23 IOP: Electricity: the ‘good, the ‘bad’ and the ‘fiddly’! Christopher Embrey, Peter Tiktin Organisation: Institute of Physics and Science Learning Centre Network Email/web: www.stimulatingphysics.org 1100-1300 This session covers teaching electricity at KS3 and 4 and includes: models to challenge misconceptions; teaching strategies to avoid “fire fighting”; demonstrations to provoke pupil thought;

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Saturday 11 January sharing ideas to make electricity a fun and engaging topic in the classroom. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 Technicians DI18 Practical microbiology: eats, soils and leaves Dr John Grainger Organisation: Microbiology in Schools Advisory Committee (MiSAC) Email/web: www.misac.org.uk 1100-1300 BioSciences lab 202 ‘Cheap and cheerful’ microbiology practicals for secondary level using microscopical and selective culture methods for studying protists, fungi and bacteria from natural sources such as plant leaves, soil, and hay infusions. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians ASE Books associated with this session: Topics in Safety 3rd edition 2001 SE24 Think Universe: All is One Coordinated natural science for primary and secondary Dr Francisco Diego, Shirin Sheikh-Bahai Organisation: University College London Email/web: www.ucl.ac.uk/thinkuniverse 1100-1300 Mechanical Engineering G29 Think Universe: All is One refers to the nature of the entire universe, where everything we see is made out of the same tiny building blocks. In this lecture we present a novel and simple teaching approach to all natural sciences coordinated at all levels of education. We describe the amazing results of a pilot project sponsored by the Royal Society, where analogies, materials and optical equipment were used to explore connections between the very small and the very large. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 4-16 post 16 BC24 Writing for ASE Publications Bob Kibble Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1100-1300 Sharing practice is a key part of professional development, especially related to school-based training. Explore how you can share your ideas through ASE Journals and ASE books and web resources. This workshop is a repeat of the very successful sessions held at previous Conferences, where ASE Journal Editors and members of the Publications Committee have helped people like you to take the first step towards publication. Bring your own ideas, however basic, and we’ll work on them with you. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment practical science primary focus international using technology creatively research into practice Target audiences: ASE Books associated with this session: All W065 Datalogging and more with iPads Barry Hawkins Organisation: Data Harvest 1130-1230 Nuffield G18 Use Apple iPads and data loggers to create collaborative learning groups. Bring your own iPad with the Easysense App loaded. A workshop to explore the advantages and problems of tablet data logging. We believe there are more advantages and curriculum developments when using the iPad, but here is a chance to test flight in an experimental class. Themes/disciplines: practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16

DI19 EARTH SCIENCE: Working with Rocks and Fossils – drop in session ESTA Primary Representatives Organisation: ESTA 1130-1230 BioSciences N202 Visit the demonstration ESTA Primary Workshop, laid out for you to see and sample a wide range of Earth science-related activities. These include: sorting minerals; rock identification at different levels with the ESTA kit of 15 rocks; testing rock porosity; making your own well; the formation of fossils; their place in the evidence of evolution. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 ITE Advisors BC25 Electronics for Novices Dr David Ward, Rik Whittaker Organisation: The Greater Manchester STEM Centre Email/web: www.stemsalford@aol.com 1130-1230 Know nothing about electronics? This is the course for you. If you wish to add this to your STEM Club repertoire we have some basics to move you ahead. The manual we suggest is student friendly so it can be copied to take you and them forward. We have a kit of components and a breadboard to assist you. This session has been at this conference for many years and receives top satisfaction responses. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 Technicians FS20 FS: Could a baby robot grow up to be a mathematician? Professor Aaron Sloman Organisation: School of Computer Science Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG5 Since Turing discussed the possibility of intelligent machines in 1950 there have been many outstanding achievements in artificial intelligence, robotics and computational cognitive science -- including powerful logical and algebraic theorem provers and proof checkers, programs that model complex physical processes, and increasingly impressive mobile robots. Yet we don’t know how to give a machine spatial reasoning abilities found in very young children and many other animals, apparently required for the discovery of the simplest truths and proofs in Euclidean geometry leading up to Euclid’s Elements, for example proofs about triangles. Can we understand what’s missing and how it evolved? Perhaps mathematical spatial reasoning requires new forms of computation? Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS21 FS: Plant adaptation to changing environments: A role for GM Dr Jeremy Pritchard Organisation: School of Biosciences Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1230 Aston Webb WG12 The aim of the exercise to use online data resources to examine the function of and relationship between some plant genes in the model plant Arabidopsis. A lecture will introduce my research using genetic modification of plants to understand plant interaction with the environment including salt tolerance and herbivore resistance. A follow up workshop will give teachers the opportunity to use some of the online line bioinformatics techniques that are used in genetic manipulation. This will provide them with an update on genetic manipulation and resources that can be taken away to use in the class room. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all

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Saturday 11 January DI20 Janet videoconferencing Richard Sedding Organisation: National Research and Education Network provider Email/web: www.ja.net 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 109 The Janet Videoconferencing service has run since 1995 and offers teachers of science from Key stage 1 through to AS level a variety of content through videoconferencing. The Janet Content Providers include the National Space Centre, the Deep, Virtually University. All of these enable teachers to enrich the science curriculum without leaving the classroom. You can interact with anyone anywhere at a fraction of the cost of travelling, saving valuable time in the process. The ASE session aims to demystify the technology involved with making videoconferencing work and encourage teachers, advisors, students to consider how they might benefit from using videoconferencing. The Content Directory link is http://vccontentdirectory.ja.net/ The main Janet website link www.ja.net Themes/disciplines: using technology creatively Target audiences: FE/SFC Technicians Advisors W066 Oxford Sparks – public science from Oxford University Annabel Cook, Ann Childs Organisation: University of Oxford Email/web: www.oxfordsparks.net 1130-1230 Nuffield G13 Learn about Oxford University’s ‘Oxford Sparks’ project - an online science centre where the public can engage with the huge breadth of Oxford’s research. With everything from animations to blogs to social media and specially-designed teachers’ resources, Oxford Sparks has everything a science teacher needs. In this session, watch the latest Oxford Sparks animations, be guided through the teachers’ resources and find out how you can get involved with the project. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 14-16 W067 Strictly Come Fractional Distillation: a revision script for GCSE Science Kate Brennan Organisation: Act the Facts, the educational script writing company Email/web: www.actthefacts.com, contact: kate@actthefacts.com 1130-1230 Arts LR8 Delegates at last year’s ASE Conference enthusiastically endorsed the idea of using scripted drama to revise GCSE Science. Their feedback has resulted in a Chemistry script which uses the pace and structure of the dances in ‘Strictly Come Dancing’ to model the behaviour of fractions in a distillation chamber. So can ‘Strictly Come Fractional Distillation’ reach the parts other revision techniques cannot reach? Come and find out! NB: There will be strictly no dancing in this workshop. You have been warned. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 11-14 T096 Supporting effective teaching and learning: starting out in your career Guest speakers Organisation: National Network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering B01 Myscience, through the network of Science Learning Centres and the National STEM Centre supports teachers throughout their career. This session will look at how we can support you starting out in teaching, as well as giving some top-tips to help you through your first few years. This

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will include practical activities, open-ended investigations and effective collaborative learning, as well as the resources that are offered. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 SE25 Supporting science teachers with disabilities ~ forum Dr Lyn Haynes, Dr Maria Turkenburg Organisation: Canterbury Christ Church University & University of York Email/web: lyn.haynes@canterbury.ac.uk 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 118 At ASE 2013 The Working Group was established to devise guidance for teaching colleagues, mentors and Senior Leadership Members as well as Teacher Trainers on how to support teaching staff with disabilities, enabling better appreciation of what ‘reasonable adjustments’ might constitute. A major emphasis of the guidance under development is about practical and logistical support. We aim to promote a paradigm shift in working with and supporting staff with disabilities through developing a celebratory “Culture for Diversity” approach within educational institutions. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors W068 Teaching the nature of science through climate change John Oversby Organisation: Institute of Education, University of Reading Email/web: j.p.oversby@reading.ac.uk 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 113 Typically, many teachers will have had little training in embedding philosophical work (The Nature of Science) in science lessons. Doing so brings benefits to developing Nature of Science ideas, shows how science culture has progressed, can involve learners in creativity as they interpret historical events, and can highly motivate them to learn more, often independently. This workshop is based on the outcomes of the European Project History and Philosophy in Science Teaching (HIPST), with materials that have been trialled in UK schools. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: ASE Research Guide, Teaching chemistry W069 Using research to improve teaching and learning Guest speakers Organisation: National Network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1130-1230 Mechanical Engineering B04 Many teachers are now using published research or action research projects to help improve teaching and learning. In this session practical tips and tricks about how to do this will be shared by experts and teachers already putting this effective way of demonstrating impact into action. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 DI21 What – no levels? Assessment and tracking at KS3 Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1130-1230 Muirhead Tower 121 Many schools have been using progress tracking systems based on levels; however the new Programme of Study is set up in quite a different way. However, schools will still be expected to report on progress and identify students who need some form of intervention. This workshop will look at how topics can be planned so that teachers have a clear idea of the outcomes, can assess accordingly and develop a clear view of

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Saturday 11 January effective progress. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment Target audiences: 11-14 ITE Advisors FS22 FS: Frontier Science Special: A tour of the Hydrogen Technology and Rare Earth Magnet laboratories and visit to ‘The Ross Barlow’, the University’s hydrogen powered narrow boat Dr Allan Walton, Magnetic Materials group Leader, Dr David Book, Hydrogen and Materials Group Organisation: Metallurgy and Materials, EPS, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1130-1330 Meet in Aston Webb foyer There will be a laboratory visit under the supervision of Drs Allan Walton (Magnetic Materials group Leader) and David Book (Hydrogen and Materials Group). Demonstrations will include the practical demonstration of various applications rare earth magnets and hydrogen fuel cells and will also include a visit to the ZCE Canal Boat, the Ross Barlow. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all DI22 Edexcel A level Science 2015 update Damian Riddle Organisation: Senior Product Manager - A level Sciences, Pearson Edexcel 1230-1330 Exhibition Marquee seminar room D6 Information on the progress of the re-development of our science qualifications, including AS and A levels in Biology, Chemistry and Physics for 2015. This is an opportunity to ask questions about the re-development and timeline. Themes/disciplines: new curricula Target audiences: post 16 SE26 Margaret Collis ASE Primary Science Lecture“Reaching for the Stars” a Beginner’s Guide to the Universe Dr Maggie Aderin-Pocock Organisation: ASE Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1230-1330 Arts 120 Main LT Finding ways to engage primary school kids with the wonders of the universe can be challenging due to the complex concepts and large numbers. Maggie Aderin-Pocock speaks of her experience in using this field of science to break down stereotypes and engaging kids with the wonders that are out there. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 W070 Story science – science and literature Carolyn Yates, Sally Howard Organisation: Senior Teaching Fellow Primary / Early Years PGCE, Warwick University Email/web: Sally.howard@warwick.ac.uk 1400-1500 Arts LR5 Many students are not choosing to study science beyond the compulsory stages of schooling having become disengaged with it by the age of about 8. Carolyn Yates & Sally Howard will be drawing on Cognitive Acceleration Programmes and neuro ogntive neuroscience to explore how to select and use popular storybooks to stimulate scientific ideas and questions. Delegates will try out story-linked activities, get a reading list of recommended books linked to science, be invited to add their own favorites. Themes/disciplines: primary focus Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 Advisors ASE Books associated with this session: Not directly but Star Science, Early Yeas Handbook, any poetry book or story book, sc 1 primary

W071 Datalogging for Primary Science Investigations Barbara Higginbotham Organisation: Data Harvest 1400-1500 Nuffield G18 Collecting data with Vu gives children the ability to make comparisons using numbers, see data graphically and tell the story of the graph. The activities today are linked to stories. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus using technology creatively Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 T097 Evolution and genetics in the new primary national curriculum Stuart Naylor Organisation: Millgate House Education Email/web: www.millgatehouse.co.uk 1400-1500 Arts LR2 Many primary teachers are concerned about teaching the section on evolution in the new primary national curriculum. That’s understandable. The aim of this session is to outline the background that you need to teach this area, and to make it accessible and easy to understand. You will leave this session feeling confident and looking forward to putting this into practice! Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus Target audiences: 7-11 Advisors SE27 Forensic anthropology in the real world Professor Sue Black Organisation: Centre for Anatomy & Human Identification, University of Dundee Email/web: www.cahid.dundee.ac.uk 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower G15 This presentation will give an overview of the work of a forensic anthropologist. It will consider some casework and offer an insight into forensic science as a career. Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC ITE Technicians Advisors W072 From scientific enquiry to working scientifically Kate Blacklock, Tanya Shields Organisation: Primarily Science 1400-1500 Arts LR8 This practical workshop offers suggestions on how best to teach the ‘working scientifically’ elements of the new English primary curriculum for science. An approach to the different types of enquiry at each key stage will be covered. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science primary focus Target audiences:5-7 7-11 Advisors FS23 FS: 100 million to 1: what can maths tell us about the Great Sperm Race? Dr Dave Smith Organisation: School of Mathematics Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG12 Reproduction is a numbers game! The average man produces over 1000 sperm every heart beat, yet only one is needed for fertilisation. Maths and engineering are being applied to understand how the millions of sperm propel themselves through the tortuous maze of the female tract. We will look at both the fluid mechanics of microswimming and migration through complex microarchitectures, including tantalising possibilities of sperm guidance and drug stimulation. Maths provides a rational way to understand the counterintuitive world that sperm encounter. The talk features high speed imaging in microscopic mazes, and ‘virtual sperm’

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Saturday 11 January supercomputing simulations. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS24 FS: Opportunities and Challenges from nanomaterials for the Environment Iseult Lynch Organisation: Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, LES Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1400-1500 Aston Webb WG5 Nanotechnology refers to the use of very tiny (nanoscale) materials in a range of novel ways. Nano means tiny, and nanoparticles are more than 8000 times smaller than a human hair. The small size and large surface area of nanoparticles leads to the potential for innovative solutions across a range of environmental applications, both improving (reacting to) existing environmental problems and anticipating future environmental problems (proactive approaches). Examples include energy harvesting, environmental remediation, smart and sustainable packaging materials. It is vital that applications of “nano” do not result in unanticipated longer-term consequences, so safety is addressed in parallel to development of applications. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all W073 Improving progress in primary science Jane Turner, Nicola Beverley Organisation: Collins Education Email/web: www.collinseducation.com 1400-1500 Arts LR4 The new National Curriculum provides an ideal opportunity for schools to review, revise and revitalise their approach to primary science. This session will explore how teachers can adapt their planning to focus on key scientific ideas and skills, and develop learning sequences which will ensure that outcomes are achieved and progress monitored – without levels! It will include practical activities, which participants will be encouraged to try out and then take away with them to use. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: new curricula primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 W074 Making the most out of collaborative and cluster work Guest speakers Organisation: National Network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering B01 The national network of Science Learning Centres has been supporting clusters of schools improve their science teaching and learning by providing ENTHUSE Cluster Awards. These Awards are available for any state funded schools or colleges, from all phases, who want to work together in a cluster. This session will look at the best practice emerging from these clusters with input from schools that have taken part. Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 SE28 The World of Microbiology – A Practical Course for Schools Professor Anthony C. Hilton, Professor of Microbiology, Head of Biomedical & Biological Science Organisation: Aston University 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G29 Microbiology is a practical subject with is too often given limited coverage in the classroom for various reasons including resourcing, concerns about H&S and confidence of teaching staff with the subject material. This session describes a novel two-day practical workshop delivered by academic staff from Aston University aimed at Year 9 & 10 students to engage them in essential aspects of microbiology. Target audiences: all

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T098 Resources and ideas for teaching animal behaviour Charlotte Evans Organisation: Association for the study of Animal Behaviour Email/web: behaviour@cardiff.ac.uk 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G28 Animal behaviour is an engaging subject that is taught in both science and psychology and throughout the key stages. In this workshop, Charlotte the education officer from the Association For The Study Of Animal Behaviour (ASAB), will provide a number of practical ideas and resources for all key stages. ASAB: produces materials for teaching animal behaviour incorporating ‘How Science Works’, provides advice on behavioural methods, ethics in animal behaviour teaching and rough guides to animals commonly used in behaviour work. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 5-7 7-11 11-14 14-16 W075 Supporting teachers through GCSE reform – an overview of ‘science for all’ offer for Heads of Science and advisors Elise Reece Organisation: AQA Email/web: www.aqa.org.uk 1400-1500 Mechanical Engineering G36 The session aims to give a clear overview of how GCSE reform will affect AQA GCSE science. We will provide a walk through the AQA ‘science for all’ offer, which focuses on students who may not wish to follow the three Separate Sciences or the Double award route, and then give you the opportunity to tell us what would benefit your students. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: 14-16 Advisors DI23 Tablets for the science teacher Ed Walsh Organisation: Cornwall Learning Email/web: edmundwalsh@hotmail.com 1400-1500 Muirhead Tower 121 An increasing number of schools are using iPads and other tablet devices, both as teaching aids and as tools for students to use. Their portability, versatility and tactile interface open the door to a range of strategies that can improve engagement, understanding and outcomes. This demonstration features a range of ways in which these innovative pieces of equipment can enhance teaching and engage students. Sponsored by Collins Education. Themes/disciplines: using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 ITE Advisors W076 The Human Guinea Pig – Careers in Healthcare Science Tom Warrender Organisation: Classroom Medics Email/web: www.classroommedics.co.uk 1400-1500 Exhibition marquee seminar room D6 Come and meet Tom Warrender, The Human Guinea Pig as he takes you on a journey around the NHS and the medical tests he has been through to explore the many different Healthcare Science careers that are based in the NHS. The show has exciting live demos including using an iPhone to picture the Retina in the eye, imaging the carotid artery with an Ultrasound machine and recording ECGs and EMGs from a volunteers heart and muscle. Tom also includes video footage of some of the tests he has been through including allergy tests and a bronchoscopy, which is a camera up his nose and into his lungs. Attendees will be able to find out how to access the videos from the show in their school and take away links & resources on careers in the NHS. The show was developed with the NHS and aims to help teachers and pupils find out more about careers other than doctors and nurses

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Saturday 11 January in the NHS. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 FE/SFC Advisors W077 Yes we can! Phil Bunyan + Safeguards Committee Organisation: ASE Safeguards Committee Email/web: www.ase.org.uk 1400-1530 BioSciences Lab 201 Some reflections on 50+ years of the ASE’s Safeguards Committee, with a selection of demonstrations about what we can do and the stories behind them. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 post 16 ASE Books associated with this session: Safeguards in the school laboratory BC26 INSPIRING SECONDARY SCIENCE! Novel & Fun Ways to Engage Your Pupils! Dr Mark Biddiss Organisation: Dr Mark’s INSPIREducation Email/web: www.Dr-Mark.co.uk 1400-1600 ‘Dr Mark’ is back again! This lively and “inspirational” session - especially for SECONDARY teachers - is packed full of simple, novel ‘hands-on’ science experiments from across the science curriculum. The activities will help you put a ‘WOW!-Factor’ into your science lessons, and more fully engage your pupils! Featured on Teachers’ TV, Dr Mark’s activities will stimulate ‘creative thinking’, and get your pupils thinking and talking ‘scientifically’! The resources provided are worth £200, and include full details of about 150 experiments! Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors BC27 Exploring Bioenergy – class discussion with practicals Adelia de Paula, Guest speakers Organisation: Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) Email/web: www.bbsrc.ac.uk/society/dialogue/activities/bioenergydialogue/take-part.aspx 1400-1630 This FREE workshop will introduce you to a new bioenergy debating kit and a practical guide to biofuel experiments and activities for secondary students. The Democs card game is a conversation tool that encourages group discussion. It is an ideal way to explore complex issues with your students without being an expert on the topic. You will receive a free copy of the card game and the Practical Biofuel activities book to take back and use in class. Having taken part in the session you will be able to confidently use the Democs card games to explore bioenergy issues. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 14-16 post 16 SE29 Alan Dale Tunnicliffe Memorial primary workshop Kathleen Nugent, Dr Tuula Asunta Organisation: Institute of Education, London and CASTME Email/web: s.tunnicliffe@ioe.ac.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR2 Come and drop in and try out various hands on activities you can use in your learning area with children 3-11 or older! Presenters from UK and abroad will present at this drop in workup real activities, which are minds on as well as hands on. Children are intuitive scientists and observers; they notice patterns and experiment spontaneously working things out as they do so. Increasingly the importance of hands on experiences are recognised as essential precursors of acquiring formal science knowledge and skills, it is named in

memory of a born teacher who excelled at such activities with children Themes/disciplines: practical science Target audiences: 0-4 (early years) 5-7 7-11 ASE Books associated with this session: It’s Not Fair Talking and Doing Science in the Early Years Journal of Emergent Science (Online at ASE) W078 A-level Science: Plan ahead with AQA Matthew Bennett Organisation: AQA Email/web: www.aqa.org.uk 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering G36 New specifications will be released in Spring 2014, for first teaching in 2015. This workshop session will allow Heads of Department, teachers and advisors to:- Plan ahead by getting first sight of some of the new specification material.- Try out some of the new question types.- Share ideas on practical tasks and assessment.- Sign up for preview copies of materials, so you can start trying them out in school. Themes/disciplines: new curricula developing assessment Target audiences: post 16 FE/SFC T099 Animating Science Jocelyn Wishart Organisation: Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol Email/web: www.bristol.ac.uk/education/research/ 1530-1630 Arts LT3 This session will share the results from observing classes, from ages 8-17, making stop-motion animations as a means of consolidating learning in science and collecting feedback from the teachers and their students. Making animations was found to be very engaging, both prompting peer discussion about the science and showing up students’ misconceptions for the teacher to act on. Whilst students reported opportunities for discussion to be most help to understanding the science; making, modelling and drawing were enjoyed the most. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: 7-11 11-14 14-16 post 16 ITE FS25 FS: Egg and sperm – a chatty couple Steve Publicover Organisation: Biosciences, LES Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1530-1630 Aston Webb WG5 From a sperm’s point of view fertilisation is a huge task. Finding the egg is difficult: in a reef of spawning organisms a sperm doesn’t just have to find an egg, it has to find the right one. In humans a sperm must find a minute target ‘hidden’ in a complex maze. As it swims the sperm has to perform a complex physiological transformation - if it fails to do this right then even if finds the egg it can’t fertilise! Throughout this process the sperm is guided by chemical cues on where it is and what to do. And when it arrives – the sperm must reply! This talk discusses what we know about these events, what we think we know and how we might exploit them. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all FS26 FS: Stress is bad, Exercise is good: Are the effects on immunological health really that simple? Dr. Victoria Burns Organisation: School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham Email/web: www.birmingham.ac.uk 1530-1630 Aston Webb WG12 Everyone knows that you’re more likely to get a cold when you’re stressed, and that exercise will help protect you against nasty bugs. Don’t we? This lecture will discuss to what extent these common assertions have evidence to support them, and what biological and psychoso-

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Saturday 11 January cial mechanisms might explain these effects. We’ll also discuss some situations in which a little bit of stress might be just what the doctor ordered and when you should step away from the treadmill. Themes/disciplines: research into practice Target audiences: all

Weather permitting, we will go outside for part of the session so please bring suitable outdoor clothing and footwear. Cameras, iPads, smart phones and tablet devices are encouraged. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11

BC28 Making Moving Models Sarah Ward, Angharad Ward Organisation: Greater Manchester STEM Centre Email/web: www.stemsalford.org 1530-1630 An opportunity to hone up your Design & Technology Skills and links into Science. We have a number of wood based toys for you to build. In an hour you should be able to make two out of the four simple kits for you to take away. Two to make now and two to make later. We will look at some tried and tested ways of joining wood to make moving models. Two of the 4 models have electric motors and one uses syringes. This isn’t rocket science but is an opportunity to gain or hone up your confidence to make some simple moving models back at school. Themes/disciplines: practical science primary focus Target audiences: 5-7 7-11

W081 The STEM Challenge: Using toys and artefacts for inspirational science teaching Pete Robinson, Karen Hornby Organisation: National STEM Centre Email/web: www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering B01 The challenge is to get to grips with a range of toys and gizmos for inspirational science teaching in just one hour! There are so many engaging examples that pupils have access to but which are also great for teaching science concepts. This session takes a look at a variety of gizmos and gadgets and tries to unpick the science that sit behind them. The challenge is further extended to integrate these ideas into your teaching and learning Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 Advisors

SE30 Preparing for linear assessment in triple science Linda Needham, Lynn Henfield Organisation: National network of Science Learning Centres Email/web: www.slcs.ac.uk/go/net/ase 1530-1630 Mechanical Engineering B04 The move to linear assessment requires changes in managing and delivering the science curriculum to ensure that young people learn most effectively and are therefore well prepared for assessment at the end of their courses. This workshop explores the impact of the move to linear assessment in science and provides access to free resources and advice from the Triple Science Support Programme and other sources which teachers can use to prepare for linear assessment. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W079 Socrative: A practical by any other means Philip Morton Organisation: George Salter Academy Email/web: mrmortonscience@gmail.com 1530-1630 Learning Centre UG08 Attendees will use the latest innovative resource not as was originally intended but as a content delivery mechanism that enables the teaching to be highly engaging, individually paced, giving immediate feedback, and enables you to track individual progress and understanding in real time. Includes step by step demo, hands on and what pitfalls to avoid. This will change the way you look at utilising ICT in science lessons. Award winning innovator Philip Morton delivers the training based on his experience teaching with this resource in four very different schools. Themes/disciplines: developing assessment practical science using technology creatively Target audiences: 11-14 14-16 W080 Taking the new curriculum outside! Dr Katharine Forsey Organisation: ASE Field Officer North of England and ‘Educate Everywhere’. Email/web: @DrBiol www.educateeverywhere.co.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR4 Plants feature heavily in the new curriculum. We’ll explore resources and activities to enhance teaching and learning of this curriculum area using school grounds and local areas.

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W082 Using dramatic science to enrich learning outlined in the new science curriculum Wendy Precious, Debbie McGregor Organisation: Entrust and Oxford-Brookes University Email/web: wendy.precious@entrust-ed.co.uk 1530-1630 Arts LR5 This ‘bodies-on’ session will share tried and tested drama strategies that support eliciting children’s ideas, developing imaginative thinking, broadening understanding of scientific concepts and working scientifically. The focus of the session will be on the science within the reviewed curriculum. All outcomes were stimulated through a three year research project funded by AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust. Themes/disciplines: new curricula practical science research into practice Target audiences: 5-7 ITE

Anthony C. Hilton - Professor of Microbiology B.Sc., Ph.D., Pg. Cert. LTHE, FHEA, NTF, FSB, FIBMS

Head of Biology & Biomedical Science Aston University Following a PhD in microbiology from the University of Birmingham, Professor Hilton remained at the University as a lecturer in the Institute of Public & Environmental Health for five years before moving to Aston University in 2000. At Aston, Anthony has continued to pursue his research interest in the molecular epidemiology of foodborne pathogens and other important clinical bacteria including MRSA and Clostridium difficile. He was appointed as Senior Lecturer and Director of Biology / Biomedical Sciences in 2005 and promoted to Reader and Head of Department in 2009. He has served as the Honorary General Secretary of the Society for Applied Microbiology and held several journal editorial positions. Through his work with the media, Professor Hilton is a regular contributor to print and broadcast articles in the field of microbiology. He featured in an eight part BBC Three series, ‘Grime Scene Investigation’ taking a mobile laboratory to visit members of the public in their homes and reveal the microbial world living around them, and more recently on The One Show. He leads a two day microbiology road-show taking practical microbiology into schools both in the UK and internationally and is always keen to engage the public and younger students in microbiology.

Streets

86

Exhibitors 2014 Company

Stand No(s)

3B Scientific

AS7, AS8

3P Learning Affordable Science

Company

SAS Curriculum Pathways

C32

Euro Science Market

D28

Schoolphysics C4

D50

Exampro CS2

Alton Towers Resort (Merlin Entertainments Group)

Gratnells Ltd

A51

AQA C1 Association for Science Education (ASE) DS2 ASE Open Conference area

D1

ASE Booksales

A2

Biozone B9 AS32

British Nutrition Foundation

D12

British Physics Olympiad

D17 B and D area

Cambridge Nationals

A1

Cambridge Technicals

A1

Cambridge University Press

D41

Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament CNDUK

D26

CAT (Centre for Alternative Technology) D40 CE4tf Curriculum Enrichment For The future AS19 Centre for Science Education

Harper Collins Hodder Education

B8 AS20 A6 C36

ICASE A41 IChemE CS15 Immersive Theatres

A 33

Institute of Physics

BS20

Instruments Direct Services Ltd Irwin Instrumentation

C11 DS22, D23

Living Eggs

AS22

Matrix Ltd

CS26

Medical Models Online Ltd Met Office Millgate House Education Molymod® Models – Spiring Ltd

B1 A50 AS48 CS24

Morley's C16 Mystrica Ltd

CS18

Narika Corporation

AS49

C3

National Oceanography Centre

B3

CHEMGO C10

National Schools Observatory

CS31

Classroom Medics

OCR A1

AS26

CLEAPSS CS37

Operation Wallacea

Compassion in World Farming

C13

Oxford University Press, Nelson Thornes A30

AS27

Pearson D30

A2

Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics B5

Data Harvest Delegate bag collection

C38

Digital Explorer

D39

Philip Harris Education

BS23

Discover The World

D49

Practical Action

AS47

e-bug, Public Health England

B6

Rising Stars

DS7

Edexcel D14

RM Education

Education Interactive

A16

Roger Frost's Organic Chemistry

CS25

Eggsploring

D34

Royal Horticultural Society

CS30

Engineering Development Trust

D47

Royal Microscopical Society

BS24

ESEU

A 15

RSC BS12

Espresso Education

Stand No(s)

A 14

Gatekeeper Education

Café

Company

ESTA

Alfiesoft CS9

Bradford Robotic Telescope & STEM

Stand No(s)

B7

Salters' Institute

Unleash the joy of Science with OCR at ocr.org.uk/science

A5

B13

Science Learning Centres/ National STEM Centre

D43

BS14

Scienceshirts C14 Scientific and Chemical Supplies

AS31

Sky Hi Products/ British Model Flying Association

A12

Smart Learning Ltd

BS25

SLS AS17 Society of Biology

B10

Solar Active

C27

Sphere Science Ltd

C40

STEM Education North West

CS39

STFC D5 Teachit Science

C5

Testbase C6 The Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining

BS15

The Institution of Engineering + Technology

BS16

The LabAid Trust

C7

The Royal Institution

C19

The Yes Programme

B2

Timstar AS24 Twig World Tweets, teachmeets and lectures

AS23 D6

Tyn Can Learning

D44

University of Hertfordshire

C17

University of Reading Student Travel Keycards

AS46

University of Sheffield Faculty of Science D48 University of York Science Education

BS18

Wild Learning

A55

Williams Words & Games

A 13

WJEC C22 Women's Engineering Society

D11

Working Science

D33

YPO D38

87

ENTRANCE 2

D39

D40 D41 D43 D44 D47 D48 D49

D30

Pearson

D

DS38 D35 D34 D33 DS23 D26 D27 D28

D14

D50

ASE

Open Conference

Edexcel

ASE DS2

DS22 D19 D18 D17 DS7 D10 D11 D12

D5

EMERGENCY EXIT ONLY

Exhibition Office

3B Scientific

AS7

A6

A5

A10

A50

A51

A54

ENTRANCE 3

AS31

Oxford University Press Bronze Partner

A30

Scientific & Chemical

AS32 A41

Networking Area

Immersive Theatre A33

A13 A14 A15

Clock Tower

A12

A17

SLS

A9 A16

AS8

A Data Harvest

AS27

AS26 AS19

AS24 AS20 AS23 AS22

OCR

Gold Partner

A1

ENTRANCE 1

AS49

AS48 AS47 AS46

RSC BS12

B13 C40 CS39 C38

CS37

cleapss

3B Scientific

Timstar

Registration in Great Hall

Narika Millgate

Lectures Tweets TeachMeets

D6

D1

A2

ASE Book Sales Delegate Bags Collection

Gratnells

Exhibition Marquee

BS25

Smart Lng

BS14

Myscience

B1

The Association for Science Education

The University of Birmingham

ENTRANCE 4

C5

B10

C 14

CS 15

C 16

C 17

CS 18

B 7

B 8

B 9

The Biology Stand

IOP

BS20

B6

C19

CS30

C6

CS31

C4

C29

B5

BS18

B4

B

BS23

January 9 - 11 - 2014

BS16

BS24

BS15

B3

C32

C28

C22

C27

B2

Molymod C24

C34

C7

C

C3

C13

C8

C11

CS2

C10

CS9

C26 CS36

CS25

AQA

C1

Silver Partner

ENTRANCE 5

Unleash the joy of Science with OCR at ocr.org.uk/science

88

Contacts ASE OFFICERS Chair Pete Robinson CSciTeach. E-mail: support@peterobinson.org.uk Chair-Elect Dr Christine Harrison. E-mail: christineharrison@kcl.ac.uk Immediate Past-Chair Mrs Liz Lawrence CSciTeach. E-mail: lizlawrence10@btinternet.com Hon. Treasurer Mr Des Dunne. E-mail: deslimited@aol.com Quality and Audit Committee Chair Mr Roger McCune. E-mail: rmccune@ccea.org.uk

If you have difficulty in contacting any of those listed below, please ring Suzanne Dickinson at ASE Headquarters on 01707 283000 for the latest contact details.

ATSE Ms Caro Garrett. E-mail: c.garrett@soton.ac.uk NAIGS Ms Jo Conn. E-mail: joanna.conn@hertscc.gov.uk Annual Conference (Hon. Sec.) Ms Susie Burr. E-mail: susanburr952@btinternet.com REGION SECRETARIES 1. North East Ms Cynthia Tippling. E-mail: Cynthia.tippling@tesco.net 2. Cymru/Wales Cymru/Wales Ms Carol Wood. E-mail: carol.wood@newport.ac.uk

COUNCIL

3. North West Ms Gillian Kay Halton. E-mail: gill.halton@ic24.net

n Stuart Farmer. Chair of Council. E-mail: stuart.farmer@yahoo.co.uk

4. Yorkshire & the Humber Mr Paul Tempest. E-mail: paulrtempest@gmail.com

n Des Dunne. E-mail: deslimited@aol.com

5. Anglia Mr Kevin Blogg. E-mail: kevin.blogg@norfolk.gov.uk

n Stuart Naylor, Vice Chair of Council. E-mail: stuart@millgatehouse.co.uk

6. London Ms Sheila Curtis. E-mail: s.curtis@ioe.ac.uk

n Pete Robinson. E-mail: support@peterobinson.org.uk

7. West Midlands Mr George Hurst. E-mail: george.hurst@blueyonder.co.uk

n Susie Mullen. E-mail: susiemullen@gmail.com n Maggie Hannon. E-mail: mmahannon@aol.com

8. Scotland For all enquiries, please contact Region Chair, Heather Earnshaw. E-mail: h.earnshaw@gwc.org.uk

n Sally Howard. E-mail: sally2how@yahoo.com

9. Southern Counties Ms Sue Martin. E-mail: sue@wowscience.co.uk

n Alan Rhodes. E-mail: rhod3s@ntlworld.com n Miriam Watson. E-mail: miriam.watson@hotmail.co.uk

10. Berkshire and Oxfordshire Ms Kate Donegan. E-mail: kate@palmcomputing.co.uk

n Roger McCune – observer on Council representing the

11. Northern Ireland Mr Wilson Agnew. E-mail: wilsonragnew@hotmail.com 12. Home Counties Ms Jo Conn. E-mail: joanna.conn@hertscc.gov.uk

ASSEMBLY

13. West of England Ms Anne Sell. E-mail: asell@talk21.com

Pete Robinson. E-mail: support@peterobinson.org.uk Liz Lawrence. E-mail: lizlawrence10@btinternet.com Christine Harrison. E-mail: christineharrison@kcl.ac.uk Wilson Agnew. E-mail: wilsonragnew@hotmail.com Chris Colclough. E-mail: cpcsms@dial.pipex.com Joanna Conn. E-mail: Joanna.conn@hertscc.gov.uk Des Dunne. E-mail: deslimited@aol.com Stuart Farmer. E-mail: stuart.farmer@yahoo.co.uk Caro Garrett. E-mail: c.garrett@soton.ac.uk Gavin Gray. E-mail: office@iosa.org.uk Sally Howard. E-mail: sally2how@yahoo.com Stuart Jones. E-mail: stuartj51@hotmail.com Michelle McGaughey. E-mail: mmcgaughey302@chs.cookstown.ni.sch.uk Philip Morton. E-mail: mrmortonscience@gmail.com Nick O’Brien. E-mail: nickjobrien@me.com Jan O’Connell. E-mail: joconnell@abbotsfield.org Michelle Pope. E-mail: mpope@towers.w.sussex.sch.uk Alan Rhodes. E-mail: rhod3s@ntlworld.com Helen Rogerson. E-mail: helenrogerson80@googlemail.com Sally Spicer. E-mail: sallylspicer2@yahoo.co.uk Natalie Timoney. E-mail: Natalie.mccoy@gmail.com Jane Turner. E-mail: j.turner@herts.ac.uk Miriam Watson. E-mail: miriam.watson@hotmail.co.uk

14. South West of England Dr Nigel Skinner. E-mail: n.c.skinner@exeter.ac.uk 16. North and East Midlands Mr Robert Butler. E-mail: rob@fiendishlyclever.com 17. South East Ms Hellen Ward. E-mail: h.c.ward@canterbury.ac.uk 18. North East London and Essex For all enquiries, please contact Frances Evans, Field Officer. E-mail: francesevans@ase.org.uk 19. Surrey and Sussex Dr Sarah Pannell. E-mail: sarah@robpannell.com FIELD OFFICERS Mrs Frances Evans - HQ-based Field Officer Co-ordinator and covering all regions in the South. E-mail: francesevans@ase.org.uk Dr Katherine Forsey - covering Northern England. E-mail:katherineforsey@ase.org.uk Scotland – vacant Dr Gaynor Sharp and Ms Tanya Dempster - covering Midlands (job share). E-mails: gaynorsharp@ase.org.uk and tanyadempster@ase.org.uk Mrs Cerian Angharad - covering Cymru/Wales. E-mail: cerianangharad@ase.org.uk Ms Michelle Ryan - covering Northern Ireland. E-mail: michelleryan@ase.org.uk

CHIEF EXECUTIVE Annette Smith. E-mail: annettesmith@ase.org.uk

COMMITTEE CHAIRS Professor Alice Roberts PRESIDENT

Pete Robinson CHAIR OF ASE

Science Education 11-19 Committee Mr John Charlesworth.| E-mail: jcharlesworth@sibfordschool.co.uk Primary Science Education Committee New Chair to be confirmed International Aspects of Science Education Specialist Group Mr Graham Jackson. E-mail: jackogd@aol.com Science Laboratory Technicians Committee Ms Michelle McGaughey. E-mail: mmcgaughey302@chs.cookstown.ni.sch.uk Publications (Books) Specialist Group New Chair to be confirmed Safeguards in Science Education Specialist Group Mr Ralph Whitcher. E-mail: rwhitcher@btinternet.com Research in Science Education Specialist Group Dr John Oversby. E-mail: j.p.oversby@reading.ac.uk

Unleash the joy of Science with OCR at ocr.org.uk/science

If you have difficulty in contacting any of those listed above, please ring Suzanne Dickinson at ASE Headquarters on 01707 283000 for the latest contact details.

Getting to the

University

of Birmingham

For all travel information visit: www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/government-society/departments/ international-development/events/2013/maps-directions.aspx

Public Transport By rail i (ASE recommended option)

Most cross-country services to Birmingham arrive at New Street Station. Catch the cross-city line 2 stops to University station (takes 7 mins), final destination Longbridge or Redditch. This service runs every 10 minutes. Turn left out of University station and you will see the main campus. By bus R Numbers 61, X62 and 63 travel to the University’s Edgbaston campus. The services all run frequently from the city centre, bus timetables available online on the Express West Midlands website. By coach b There are frequent express coach services to Birmingham from main UK airports and cities. Digbeth coach station in the city centre is a short walk from New Street train station. By taxi U Recommended Taxi Number: TOA 0121 427 8888 There are taxi ranks at New Street Station and throughout the city centre. The journey to the University takes about ten minutes. Travelling by Car U Approaching from the north west or south east along the M6: Leave at Junction 6 (signposted Birmingham Central) to join the A38(M). At the end of the motorway, keep to the right, and join the A38 Bristol Road. The University is on your right, 2½ miles from the city centre. Approaching from the M42 north: Leave at Junction 8 to join the M6 northbound and follow the instructions above. Approaching from the south west: Leave the M5 at Junction 4 signposted Birmingham SW) to join the A38. The University is approx. 8 miles from the motorway.

A butterfly would take 8.5hrs flying non-stop from the centre of London to Birmingham

Approaching from the M40: It is easier to turn south on the M42 and leave at Junction 1, heading north on the A38 Bristol Road. The University is approx. 8 miles from the motorA94 way Visitor Car Parking - Limited Visitors please use the pay & display car parks: n South Car Park (access via Edgbaston Park Road) Sat Nav Postcode B15 2TU n North Car Park (access via Pritchatts Rd) n Pritchatts Road Car Park (at the junction with Vincent Drive) n Grange Road Car Park (Main Campus) The first three car parks above are peripheral car parks and can be accessed without entering the main campus. Visitor charges for Non University Permit Holders are: Up to 1 hour £1.00 1-3 hours £3.00 M74 3-5 hours £4.00 5-8 hours £6.00 Disabled Access Parking for blue badge holders is available onsite at Chancellor’s Court (where the Exhibition is situated).

M6

M62 M1

M6

Birmingham M6

Luton

M5 M1

M40 M4

Reading M5

However, a Giraffe would take 3.5 hours.

M25

M23

Gatwick

M20

Dover


ASE Annual Conference 2014 Handbook