Page 185

170 |

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon

federal Indian policy in the 1930’s. While recognizing these negative results, it is also important to remember that without Quinton and Bonney, it is very likely that much more Native American territory would have been taken by laws Congress was considering, and neither citizenship, equality before the law, or funds for education were considered for compensation. In 1901, the Women’s National Indian Association allowed men to join and became the National Indian Association, working for Native American rights. Amelia Quinton went on to found some fifty missions among Native Americans providing resources to build homes, provide teachers, and establish libraries on reservations. In a time when most white Christians had little concern for Native American issues, Amelia Stone Quinton stands as a shining example of a Christian concerned for diversity and equal rights for Native Americans.

Profile for First Fruits Press

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon  

Robert A. Danielson

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon  

Robert A. Danielson