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Can Education Be Arizona’s Hot-Button Issue? Legislative Voting Records on Key K-12 Issues PLUS... Mentoring New Board Members

z DEPARTMENTS 4

ASBA News By Tracey Benson, ASBA Journal Editor

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President’s Message We Need More ‘Builders’ Serving Arizona’s Students By Debbie King, ASBA President

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Leadership Matters Designing a Smooth Board Transition: Mentoring New Board Members Begins Before They Take OfďŹ ce By Karen Beckvar, ASBA Leadership Development Specialist

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Capitol View 2010 Legislative Session Wrap-Up PLUS... Key Legislation and Voting Records By Janice Palmer, ASBA Director of Governmental Relations

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Lessons from Research Backlash Against Non-Classroom Spending Will Hurt Children By Michael T. Martin, ASBA Research Analyst

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Education and the Law How Much Discussion about the Budget Can Take Place in an Executive Session? By Chris Thomas, ASBA Director of Legal Services Points On Policy Mentor or Mentee? Effective Board Members Must Be Willing To Play Both Roles By Jim Deaton, ASBA Director of Policy Services Viewpoints Your Role in Preparing the Next Generation of School Board Members By PanďŹ lo H. Contreras, ASBA Executive Director

z FEATURES 9

ProďŹ le in Leadership: Anne Gibson

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Quality Afterschool Programs in the Best Interest of Students By Melanie McClintock

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Campaign Seeks to Make Education Arizona’s Hot-Button Issue By Nicole Magnuson

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Where We Stand: How ASBA’s Positions on Issues Are Determined By Tracey Benson, ASBA Journal Editor

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Generating Powerful Savings Through Energy EfďŹ ciency By Jennifer Rivera

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Increasing Impact and Ongoing Stigma of HIV/AIDS in Arizona Schools By Janice Piatt, M.D.

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The Secrets to a Good Board-Superintendent Marriage By John Blattner, Ph.D. =Z\SXQ  3

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ARIZONA SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIATION z OfďŹ cers President Debbie King President Elect Dee Navarro Secretary Deb Scott Treasurer Lamar Johnson Immediate Past President Robert Rice

z County Directors, Caucus Presidents Apache Rose Martinez Cochise Carolyn Calderon Coconino Chuck Wahler Gila Bob Cassa Graham Roberta Lopez Greenlee Mike Wearne La Paz Rudy Parker Maricopa Kevin Clayborn Maricopa Randy Schiller Mohave William Goodale Navajo Raymond Laughter Pima Jim Coulter Pima Elaine Hall Pinal Irene Patino Santa Cruz Harry Clapeck Yavapai Karen McClelland Yuma Maureen Irr Hispanic/Native American Indian Caucus David Esquivel

z Staff Executive Director PanďŹ lo H. Contreras Director of Administrative Services Ellen White Director of Policy Services Jim Deaton Director of Legal Services Chris Thomas Director of Governmental Relations Janice Palmer Director of Leadership Development John Gordon Communications/Journal Editor Tracey Benson Education Policy Analyst Dr. Terry Rowles Education Policy Analyst Steve Highlen Governmental Relations Analyst Beth Sauer Research Analyst Michael T. Martin Leadership Development Specialist Karen Beckvar Policy Technician Renae Watson Administrative Secretary Jolene Hale Administrative Secretary Shirley Simpson Administrative Secretary Colleen Mee Administrative Secretary Elizabeth Sanchez Receptionist Kristi Johnson Publication Policy: Articles printed herein may be divergent in point of view and controversial in nature. The materials published in each issue represent the ideas or beliefs of those who write them, and not necessarily the views or policies of the Arizona School Boards Association. Š 2010 by the Arizona School Boards Association. Address all correspondence to: ASBA Journal Editor 2100 N. Central Ave., Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85004 Phone: 602-254-1100; 1-800-238-4701 editor@azsba.org; Web site: www.azsba.org Annual subscription rate $24. Production and Design by S&L Printing & Mailing 1428 W. San Pedro • Gilbert, AZ 85233 • 480-497-8081

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ASBA NEWS

By Tracey Benson, ASBA Journal Editor

Keynote speakers announced for 2010 ASBA-ASA Annual Conference

Two nationally-known keynote speakers, one an author and motivational speaker and the other a retired Army ofďŹ cer, will discuss aspects of servant leadership in their keynote addresses at the 2010 ASBA-ASA Annual Conference (Dec. 15-17 in Phoenix). Dr. Kent Keith has been focused on helping people ďŹ nd personal meaning since he was a college student in the 1960s. Dr. Keith is the author of The Paradoxical Commandments, which he wrote when he was 19, while a sophomore at Harvard College. His “commandmentsâ€? are guidelines for ďŹ nding personal meaning in the face of adversity. Dr. Keith also is the author of The Universal Moral Code, a set of fundamental moral principles that can be found throughout the world. A dynamic speaker whose mission is “to help people ďŹ nd personal meaning in a crazy world,â€? Dr. Keith’s seminars, presentations, research and books are designed to reconnect people with the most important sources of meaning that are available to them as leaders, employees and individuals. Consuelo Castillo Kickbusch overcame poverty, discrimination and illiteracy, and grew up to become a successful leadership role model for her community. Breaking barriers and setting records in the military, Lt. Col. (Retired) Kickbusch rose to senior ofďŹ cer position and became the highest-ranking Hispanic woman in the Combat Support Field of the U.S. Army. A charismatic, passionate and entertaining speaker, Kickbusch will share how to be an effective leader in today’s global marketplace.

Educating diverse student populations subject of recent conference School board members, administrators and other public school leaders from throughout the southwestern United States gathered in Phoenix from March 25-28 for the 2010 Celebrating Educational Opportunities for Students of All Cultures Conference. The event, which was hosted by ASBA, offered unique opportunities to gather information about new approaches in successfully educating diverse student populations, network with governing board members and school staff, engage in courageous conversations about what can be done to meet the educational needs of all children, and hear about ways to create pathways to success for both students and staff. Next year’s Celebrating Opportunities conference will be held April 28 – May 1 at the Eldorado Hotel in Santa Fe, N.M. Keynote speaker Joe Prince, a special educator and head track and ďŹ eld coach at Sahuarita High School in southern Arizona, signs his book “Liberation Saturdayâ€? for Holbrook USD governing board member Linda Yazzie.

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Once again, inspiring personal stories shared by a panel of students and young professionals were a conference highlight. Panelists, pictured here with 2009-2010 NSBA Hispanic Caucus Chair Cindy Matus Morriss (second from left) and ASBA President Debbie King (third from left), are (from far left) C.K. Green, a math teacher and graduate student from California; Candace Hubbell, a senior at Arizona’s Ganado High School; Sarah Elizabeth Saucedo, who grew up in New Mexico and now is a litigation associate with a Washington, D.C., law ďŹ rm; and Anthony Franklyn, a University of Texas student majoring in history and government.

Los Diablitos, the mariachi group from Sunnyside High School in Tucson’s Sunnyside UniďŹ ed School District, welcomed attendees with a performance immediately prior to the conference’s opening session.

ASBA C a l e nd a r o f E v e n t s May 2010 31 ASBA OfďŹ ce Closed Memorial Day

June 2010 25 ASBA Board of Directors Meeting Scottsdale

Campaign shines spotlight on school board service This spring ASBA launched a statewide campaign aimed at highlighting the rewards and challenges of serving as a school board member. Informational webinars, which were the centerpiece of the campaign, were held in April and early May and attracted participation from community members throughout Arizona who are considering a run for their local board in November. Topics covered in each webinar included Why Serve?; Do You Have What It Takes?;What School Board Members Do (and What They Don’t Do); Eligibility and the Basics of Running for OfďŹ ce; Commonly Asked Questions about Board Service; and Support Available to Board Members Once Elected. The campaign received statewide TV, radio and newspaper coverage.

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ASBA Delegate Assembly Scottsdale

July 2010 5 ASBA OfďŹ ce Closed Independence Day Observed 10-12

NSBA PaciďŹ c Region Summer Meeting

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ASBA Summer Leadership Institute Flagstaff

August 2010 1-5 NSBA Executive Directors Summer Institute

Sessions on hot legal topics, a candidate debate and two pre-conferences to make this year’s law conference better than ever The Annual ASBA Law Conference will be returning for its 34th year bigger and better than ever. Scheduled for Sept. 9-11 at the JW Marriott Camelback Inn, “Legal Perspectives 2010â€? will feature ASBA’s most comprehensive legal and legislative update of the year, a panel discussion on immigration and public schools (“SB1070 and Beyondâ€?), 16 breakout sessions on the most critical legal topics Arizona schools are facing today, and the return of humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson with a portrayal of Arizona legend John Wesley Powell. On the closing morning of the conference (Saturday, Sept. 11), ASBA will host a candidate forum for attendees featuring major party nominees for the ofďŹ ces of Arizona superintendent of public instruction, attorney general and governor. In addition to the regular conference programming, for an additional fee attendees will have the choice between two all-morning, in-depth pre-conferences on Thursday, Sept. 9. The topics are “Technology and Student-Employee Boundary Issuesâ€? and “Arizona’s Open Meeting Law from All Sides.â€? Look for additional details on the 34th Annual ASBA Law Conference on “Legal Perspectives,â€? ASBA’s largest ASBA’s web site (www.azsba.org), by email and in your ASBA Report Card member conference of the year, will beneďŹ t from newsletter. the Camelback Inn’s new conference Registration and hotel reservations will open Tuesday, July 6 at 8 a.m. center and additional guest rooms. =Z\SXQ  3

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z PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE By Debbie King, ASBA President

We Need More ‘Builders’ Serving Arizona’s Students The Builder I saw them tearing a building down. A team of men in my home town. With a heave and a ho and a yes yes yell, they swung a beam and a sidewall fell. And I said to the foreman, “Are these men skilled? Like the ones you’d use if you had to build?� And he laughed and said, “Oh no, indeed... the most common labor is all I need...for I can destroy in a day or two what takes a builder ten years to do.� So I thought to myself as I went on my way. Which one of these roles am I willing to play? Am I one who is tearing down as I carelessly make my way around? Or am I one who builds with care, in order to make the world a little better because I was there? -

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was touched by this poem. It made me stop and think about my role as servant leader, and I hope it will have the same effect on you. Of course, we all want to be those skilled “builders,� and we must continue to work toward that end through continued training, collaboration, and the use of the knowledge and experience we’ve acquired over our time as public school leaders. However, I would like you to think about your role as a servant leader from a slightly different perspective. What are you doing to mentor future “builders?� I’m not referring to our students; I’m referring to parents, grandparents and community members who care deeply about their communities and public schools. Are you actively looking for those “skilled� individuals who have a servant’s heart to step in to your shoes when the time comes? If you answered “yes,� then give yourself a big round of applause! If your answer was something else, ask yourself why not. What are you afraid of? Are you concerned someone might take “your spot?� If that’s the case, here’s something that may warrant even greater concern. What if you don’t mentor someone? What if someone who is being encouraged by other groups, with a very

different and harmful agenda, comes in and takes your spot? If you’re the “skilled builder� who has been working for many years, who would you rather have follow in your footsteps? Perhaps you’ve been doing a fabulous job of mentoring your community members, and you’re not concerned. Ask yourself this question: Do we have all the site council members, PTA members and volunteers we can use? If not, there is room for more mentoring. What about other local positions that impact education? Do you need more public education supporters on your city or town council, or as county supervisors or legislators representing your district? The people who serve in these positions can make a huge difference for our public schools. Is there someone you know who you think would be great in one of these positions? Does this individual have the servant heart that is needed to truly help others? Maybe you need to ask this person to serve. Perhaps being asked by someone they respect, who is serving others, would have an incredible impact on them. I know that I may never have gotten involved on my local school board had someone not asked me to do so. What about you? Have you been asked to serve in other roles? Has

someone suggested that you would be great as a legislator or a leader in some other area that could positively impact public education? Don’t just dismiss the idea. Give it some serious thought. You may be wondering why I have made this the focus of my article for this edition of the ASBA Journal. We are facing the toughest budget issues I’ve experienced in my 10 years on my school board. I heard this poem and realized that as a “builderâ€? who has worked for many years, I am now watching progress being “torn downâ€? in a matter of a few short months. We need to step outside our normal comfort zones and do all that we can to make a difference in our schools. That may mean we look at things a little differently. We may think about involving more people or stepping into a new role ourselves. We are the builders.We must protect what we’ve worked so hard to secure for our children. We must not let those who are less skilled than we are, or who have agendas that come from something other than a desire to be a servant leader, destroy our children’s future. Reach out to your communities as you have never done before. Search for those who are of the same mindset. We have a lot of work to do, and people need you. They need servant leaders they can trust! „ =Z\SXQ  3

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We’re helping public school leaders pave the way to effective school board service through upcoming training opportunities for candidates and new governing board members.

Early Bird Sessions for School Board Candidates — Sept. 28 - Oct. 28, 2010 7YLWHYPUNUL^IVHYKTLTILYZMVYZLY]PJLILNPUZL]LUILMVYL[OL`[HRLVMÄJL0ULSLJ[PVU`LHYZ(:)( VMMLYZLHYS`IPYKZLZZPVUZMVYZJOVVSIVHYKJHUKPKH[LZH[L]LY`*V\U[`4LL[PUN;OLZLZZPVUJV]LYZ[OL YVSLZHUKYLZWVUZPIPSP[PLZVMIVHYKTLTILYZ:\WLYPU[LUKLU[ZHYLLUJV\YHNLK[VYLNPZ[LYHSSJHUKPKH[LZ MVY[OPZVWWVY[\UP[`=PZP[^^^HaZIHVYNMVYKH[LZSVJH[PVUZHUKYLNPZ[YH[PVUPUMVYTH[PVU New Board Member Orientation — Dec. 15, 2010 Biltmore Conference Center, Phoenix ;OPZHSSKH`ZLZZPVUWYV]PKLZUL^NV]LYUPUNIVHYKTLTILYZHUKZ\WLYPU[LUKLU[Z^P[OHUHJJ\YH[LSVVRH[ ZJOVVSNV]LYUHUJLPUJS\KPUNYVSLZHUKYLZWVUZPIPSP[PLZ"PUZPNO[ZPU[V[OLSLNHSHUKL[OPJHSYLZWVUZPIPSP[PLZ VM[OLVMÄJL"HUV]LY]PL^VM(YPaVUHZJOVVSÄUHUJLHUKI\KNL[PUN"HUKHSVVRH[[OLYLZV\YJLZHUK ZLY]PJLZH]HPSHISL[OYV\NO(:)(TLTILYZOPW3VVRMVYKL[HPSZHUKYLNPZ[YH[PVUPUMVYTH[PVU[OPZMHSS

Arizona School Boards Association Quality leadership and advocacy for children in public schools. ^^^HaZIHVYN‹‹

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z PROFILE IN LEADERSHIP 

+XXO1SL]YX national and international recognition. What I learned from him was to have patience when causes become difďŹ cult, to build strong teams to accomplish a goal, to involve many people in the decisionmaking process and allow them feelings of ownership, and most of all not to give up. He taught me to view my volunteer work as a mission with the commitment to make education for all children the best that it can be and not to be afraid to try new and innovative methods to reaching my goal. Mr. Baker has mentored me and continues to guide me. He inspires not only me, but also all those around him. Governing Board Vail UniďŹ ed School District Hometown Tucson – third generation A Board Member for 11 years and ďŹ ve months Books at Bedside The World Is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman, to remind me we live in a global economy and of the advancing beneďŹ ts of technology. Tucson:The Life and Times of an American City by C.L. Sonnicbsen, to remind of my roots. mind me o Plants For Dry C Climates – How to Select, Grow and Enjoy by Mary Rose DufďŹ eld d and Warren D. Jones, to keep me rooted in my love off natu nature and gard gardening. n, to keep m The Message byy Eu Eugene H. Peterson, me grounded on who really sets the path for my life. Inspiration ation Throug Throughout myy life the there have been many high proďŹ le people such h as SSusan B. Antho Anthony, Rosa Parks, Mother Teresa and Calamity Jane ne w who have ave in inspired me. About 20 years ago, my inspiration cam came closer ser to home. There are two men in my life that not only have inspired me but also have served ed as role models. mode One was my husband off ov over 40 years who allowed l me the h latitude tto grow and take advantage of experiences as they presented themselves. hemselv The other is a gentle gentleman who came not only to inspire and inuence nuen me but tthe en entire community of Vail. Calvin Baker came in 1988 to Vail as an administrator. ator It was a sc school district ict of 350 stu students with onee K-8 school. sc The district w was deeplyy divided politicall politically. Today there ar are 1,600 employees, em 15 schools,, more than tha 10,600 0,60 students, ts, a united uni community, ommun and

Motto as a Board Member There is nothing that cannot be accomplished with hard work and dedication. Pie-in-the-Sky Vision for Education The vision would begin with the election of Arizona state legislators who recognize the importance of appropriate funding and legislation for all school districts. With the appropriate funding all students would be provided with the tools to achieve in the 21st century and master the national academic standards. Advice to New Board Members Be fair, listen, develop a strong relationship with your fellow board members and take advantage of ASBA board training. Greatest Accomplishment as a Board Member A tough question... Probably my growth as a board member that has allowed me to be more effective locally and statewide with ASBA. Pet Peeve as a Board Member People who say they are going to do or support something and then, without a good reason, don’t. Reason I Like Being an ASBA Member Attending ASBA conferences, workshops and special programs allows an opportunity for professional growth and, more importantly, a time to interact with board members across the state. ASBA brings board members from diverse school districts together to be heard as one voice on education issues that affect the children of Arizona. My Epitaph She caused positive change and made a small mark in the education of children. =Z\SXQ  3

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z LEADERSHIP MATTERS

By Karen Beckvar, ASBA Leadership Development Specialist

Designing a Smooth Board Transition: Mentoring New Board Members Begins Before They Take OfďŹ ce

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t’s an election year for governing boards around the state of Arizona. What’s in store for your boardsuperintendent team? Are the board members whose terms are over planning to run again? What should board members and superintendents be doing if it looks like there will be a change on the board? Keep in mind that districts are prohibited by state law from taking a position or using district resources to inuence the outcome of elections, but this does not mean that potential board members should be ignored until they sit at their ďŹ rst board meeting. If your team wants a smooth transition with new team members, there is plenty that can be done while still staying within the bounds of the law. Mentoring new board members begins before they take ofďŹ ce. Before the Election The current team can begin by making sure they have documented what processes and procedures are working for the team. Some of this is in the form of policies; others may be in the form of written operating protocols. Ensuring that there are quality candidates to run for ofďŹ ce. Begin with the current board. Can that effective board member who is on the fence be convinced to run for another term? If there is going to be a vacancy on the board, individual board members should actively help ďŹ nd and encourage quality individuals to consider joining their team. Look at your community – who are the advocates for children

and public education in your district? Who has been an active volunteer in your schools or the community? Who are the team players, willing to listen and understand both sides of an issue before making a decision? Encourage these individuals to serve on your board. Board members are servant leaders who will put the needs of the students and district above their personal desires.

by modeling in their interactions how important teamwork is to the process and the division in roles and responsibilities in the district. Information sessions for board candidates. Think of the positive message you are sending when all candidates for the board get to meet with the superintendent and senior staff and receive information about the district – such as basic budget information, how to ďŹ nd the district policies on-line, copies of the last few board meeting minutes or agendas. The investment of an hour of your time now can help set the stage for a warm welcome – no matter who is elected; all will feel that they were treated fairly and openly. Superintendents should help candidates to register for the “Early Bird Sessionâ€? at the ASBA County Workshop in the fall where they will learn more about the roles and responsibilities of board members. Superintendents can also begin sending the board agenda and non-conďŹ dential material to candidates so that they can begin to get into the swing of board meeting preparation expectations.

The current team can begin by making sure they have documented what processes and procedures are working for the team. Some of this is in the form of policies; others may be in the form of written operating protocols.

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Making sure that board candidates understand what board service is - and isn’t. Some advocates and volunteers are great in their current role, but may not make the best board members. Sometimes when candidates understand what the role of the board actually is they will see that it is not the job for them. It is always better for them to reach this conclusion before they are actually seated on the board. Current board members and superintendents can help in this regard

After the Election Welcoming the new board member(s). Whether or not the individual elected was someone you preferred to have on the board, they are now part of your team. A personal phone call from the superintendent and continuing board members is a great way to say, “Welcome to our team.� The superintendent should offer to

register the new member for the ASBA New Board Member Orientation in December, and existing board members should encourage the new member to attend. District orientation for new board members. Before the new member is seated at the ďŹ rst meeting, the superintendent should arrange a district orientation for new and continuing board members (all board members should get the same information). Ideas for what this can include can be found on the ASBA website under Leadership Development (Board-Superintendent Resources). New team transition meeting. Whenever even a single new member joins the board, a new team is formed. This is a great time to review the vision, mission and core beliefs of the district and decide if they still represent the views of the community. Reviewing established protocols and listening to see if adjustments need to be made to accommodate the new member’s needs is an important

step in letting the new member see that their presence and thoughts are valued. For instance, the new member may need an extra day to review the board meeting materials because of their work schedule. The board and superintendent should make every effort to accommodate this because a well-prepared board member is less likely to spring surprises at the board meeting. ASBA has years of experience in facilitating these types of meetings. Continued mentoring of new board members. Just because you have had the board orientation and transition meeting doesn’t mean that you are done. New board members will need some mentoring for awhile. This can be formalized by having one board member available to answer procedural questions for the member (such as “How do I make a motion?� or “Who should I call when I get a complaint about a teacher?�). There is also an informal part of the mentoring process. After a meeting, a quick, one-on-one aside to the new

board member about something that he or she did well helps build the conďŹ dence that is needed to be an active participant at the board table. A brief, constructive suggestion on how something could have been handled better at the table can be equally enlightening to the new member and help nurture continuous improvement. The district’s superintendent and experienced board members in neighboring districts, including ASBA county directors and ofďŹ cers, also can be a resource for the new board member. When weaknesses are observed, suggesting and encouraging attendance at various trainings that are offered around the state can help the new board member see the road to continuous improvement. Finally, remember that all board members and superintendents have another ace in their pocket – the Arizona School Boards Association. We are here to help the boardsuperintendent team provide quality leadership and advocacy for the students in your district. „

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ervices for Arizona’s children are under attack. In the past two years, the Arizona state legislature cut approximately $300 million from the state’s primary and secondary education budget causing school districts to lay off teachers, increase class sizes, and reduce or drop extracurricular activities that are vital to assuring our children’s educational and developmental success. Simultaneously, parents and employers expect schools to raise student performance scores as measured by the AIMS test, increase the state’s 73.4 percent four-year graduation rate, and decrease the state’s 6.8 percent dropout rate of students in the 9 – 12th grades. Currently, Arizona boasts the nation’s secondfastest growing student population but ranks 43 in the U.S. on Education Week’s overall “chance-for-success� index. At the same time that state funding is declining, there are those who propose that the only way to improve Arizona’s national education ranking is to increase the length of the school day and/or the school year. And while it is true that students are only in school 27 percent of the day, the demands of working parents require that their children be at school before the bell rings in the morning and remain at school long after the bell rings at the end of the day. As a result, schools and communitybased providers began before and afterschool programs as a safe and nurturing place for children to be while their parents work instead of being home unsupervised. According to America After 3 p.m., at nationwide survey sponsored last year by the JC Penney Afterschool Fund, 16 12 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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percent of Arizona children, or 185,737, participate in organized afterschool programs, while 22 percent, or 252,557, are unsupervised and take care of themselves an average of nine hours per week.Thirty-four percent of Arizona children not in afterschool (32,913) would likely participate if an afterschool program was available in the community. More than nine of every 10 Arizona adults agree that there should be “some type of organized activity or place for children and teens to go after school every day that provides opportunities to learn.â€? While quality afterschool, or out-of-school time, programs originated as safe places for our children once the ďŹ nal schoolday bell rings, research now shows that quality afterschool programming has a strong and direct link to a child’s overall developmental and academic success. Research consistently shows that participation in quality afterschool programs results in improved school attendance, increased academic achievement in reading and math, higher levels of student engagement and motivation to learn, higher self-esteem, reduced delinquency and increased likelihood of high school graduation. SpeciďŹ cally, the Promising Afterschool Programs Study of about 3,000 low-income, ethnically diverse elementary and middle school students showed that those who regularly attended high-quality programs over two years demonstrated gains of up to the 20th percentile in standardized math test scores compared with peers unsupervised during after school hours.

While no one argues that schools must remain focused on the mastery of students’ skills, quality afterschool programs have the potential to do more than merely increase the amount of time for learning. Quality afterschool programs reafďŹ rm what is taught in the classroom at the same time they maximize children’s different styles of learning and create environments for learning that are distinct from the classroom environment. Quality afterschool programs bring together community resources that expose children to a level of experiential learning that is not easily obtainable in the daily classroom environment with all the other demands put on formal education. Outof-school time (OST) programs provide children both the opportunity and experience to “try onâ€? or “sampleâ€? or “exploreâ€? various interests that they are not exposed to in school and at the same time see ďŹ rsthand the relevance of what they are learning in school and what interests and careers they might pursue after graduation. Quality OST programs also give children the opportunity to explore their own uniqueness and develop a self-conďŹ dence that school does not always afford them. Finding their “nicheâ€? in life and in school allows children to improve their performance in academic areas where they previously struggled. Arizona lacks a clear, comprehensive policy addressing the long-term educational and development needs of our children that takes into consideration the natural synchronicity that exists between the formal school day and quality out-of-school time programs. Currently there are before and afterschool programs that are run by the schools; there are also afterschool programs run by community-based organizations using existing school facilities; and there are afterschool programs that are run by community-based programs at independent locations. In reality, there is little intentional programming that partners directly with the schools that children attend for the purpose of addressing and meeting our children’s needs. The 21st Century Community Learning Centers, which are funded by the federal Department of Education, are a notable exception. The Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence, a nonproďŹ t advocacy organization for the expansion of quality afterschool programs for all Arizona’s children, is committed to facilitating a statewide conversation that will hopefully lead to the adoption of and support of a comprehensive policy to beneďŹ t both our children and our schools. In March, the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence convened the ďŹ rst Arizona Mayoral Summit on Afterschool/ Extended Learning with 100 education, business and community leaders. The summit, hosted by the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence, Tucson Mayor Robert Walkup, Tempe Mayor Hugh Hallman and Flagstaff Mayor Sara Presler with support from the National League of Cities’ Youth Education and Families Institute, began identifying key priorities and strategies for increasing afterschool availability and accessibility, supporting afterschool program quality and using afterschool programs to increase students’ workforce readiness skills. Summit participants concluded that to be effective, a statewide afterschool strategy requires • strong leadership and a commitment to change,

• the completion of a statewide community needs assessment, • an expanded partnership between schools and municipalities, • engaged partnerships including youth representation, • more effective collaboration between schools and out-ofschool time providers and • creating a larger pool of qualiďŹ ed personnel to staff out-ofschool time programs. Following the mayoral summit, the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence began a partnership with the Valley of the Sun United Way to develop an Out-of-School Time Network Action Agenda for Maricopa County. Funded by a United Way Worldwide grant, the OST Network Action Agenda is designed to expand access for youth and families in out-of-school time programs, increase coordination among out-of-school time providers, school and community resources, and actively engage out-of-school time providers in post-secondary readiness strategies in the community. Using the Forum for Youth Investment’s Ready by 21 approach to build on and coordinate existing efforts to improve the outcomes of young people, the OST Network Action Agenda is being developed by a diversity of policymakers, school administrators, programs directors, business leaders and parent representatives led by Dr. Kent Scribner, superintendent of the Phoenix Union High School District. The hope is that what is learned in adopting and implementing an OST action agenda in Maricopa County will lead to similar efforts being replicated in other counties which, in turn, will lead to major statewide systemic changes in how Arizona educates and cares for its children. Ultimately, if Arizona is to be successful in raising and educating children with the academic and life skills required to be successful in school, work and life, we need to elect policymakers at the local, state and national level that understand and are committed to serving and meeting the needs of our children. We need policymakers that understand our children are tomorrow’s workforce, voters and community leaders. We need policymakers that will understand how to grow and develop the state economically without throwing our children’s education under the school bus in order to balance the state budget. To that end, the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence will work with partners statewide to conduct an afterschool awareness campaign for Arizona candidates running for key state and congressional positions highlighting both the need for and value of quality afterschool programming as a critically needed piece of the education reform puzzle. The Arizona School Boards Association, its partner school districts and superintendents must be major players in promoting and designing new statewide policies for our children. We all must work to elect leaders who will adopt and fund the policies that will ďŹ nally establish Arizona as an education success story and national leader. „ About the writer: Melanie McClintock is the executive director of the Arizona Center for Afterschool Excellence. Learn more at www. azafterschool.org. =Z\SXQ  3

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Arizona Cardinals President Michael Bidwell (at podium), at an April 27 news conference in Maricopa County, is just one of the state leaders standing behind the new Vote 4 Education campaign.

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s the 2010 election season ramps up, Expect More Arizona is urging voters to make education their â&#x20AC;&#x153;hot-buttonâ&#x20AC;? issue. The statewide partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recently launched Vote 4 Education campaign is designed to rally Arizonans to get out to vote, get their friends out to vote and support whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good for education from ballot initiatives such as Proposition 100 to candidates. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vote 4 Education was created in response to the growing community concern that Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already struggling education system will be signiďŹ cantly impacted by decisions made at the polls this year,â&#x20AC;? said Paul J. Luna, Expect More Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board chairman and president/CEO of Helios Education Foundation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to draw peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention to education and its critical importance to the future of our state.â&#x20AC;? The Vote 4 Education campaign began rolling out across communities statewide last month following a series of press conferences in Maricopa County, Tucson, Flagstaff and Yuma. Recognizing that a strong education system drives Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy and quality of life, business and community leaders including Phil Francis, CEO of PetSmart, Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals, and Cathleen Barton, U.S. education manager for Intel, joined Expect More Arizona for the Maricopa County launch event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As key policy and budget decisions continue to be made at a state level that impact education, it is more important than ever before to make education a key factor in every vote,â&#x20AC;? said Bidwill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic future depends on a quality education system, and we must elect leaders who will make it their priority.â&#x20AC;? Campaign signs promoting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vote 4 Educationâ&#x20AC;? and questioning â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are They 4 Education?â&#x20AC;? will soon be seen in public locations, including on street corners alongside candidate signs. In addition, voters are being asked to evaluate

their preferred candidates based on the following four questions: 1. Is education one of their top two priorities? 2. Do they have a clear plan with speciďŹ c strategies for how they will address the biggest issues affecting education in our state? 3. Are they willing to invest resources â&#x20AC;&#x201C; time, talent and money - in education to support Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-term success? 4. How will they challenge Arizonans to expect more and do more for education? All the ďŹ&#x201A;yers, posters, graphics and supporting messaging for the Vote 4 Education campaign are available online at ExpectMoreArizona.org. Businesses, community groups and individuals are encouraged to use them to rally their personal and professional networks in support of education. Expect More Arizona is a statewide partnership dedicated to creating a movement of Arizonans who value education as our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top priority. The Arizona School Boards Association is one of 10 funders supporting the public awareness and engagement effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are proud of our partnership with Expect More Arizona and share its commitment to raising the bar in education and rally Arizonans to support a stronger education system that better prepares our students to succeed in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s global economy,â&#x20AC;? said PanďŹ lo H. Contreras, executive director of ASBA and a member of the Expect More Arizona board. Â&#x201E; About the writer: Nicole Magnuson is executive director for Expect More Arizona. To learn more about Vote 4 Education and join the movement to make education Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top priority, visit ExpectMoreArizona.org. =Z\SXQ  3

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z CAPITOL VIEW

By Janice Palmer, ASBA Director of Governmental Relations

2010 Legislative Session Wrap-Up

T

he 2010 Legislative Session adjourned sine die on Thursday, April 29, at 11:07 p.m. after a 109-day session. The general effective date for chaptered bills will be July 29, 2010. The exception to that effective date is for bills passed with an emergency or retroactivity clause. Overall, ASBA had one of its best years in impacting signiďŹ cant policy for the betterment of students. With one of the shortest sessions in recent history (keep in mind that the statutory requirement is 100 days, so it is all relative), a number of signiďŹ cant policy issues were passed that will impact K-12 education now and into the near future. ASBA successfully implemented its strategy, with the help of House and Senate leadership, to reenact the school personnel policy provisions included in the 7th Special Session to moot the Arizona Education Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lawsuit. These measures will go far in giving districts the tools and ďŹ&#x201A;exibility to make stafďŹ ng decisions based on what is best for students, not adults. Parameters have been set with the passage of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Move on When Readyâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Move on When Reading,â&#x20AC;? and bills strengthening teacher and principal evaluations, changing the school-level labeling system and adding a district-level labeling system, and reviewing Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s data system. However, much work is to be done during the interim, and into the next few years, to work on the details for successful implementation of 16 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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these items. ASBA was able, through negotiations and amendments, to positively affect legislation and will continue to be engaged in the needed conversations necessary to move these items forward to fruition.

factor (instead choosing to fund the 1.2 percent inďŹ&#x201A;ation factor only on transportation in violation of Prop. 301). Additional cuts include $165 million in soft capital (approximately an 80 percent cut to districts with more than 600 students and approximately a 40 percent cut to districts with less than 600 students); the suspension of the building renewal and utility formulas; a $10 million cut to charter schools; capping the Career Ladder program at 5 percent; funding JTEDs at 91 percent of what should be funded; and $38 million in nonformulaic cuts. Without the passage of Prop. 100, K-12 education will see another $420 million in cuts for FY 11. In addition, there will be a referendum on the November 2010 ballot to eliminate First Things First At the same time these policy and sweep those invested monies into advances were made, our K-12 the state general fund. Later this summer, the ASBA education budget for ďŹ scal year 2011 (FY11) took steps back. With the Governmental Relations team will one-cent, three-year temporary sales mail to all our members a ďŹ nal status tax referral (Proposition 100) on the report on our efforts this session in May 18 ballot, the legislature passed accomplishing the top 10 priorities two versions of the FY11 budget; set by membership for 2010.We think one that assumed successful passage youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see that ASBA Governmental and one that assumed failure. Both Relations continues its effective include devastating cuts to public work in advocating our membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; priorities! In addition, when you schools, just in varying degrees. K-12 education has already seen receive the ďŹ nal status report, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll $240 million in cuts in previous ďŹ scal also receive the 2011 ASBA Political years and will see a minimum of Agenda, and a request to identify more than $500 million in additional your boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top 10 priorities for devastating cuts in Fiscal Year 2011. the year ahead. We encourage you These include the elimination of to participate fully in this process so state-funded full-day kindergarten that the needs of your students and ($218.3 million) and a refusal to schools can be well represented by fund the legally required inďŹ&#x201A;ation ASBA at the legislature. Â&#x201E;

Overall, ASBA had one of its best years in impacting signiďŹ cant policy for the betterment of students.

2010 Key Legislation and Voting Records So how did legislators in your district contribute to the outcome of this legislative session? Each year, the ASBA Governmental Relations team compiles the voting records of our state legislators on significant policy bills affecting K-12 public education. We encourage you to contact your legislators about their positive and negative votes cast on K-12 education. We also encourage you to use these records as a starting point when advocating for candidates and voting in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary and general elections. It must be noted that voting records donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t illustrate the full involvement and critical role certain legislators play in shaping legislation and determining final outcomes. Please note that to make these voting records more useful we have for the first time categorized bills into four distinct areas: personnel issues, mandates/local control, funding/taxation, and major policy initiatives. (For a detailed summary of K-12 education bills, please consult the ASBA Legislative Wrap-Up brief.)

Summaries of Bills by Category PERSONNEL ISSUES â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2227 (SCHOOLS; TEACHER CONTRACTS; ACCEPTANCE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hendrix) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would require a teacher to return his/her contract within 15 business days upon receipt rather than the current 30 days. Further, the bill also includes the school personnel changes included in HB 2011, along with a retroactivity clause to Nov. 24, 2009, when the legislation took effect; passed in the 2009 3rd Special Session to defend against any litigation that would overturn these provisions. ASBA supported as a priority bill; Chapter 98; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1040 (TEACHER AND PRINCIPAL EVALUATIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Huppenthal) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would require the State Board of Education to establish and maintain a model framework for a teacher and principal evaluation instruments that uses a minimum of 33 percent and up to 50 percent of quantitative data on student academic progress and includes best practices for professional development and evaluator training. Districts and charter schools are required to use this instrument to annually evaluate individual teachers and principals beginning in school year 2012-2013. Last, the bill includes ďŹ xes to defective enactments to 15-536 and 15-538.01. ASBA supported; Chapter 297; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2298 (PREPARATION PROGRAMS; TEACHER CERTIFICATION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; McComish) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill requires the State Board of Education to allow a variety of teacher and administrator preparation program providers to offer a variety of preparation models and courses of study for alternative certiďŹ cation. ASBA supported; Chapter 49; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2521 (SCHOOLS; SUPERINTENDENT CONTRACTS; PERFROMANCE PAY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Murphy) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill requires 20 percent of a superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salary and beneďŹ ts to be for performance pay and prescribes a mechanism for calculating performance pay that districts may implement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 percent of performance pay determined by student academic gain and 25 percent based on parental satisfaction surveys. ASBA supported; Chapter 261; 2010 Laws.

MANDATES/LOCAL CONTROL â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1309 (PARENTS; RIGHTS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gray C) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill outlines extensive parental rights related to healthcare, education, recordings, scans, genetic testing and the upbringing of a minor child. ASBA opposed; Chapter 307; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1097 (SCHOOLS; DATA; NONCITIZEN STUDENTS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pearce) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would require, to the extent permitted by federal law, school districts to submit data to the Arizona Department of Education on students who attend school and are undocumented. Further, the bill requires ADE to submit a report each year with a variety of items and allows the Superintendent of Public Instruction to withhold state aid for noncompliance. ASBA opposed; never heard in the House. â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1070 (IMMIGRATION; LAW ENFORCEMENT; SAFE NEIGHBORHOODS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Pearce) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would require school districts, along with other political subdivisions, to comply with and assist in the enforcement of federal immigration laws. ASBA opposed; Chapter 113; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1308 (SCHOOLS; INSTRUCTION; DATING ABUSE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gray L) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would allow the voluntary adoption of dating abuse policy and requires district governing boards to review and consider its adoption at a public meeting by June 30, 2011, and requires a domestic violence organization to be notiďŹ ed at least two weeks prior to the meeting. ASBA opposed; Chapter 335; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2282 (POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS; GOVERNMENT TRANSPARENCY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Montenegro) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would require school districts, along with other local governments, to establish and maintain an ofďŹ cial website of receipts and expenditures over $5,000 by Jan. 1, 2013. ASBA opposed; Chapter 288; 2010 Laws. =Z\SXQ  3

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FUNDING/TAXATION â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2008 (K-12 EDUCATION; BUDGET RECONCILIATION; 2010-2011 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Adams) This bill included for the K-12 Education FY11 budget over $500 million in cuts, as well as two contingency budgets depending on the outcome of Prop. 100. ASBA opposed; Chapter 8, 7th Special Session; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2386 (SCHOOL DISTRICT OVERRIDE ELECTIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Boone) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill makes changes to current school district budget override statutes to complement the changes made during the 2009 Special Session. Further, this bill keeps override levels for FY11 at the level prior to the cuts contained in HB 2008 and that elimination of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kâ&#x20AC;? weight would not apply to the budget limit for FY11 overrides and contains an emergency clause. ASBA supported; Chapter 179E; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1284 (SCHOOL FINANCE REVISIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Huppenthal) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill requires ADE to apply any change to state law that occurs after the effective date and modiďŹ es or impacts the school ďŹ nance formula so it applies to the entire ďŹ scal year the change became effective. Further, the bill allows districts to use a two-year Prop. 301 phase-down with non-supplanting provisions included. ASBA supported; Chapter 306; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HCR 2039 (TEMPORARY SUSPENSION; VOTER-PROTECTED FUNDING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kavanagh) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This referendum would put on the November 2010 General Election ballot a temporary suspension of voter-protected funds. From Fiscal Years 2011 through 2014, up to 50 percent of voter-protected funding can be diverted to similar purposes as those authorized by the ballot measures (i.e. Prop. 301 monies would be diverted for education purposes). ASBA opposed; never heard in Senate COW. â&#x20AC;˘ HCR 2041 (FUNDING BALLOT MEASURES; REAUTHORIZATION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Stevens) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This referendum would put on the November 2010 General Election ballot the stipulation that every ballot measure is good for only eight years, at which time it must be put back to the voters for reauthorization. This measure would apply retroactively. ASBA opposed; failed senate third read. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2128 (OMNIBUS; JTEDS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Crandall) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill makes a number of changes to JTED statues, including ďŹ nancial provisions and program v. course deďŹ nitions. ASBA supported; Chapter 17E, 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2664 (STOS; TAX CREDIT REQUIREMENTS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Murphy) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill only modiďŹ es the requirements for the STOs that accept individual income tax credits and no longer includes an increase to these credits except for an inďŹ&#x201A;ationary increase. ASBA opposed; Chapter 293; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1274 (STOS; CONTRIBUTION DATE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Yarbrough) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill extends the deadline to April 15 (currently, it is Dec. 31 for the taxable year) for individual STO contributions to be claimed, which is estimated to cost the state general fund $2.9 million. ASBA opposed; Chapter 188, 2010 Laws.

MAJOR POLICY INITIATIVES â&#x20AC;˘ SB 1286 (SCHOOLS; ACHIEVEMENT PROFILES; LETTER GRADES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Huppenthal) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill would include school districts into the current AZ Learns labeling system and change the current labels from excelling to failing to meet academic standards to A through F. Further, the bill states that 50 percent of the school and district classiďŹ cation must be on academic performance measurements and 50 percent must be on all student academic gain and 50 percent on the measurement of the lowest 25 percent of students making academic gain. ASBA opposed; Chapter 247; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2731 (HIGH SCHOOLS; GRADUATION; BOARD EXAMINATIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Crandall) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill is commonly referred to as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Move on When Readyâ&#x20AC;? bill and creates the Grand Canyon Diploma to enable high school students to choose different educational pathways. ASBA was neutral; Chapter 333; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2732 (SCHOOLS;THIRD GRADE RETENTION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Crandall) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Move on When Readingâ&#x20AC;? legislation to ensure every third grader is reading at grade level. It contains a number of provisions regarding parental notiďŹ cation of school promotion policies; delays the application of the third-grade promotion competency requirements until the 20132014 school year and adds a conditional enactment contingent upon Proposition 100 being approved by the voters in the May 18, 2010, special election. ASBA supported; Chapter 296; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HB 2733 (DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION; DATA COLLECTION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Crandall) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This bill requires the Superintendent of Public Instruction to enter into contracts with public or private entities to evaluate the existing system of data collection, compilation and reporting conducted by the Arizona Department of Education on or before Aug. 1, 2010. ASBA supported; Chapter 334; 2010 Laws. â&#x20AC;˘ HCR 2001 (EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT; HEALTH; REPEAL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Adams) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This referendum will appear on the November 2010 ballot to repeal First Things First, redirect $324 million in reserve funds to the state general fund and redirect future tobacco tax revenues to the state general fund. ASBA opposed; transmitted to the Secretary of State. 18 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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Legislative District 2

Legislative District 1 Sen. Steve Pierce

Bill

Rep. Lucy Mason

Rep. Andy Tobin

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Albert Hale

Rep. Tom Chabin

Rep. Chris Deschene

Personnel

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

HB 2227

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

NO

YES

HB 2298

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2298

NO

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

Mandates/Local Control

NOT VOTING NOT VOTING YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

YES

NO

YES

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

NOT VOTING

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1070

NOT VOTING

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

NO

YES

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

HB 2128

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2128

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

SB 1286

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

NOT VOTING

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

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Legislative District 3 Sen. Ron Gould

Bill

Legislative District 4

Rep. Nancy McLain

Rep. Doris Goodale

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Jack Harper

Rep. Tom Boone

Rep. Judy Burges

Personnel

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1309

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

NO

NO

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

NO

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

NO

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HCR 2039

YES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

YES

NOT VOTING

HCR 2039

YES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

NO

YES

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2041

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

NO

YES

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 20 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

3

=Z\SXQ 

Legislative District 5 Sen. Sylvia Allen

Bill

Legislative District 6

Rep. Bill Konopnicki

Rep. Jack Brown

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Dave Braswell

Rep. Carl Seel

Rep. Amanda Reeve

Personnel

HB 2227

YES

YES

NO

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

NO

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

YES

YES

NO

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

NO

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

NO

NO

HB 2282

YES

NO

NOT VOTING

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

NO

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

YES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

NO

NO

HCR 2039

NO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

YES

YES

HCR 2041

YES

YES

NO

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

NO

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

NO

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

YES

YES

NO

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

NO

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

+=,+ 4Y_\XKV

21

Legislative District 7 Sen. Ed Bunch

Bill

Legislative District 8

Rep. Ray Barnes

Rep. Nancy Barto

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Carolyn Allen

Rep. Michele Reagan

Rep. John Kavanagh

Personnel

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

HB 2227

NO

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1309

NO

YES

YES

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

NOT VOTING

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1070

NO

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

NO

YES

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

NO

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2041

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

NO

YES

HB 2128

NOT VOTING

YES

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

NO

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

SB 1286

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 22 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

3

=Z\SXQ 

Legislative District 9 Sen. Bob Burns

Bill

Legislative District 10

Rep. Rick Murphy

Rep. Debbie Lesko

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Linda Gray

Rep. Jim Weiers

Rep. Doug Quelland

Personnel

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

HB 2227

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

SB 1040

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

NO

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

HB 2386

NO

YES

NO

HB 2386

YES

NO

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2041

NO

YES

YES

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

NO

NO

HB 2128

YES

NO

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

+=,+ 4Y_\XKV

23

Legislative District 11 Sen. Barbara Leff

Bill

Rep. Adam Driggs

Legislative District 12 Rep. Eric Meyer

Personnel

Bill

Sen. John Nelson

Rep. Jerry Weiers

Rep. Steve Montenegro

Personnel

HB 2227

YES

YES

NO

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2521

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

YES

YES

NO

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

NO

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

NO

NO

SB 1284

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

NO

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2041

YES

YES

NO

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

NO

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

NO

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

YES

YES

NO

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 24 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

3

=Z\SXQ 

Legislative District 13 Sen. Richard Miranda

Bill

Rep. Martha Garcia

Legislative District 14 Rep. Anna Tovar

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Debbie Rep. Chad McCune-Davis Campbell

Rep. Robert Meza

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

HB 2227

NO

NO

NO

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NO

NO

NO

HB 2298

NO

NO

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

NO

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2282

NO

NO

NO

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2041

NO

NOT VOTING

NO

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

NO

NOT VOTING

NO

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives SB 1286

NO

NO

NO

SB 1286

NO

NO

NO

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2733

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

+=,+ 4Y_\XKV

25

Legislative District 15 Sen. Ken Cheuvront

Bill

Rep. David Lujan

Legislative District 16 Rep. Kyrsten Sinema

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Leah Rep. Cloves Landrum Taylor Campbell, Jr.

Rep. Ben Miranda

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

NOT VOTING

NO

HB 2227

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NO

NO

NO

HB 2298

NO

NO

NO

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NOT VOTING

NO

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NOT VOTING

NOT VOTING

NOT VOTING

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NO

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives SB 1286

YES

NO

NO

SB 1286

YES

NO

NO

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NOT VOTING

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 26 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

3

=Z\SXQ 

Legislative District 17 Sen. Meg Burton Cahill

Bill

Rep. Ed Ableser

Legislative District 18 Rep. David Schapira

Bill

Sen. Russell Pearce

Rep. Cecil Ash

Rep. Steve Court

Personnel

Personnel HB 2227

NO

NO

NO

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NO

NO

NO

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

NO

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

NO

NO

NO

HB 2282

NO

YES

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

NO

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2039

YES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

YES

YES

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

NO

NO

NO

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

+=,+ 4Y_\XKV

27

Legislative District 19 Sen. Chuck Gray

Bill

Rep. Kirk Adams

Legislative District 20 Rep. Rich Crandall

Bill

Sen. John Huppenthal

Rep. John McComish

Rep. Rae Waters

Personnel

Personnel HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

HB 2227

YES

YES

NO

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2521

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1309

YES

YES

NO

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1070

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

SB 1308

NO

NO

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

NO

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

HB 2386

NO

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

-

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

NO

HCR 2041

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HCR 2041

NOT VOTING

YES

NO

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

NO

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

NO

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

SB 1286

YES

YES

NO

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 28 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

3

=Z\SXQ 

Legislative District 21 Sen. Jay Tibshraeny

Bill

Rep. Warde Nichols

Legislative District 22 Rep. Steve Yarbrough

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Thayer Verschoor

Rep. Andy Biggs

Rep. Laurin Hendrix

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

YES

YES

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

YES

YES

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1097

NOT VOTING

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

NO

SB 1308

NO

NO

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

NO

YES

YES

HB 2386

NO

NO

NO

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NOT VOTING

YES

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2041

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2128

YES

NO

NO

HB 2128

NO

NO

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

NO

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

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29

Legislative District 23 Sen. Rebecca Rios

Bill

Rep. Barbara McGuire

Legislative District 24 Rep. Frank Pratt

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Amanda Aguirre

Rep. Lynne Pancrazi

Rep. Russ Jones

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2227

NO

NO

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2298

NOT VOTING

NO

NOT VOTING

HB 2298

NOT VOTING

NO

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NOT VOTING

YES

SB 1309

NO

NO

YES

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NO

YES

SB 1070

NOT VOTING

NO

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

HB 2282

YES

NO

YES

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

NO

NO

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

NO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

NO

YES

HCR 2039

NO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

NO

YES

HCR 2041

NOT VOTING

NO

YES

HCR 2041

NO

NO

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

YES

SB 1274

NO

NO

YES

SB 1274

NO

NO

NOT VOTING

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

NO

NO

YES

SB 1286

YES

NO

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

YES

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 30 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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Legislative District 25 Sen. Manny Alvarez

Bill

Rep. Pat Fleming

Legislative District 26 Rep. David Stevens

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Al Melvin

Rep. Nancy Young Wright

Rep. Vic Williams

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

NO

YES

HB 2227

YES

NO

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NO

NO

YES

HB 2298

YES

NO

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NO

YES

SB 1309

YES

NO

YES

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NO

YES

SB 1070

YES

NOT VOTING

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

NOT VOTING

HB 2282

YES

NO

YES

HB 2282

YES

NO

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

YES

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

NO

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

YES

HCR 2039

YES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

NO

YES

HCR 2041

NO

NO

YES

HCR 2041

YES

NO

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

YES

HB 2664

YES

NO

YES

SB 1274

NO

NO

YES

SB 1274

YES

NO

NOT VOTING

SB 1286

YES

NO

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

NO

NO

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

YES

NO

YES

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

YES

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

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31

Legislative District 27 Sen. Jorge Luis Garcia

Bill

Legislative District 28

Rep. Olivia Rep. Phil Cajero Bedford Lopes

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Paula Aboud

Rep. David Bradley

Rep. Steve Farley

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

NO

NO

HB 2227

NO

NO

NO

SB 1040

YES

NO

NO

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NOT VOTING

NO

NO

HB 2298

NO

NO

NO

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

NO

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1309

NO

NO

NO

SB 1097

NOT VOTING

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

YES

YES

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

HB 2282

YES

NO

NO

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2039

NO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; APPROPS

NO

NO

HCR 2041

NOT VOTING

NO

NO

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NO

HB 2128

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

SB 1286

NO

NO

NO

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives

SB 1286

NO

NO

NO

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber 32 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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=Z\SXQ 

Legislative District 29 Sen. Linda Lopez

Bill

Rep. Matt Heinz

Legislative District 30 Rep. Daniel Patterson

Personnel

Bill

Sen. Frank Antenori

Rep. David Gowan

Rep. Ted Vogt

Personnel

HB 2227

NO

NO

NO

HB 2227

YES

YES

YES

SB 1040

YES

YES

NO

SB 1040

YES

YES

YES

HB 2298

NO

NO

NO

HB 2298

YES

YES

YES

HB 2521

NO

YES

YES

HB 2521

YES

YES

YES

Mandates/Local Control

Mandates/Local Control

SB 1309

NO

NOT VOTING

NO

SB 1309

YES

YES

YES

SB 1097

NO

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1097

YES

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

SB 1070

NO

NO

NO

SB 1070

YES

YES

YES

SB 1308

NOT VOTING

YES

YES

SB 1308

YES

NO

NO

HB 2282

NO

NO

NO

HB 2282

YES

YES

YES

Funding/Taxation

Funding/Taxation

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HB 2008 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

VACANT

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

HB 2386

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

SB 1284

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NO

NO

HCR 2039

â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

YES

YES

HCR 2041

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2041

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

YES

YES

HB 2128

YES

NO

YES

HB 2664

NO

NO

NO

HB 2664

YES

YES

YES

SB 1274

NO

NO

NO

SB 1274

YES

YES

YES

Major Policy Initiatives

Major Policy Initiatives SB 1286

NO

YES

NO

SB 1286

YES

YES

YES

HB 2731

NO

YES

YES

HB 2731

YES

YES

YES

HB 2732

NO

YES

YES

HB 2732

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HB 2733

YES

YES

YES

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

NO

NO

NO

HCR 2001 (7th Spc Sessn)

YES

YES

VACANT

Â&#x201E; Vote in accord with ASBA position Â&#x201E; Vote in opposition to ASBA position Â&#x201E; ASBA was neutral â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dashes signify that the bill was either not voted on by the entire body or not voted on in that chamber =Z\SXQ  3

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33

Where We Stand: How ASBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Positions on Legislative and Legal Issues Are Determined By Tracey Benson, ASBA Journal Editor

T

he Arizona School Boards Association represents and approval at the annual ASBA Delegate Assembly, a critical advocates for the diverse interests of public school policy-determining meeting where the views of ASBA governing boards and the more than 1 million member districts are represented and discussed. The Delegate Assembly, which is held in late June, is where Arizona children whose education is entrusted to their care. The associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Governmental Relations team works the agenda for the coming year is set. Every member district diligently with the state legislature and governor to ensure may designate one delegate to take the ďŹ&#x201A;oor at the Delegate adequate state support of public education and the enactment Assembly and vote on its behalf. Votes cast at the Delegate of legislation that favors the interests of public schools and all Assembly are expected to represent the view of the member board as a whole, not the personal views of the delegate on the children who attend them. the ďŹ&#x201A;oor.To ensure that this ASBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positions on is the case, in the weeks issues are guided by its between the meeting of the membership and based on Legislative Committee and the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political the Delegate Assembly, all agenda for the year. Every ASBA member boards are ASBA member district has provided with the complete the opportunity to inďŹ&#x201A;uence recommendations of the the yearly agenda. Legislative Committee and This process begins in are asked to put a discussion February when member of these items on their boards are invited to submit board agenda. How the â&#x20AC;&#x153;action agenda itemâ&#x20AC;? boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s delegate will vote proposals for adding to, at the Delegate Assembly removing items from or Members cast their votes at the Delegate Assembly. should be determined at amending the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s political agenda to create a guiding document for the year that time. When the gavel raps to close the Delegate Assembly, ahead. Proposals are often crafted with input from district staff and community, and they must be discussed and approved at ASBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positions for the year ahead have been determined. In a board meeting prior to submittal to ASBA. Once ASBA late August or early September, all those serving on ASBA receives the proposals, typically in mid- to late-April, the member boards, as well as their superintendents, receive Governmental Relations team reviews them all and makes a printed copy of the ASBA Political Agenda for the year recommendations to the ASBA Legislative Committee to ahead. At that time, member boards are asked to take action support or not support those proposals. Supporting a proposal on the document once again, this time to determine their boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top 10 priorities from the political agenda. With this with changes is sometimes recommended as well. The Legislative Committee comprises interested school input, ASBA ranks the priorities of the entire membership to board members from throughout the state. The committee determine the 10 items the Governmental Relations team chair and committee members are appointed by ASBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will focus its efforts on when the legislative session begins in president and serve for one year. Many members have served January. An action plan is developed by the Governmental for numerous years consecutively. The committee meets the Relations team for each priority item to guide efforts during ďŹ rst Friday in May to review district proposals, as well as other the course of the legislative session and to form the basis changes or additions to the political agenda recommended for an accountability document at the conclusion of session. by staff. At this day-long meeting, the committee considers These plans are provided to members at the start of session. The expansive nature of the ASBA Political Agenda also every item, often with much debate, and votes on which recommendations to forward to the full membership for gives the association the ability to respond to issues that arise 34 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

3

=Z\SXQ 

at the legislature or in other policy discussions that are not included in the top 10 priorities. For issues that arise concerning legislative, legal or policy and for which the political agenda gives no speciďŹ c direction, staff turns to the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s executive committee (president, past-president, secretary, treasurer and president-elect) for direction. At the close of the legislative session, which typically occurs in May or June, the ASBA Governmental Relations team reviews its record and returns an accountability document to members indicating the extent to which the association was successful in addressing membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; top priorities. In addition, the legislative voting records, published annually here in the ASBA Journal, provide an additional opportunity for ASBA member boards to review how the their positions are being represented at the legislature.These voting record charts also provide members with critical information on the degree to which their elected representatives upheld the interests of their board and district at the capitol. If you would like more information about how ASBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s positions on legislative issues are determined, please contact Janice Palmer, ASBAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s director of governmental relations, at 602-254-1100 or jpalmer@azsba.org.

2010 ASBA Delegate Assembly WHEN: June 26, 2010 WHERE: The Fairmont Scottsdale, 7575 E. Princess Drive, Scottsdale WHAT:

Determining the positions of the Arizona School Boards Association for any future Special Sessions of the current legislature and for the First Regular Session of the Fiftieth Legislature.

REGISTRATION: Online at www.azsba.org Districts should designate and register one delegate (and an alternate, if necessary). Additional non-voting attendees wishing to sit in the gallery must also register to attend.

=Z\SXQ  3

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35

Generating

POWERful

Savings Through Energy EfďŹ ciency By Jennifer Rivera

W

hen a school cuts its energy use and costs, it ďŹ&#x201A;uorescent lights are probably ripe for an upgrade. This is frees up funds for other activities and uses. Many a relatively simple step and very cost-effective. Replacing energy efďŹ ciency improvements also increase outdated T12 lamps and magnetic ballasts with T8 lamps and comfort and enhance the learning environment. Some electronic ballasts can reduce lighting energy use by 30-40 projects pay for themselves with energy savings in months, percent. Save even more with premium T8s. most within a few years. Schools can shorten the payback â&#x20AC;˘ Have we maximized use of occupancy sensors, timers, period even more by applying for a rebate from their local photosensors and other controls? These devices make it utility program. simple to save - and they can make a big impact. Occupancy sensors, for example, can reduce lighting energy use up to When Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Out, EfďŹ ciency Is In 40 percent. Now is the time to create an action plan. Summer vacation â&#x20AC;˘ Are we making the best use of natural light in classrooms means empty classrooms and easy access for implementing and ofďŹ ces? Are window coverings in working condition? If energy efďŹ ciency improvements. Facility staff may already blinds or shades are difďŹ cult to open and close, they probably have a good idea of needed improvements and can get moving will not be used. with a few tips and resources. Alternatively, there are online â&#x20AC;˘ Where else can we improve efďŹ ciency? Save valuable funds tools to help staff conduct walk-through assessments, or a for each incandescent exit sign replaced with an LED exit professional consultant can conduct a comprehensive energy sign. What about the gyms and auditoriums? Replace high audit. intensity discharge (HID) lights in high bay systems with T5 Lighting typically consumes the most electricity in high output lamps and ďŹ xtures to cut lighting energy use by schools and it adds to cooling costs. Lighting is also relatively almost 50 percent. easy to change and most projects pay back quickly in energy Air conditioning is the second-largest component savings. So it makes sense to start here for savings. Ask these of a schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy bill and a critical factor in creating a questions: comfortable and successful learning environment. There are â&#x20AC;˘ Are we still using any incandescent (â&#x20AC;&#x153;traditionalâ&#x20AC;?) light bulbs? If so, replace them with Energy Star qualiďŹ ed compact ďŹ&#x201A;uorescent lamps (CFLs). CFLs use 75 percent less energy and last ten times longer. That means fewer trips up the ladder for maintenance staff, more consistent lighting and lower energy bills. â&#x20AC;˘ When was the overhead ďŹ&#x201A;uorescent lighting installed? Older 36 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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low-cost steps that can cut cooling costs while maintaining (and even improving!) comfort. Ask these questions: â&#x20AC;˘ Do we need to tune up our air conditioning equipment? An advanced diagnostic tune-up is a low-cost service that can shave up to 7 percent off cooling costs. If equipment is at least three years old and four tons or larger, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good candidate. â&#x20AC;˘ Are we matching the cooling schedule to occupancy patterns? Install controls to raise the temperature set point when students and staff leave. Check the set points on existing controls to ensure they are correct. â&#x20AC;˘ Do we have drafts? Simply sealing leaks in walls, doors, windows and roofs can reduce cooling costs by up to 30 percent. Plugging leaks will also keep out dust, noise and pests. â&#x20AC;˘ Does the air leave the register as a blast or a whisper? Leaky ducts can siphon off conditioned air and draw dirty air into the ventilation system. Facility staff can conduct a visual assessment to locate gaps and seal with ďŹ berglass mesh and mastic, mechanical fasteners or foil tape (but never duct tape). â&#x20AC;˘ How old is it? If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to replace the cooling system, be sure to specify high-efďŹ ciency equipment that is sized correctly for the facility. Oversized chillers consume more energy and do not work as effectively. Promote Sleeping at School Look for low-cost savings in unusual places. Save $10 to $30 per monitor and $15 to $45 per desktop computer annually by placing them into a low-power sleep mode when not in active use. Sleeping computers still draw some energy, so be sure that staff turn them off when done, along with other equipment like printers and copiers. Simplify the job by plugging devices into power strips and turning off the power strip. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about other energy hogs like ice makers, refrigerators, hot food holding cabinets and vending machines. Install controls on existing equipment. Adding controls to beverage vending machines, for example, can cut the unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy use by 80 percent. Specify more-efďŹ cient models when purchasing new equipment and always look for the Energy Star label. It may be time to retool the maintenance calendar. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a well-crafted operation and maintenance (O&M) program can save 5 percent to 20 percent on energy bills. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big impact for a small investment. A typical O&M program may include activities such as cooling tune-up, cleaning coils, changing air and water ďŹ lters, verifying operation and adjusting setpoints of sensors and controls, calibrating thermostats and humidistats, cleaning light ďŹ xtures and group re-lamping. Replacing all lamps on the same schedule (group re-lamping) can cut lighting maintenance costs by 25 percent or more.

Source: APS Solutions for Business

Employ Creative Solutions If capital budgets are really tight, you might target your most inefďŹ cient systems ďŹ rst and then use the savings for additional capital investments. Consider performance contracting for comprehensive projects. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget about utility rebate programs. Then begin asking how much your schools can save. Â&#x201E; About the writer: Jennifer Rivera is marketing manager for the APS Solutions for Business program, which is funded by APS customers and approved by the Arizona Corporation Commission. The program has paid more than $3.6 million in energy efďŹ ciency incentives to Arizona schools since 2006, and projects implemented are expected to save these schools more than $320 million in energy costs. Learn more at www.aps.com/businessrebates.

Additional Resources Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Hot and Dry Climates www.nrel.gov/docs/fy02osti/32103.pdf Energy Star for K-12 School Districts www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=k12_schools.bus_ schoolsk12 National Energy Education Development Project www.need.org School Operations and Maintenance: Best Practices for Controlling Energy Costs www.ase.org/uploaded_ďŹ les/greenschools/School%20 Energy%20Guidebook_9-04.pdf

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37

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3

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z LESSONS FROM RESEARCH

By Michael T. Martin, ASBA Research Analyst

Backlash Against Non-Classroom Spending Will Hurt Children

D

uring a workshop at this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National School Boards Association Annual Conference, the 2010 Teacher of the Year explained how a retired police ofďŹ cer became a teacher. It began, he said, when he received a call to respond to a suicide attempt.The report was of a woman balancing on the railing of the ďŹ fth-ďŹ&#x201A;oor ďŹ re escape and throwing jewelry at a crowd below. When he arrived on the scene, he quickly went up the ďŹ fth-ďŹ&#x201A;oor and onto the ďŹ re escape, but the woman jumped. He dove and grabbed her, barely holding on, and asked his partner to go to the fourthďŹ&#x201A;oor ďŹ re escape to grab her legs before he lost his grip. Once his partner secured her legs, they were able to pull her to safety. She was a high school student depressed over personal circumstances. Anthony Mullen decided he wanted a chance to intervene in young peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lives before they were on a ďŹ re escape, and so he began studying to become a teacher. He now works with troubled high school students at an alternative high school. During his presentation, he gave other examples of troubled students. He told of an attractive girl who was a â&#x20AC;&#x153;cutter,â&#x20AC;? repeatedly cutting herself with razor blades to dull the pain of her constant anger. The psychological needs of these children are enormous and can stand in the way of academic success, noted Mullen, but often they could be served by an adult who took a personal

interest in the student. According to Mullen, the typical classroom teacher lacks the time and training to deal with the complex psychological needs of many children in schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the â&#x20AC;&#x153;difďŹ cultâ&#x20AC;? children as some call them. He lamented that school counselors and psychologists

General has made it practice to publish a report each spring complaining that schools are â&#x20AC;&#x153;shiftingâ&#x20AC;? funds from the classroom to â&#x20AC;&#x153;student support services.â&#x20AC;? Would the Auditor General prefer we withhold psychological support services and drop-out prevention â&#x20AC;&#x201C; essentially pushing children off the ďŹ re escape railings of the world? In recent years, crises like the massacre at Columbine have taught public schools that â&#x20AC;&#x153;student support servicesâ&#x20AC;? are crucial expenditures. A call to devote more and more dollars exclusively to â&#x20AC;&#x153;classroom expendituresâ&#x20AC;? means to deny services to special needs children, to withdraw classroom support for teachers, to hobble programs aimed at increasing graduation rates, to remove literacy support, science coordinators and any number of other support programs in schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; even libraries. It also fails to recognize what the modern classroom looks like. In the modern classroom there are networked computers that provide students access to the world. At this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s NSBA conference there was a presentation of a program that encourages students to engage in collaborative projects with students around the world. The example shown was a Philadelphia high school student who led a team of high school students from Singapore, Kuala Lampur, the Netherlands and Egypt in the building of a website about the respiratory disease SARS.

In recent years, crises like the massacre at Columbine have taught public schools that â&#x20AC;&#x153;student support servicesâ&#x20AC;? are crucial expenditures. are overwhelmed with the hundreds of students they are required to work with. There simply are not enough of them. Mullen stressed that when dealing with special needs students, who are more likely to drop out of school, there needs to be resources available to the classroom teacher to provide the knowledge and time to devote to these children. Unfortunately, these types of vital resources designed to improve student achievement and outcomes routinely come under ďŹ re when school funding is discussed. Because these resources are not teachers or textbooks, they are not technically accounted for as â&#x20AC;&#x153;classroom spendingâ&#x20AC;? and often are called into question as â&#x20AC;&#x153;extras.â&#x20AC;? In fact, in recent years, the Arizona Auditor

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This kind of classroom experience is only possible because there are school technicians maintaining the network, implementing the ďŹ rewalls and blocking improper websites. The classroom computer has to work along with all the other classroom computers networked together with the proper software installed to protect the computers and to provide the utility for the classroom. Though all this directly and positively impacts the classroom and student learning, those expenses are not â&#x20AC;&#x153;classroomâ&#x20AC;? expenditures. The software itself does count as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;soft capitalâ&#x20AC;? classroom expenditure; it is a classroom supply. Unfortunately, the legislature has cut soft capital expenditures recently. These cuts, along with reductions in classroom site fund dollars from trust land sales and gaming collections have made it impossible for school districts to maintain the â&#x20AC;&#x153;classroomâ&#x20AC;? expenditures of the past. Despite this, the Auditor General chose to cite classroom expenditures as a percentage of total expenditures, stacking them up against such expenses as cafeterias, transportation, and other programs that could not under any circumstances be utilized in the classroom. The cost of transporting children can vary widely depending on the cost of fuel, the activities and events students attend and the size of the district. Thus

it makes no sense to include these expenditures when calculating the percentage of classroom expenditures or using such ďŹ gures to compare how â&#x20AC;&#x153;wellâ&#x20AC;? one district allocates its funding in relation to another. Even if the spending could be included in classroom spending it would not make any sense to abandon most of the children to achieve this. Similarly, the cost of school lunches and breakfasts provides an important function in ensuring students have good nutrition and are fed quickly. In some countries, students are given an hour or two to go home for lunch. But regardless, it makes no sense to calculate a percentage that assumes these cafeteria expenses should be spent in the classroom. Even when it does make sense to include some expenditures, it can make no sense to spend them in the classroom. The many computers and computer screens along with many other high-tech machines, such as science equipment, require large expenditures of taxpayer dollars. To ensure that the purchases of these machines are cost effective and that equipment is not stolen or misplaced requires district administrative staff in purchasing and security. Schools are targets for fraud and thieves precisely because they tend to focus expenditures on classroom security rather than asset and ďŹ nancial security. Thus audits and

proper ďŹ nancial protocols are important functions. To ensure that employees hired by the district do not have pedophile backgrounds or criminal records means the human resources staff needs to conduct background checks and follow legal screening procedures. Payrolls have to be accurate and timely. The term â&#x20AC;&#x153;bureaucratâ&#x20AC;? refers to employees that follow pre-arranged procedures to ensure that functions are not exploited or that people are not receiving special favors.Thus â&#x20AC;&#x153;bureaucratsâ&#x20AC;? are crucial to ensure that schools are operated safely and efďŹ ciently. Despite these facts, the Auditor Generalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report and many comments in the media assume that operating schools without professional classroom support should be the goal of governing boards. Fortunately, governing boards are elected by people more familiar with how schools should be operated to be successful. Successful schools utilize professional expertise to address problems and provide interventions. Research repeatedly says the biggest obstacle to improving education is the existence of the isolated teacher in a classroom of kids without support or training. A blind quest to force more dollars into the narrow â&#x20AC;&#x153;classroom spendingâ&#x20AC;? category may be the biggest impediment to improving Arizona schools. Â&#x201E;

Your solution is just a call away!

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z EDUCATION AND THE LAW

By Chris Thomas, ASBA Director of Legal Services

How Much Discussion about the Budget Can Take Place in an Executive Session?

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y the time you read this, your district will probably have already passed its Fiscal Year 2011 budget, complete with employee salaries and beneďŹ ts for the year. Chances are, as part of that budget development process, your board had an executive session or two where the board noticed it would go into an executive session for the purpose of giving direction to your representatives regarding negotiations with employee organizations on salaries, salary schedules or compensation. In those sessions, you may have been given a short overview of the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget situation and heard about recommendations that your administration had regarding salary levels for employees for the coming year. While this is likely allowed under the OML, it is a ďŹ ne line that must be walked. This edition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Education and the Lawâ&#x20AC;? will discuss this line and what boards need to know in navigating it. Q. What is the authority in the law for discussing budget issues in an executive session? A. There isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any authority for discussing budget issues in an executive session. Budget issues are among the most important decisions that governing boards will make and should be done according to a very public process. However, A.R.S. § 38-431.03 A.5. provides that â&#x20AC;&#x153;upon a public majority vote of the members constituting a quorum, a public body may hold an executive session but only for the following purposes: â&#x20AC;Ś (d)iscussions or consultations with designated representatives of the 42 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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public body in order to consider its is being furthered by carving out the position and instruct its representatives exception â&#x20AC;&#x201C; because the section is regarding negotiations with employee written not to protect the public body organizations regarding the salaries, or its employees but rather to further salary schedules or compensation some overall public interest. In the paid in the form of fringe beneďŹ ts of exception for discussing compensation employees of the public body.â&#x20AC;? This to give direction to the negotiating implies that the governing board should representative, the public interest is have some contextual information prior furthered by having fair negotiations to giving instruction of its position to with the employee groups. It would its negotiating representative. Among not be fair to the public body â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and by the relevant information would be the extension the taxpayers of the public overall amount of available funding for body â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for the employee organization to employee salaries expected for the next know the range of what the public body year, the various costs of making certain was willing to settle for in negotiation choices in the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s negotiating of compensation issues. An excellent comparison is position with regard to salaries and employee beneďŹ ts, and what other found elsewhere in another provided exception for having an executive districts may be doing in the area. session: discussions or consultations with Q. Since the board needs the representatives in consideration of the contextual information to give purchase, lease or sale of real property direction to its negotiating (A.R.S. § 38-431.03 A.7). The public representative, they can get this interest in allowing this discussion/ information in executive session, consultation to be handled in executive session is to protect public resources; the right? A. Not necessarily. It would price the public body may pay/get may depend on whether the information be adversely affected by its negotiation Still, was conďŹ dential and whether the parameters becoming public. information was directly tied to its the exception does not allow all negotiating position. Much of the discussion of real estate transactions to information needed to consider be conducted in executive session, only the negotiating position (and to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;discussions or consultations with give direction based on that) is not designated representatives of the public conďŹ dential and gives no indication body in order to consider its position of the scope of the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position. and instruct its representatives regarding If the information is not conďŹ dential, negotiations for the purchase, sale or the information must be discussed in lease of real property.â&#x20AC;? This means other open session. It is critical in construing issues surrounding the property â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the the scope of the executive session site selection, whether to entertain the exceptions found in A.R.S. §38-431.03 purchase, sale or lease to start with, or to understand the public interest that general information about the real

estate market â&#x20AC;&#x201C; cannot be discussed in executive session. Likewise with the employee organization negotiation exception, if there is information that is ancillary to the consideration of the public bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s negotiating position or the instruction to its negotiating representative, that information must be discussed in public.

Discussions about whether or not to do a reduction in force (or RIF) must be done in open session! It is almost impossible to imagine a scenario where the discussion of budget issues could be allowed under the â&#x20AC;&#x153;employee mattersâ&#x20AC;? exception.

Q. How about the exception to get legal advice â&#x20AC;&#x201C; any chance we Q. What about the exception in can discuss the budget using that the OML dealing with employee exception? matters? Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we discuss the budget A. Nope. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;legal adviceâ&#x20AC;? in that context, especially when exception to the OML (A.R.S. § 38we are considering eliminating or 431.03 A. 3.) is to get advice from changing positions, which will have your attorney on legal matters; once a budgetary impact? the advice has been given, no other A. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big fat NO. The discussion can take place unless that exception for â&#x20AC;&#x153;employee mattersâ&#x20AC;? discussion meets â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and has been noticed (A.R.S. § 38-431.03 A. 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the most for â&#x20AC;&#x201C; another legitimate exception common exception school district to have the executive session. In fact, governing boards use to conduct an in order to meet the â&#x20AC;&#x153;legal adviceâ&#x20AC;? executive session) states that it can be exception, the matters discussed likely used for: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discussion or consideration of need to fall within subjects for which employment, assignment, appointment, there is an attorney-client privilege promotion, demotion, dismissal, salaries, and information about budget issues is disciplining or resignation of a public not privileged. ofďŹ cer, appointee or employee of any public bodyâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? This is an exception Q. Back to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;employee for discussing an identiďŹ ed person â&#x20AC;&#x201C; organization negotiationâ&#x20AC;? exceptionâ&#x20AC;Ś and even then the employee that is the must we have a formal meet-andsubject of the discussion must be given confer process in our district in advanced notice of the session, have the order to use this exception and right to object and have the discussion have an executive session under it? in open session and is entitled to the A. No, you do not have to have section of the minutes of the meeting in a formal meet-and-confer process in which they were discussed. Discussions order to utilize this executive session about the need for or the elimination of exception. However, you should positions must be done in open session! have some negotiation process to use

it. If there isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t another side to the negotiation, it isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a negotiation at all; the public body cannot use the â&#x20AC;&#x153;employee organization negotiationâ&#x20AC;? exception if there is no employee organization and they certainly cannot use the exception to negotiate with themselves or the administration. Q. Can we discuss the budget in a study session which is open to the public? A. YES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and you should. Creating and passing a budget should not be done at a single, regular board meeting. It should be done over several sessions, with no surprises. Many boards hold community forums, send out newsletters and, yes, hold single-issue study sessions in the development of the budget. While not legally required, all of these are great ideas and are indicative of a board that is reaching out and bringing the public into the process. School governing boards would be wise to look at their budgetary planning processes and examine whether any budget-related information is coming out in executive session that is not consistent with the OML. As stated earlier, the decision, and process leading up to the decision of setting your budget are among the most critical things that school governing boards do. Make sure that you follow the OML in doing them and that you are appropriately bringing your school community into these monumental decisions. Â&#x201E;

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he AIDS epidemic in the United States is now almost 30 years old and affects over 1.1 million people in the U.S., with 56,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The character of the epidemic has shifted over time, with increasing numbers of women and youth infected. The poor and populations of color have been disproportionately affected. Schools are dealing with increasing numbers of children with chronic illnesses, including HIV. In addition, there are growing numbers of children who have an infected family member or relative. Treatment for HIV infection has markedly improved over time, with complex drug regimens now able to control the infection for long periods. Infected patients are now dealing with a long-term chronic illness, but are living longer and healthier lives. Adults with HIV are now predicted to live 30 years after diagnosis, on average, and are more commonly dying of non HIV-related illnesses and causes. Children who were congenitally infected are also living longer and are now school-aged and growing into their teen years and into young adulthood. New infections are unfortunately being diagnosed in younger and older teens. Sadly, the stigma against the disease and ignorance about it remain very strong. Classroom discussions about HIV are sometimes outdated or incorrect. Cases of discrimination in schools continue to be reported. So, too, does inappropriate decision-making by school staff based on a lack of knowledge and inordinate fear about the disease and its transmission. Fears remain about the safety of interactions with children with HIV in schools. In some cases, these fears have played out in the extremes: children have been expelled, suspended or excluded from some schools in Arizona for simply asking questions about the disease; laboratory results and medical records have been â&#x20AC;&#x153;requiredâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; illegally, it must be added - for school reentry; and conďŹ dential information has been widely and inappropriately disseminated. There have, at times, even been severely negative attacks against people with HIV/AIDS in the classroom setting. Although HIV is a serious disease with lifetime consequences, it is not highly contagious or easily transmitted. Here are a few facts to remember when thinking about children with HIV in schools:

1) HIV is transmitted through blood exposure or sexual contact. 2) There has never been a case of transmission of HIV in a school setting. 3) HIV cannot be transmitted through hugging, touching or close contact. 4) The use of universal precautions with any blood exposure will prevent transmission of HIV, as well as Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C. 5) HIV is not transmitted through the sharing of a straw, drinks, utensils or plates. The only precaution required when dealing with a student or family member that is infected is the consistent use of universal precautions. That means that if blood or dangerous bodily ďŹ&#x201A;uids are present, it is necessary to use gloves and a 10 percent bleach solution for cleanup. Otherwise, it is perfectly safe to hug HIV infected individuals, shake their hands, play with them, share foods, share bathrooms and learn together. Children with HIV cannot be recognized by their looks and are not legally required to disclose their status to schools. Children cannot legally be suspended or excluded from school because they have HIV. These children and their families are already facing serious issues with their health. Discrimination in schools by authority ďŹ gures only increases and adds to their stress. Keep in mind that the stigma against HIV infected individuals remains today, which is an incentive for students in schools or family members to be reticent to disclose this health information to the school staff. If a student does happen to disclose their own HIV status or the status of a family member to any school staff, A.R.S. 36-664 protects their conďŹ dentiality. Unless permission is obtained by the individual, the information cannot be legally shared with any other staff member. It is also imperative that all HIV curriculum taught in the schools is up to date and is taught in a sensitive manner. AIDS service organizations, including the Bill Holt Pediatric HIV Clinic at Phoenix Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital, are available to provide resources, review curriculum or provide classroom support. Â&#x201E; About the writer: Janice Piatt, M.D., is medical director at Phoenix Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bill Holt Pediatric HIV Clinic. To contact the Bill Holt Clinic, please call 602-546-2122 or 602-546-0955. =Z\SXQ  3

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z POINTS ON POLICY

By Jim Deaton, ASBA Director of Policy Services

Mentor or Mentee? Effective Board Members Must Be Willing To Play Both Roles

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hen the central theme of â&#x20AC;&#x153;mentoringâ&#x20AC;? was announced for this issue of the ASBA Journal, this writer pondered what relationship might be drawn between the theme and the primary mission of ASBA Policy Services. Policy Services is dedicated to researching actions by the various entities having authority to impact the governance and administration of a school system, and to recommending document models and procedures a subscribing school system can use to achieve and maintain compliance with the requirements. Studying the topic led to choosing the deďŹ nition for mentoring as, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A structured and trusting relationship that brings together caring individuals to develop the knowledge and competencies of the mentee.â&#x20AC;? Mentoring is not coaching, which is based on the exercise of authority by one individual over another, but a relationship where a mutual desire to share and receive is acknowledged and valued by both persons. Mentoring should promote a fertile environment where each party evidences humility, or courteous respect, for one anotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contributions towards achieving a desired outcome. When seeking a mentor the objective is to locate someone who has knowledge and successful experience in

board membership is fairly transient. Individuals often serve a term or two, possibly three, after which other interests, duties and circumstances result in departure from the ofďŹ ce. Longevity as a board member, in and of itself, does not assure development of a broad knowledge of a school systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ cial policies and administrative regulations. Hopefully, however, continuation through several terms of ofďŹ ce has grown their knowledge. Conversely, a board member having served a relatively short period may have devoted their time and efforts to becoming well informed on policies and regulations. Therefore, at any point in time, the myriad of potential possibilities can blur who might be the mentor and who the mentee. Disregarding the effects of time in ofďŹ ce as a predictor, the scenarios described above may enhance the beneďŹ t a governing body can gain from the contributions each of its members brings to the educational community. Nevertheless, remainder of this article focuses on an the likelihood of capitalizing on those example of how board members may values is dependent in large part on recognize opportunities for mentoring the willingness of each member of the to and being mentored by their fellow board to possess and evidence courteous board members. respect for what other members are Some persons have given many ready and capable of contributing to the years to their role as a governing common good. Every member must board member but, on the whole, place the education of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ďŹ eld in which the mentee wants to improve. That individual may already be in the seekerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s circle of acquaintances, or come from a variety of external sources. The person desiring to be a mentor is hopeful of connecting with someone who is eager to explore with the mentor means for the mentee to learn and adopt the skills and knowledge the mentor brings to the exercise. The

As governing board policies form the framework for the organization and functioning of the school system, the spirit of cooperativeness among the board members for giving to and receiving from one another builds a foundation for applying those attributes to improving all components of the educational enterprise.

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youth above their own self-assessed one another to avoid the consequences. superiority or inferiority compared to It is not about one member controlling other members of the governing body. an individual or the entire board by Fundamentally, the ideal atmosphere forcing his or her will on the others, but is one where all board members are by every board memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment disposed to being a mentor and to being to guide each other and the corporate body away from error. A kind reminder mentored. Take for example each memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of the requirements of the open meeting knowledge and practice of the open law doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean there will always be meeting law. The policy arena is one agreement on matters of substance. It where all participants should become does mean the efforts in deliberating better informed through their own and arriving at a majority determination study as well as the knowledge and to adopt policies wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be negated by opinions of others. Considerately intended or inadvertent disobedience of sharing information and observations the law. can enhance the service provided by the As governing board policies form board. The open meeting law can set the framework for the organization the stage for appropriate inclusion and and functioning of the school system, healthy involvement of the community, the spirit of cooperativeness among or violations can create a pit into which the board members for giving to and members plunge to the destruction of receiving from one another builds a their reputations and inďŹ&#x201A;uence with foundation for applying those attributes potential legal ramiďŹ cations. Board to improving all components of the members should commit themselves to educational enterprise. Demonstrating watchfully encouraging and correcting to the student body and adults in the

community how valuable courteous respect can be to the process of solving important and difďŹ cult issues may be one of the greatest contributions a governing body can provide. No one knows all the answers, for as Will Rogers said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.â&#x20AC;? That being the case, there are likely subjects on which certain board members serve as mentors to their colleagues, then in turn become the mentee on subjects about which their colleagues are more informed. The result is an increase in the collective intelligence through each memberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contributions. Do you, as a board member, project enthusiasm for being a mentor as well as a mentee? Hopefully so, for Ralph Waldo Emerson sends an important message with his statement,â&#x20AC;&#x153;You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late.â&#x20AC;? Â&#x201E;

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ny good marriage, partnership or relationship takes a great deal of effort and work. Superintendents and boards who work together to develop a strong partnership will likely experience a positive and mutually productive relationship. Marriages often start with a honeymoon, when both partners are excited, interested and looking to the future. The possibilities can seem endless. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a time when the couple is getting to know each other and developing and deďŹ ning each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roles and expectations. But what happens when the idyllic honeymoon period is over? A good marriage requires a strong foundation and continued work to keep it strong. The same holds true for a healthy board-superintendent relationship. School leadership teams, like married couples, commit to uphold their vows for better or worse. Sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not an easy task, and it can put a strain on even the best marriages. Severe challenges to superintendents and boards are cropping up daily at both the state and national levels. Many districts must manage signiďŹ cant reductions in revenue, and, as a result, are being forced to close schools, reduce teachers, cut many programs and increase class sizes. There is also national concern about core curriculum issues and how federal inďŹ&#x201A;uence is affecting the state and local districts.These tough issues arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going away any time soon, and new ones are sure to arise on their heels. So how is the board-superintendent union to manage these critical and dynamic issues without winding up in divorce court? As with a good marriage, they will need to learn, grow, and work diligently to develop and maintain an effective and productive relationship. This will require openness to change and the ability to improve their interpersonal skills as a team. They must establish clarity in their roles and use that to deďŹ ne how they will work together. Leadership and team skills are extremely important - especially as stress levels increase. The superintendent may beneďŹ t from re-assessing his or her leadership style and how that style could improve, since the demands on superintendents have increased at a greater rate than ever before. Getting a baseline reading of his or her leadership style may enable the superintendent to see that altering that style may actually facilitate greater cooperation, not only with the board, but also with the staff.These insights may make the superintendent more resilient when leading in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complex public education landscape. Board members may also need to understand how their positive or negative interactions as a board affect the entire 48 +=,+ 4Y_\XKV

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leadership team. Understanding board member dynamics how they interact as individuals and as a group - is necessary for the team to function as optimally as possible. As in marriages, recognition and acceptance of different styles of handling conďŹ&#x201A;ict is extremely critical to ďŹ nding the best way to come to consensus. Recognizing the issues facing superintendents and boards, how can these two groups continue to be open, collaborative, cooperative, and ultimately, productive? As with a developing marriage, the board-superintendent relationship must continually address the dynamic forces between them. They must continue to promote an atmosphere of trust where even highly emotionally charged issues can be discussed openly and constructively.When disruptive and unproductive behavior and reactions arise, they must be managed and contained. Understanding the origin of their frustrations can help members of the leadership team create ways to manage those sometimes disruptive emotions and turn them into positive interactions. This means working toward a greater understanding of each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s styles and learning to deal with interpersonal conďŹ&#x201A;ict so differences do not derail the business of the board and district. The challenge for both parties is taking the time to assess and create a plan to address these issues head on. Those that make this a priority and continue to work on building a solid foundation long after the honeymoon is over prosper, and those who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t may experience greater frustration, anger and overall dysfunction that could lead to a failure to move the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals forward. During these particularly difďŹ cult times, it is vital that boards and superintendents not let the stress and their differences create a rupture and fracture healthy relating. Instead, they must work towards greater emotional resilience, individually and as a leadership team, as they face very challenging and very emotional decisions for their districts. Â&#x201E; About the writer: For the past 30 years, John Blattner, Ph.D., has assisted CEOs, superintendents, presidents, senior executives and organizations to manage change and develop their individual and organizational strengths. A licensed psychologist, he is currently a managing partner with Arizona-based Estrella Partners Group, and specializes in executive coaching, leadership development, organizational culture assessment, executive assessment, staff development and strategic planning for national and international organizations.

z VIEWPOINTS

By PanďŹ lo H. Contreras, ASBA Executive Director

Your Role in Preparing the Next Generation of School Board Members

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t is ďŹ nal exam and graduation season, and that can mean only one thing: November elections are just around the corner! Many candidates for Congress and state legislature have had their signs up for more than a month now, but those arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the elections that are top-of-mind for me â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and many of you as well. Hundreds of school board seats in Arizona will be up for election this fall, and the deadline for submitting materials necessary to run is fast approaching. In the fervor of â&#x20AC;&#x153;election season,â&#x20AC;? we must not overlook the importance of these nonpartisan school board races happening right in our backyards. As school board members so well know, the decisions made locally are critical to the success of our students and our schools. Many of you will be considering re-election, and I applaud you for your continued interest in serving students in your community. Long-standing, experienced and well-trained board members are making good decisions for kids in every community of the state. Recent data shows, however, that the average tenure of school board members is just less than two terms. In this discussion of longevity of service, two issues are too seldom raised. The ďŹ rst is the mentoring of newer members of the board, and the second is identifying and preparing folks to replace you when you decide to â&#x20AC;&#x153;retireâ&#x20AC;? from the board. To assist in these important tasks, ASBA launched a school board service campaign this spring aimed at helping the greater

community and interested individuals understand what it takes to run for and serve on an Arizona school board. In addition to newspaper articles, oped pieces, and outreach to all Arizona county school superintendents, ASBA presented two webinars, which drew prospective board members from cities and towns all around our state. While our efforts can begin the dialog, school board members are the best ambassadors for board service.You are better placed to mentor new board members and those considering running because you know your community and district. Long before leaving your board position, even years before, you can and should be identifying community members that would work well in governance. (See ASBA President Debbie Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s excellent article on page 7.) Give them a glimpse of what board service entails by asking them to serve on committees of the district. Look for people that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have agendas and can be objective and ďŹ&#x201A;exible with ideas to make things better for kids. Be sure that their motivation for involvement is an opportunity to make decisions in the best interests of all children â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and not party politics or the agenda of a special interest group, which does not create a healthy board governance environment. After the election, take in the new member on your board. Ask the superintendant to conduct an orientation and provide a tour of the district. The more experienced board members should be open to orienting

the new person(s) on matters of the board and board operations. This will help the learning curve and foster the teamwork that you will need to address the serious issues to come. Readily admit that there may be disagreements, but stress that the culture is to disagree in a professional manner. Address the issue not the person should be the approach. (I hope you will read the article on designing smooth board transitions on page 10.) Also let new and prospective members know that ASBA is a constant resource on a wide variety of topics. For candidates and incumbents there are ASBA trainings beginning with the candidate orientations as preconference to the County Meetings in October. Once elected, but not yet active, there is the full-day workshop for newly elected board members as part of the ASBA/ASA Annual Conference in December. The training and resources continue with the Board Operations and Leadership Training Seminars (BOLTS) in January, just after swearing in of new members and reorganization of the board as required by state law. If your term is coming to an end and you do not plan to run or if you plan for this next term to be your last, please start now in the recruitment of individuals that will be positive and helpful in the development of policy and operate well in the governance process of the district. It is your obligation to leave the district with someone that will carry forward the good work you have done. It is the right thing to do for kids! Â&#x201E; =Z\SXQ  3

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$6%$$IÂżOLDWH0HPEHUV AIG Retirement Group retirement plans, individual ďŹ nancial services Ann Zlamal 11201 N.Tatum Blvd., Ste. 100 Phoenix, AZ 85028 602-674-2614 www.aigvalic.com APS Energy Services Energy conservation, renewable solutions 60 E. Rio Salado Pkwy., Ste. 1001 Tempe, AZ 85281 602-744-5000 www.apses.com Accelerated Construction Technologies Catherine Walley 22425 N. 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85024 602-272-2000 www.act-az.com Accelify Outsourced Medicaid billing service Alex Brecher 81 Spencer St. Brooklyn, NY 11205 347-922-2354 www.accelify.com Administrative Enterprises Inc. Leanne Appledorn 5810 W. Beverly Ln. Glendale, AZ 85306 602-789-1170 Adolfson & Peterson Construction General contractor Tamara Caraway 5002 S. Ash Ave. Tempe, AZ 85282 480-345-8700 www.a-p.com Alvarez & Gilbert PLLC Legal services Randy McCaskill 14500 N. Northsight Blvd., Ste. 216 Scottsdale, AZ 85260 602-263-0203 www.alvarez-gilbert.com American Building Maintenance Co. Wade Moffet 2632 W. Medtronic Way Tempe, AZ 85281 480-968-8300

American Fidelity Assurance Donna Sciulara 3505 E. Flamingo Rd., #6 Las Vegas, NV 89121 800-616-3576 Arcadis Infrastructre, environment, buildings Ed Boot 950 W. Elliot Rd., #220 Tempe, AZ 85284 480-394-0335 www.arcadis-us.com Arizona Correctional Industries Bill Branson 3701 W. Cambridge Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85009 602-272-7600 www.azcorrections.gov ASBAIT (Arizona School Boards Association Insurance Trust) Wayne Carpenter 5810 W. Beverly Ln. Glendale, AZ 85306 602-789-1170 www.asbait.org Assured Imaging Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wellness of Southern Arizona, LLC David Shain 8710 N.Thornydale Rd., Ste. 100 Tucson, AZ 85742 520-744-6121 www.assuredwomenswellness.com Auto Safety House School bus sales and service Rudy Garcia 2630 W. Buckeye Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85009 602-269-9721 www.autosafetyhouse.com The Bagnall Company Employee beneďŹ t consulting Mark W. Bagnall 1345 E. Chandler Blvd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 103 Phoenix, AZ 85048 480-893-6510 www.thebagnallcompany.com BeneďŹ t Intelligence Charles Carlson, Mark Imbrogno 4862 E. Baseline Rd., Ste. 101 Mesa, AZ 85206 480-892-4207 www.beneďŹ tintelligence.com

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BoardBook Tim Curtis P.O. Box 400 Austin, TX 78767 888-587-2665 www.boardbook.org

D.L.Withers Construction Dan Withers 3220 E. Harbour Dr. Phoenix, AZ 85034 602-438-9500 www.dlwithers.com

Fennemore Craig, P.C. Deanna Rader 3003 N Central Ave., #2600 Phoenix, AZ 85012 602-916-5000 www.fclaw.com

CCS Presentation Systems Julia Solomon 17350 N. Hartford Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85255 480-348-0100 www.ccsprojects.com

DLR Group Lynnette Morrison 6225 N. 24th St., Ste. 250 Phoenix, AZ 85016 602-381-8580 www.dlrgroup.com

CN Resource LLC Rich Crandall 1930 N. Arboleda, #101 Mesa, AZ 85213 480-835-7072 www.cnresource.com

Dairy Council of Arizona Patricia Johnson 2008 S. Hardy Dr. Tempe, AZ 85282 480-966-8074 www.dcaz.org

First Financial Group of America BeneďŹ t Plan Administration, Independent Insurance and Investment Services Mike Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley 2201 San Pedro Dr. NE, Bldg. 1, Ste. 2101 Albuquerque, NM 87110 800-365-3860 www.ffga.com

Calderon Law OfďŹ ces Legal services Ernest Calderon 2020 N. Central Ave., Ste. 1110 Phoenix, AZ 85004 602-265-0004

DeConcini McDonald Yetwin & Lacy John C. Richardson 2525 E. Broadway, Ste. 200 Tucson, AZ 85716 520-322-5000 www.deconcinimcdonald.com

Centennial Contractors Enterprises Lisa Bentley 1616 E. Indian School Rd., #200 Phoenix, AZ 85016 623-764-0397 www.cce-inc.com

Durrant Architects Frank Slingerland 2980 N. Campbell Ave., Ste. 130 Tucson, AZ 85719 520-318-4250 www.durrant.com

Chartwells School Dining School lunch management Joel Mee 11634 W. Monroe St. Avondale, AZ 85323 602-350-4876 www.eatlearnlive.com

eBOARDsolutions Web-based board governance software Mark Willis, Diane Sandifer 5120 Sugarloaf Parkway Lawrenceville, GA 30043 800-226-1856 www.eboardsolutions.com

Claridge Products & Equipment Melissa Bracy 28473 N. 108th Way Scottsdale, AZ 85262 480-419-9434 www.claridgeproducts.com Core Construction Jessica Steadman 3036 E. Greenway Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85032 602-494-0800 www.coreconstruct.com D2 Data Driven Software Education software Matt Winebright 900 Jackson St., Ste. 380 Dallas, TX 75202 972-490-4044 www.d2sc.com

Edupoint Educational Systems Joseph Kirkman 1955 S.Val Vista Dr., #210 Mesa, AZ 85204 480-833-2900 www.edupoint.com EMC2 Group Architects Architects, planners Ron Essley 1635 N. GreenďŹ eld Rd., Ste. 144 Mesa, AZ 85205 480-830-3838 www.emc2architects.com Estrella Partners Group Al Uretsky P.O. Box 6962 Goddyear AZ 85338 623-594-9283 www.estrellapartners.com

GHD Inc. Architecture, civil engineering Terry Worcester 1501 S.Yale St., Ste. 101 Flagstaff, AZ 86001 928-774-7179 www.ghd.com G.V. Enterprises Project managers, procurement consulting Gordon Vasfaret 9102 W. Marshall Ave. Glendale, AZ 85305 623-872-1852 www.gventerprises.com Gust Rosenfeld Robert Haws 201 E.Washington, Ste. 800 Phoenix, AZ 85004 602-257-7976 HDA Architects LLC Pete Barker 459 N. Gilbert Rd., Ste. C-200 Gilbert, AZ 85234 480-539-8800 Heinfeld, Meech & Co. Gary Heinfeld 10120 N. Oracle Rd., #100 Tucson, AZ 85704 520-742-2611 Homeland Educational Connections Financial consultants Rita Webb 194 N. Main St. SnowďŹ&#x201A;ake, AZ 85937 928-536-5437 Hufford, Horstman, Mongini, Parnell & Tucker C. Benson Hufford 120 N. Beaver St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001 928-226-0000 www.h2m2law.com

Hughes-Calihan Konica Minolta Dan Schmidt 4730 N. 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85016 602-244-9944 www.hc-km.com

Mangum Wall Stoops & Warden A. Dean Pickett P.O. Box 10 Flagstaff, AZ 86002 928-779-6951 www.ďŹ&#x201A;agstaffattorneys.com

Kennedy Partners LLC Allison Suriano 2222 W. Pinnacle Peak Rd., Ste. 330 Phoenix, AZ 85027 623-374-2478 www.kennedyprtnrs.com

Miller, LaSota & Peters Jack LaSota 722 E. Osborn Rd., #100 Phoenix, AZ 85014 602-248-2900

Mohave Educational Services Co-op Kitchell CEM Tom Peeler Program, project and 625 E. Beale St. construction management Kingman, AZ 86401 Karen Heck 928-753-6945 1661 E. Camelback Rd., Ste. 375 www.mesc.org Phoenix, AZ 85016 N.L. Booth & Son 602-266-1970 www.kitchell.com General contractor Robert Booth Lewis & Roca LLP 3025 N. Tarra Ave. Mary Ellen Simonson Prescott, AZ 86301 40 N. Central Ave. 928-772-0077 Phoenix, AZ 85004 602-262-5317 NTD Architecture www.lrlaw.com Scott Beck 2800 N. 44th St., Ste. 500 M.L. Riddle Painting Inc. Phoenix, AZ 85008 Mike Riddle 602-956-8844 5922 N. Black Canyon Hwy. www.ntd.com Phoenix, AZ 85017 602-277-3461

The Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley Group Facilities, project, construction management Tim Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley, Sharon Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malley 80 W. State Ave., Ste. 300 Phoenix, AZ 85021 602-906-1905 www.omalleyaďŹ&#x201A;.com The Orcutt/ Winslow Partnership Paul Winslow 3003 N. Central Ave., 16th Fl. Phoenix, AZ 85012 602-257-1764 www.owp.com

Pueblo Mechanical & Controls Design, build HVAC specialist Steve Barry 2775 E. Ganley, Ste. 103 Tucson, AZ 85706 520-545-1044 www.pueblo-mechanical.com

SRP Rebecca West PAB 336 P.O. Box 52025 Phoenix, AZ 85072 602-236-3578 www.srpnet.com

RBC Capital Markets John Snider 2398 E. Camelback Rd., Ste. 700 Phoenix, AZ 85016 602-381-5361 www.rbccm.com

SAPA Fabricated Products Aluminum ramps, stairways, all REDD Team products Janet Wray 1617 N. Washington St. Magnolia, AR 71753 800-643-1514 www.sapafabricatedproducts.com

Regional Pavement Maintenance Piper Jaffray & Co. Steve Leone William C. Davis P.O. Box 3778 2525 E. Camelback Rd., Ste. 925 Gilbert, AZ 85299 Phoenix, AZ 85016 480-963-3416 www.regionalaz.com 602-808-5428 www.piperjaffray.com Rodel Charitable Foundation PracticeMax Inc. Carol Peck Medicaid billing for special 6720 N. Scottsdale Rd., Ste. 380 education services Scottsdale, AZ 85253 9382 E. Bahia Dr., Ste. B202 480-367-2920 www.rodelfoundationaz.org Scottsdale, AZ 85260 480-421-9700 www.practicemax.com SCF Arizona Workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compensation insurance Professional Group Tod Dennis Public Consulting, Inc. 3030 N.Third St. Caroline Brackley Phoenix, AZ 85012 P.O. Box 30850 602-631-2000 www.scfaz.com Mesa, AZ 85275 480-797-6873 www.pgpc.org

SPS + Architects Herb Schneider 8681 E.Via De Negocio Scottsdale, AZ 85258-3330 480-991-0800 School Reach Wil Pearson 9735 Landmark Pkwy., #100 Saint Louis, MO 63127 800-420-1479 www.schoolreach.com Shade â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N Net Sun and UV protection structures Joe Reda 5711 W.Washington Phoenix, AZ 85043 602-484-7911 www.shade-n-net.com

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Schaefer-Smith-Ankeney Insurance (Compass Insurance) Craig Ankeney 2002 E. Osborn Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85016 602-956-7800

Summit Food Service Dave Brewer 2703 Broadbent Pkwy. NE, Ste. F Albuquerque, N.M. 87107 505-341-0508 www.summitfoodservice.com

Shaffer Consulting Thomas Shaffer 1626 W. Encanto Blvd. Phoenix AZ 85007 602-253-4366

Summit Management Services Michael Gonzales 14646 N. Kierland Blvd., #200 Scottsdale, AZ 85254 480-505-0427 www.summit-inc.net

Smartschoolsplus, Inc. Phased retirement services Sandra McClelland P.O. Box 11618 Tempe, AZ 85284 480-839-8747 www.smartschoolsplus.com

Sundt Construction Construction Edward Mullins 2620 S. 55th St. Tempe, AZ 85282 480-309-2347 www.sundt.com

Sodexo Katrina Lewis 1842 W. Windermere Dr. Phoenix, AZ 85048 480-577-3503

Sunland Asphalt Asphalt, concrete, sport courts, tracks, turf and bleachers John McCormack 3002 S. Priest Dr. Tempe, AZ 85282 602-288-5020 www.sunlandasphalt.com

Stone & Youngberg Financial services Bryan Lundberg 2555 E. Camelback Rd., Ste. 280 Phoenix, AZ 85016 602-794-4000 www.syllc.com

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TCPN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Cooperative Purchasing Network Mike Chouteau 2100 N. Central Ave., #220 Phoenix, AZ 85004 602-405-9402 www.tcpn.org

Troxell Communications Audio-visual equipment Bob Berry 4830 S. 38th St. Phoenix, AZ 85040 480-495-4745 www.trox.com

Technology Coordinators Utilities and building renewal projects Ed Schaffer 2116 W. Del Campo Cir. Mesa, AZ 85202 888-474-5509 www.tc-az.com

The Trust 333 E. Osborn Rd., #300 Phoenix, AZ 85012 602-222-2110 www.the-trust.org

Thunderbird Mountain Facilities performance services David Johnson P.O. Box 10130 Glendale, AZ 85318 623-825-1730 www.thunderbirdmountain.com Traaen & Associates, LLC Human resources management, training and organizational development Teri J. Traaen, Ed.D., DPA 4831 E. Calle Tuberia Phoenix, AZ 85018 602-510-3989 www.traaenandassociates.com

Turner Construction Construction management services Scott Ellison 637 S. 48th St., 1st Fl. Tempe, AZ 85281 480-557-4700 www.tcco.com U.S. Army Access for Education Thedius Burden 11122 W. Olive Dr. Avondale, AZ 85392 623-234-4904 www.goarmy.com

Udall Shumway & Lyons PLC Denise Lowell-Britt 30 W. First St. Mesa, AZ 85201 480-461-5300 Valley Schools Mgmt. Group Patrick Dittman P.O. Box 41760 Phoenix AZ 85024 623-594-4370 www.vsit.org Wedbush Morgan Securities (PHS&G) Financial advisor, underwriter, investment banker Larry Given, Jim Stricklin 2999 N. 44th St., Ste. 100 Phoenix, AZ 85018 602-952-6800 www.wedbush.com

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Arizona School Boards Association 2100 North Central Avenue Suite 200 Phoenix, Arizona 85004

3565767' 863267$*( 3$,' 3+2(1,;$= 3(50,712

$6.00 21744Š S&L Printing 2010

Quality leadership and advocacy for children in public schools.


ASBA Journal - Spring 2010