Page 104

Robert A. Danielson

| 89

Biography Susan Brownell Anthony (Feb. 15, 1820-Mar. 13, 1906) was born into a Quaker family, and with her friend and co-worker, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, became a major force for social reform in the United States. Her early Quaker background in New York brought her into the movements for the abolition of slavery, temperance, and women’s rights. In 1863, they founded the Women’s Loyal National League, which advocated the abolition of slavery, followed by a paper for women’s rights called The Revolution and the National Woman Suffrage Association in the late 1860s. In 1872, Anthony was arrested for illegally voting and went to trial, where she dramatically and passionately defended the right of women to be treated as equal citizens in one of the most famous speeches ever given for women’s rights. (For an account of the trial see: http://ecssba.rutgers.edu/docs/sbatrial. html) She refused to pay the fine and the government refused to take the issue further. In 1878, along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony advanced an amendment giving women the right to vote. It would ultimately become the Nineteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. In 1979 her image became the first image of an American woman on a U.S. coin. Anthony never married, in part because of the legal subjugation she felt that entailed. Had she married she would have been unable to sign contracts on her own behalf. Laws gave husbands absolute control over the family and its finances. This was one reason the Temperance Movement was seen as a woman’s issue. Men who abused alcohol could completely destroy their families with no legal recourse. Even if a husband was abusive, if a woman was able to gain a very rare divorce, usually the husband ended up with custody of any children. She is quoted as saying in 1877, “If women will not accept marriage with subjugation, nor men proffer it without, there is, there can be, no alternative. The woman who will not be ruled must live without marriage.”

Profile for First Fruits Press

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon  

Robert A. Danielson

Hannah Whitall Smith: The Feminist Connections of a Holiness Icon  

Robert A. Danielson