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Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon Now I felt in my heart it was right to do this instead of going back home. I did so. “And after all it may be I may hear the word the Lord has for me; for He meant something by my coming.” So I slipped in quietly and stood at the door; there were a number of others standing up. Just as Mrs. Smith was in the midst of her good Bible address, sure enough the Lord had a message for me, and I got a great blessing as I stood at the door. Praise the Lord! And now, the change is, instead of Amanda Smith, the colored washwoman’s presence having a bad effect on a meeting where ladies of wealth and rank are gathered to pray and sing His blessing, they think a failure more possible if the same Amanda Smith, the colored woman, cannot be present. This is all the Lord’s doings, and marvelous in our eyes. At the close of this meeting as the ladies were passing out, one and another came to me and spoke to me, and shook hands; “Why, this is Amanda Smith.” “Yes.” “Oh, here is Amanda Smith; why didn’t you sing?” And another, “Oh I have heard of you.” And another, “Oh, I wish you had sung such a piece.” And another, “Why didn’t you speak?” And another, “I have heard you sing such a piece at Ocean Grove at such a time, or at Round Lake.” I was glad of this, for I thought, “After all, I have not spoiled the spirit of the meeting.” But then, I was not so well known then, and many people were shy of me, and are yet. But I belong to Royalty, and am well acquainted with the King of Kings, and am better known and better understood among the great family above than I am on earth. But I thank God the time is coming, and we “Shall know each other better when the mists have rolled away.” Hallelujah! Amen. (An Autobiography: The Story of the Lord’s Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith the Colored Evangelist, by Mrs. Amanda Smith, 1893, pages 196-198)

Profile for First Fruits Press

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon  

Robert A. Danielson

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon  

Robert A. Danielson