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Fashion Journal Asanta Maxwell


Contents Michael Kors Heads to Palm Beach with New Scent .................................................................................... 3 The Little Season That Could ........................................................................................................................ 6 How the Web Is Changing Fashion Marketing in 2010 ............................................................................ 11 Current Fashion Trends .............................................................................................................................. 18 Past Fashion................................................................................................................................................. 19 Visual Displays............................................................................................................................................ 20 Television Show Fashion ............................................................................................................................. 21 Favorite Designer ........................................................................................................................................ 22 Career Paths ................................................................................................................................................ 23 Fashion Don’ts ............................................................................................................................................ 24 Career Opportunities .................................................................................................................................. 25

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Entry #1 What’s the best way to survive the winter blues in the Midwest? Think of resort wear and cosmetics. Michael Kors is heading to Palm Beach with his new fragrance for women. Palm Beach is being added to his list of island destination based scents. It follows behind the original scent, Island, Fiji (2006), Hawaii (2007), Capri (2007), and Bermuda (2008). Michael considers Palm Beach “the closest thing America has to Capri.” Palm Beach will retail for $62 and will be sold in about 1,000 department and specialty stores in the United States.

Michael Kors Heads to Palm Beach with New Scent by Julie Naughton Posted Friday December 3, 2010 From WWD Issue 12/03/2010

Michael Kors' Palm Beach fragrance. 3


Photo By Courtesy Photo Michael Kors is adding Palm Beach to his roster of Island destination fragrances. “One of the reasons that the Island concept resonated with me is because if you’re trying to

escape on a trip, anywhere water is involved is great — and an island is a triple star,” Kors told WWD. The franchise bowed with the original Island scent in spring 2005. Island Fiji followed in April 2006, Island Hawaii in February 2007, Island Capri in November 2007 and Island Bermuda in December 2008.

Palm Beach was a natural, Kors said, because its luxurious environment is “a commutable Riviera.”

“Palm Beach is the closest thing America has to Capri,” he said. “It’s American glam, over the

top and indulgent. I always go in January, when everyone’s in a funk in New York, and show my resort collection. In Palm Beach, people wear fine jewelry to the beach club and a crystalencrusted bikini is considered a basic. Jackie Kennedy Onassis went barelegged to church.

There’s fabulous people watching. What’s not to love?” One of Kors’ freestanding boutiques is located on Worth Avenue, Palm Beach’s most popular shopping area. The Palm Beach scent, concocted by Trudi Loren, vice president of corporate fragrance development worldwide for the Estée Lauder Cos. Inc., in partnership with Givaudan’s Olivier Gillotin, opens with notes of pink grapefruit and Florida sweet orange; has a heart of jasmine, pink pepper and rum, and a drydown of black tea and vanilla. A 1.7 oz. eau de parfum spray will retail for $62, and the scent is rolling out now into about 1,000 department and specialty store doors in the U.S. It will bow internationally in spring

2011. Like the other Island scents, the scent is captured in a glass-block bottle with the Island nameplate. The Palm Beach version is tinted green. While executives declined to comment, industry sources estimated that the limited edition fragrance could do as much as $8 million at retail globally, with $3 million expected to be 4


spent globally on promotion. Promotion will include vials on card, blow-ins and retailer catalogs, said Ottavia Piergiovanni, executive director of global marketing for Michael Kors fragrances at the Estée Lauder Cos.

So what’s next for Kors’ scent franchise? “Wherever my compass might take me,” he cracked.

“I’m going to Australia for the first time over Christmas and visiting Kangaroo Island, but I

don’t see doing a Kangaroo Island fragrance — it probably wouldn’t smell too good. I’m always looking for something new to discover, and I like the attitude of the Australians I know.

Kangaroo Island is sort of this hybrid between Big Sur and Africa. If I’m going to sit on a plane that long, I’m going to hit all the corners of Australia.” He’s also opening “a zillion stores,” he

said. “We just opened a store on Bleecker Street, and are adding a store in Paris; we’re working on our Madison Avenue flagship and a second store in London. I’m also getting ready to present my 30th anniversary ready-to-wear show in February. Thank God I’m energized.”

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Entry #2 This article is from the Wall Street Journal. It discusses the rise of the resort wear collection. Resort wear is no longer a fill in between seasons. It is serving as its own fashion show becoming a major part of the runway collections, bringing in almost 70% of designer apparel sales. Previously, designers would let the team design and produce resort wear. Now, designers are an integral part of the collection. Resort is considered the most wearable collection of the fashion seasons and celebrity turnout is just as impressive as the typical seasonal fashion shows.

The Little Season That Could Resort wear is no longer the afterthought it was designed to be—a summery collection to fill the gap between runway seasons. It has recently emerged as the retail industry’s multiseasonal moneyspinner By Meenal Mistry

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Now a retail success story, the once-overlooked resort wear is worthy of extravagant runway shows. Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel’s cruise 2010 fashion show in Venice | Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images The fashion season called resort has had a few lives. For a good part of this century, it was everything the word connotes, which is to say, leisurely maillots and caftans to fill the steamer trunks of wealthy women sailing off for winter holidays. In more recent decades, it served as a sort of retail caulk with tried-and-true basics filling in the cracks on shop floors between fall sales and spring arrivals. But it’s the latest incarnation that the fashion industry can’t stop talking about. Like Clark Kent after a visit to a phone booth, resort has gone from mild-

mannered and meekly helpful to a seasonal superpower on which luxury labels depend for strong retail sales and even a dash of prestige. It’s a colorful irony that a season inspired by leisure time has become the hardest-working collection in the business. Photos: Resort Wear 2011 Against a backdrop of Sol LeWitt’s stunning murals, resort wear shows its versatile side, with clean lines and graphic prints that will carry you through the year in style.

“Most of the collections [in the late ’80s and early ’90s] were not terribly fashion-oriented,” Saks Fifth Avenue president Ron Frasch recalls. “Many times the designer didn’t even do them. It was the team. They tended to be things that had performed in the prior season but in different fabrics.” These days, however, the most “wearable” collection bridges the two main runway seasons and can account for up to 70 and sometimes 80 percent of women’s designer-apparel sales. “Resort 7


has become an independent fashion season that will oftentimes rival a spring or fall,” says luxury consultant Robert Burke. Coupled with a shifting identity, resort—also known as cruise and pre-spring—has found itself with a handful of monikers along the way. “Resort?” says Stella McCartney. “How unsexy is

that word? It feels so dated. We call it spring.” Oscar de la Renta CEO Alex Bolen has another suggestion: “They should call it November delivery. These are not really clothes that go to a

resort.” Michael Kors has raised the white flag of surrender. “I’ve given up on renaming it,” he says. “We’ll call it the little season that could.” Conceived to be refreshing and commercial, resort tends to be more wearable than runway collections, without so many of the “Who would wear that?” moments. But this distinctly retail bent meant the clothes were largely ignored by fashion magazines. You can credit Karl

Lagerfeld with leading the charge on turning the tide. Last May, the Chanel creative director set his resort 2011 show against the fabulous backdrop of Saint Tropez’s harbor. Models arrived by speedboat as the sun was setting. Famous and beautiful friends of the house like Vanessa Paradis, Leigh Lezark and Diane Kruger were flown in for the occasion.

This was actually Lagerfeld’s 11th resort spectacular. His first, in 2000, was staged at Paris

nightclub Régine. “Karl was visionary. He was the first one to perceive the growing importance of the cruise collection,” says Chanel’s president of fashion, Bruno Pavlovsky. Although

transporting a group of international journalists and the rest of your chic posse everywhere from Venice to Miami is not a cheap proposition, Pavlovsky adds: “Chanel is very attached to the way we show this collection.” In the past few years, it seems that every designer became hyperaware of resort’s particular advantage of a selling period that can stretch from late October until June, encompassing highvolume holiday-shopping periods, and is marked down at the same time as spring runway

clothes (resort has the longest window before being marked down, most commonly November to May at full price). It’s only logical to make the most of it. Also joining Chanel were Oscar de la Renta and Christian Dior with runway presentations that couldn’t be ignored. In 2006, Style.com added resort coverage to its database of fall and spring runway reviews. Nowadays, not every label does an extravaganza, but there’s still great care taken with the presentation. Most European designers fly in to meet and greet, like Stefano Pilati, who staged 8


Yves Saint Laurent’s resort show this year at the French consulate in New York. McCartney showed hers at a downtown gallery over margaritas and vegetarian hors d’oeuvres; in

attendance were A-list friends like Gwyneth Paltrow and Naomi Watts. Meanwhile, Lanvin’s Alber Elbaz has chosen to work his considerable charm by personally narrating multiple minishows for small groups of editors and retailers. The younger guard has followed suit, even though adding another collection to a small team’s production cycle is daunting. Los Angeles–based designer Juan Carlos Obando did his first resort collection this year. “I was extremely concerned because resort happens right when you’re trying to produce the fall show and it has to be delivered right when you start

producing the spring collection,” he says. The gamble paid off. Barneys ordered double what they had from his fall 2010 show. Michelle Obama favorite Jason Wu has done a show for the past two seasons. “Why shouldn’t it be [as important]?” Wu says. “The numbers are just as great as the main seasons.” Actually better. Wu reports that he sells 60 percent resort to 40 percent

runway. This season, Wu took the collection to Paris to show to European stores and ended up adding 30 new accounts. It all adds up to the fact that designers are making these clothes a high creative priority—but within the confines of the original customer-friendly intention of the season. It’s a combination that results in a sort of perfect fashion storm. “It’s more of a realistic collection,” says Laura

Vinroot Poole, owner of Capitol boutique in Charlotte, N.C., who has consistently channeled her budget heavily into resort. “They’re just beautiful clothes, rather than the sort of idea that’s been gone over and over with stylists.” But in today’s flat fashion world of online shopping, perhaps the season’s biggest asset is simply that it’s yet another delivery of clothes. “[Resort] really supports our customers’ desire for newness,” says Net-a-Porter’s vice president of marketing and sales, Alison Loehnis. Loehnis reports high double-digit growth in the company’s resort sales over the past four years.

Even for bricks-and-mortar businesses, resort’s wide-ranging product that includes outerwear, knits, fur and lightweight early-spring clothes satisfies the current trend of buying clothes for immediate consumption that is especially important post global economic crisis. And as the industry continues to recover from the doldrums of 2009, customers will increasingly be seeing ad campaigns to support these collections. While many houses—Prada, 9


Bottega Veneta and Donna Karan included—did resort-specific advertising in 2008, the numbers logically dropped off afterward. Louis Vuitton and Michael Kors are the rare brands

that have been consistent in this arena. De la Renta’s Bolen says, “I would say for us, it’s coming very soon.” Considering that the company sells more units of resort than of any of its four deliveries, it’s likely very, very soon. As Kors sums up, “This is when people are in stores.

Treating [resort] as a stepchild in any way whether it’s advertising, design or even quantity is foolish.”

Evolution of a Season | Modern resort collections can often offer a precursor to what’s brewing in a designer’s mind

for spring—from palette to trim to print. Here, some examples of the resort-to-spring trajectory | From left: courtesy of Balenciaga; Firstview.com (3); courtesy of YSL (2)

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Entry #2 Fashion trends are not just about color, fabric, and design, it is also about marketing. In this online Vogue article, it discusses the marketing trend of the fashion industry. Designers and retail stores are using social media and the internet to get their ideas across and to market to the masses. For example, Marc Jacob uses a network system called Foursquare. It essentially allows you to “check in� to his various stores. With incentives like winning fashion show tickets to one of the most coveted weeks in New York, who can resist checking in?

How the Web Is Changing Fashion Marketing in 2010 The Fashion Tech Series is supported by Nordstrom Conversation. To share your thoughts on apps and social media in the fashion industry, join the Conversation at Nordstrom.

The fashion industry functions much like your least favorite high school clique: A leader boldly undertakes something new, a few imitators cautiously follow suit and the rest then clamber to participate before the trend dies out.

The same pattern has emerged so far this year, as brands sample new digital and mobile

technologies to market to and engage with consumers. In particular, brands took to location11


based social network Foursquare( ) to build buzz around new product launches, like Jimmy Choo’s line of trainers and Oscar de la Renta’s limited-edition series of python iPad clutches. In addition to campaigns, fashion brands released a significant amount of behind-the-scenes content on a regular basis, ranging from blurry mobile snapshots of runway models for quick

distribution over Facebook( ) and Twitter( ), to professionally produced short films delivered exclusively on company websites and mobile apps. Perhaps the most gratifying development this year began with LOFT — specifically, LOFT’s Facebook Page. The company’s corporate staff answered a widespread call for “real women���

models by modeling the clothes themselves and posting them to Facebook, sparking a flurry of positive media attention and several imitators within the industry. Let’s take a look at how the web has affected the fashion sector — in particular, marketers and media — thus far in 2010.

Marketers Embrace Location-Based Services

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Brands have continued to leverage social networks for big product launches. This year, the fashion industry proved particularly keen on location-based gaming platform Foursquare( ). Marc Jacobs was the first major designer to take advantage of the network. During New York Fashion Week in February, Marc Jacobs distributed “Fashion Victim” badges to those who

checked in to one of its stores around the country. Four users who checked in to one of its New York stores were also awarded tickets to its runway show, notoriously one of the most difficult

to get access to during Fashion Week.

Although Marc Jacobs may have been first, Jimmy Choo’s use of Foursquare was certainly the most creative. Its spring Catch-a-Choo campaign had women running all over London in order to secure a pair of the company’s new line of trainers (or sneakers, in American speak). The

company used the platform to check in at various fashionable locales; checkins were broadcast over Facebook and Twitter, and the first person at each site was awarded a free pair of trainers. Roughly 4,000 people participated in the chase, which was picked up by the mainstream and

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online media alike. Sneaker sales subsequently increased by 33%, according to social media agency FreshNetworks, which designed the campaign.

Several other brands also took advantage of location-based networks to build

buzz around big events. Louis Vuitton awarded a “Vuitton Insider” Foursquare badge to

followers who checked in three times at its new London boutique. Oscar de la Renta gave away an iPad clutch to the Foursquare mayor of its flagship store in July. TOMS and AT&T teamed up to give away 1,000 TOMS shoes and other prizes via Gowalla( ) in August. And many others,

including Cynthia Rowley, Gap, Juicy Couture and Ann Taylor, offered significant discounts to shoppers who checked in at retail locations via Foursquare. In addition to location-based networks, fashion marketers also continued to use Facebook and web-based social styling platform Polyvore to promote new product lines. To coincide with the release of his first men’s fragrance, dubbed Bang, Marc Jacobs built a Facebook game titled

Bang! You’re it!, which encouraged users to “Bang” their friends and crushes for chances at

giveaway prizes. Online retailer Yoox also launched a Facebook application to draw attention to its fall catalog. Polyvore hosted many brand-sponsored contests to encourage users to explore new collections; American designer Prabal Gurung even premiered pieces of his Spring 2011 collection to online consumers before his New York Fashion Week show in September.

Brands Become Content Creators

Marketers haven’t limited their social media use to big campaigns this year. In fact, many have released a steady stream of content on their companies’ websites, as well as platforms like Facebook, Twitter, YouTube( ) and iOS (via mobile applications).

The most common of these were behind-the-scenes shots, which were quickly captured via

mobile phones and digital cameras and distributed over Facebook and Twitter. Livestreams of

runway shows also were enormously popular this year. During fall fashion shows in February, 14


only Louis Vuitton and Dolce & Gabbana live-streamed their shows via the web and their respective mobile applications; by September, nearly every brand provided live footage of their presentations to fans on the web. Fashion Week, once an exclusive series of events for media and buyers, became a global spectacle for consumers. In addition to Twitpics and livestreams, many brands also released professional-quality celebrity interviews and short films, like the one produced by Chanel lead designer Karl

Lagerfeld above. These videos were not designed to sell individuals items (Chanel does not even sell online) but rather to bolster brand luster. During London Fashion Week, Burberry Chief Creative Officer Christopher Bailey observed (via Twitter, no less) that Burberry is “now as much a media-content company as [it is] a design company because it’s all part of the overall experience.� Like many other fashion houses,

Burberry released a heavy amount of video and photographic footage of its September catwalk show, giving fans the ability to peak backstage and watch the show live online.

Companies Learn to Listen

In addition to marketing, many brands also learned to use social networks to listen to customers for the first time. 15


In June, LOFT posted pictures on Facebook of its new silk cargo pants worn by a tall, blonde catalog model. Fans complained that it was impossible to tell if the pants would be flattering on someone who wasn’t “5′10″ and a stick like the model in the photo” and asked if the fashion retailer would show the pants on “real women” instead. The next day, LOFT posted pictures of its own corporate staff — ranging from sizes 2 to 12, and from 5′3″ to 5′10″ — posing in the cargo pants. Each styled the pants according to their own aesthetic, and explained why they liked the fit and drape of the product.

Fan response was overwhelmingly positive. “I sooooo appreciate you taking the time to ‘listen’ to our comments and show these pants on ‘real’ women,” one woman wrote. After Mashable(

)’s initial report, a number of other media outlets, including Jezebel, WWD and The Huffington Post re-reported the story, drawing even more acclaim for the brand, which has since continued to post photos of “real women” modeling its clothing. Other brands, like Nanette

Lepore, soon began posting photos of staff modeling their own clothing as well. A number of large companies, such as Comcast, Ford, Virgin Airlines, Starbucks and Best Buy, have used social media to inspire customer loyalty and satisfaction, but we hadn’t before seen this level of engagement between a fashion company and its fans. It’s a trend we hope continues to develop for the rest of 2010 and into 2011.

Other Trends

Besides the wider movements cited above, many smaller trends also emerged this year. Following the launch of Apple’s iPad, many individual brands and retailers developed and released apps for the device, including MaxMara [iTunes link], Gilt [iTunes link] and Dolce & Gabbana [iTunes link]. Many online retailers, such as Neiman Marcus, began holding flash

sales for the first time in order to compete with the likes of Gilt and Rue La La. Burberry and Christian Louboutin upgraded their online catalogues to include high-quality video as well as photographic footage of products, allowing shoppers to examine the texture and drape of a

python trench coat or the glitter of a jeweled strap, as if they were holding the product in the store. 16


With two months to go and the holiday campaign season just around the corner, industry pioneers still have plenty of opportunity to break new ground. Expect to see behind-the-scenes

footage from holiday parties, a winter-themed short film or two and location-based marketing initiatives designed to drive customers into stores this season.

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Entry #6

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Entry #7 Past Fashion

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Entry #9 Ann Taylor

Ann Taylor’s style is reflected in their window displays. The simplistic approach to their window displays spills into the store. They have a very sophisticated and minimalistic style. The window displays are not overcrowded, trying to show you everything that is in the store. Ann Taylor does a great job at teasing the customer, by leaving them wondering what else is in the store. If this is your style of wardrobe, the window displays serve as invitations to walk inside the store.

Zara

Zara’s window displays are themed based. Their approach to the color trends of 2010 was great. I noticed each window had a color trend. Zara’s display was not overwhelming and had just enough in the window to give the customer a taste of what they had to offer, including children and menswear. Overall, their color choices and position of mannequins makes this a great display. 20


Entry #10 Ugly Betty is a show that has a great fashion sense. I believe the show displays two styles, the more sophisticated style worn by Vanessa Williams and the quirky style, that some would consider fashionable, of America Ferrara.

Several fashion trends from this show include layering, mixing colors and patterns.

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Entry #11 Giorgio Armani Armani Prive Couture Fall 2010 Couture

Giorgio Armani’s Prive Couture collection is one of the most sexy, wearable collections out there. I love the softness of the color, the way the dress fits the body, and the sophistication to the style. You can probably find this collection at high-end stores such as Nieman Marcus or Saks Fifth Avenue.

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Entry #12 Public Relations Director A public relations director is responsible for securing publicity for the retail operation. They are responsible for finding cost-effective ways to promote a company’s brand. Their focus is putting their company in a positive spotlight and persuading the media to feature press about the company. The PR Director may collaborate with other departments to create or secure celebrity appearances. They are also responsible for setting up charity events and press coverage for well-known designers. They also provide the media with information about events in hopes that the media will publicize them. The PR Director is responsible for directing the press package to the media. Special Events Coordinator / Fashion Events Planner A special events coordinator develops and executes events related to fashion. These events can include trunk shows, or various events at clubs or organizations. A special events coordinator works closely with the promotions and public relations to develop events that will either feature merchandise or enhance the company’s image. They increase the visibility of design houses, brands, products or fabrics by organizing fashion events that provide exposure. Fashion Stylist A fashion stylist is the person who does most of the work prior to a photo shoot. It is important that a fashion stylist is knowledgeable of the latest trends and can bring great resources and personal style to every photo shoot. They are responsible for assembling the items and preparing the people involved in the shoot, such as apparel and accessories to be worn by the models. They have to be able to make quick decisions and be extremely detailed. Retail Trend Forecaster A retail trend forecaster researches sources to create formal reports that summarize fashion trends in a particular season. They identify the fashion trends and then interpret them for retailers’ particular customers or markets. Retail trend forecaster also project looks for the retail operations’ customers for upcoming seasons. 23


Entry #13 Fashion Don’ts

Wearing low rise jeans, while revealing your underwear.

Dowdy heels with unflattering knee length denim shorts.

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Entry #14 The following careers are opportunities in the fashion industry that I might be interested in: Personal Shopper provides expert fashion advice and gives the highest level of customized

service possible to individual customers at our retail store. The Personal Shopper provides

personalized attention and expert knowledge of fashion, local services/events, and industry

trends to their customers. The Personal Shopper is a trusted advisor for customers and provides an enhanced shopping experience. Personal Shoppers cultivate lasting relationships with new clients, and proactively communicates with them to uphold the brand. Developing a personal

relationship with customers and being able to display your expertise in design and creativity is a fulfilling opportunity. Trend Forecaster monitors the consumer and the industry through traveling, reading, networking and observing. They also create reports that summarize the important fashion trends with seasonal themes. This position is exciting as it gives a person in the industry a

chance to travel the world while being responsible for reporting what the future of fashion will be. Fashion Stylist brings to life a photographer’s vision for a fashion shoot, magazine layout, music video, commercial or print advertisement. This is a wonderful opportunity to be immersed in the fashion scene. Being able to be on the set of a fashion shoot, commercial or part of a magazine layout would be a wonderful opportunity.

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