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September
2011














Flash
 
 






























































18%
Gray
100%
Fun

Travel
Photography
 How
not
to
ruin
Vacations
 



Photographing
Butterflies
 with
Arvind
Balaraman



 Featured
Photographer
 Maharajapuram
 Ramachandran
 talks
 about
 his
 passion
 for
 photography
 



 Events
Corner
 Photowalks
&
Workshops
 



 +
Monthly
Features….
 Members
Clicks
 Monthly
Winners
 Post
Processing
How‐to’s
 Naturalist’s
Angle
 


SHOOT
SETUP
 LIGHT
SETUP
FOR
 CAPTURING
WATER
 DROPLETS



Travel
Photography
 Shruthi
Venkatasubramanian






Photograph
by
Adrian
Pope
(Getty
Images)


The
 moment
 one
 decides
 to
 be
 a
 photographer;
 most
 of
 us
 are
 guilty
 of
 conjuring
 up
 grandiose
 thoughts
 of
 travelling
 the
 world
 and
 capturing
 that
 beautiful
 wallpaper
 like
 photographs
 that
 will
 be
 the
 toast
 of
 travel
 magazines.
 Alas!
 We
 live
 in
 times
 where
 those
 pictures
 are
 dime
 a
 dozen!
 
 So,
 for
 all
 us
 commoners
 who
 end
 up
 traveling
 the
 weather
 beaten
 tracks
 of
 destinations
 that
 are
 on
 everyone’s
 itinerary,
 here
 are
 a
 few
 tips
 from
 an
 old
 hand
 of
 such
 vacations
 that
 have
 borne
 some
 indelible
 memories
 and
 travel
columns
in
newspapers.

 Jack
in
the
box
and
out
of
the
box



Be
 a
 tourist
 but
 with
 a
 traveler’s
 attitude.
 The
 idea
 is
 to
 think
 out
 of
 the
 box,
 that’s
 where
 the
 traveler
 kicks
 in.

 Consciously
wander
away
and
look
for
angles
that
no
one
has
ever
seen
before.
Can
you
get
high
or
can
you
get
low?
 Can
you
go
away
and
show
the
Taj
as
a
backdrop
to
local
life
in
Agra?
Won’t
it
be
more
interesting
to
capture
people
 who
derive
their
livelihood
from
the
Taj
with
the
monument
as
a
setting?
 The
 mesmerizing
 photograph
 does
 exactly
 that
 –
 a
 moment
 of
 local
 life
 captured
 with
 a
 setting
 sun
 brilliantly
 silhouetting
the
Taj.
 Sense
of
Place



Capturing
 this
 is
 by
 far
 the
 most
 difficult
 thing
 to
 do,
 though
 the
 concept
is
perhaps
the
simplest
to
 understand.
Sense
of
place
can
be
 captured
 in
 people,
 in
 markets,
 in
 offbeat
 ruins,
 in
 festivals
 and
 cultural
 events
 that
 abound
 most
 locations
that
you
visit.

 
Time
 your
 visit
 to
 coincide
 with
 one
 of
 these,
 check
 with
 local
 guides
 about
 time
 of
 day,
 significance
 of
 events
 and
 places
 before
you
plan
your
photographic
 sojourn
 to
 a
 destination.
 On
 a
 recent
 trip
 to
 Bali,
 that
 is
 exactly



what
I
was
able
to
achieve
by
showing
up
at
temples
during
funerals,
which
are
larger
than
life
celebrations
and
highly
 symbolic
of
Balinese
traditions.

 People


I
can’t
stress
enough
about
capturing
local
life
when
you
are
indulging
in
travel
photography.
The
flavor
of
a
place
never
 comes
 alive
 if
 you
 don’t
 capture
 the
 people
 who
 define
 it.
 Be
 friendly;
 ask
 if
 you
 can
 photograph
 someone
 by
 establishing
a
rapport
with
them.
Begin
a
conversation
and
talk
about
something
they
are
wearing
or
something
they
 are
 doing.
 Be
 inquisitive
 about
 their
 work,
 more
 often
 than
 not
 people
 will
 talk
 to
 you
 and
 allow
 you
 to
 take
 a
 photograph.
In
the
bargain
you
will
walk
away
with
interesting
anecdotes
and
stories
to
tell,
besides
brilliant
portraits.

 Try
 to
 shoot
 some
 candid
 shots
 as
 well,
 but
 never
 carry
 an
 intense
 looking
 telephoto
 lens
 to
 do
 it,
 that
 intimidates
 people.
Seek
permission
wherever
necessary,
especially
if
children
are
involved.

 People
 also
 add
 a
 sense
 of
 liveliness
 to
 otherwise
 insipid
 photos;
 they
 add
 a
 sense
 of
 movement,
 of
 life
 throbbing
 through
an
otherwise
lifeless
monument.
Even
if
they
are
not
locals
and
are
just
tourists,
they
add
life
to
a
picture.
 Do
some
Research


Before
 you
 go
 on
 a
 trip,
 make
 one
 thing
 clear
 to
 yourself
 –
 what
 are
 your
 photographic
objectives.
For
me,
I
make
a
 list
 of
 things
 I
 have
 to
 shoot
 and
 everything
 else
 is
 an
 added
 bonus.
 This
 list
 helps
 me
 fine
 tune
 my
 itinerary,
 because
time
of
day
–as
you
all
know
–
is
 absolutely
vital
to
photography.

 Equipment


I
carry
extra
memory
cards
as
these
don’t
 really
 occupy
 space,
 a
 polarizer
 and
 a
 couple
 of
 neutral
 density
 filters,
 a
 tripod
 (if
 you
 are
 serious
 about
 photography,
 please
invest
in
one)
and
three
lenses.
Let
 me
 explain
 the
 lenses,
 I
 carry
 a
 wide
 angle,
 a
 medium
 telephoto
 and
 a
 standard
zoom.
This
to
me
is
more
than
enough
lenses
for
most
travel
photography

 
 If
all
you
own
is
a
point
and
shoot,
that
is
perfectly
ok.
Just
learn
to
manipulate
your
camera
to
the
maximum
to
achieve
 what
 you
 intend
 to.
 At
 the
 end
 of
 the
 day,
 do
 remember
 it
 is
 your
 vision,
 your
 eye
 for
 detail
 that
 matters
 –
 not
 the
 equipment.
No
one
is
going
to
say,
“What
a
gorgeous
5D
Mark
II
picture
that
is”!
 
 
 About
the
Author


Shruthi
is
a
passionate
writer,
blogger
and
photographer.
Her
writings
and
photographs
have
been
published
in
leading
 newspapers
and
magazines.
You
can
follow
her
at
http://photoppurtunist.wordpress.com/



Shoot
Set
Up


“TheSfirst
permanent
photograph
was
an
image
produced
in
1826
by
the
French
inventor
Joseph



Did
You
Know?
 Strobe
is
the
brand
name
of
the
first
studio
flash.
Today,
flashes
and
strobes
are
used
interchangeably
to
denote
the
 same
light
source.


Events
Corner


Architecture
Photo
walk


On
12th
Sep
2011,
35
wide
Anglers
attended
the
architecture
photo
walk.
 Smoke
Photography
Workshop
 Tahe
 group,
 ably
 led
 by
 the
 expert
 Mr
 Prabhakaran
 Sambandham,
 Oct
9,
2011
 Strobe
is
a
brand
name
of
the
first
studio
flash.
Today,
flashes
and
strobes
are
used
interchangeably
to
denote
the


 explored
 the
 two
 ancient
 temples
 of
 Kancheepuram
 (Varadharaja
 
 same
light
source.
 Join
 us
 for
 a
 in‐person
 workshop
 with
 photographer,
 blogger,
 perumal
temple
and
Kailasanathar
temple).


 writer
and
entrepreneur
Amar
Ramesh
as
he
explains
the
step
by
 step
 recipe
 to
 get
 memorable
 smoke
 photographs.
 On
 this
 2‐ hours
 workshop,
 Amar
 will
 bisect
 the
 essentials
 of
 smoke
 photography
 and
 teach
 you
 various
 secrets
 and
 handy
 tips
 to
 bring
about
the
smoke
photographs
with
the
same
quality
of
his.
 The
workshop
will
focus
on
:
 1.
Equipment
setup
for
Smoke
photography
 2.
Steps
involved
in
taking
smoke
photographs

 3.
How
to
get
different
smoke
patterns
 4.
Steps
to
improve
creativity
around
smoke
photographs
 5.
post
processing
and
editing
techniques
 6.
You
will
also
get
an
opportunity
to
shoot
during
the
workshop
 


To
make
your
images
pop
in
 photoshop
 1.
Duplicate
layer
 2.
Change
blend
mode
to
Overlay
 3.
Adjust
opacity
to
your
liking



10
Tips
to
Photograph
Butterflies
 Arvind
Balaraman
 


Know
your
subject
 Understanding
 your
 subjects
 and
 studying
 about
 their
 habitat
 will
 pay
 dividends.
 Every
 butterfly
 will
 go
 through
 metamorphosis
 cycle
 in
 different
 seasons.
 Understanding
 this
 cycle
 and
 knowing
 its
 habitat
 will
 reward
 you
 with
 rich
 photographs.
 In
 order
 to
 get
 a
 good
 photograph,
 please
 do
 not
 destroy
 the
 habitat.
 Please
 keep
 in
 mind
 that
you
are
a
stranger
at
their
home.

 Choose
the
correct
Gear
 Butterflies
 are
 very
 colorful
 creatures.
 They
 have
 wonderful
 patterns
 and
 textures
 in
 their
 wings.
A
DSLR
equipped
with
macro
lens
in
the
 90mm
 to
 150mm
 focal
 length
 range
 is
 ideal
 to
 capture
 these
 beauties.
 
 Butterflies
 are
 very
 sensitive
 and
 can
 fly
 off
 once
 they
 detect
 motion.
Hence
lenses
with
smaller
focal
length
are
not
advisable
for
people
who
are
new
to
shooting
butterflies.
 Choose
the
correct
time
 Best
 time
 to
 photograph
 butterflies
 are
 early
 mornings
 when
 the
 sun
 is
 just
 up
 and
 the
 air
 is
 very
 warm.
 Winter
 mornings
 offer
 wonderful
 opportunity
 to
 shoot.
 During
 these
 mornings
 the
 wings
 of
 the
 butterflies
 have
 dew
 drops
 overnight.
This
will
make
their
wings
heavy
and
the
butterfly
stay
in
one
place
until
the
sun
comes
out
and
burns
the
 dew
off.
 Choose
the
correct
attire
 Butterflies
like
many
insects
are
very
color
sensitive.

Bright
colors
tend
to
scare
them
and
make
them
restless.
Wear
 mild‐colored
 dress
 with
 lot
 of
 mid
 tones
 like
 green,
 gray,
 brown
 etc.
 This
 will
 make
 you
 blend
 with
 the
 environment
 and
 help
 you
 approach
 the
 insect
 easily.
 Avoid
 using
 perfumes
 or
 strong
 deodorants
 and
 insect
 repellants.

 Get
support
 I
cannot
stress
enough
about
the
importance
of
 using
 a
 stable
 support
 while
 shooting
 subjects
 up‐close.
 At
 close
 working
 distance
 is
 very
 small,
 a
 small
 motion
 is
 magnified
 manifold.
 While
 shooting
 butterflies
 early
 morning,
 you
 are
 constantly
 challenged
 with
 low
 light.
 To
 provide
 stability,
 a
 tripod
 may
 come
 handy.
 It
 is
 not
 always
 convenient
 to
 use
 a
 tripod
 in
 many
 cases.
 During
 such











instances,
a
monopod
may
come
handy.
If
you
have
a
cable
release
or
remote
trigger,
use
them
to
minimize
shake.
 Go
Parallel
 When
you
are
shooting
butterflies
very
close,
the
working
distance
is
very
small.
This
gives
a
very
small
Depth
of
Field
 (DOF).
 So
 even
 at
 narrow
 apertures
 (f8,
 f11)
 you
 will
 have
 a
 very
 shallow
 DOF.
 To
 maximize
 the
 number
 of
 points
 in
 focus,
go
parallel
to
the
wings
of
the
butterfly.

 Watch
out
your
background
 
A
background
plays
a
vital
role
in
highlighting
your
subjects.
A
cluttered
background
will
take
too
much
of
attention
and
 will
 distract
 the
 viewer.
 A
 soft
 smooth
 background
 will
 bring
 out
 the
 details
 in
 the
 subject
 very
 well.
 Also
 look
 for
 contrasting
 colors
and
 color
theory
when
you
choose
your
background.
Blue
 and
yellow
 are
opposite
 colors,
 they
 will
 stand
out
against
each
other.

 Use
camera
features
 Most
of
the
modern
cameras
have
live
 view
.

When
you
shoot
butterflies
up
 close,
 you
 may
 have
 challenges
 using
 your
 camera
 autofocus.
 Switch
 to
 manual
 focus
 and
 use
 the
 live
 mode
 zoomed
 in
 at
 100%
 to
 get
 finer
 focus
 on
the
point
that
you
are
interested.
If
 your
 camera
 has
 mirror
 lockup
 (MLUP),
 turn
 it
 on
 to
 avoid
 any
 shake
 due
to
mirror
vibration.
Some
cameras
 do
 not
 allow
 you
 to
 use
 MLUP
 and
 Live
view
at
the
same
time.
 Try
multiple
POVs
 Butterflies
 look
 pretty
 when
 they
 perch
on
a
flower
sucking
honey.
They
 look
even
prettier
when
they
open
their
wings
and
show
the
underlying
patterns
and
designs.
The
compound
eyes
of
the
 butterflies
 are
 a
 wonder
 to
 watch.
 Translucent
 butterflies’
 backlit
 by
 the
 sun
 are
 a
 treat
 to
 photograph.
 Try
 multiple
 compositions
and
angles
and
be
creative
in
your
capture.
 Patience,
Patience
and
more
Patience
 Some
 butterflies
 are
 more
 approachable
 than
 others.
 
 Observe
 them
 and
 keep
 your
 camera
 ready.
 Approach
 them
 slowly.
Avoid
any
fast
movements
or
noise.
Before
taking
a
photograph
survey
the
location.
Take
a
couple
of
shots
for
 every
step
that
you
move
forward.
Have
loads
of
patience
in
shooting
them.
 
 About
the
Author
 
 Arvind
 Balaraman
 is
 an
 internationally
 acclaimed
 photographer.
 His
 work
 has
 been
 published
 in
 many
 leading
 newspapers,
magazines
and
books.
His
interests
include
nature,
people,
product
and
architecture.
His
work
can
be
seen
 at
http://www.arvindbalaraman.com.



Post
Processing
Tips


Photos
and
steps
courtesy
http://www.lyndsaylondonblog.com




 


Straight
Out
Of
Camera
(SOOC)


Exposure
up
to
+.31

 Added
a
bit
of
fill
light
(+13).

 Added
contrast
(+49).
 Moved
the
white
balance
warmer
from
 5000
to
5300.


Monthly
Competition
Winners


Click
the
“black
&
white”
color
converter
in
 Lightroom
3.
I
find
black
and
white
actually
 makes
the
image
look
darker
so
I
have
to
add
 more
when
it
comes
to
exposure
–
usually
 about
+.50
will
do.
I
found
that
bringing
up
 the
exposure
really
blew
out
the
dress.
I
 don’t
worry
about
blowing
out
the
highlights
 overall,
but
I
used
the
recovery
and
moved
it
 up
to
+18.
I
then
added
some
fill
light
for
the
 shadows
(+13),
moved
the
contrast
up
to
 +49.
I
added
a
little
to
the
blacks
too
+13.


Flora
Theme
winner
Aditya
Kambampati
 http://www.facebook.com/tarakarama
 

 



Portrait
Theme
winner
Vidhya
Krishnan
 http://www.facebook.com/CVidhyaa
 



When
you
use
apertures
beyond
f16,
diffraction
becomes
 significant
and
can
reduce
image
sharpness.



Featured
Photographer
 In
this
section
we
will
highlight
a
wideangle
photographer
and
will
showcase
some
of
his
work


This
edition’s
featured
photographer
is
Maharajapuram
Ramachandran
 A
few
words
about
yourself
 Here
is
what
my
Google+
profile
says:
Photographer
by
passion,
IT
Consultant
to
pay
the
bills.
I
think
that
it
pretty
much
 summarizes
myself.
I
love
to
travel
and
over
the
past
few
years,
my
work
has
taken
me
places.
I'm
also
a
social
media
 enthusiast
and
a
gadget
freak
and
would
want
to
create
my
own
start‐up
someday.
 How
long
have
you
been
into
photography?

 About
4
years.

 How
did
you
get
into
photography?
 I
 have
 always
 been
 interested
 in
 Photography,
I
got
my
first
camera
in
2006
 immediately
 after
 I
 started
 working.
 But
 the
 real
 kicker
 came
 in
 when
 I
 moved
 to
 the
US
in
2008.
Without
family
and
a
lot
of
 close
 friends
 around
 me,
 I
 had
 a
 ton
 of
 spare
 time
 over
 the
 weekends.
 Also,
 I
 badly
 wanted
 to
 get
 myself
 into
 something
 creative
 to
 beat
 the
 stressful
 and
monotonic
weekdays.

 What
are
your
primary
interests?
 I
assume
that
we
are
talking
about
photography
here.
When
I
began,
I
tried
to
shoot
everything
under
the
sun
‐
which
 isn't
 bad
 after
 all.
 While
 I
 was
 at
 it,
 I
 saw
 myself
 mostly
 shooting
 landscapes
 and
 cityscapes
 and
 macro
 ‐
 basically
 anything
that
involve
people.
I
really
suck
at
doing
people
photography
‐
be
it
portraiture
or
street.
This
is
something
 that
 I'm
 working
 consciously
 on
 as
 this
 involves
 more
 social
 skills
 at
 directing
 and
 being
 discreet
 than
 photography
 technicalities.
 What
would
be
your
advice
for
aspiring
photographers?
 As
an
aspiring
photographer
myself,
these
are
some
notes
that
I
make
to
myself.
 The
6
P's
for
success
in
Photography:
 Great
photographs
do
not
happen
by
chance.
There
is
an
immense
amount
of
practice,
patience,
perseverance,
planning
 and
some
photoshop
behind
every
one
of
those
shots.
Add
participation
to
this
mix
and
you
have
the
perfect
recipe
for
 success.
Let
me
elaborate
 Practice
makes
a
man
perfect.
The
first
shot
you
make
will
not
be
your
best.
The
hundredth
would
be
slightly
better.
The
 thousandth,
even
more.
Shoot
as
much
as
you
can
so
that
so
that
the
technicalities
become
reflex
actions
to
you.
When
 you
get
these
settings
and
numbers
out
of
the
way,
you
will
find
out
that
you
feel
immensely
relaxed
and
consistently
 make
good
looking
pictures.



Be
 patient.
Don't
 be
 forced
 to
 do
 too
 many
 things
 at
 a
 time.
 I
 have
 seen
 very
 many
 photographers
 (including
 myself)
 who
 want
 to
 create
 a
 100
 masterpieces
 in
 a
 1
 hour
 Photo‐Walk.
 It
 ain't
 going
 to
 happen.
 Think
 before
 you
 shoot.
 If
 it
 means
 that
 you
 have
 to
 wait
 for
 an
 hour
 before
 you
 get
 that
 perfect
golden
light
or
the
blue
sky,
so
be
it.
 Don't
 stop
 until
 you
 get
 that
 perfect
 shot.
Perseverance
is
 the
 key
 to
 success
 for
 anything
in
life.
Hike
a
few
kilometers
to
get
 that
perfect
reflection.
Get
back
to
the
same
 location
 again
 and
 again
 to
 get
 that
 divine
 light.
 If
 that
 small
 out
 of
 focus
 spot
 bothers
 you,
get
back
and
try
to
shoot
it
again.
 Planning
is
what
creates
that
difference
between
an
amateur
and
a
pro.
Google
is
your
best
friend.
Search
for
the
best
 photos
 from
 the
 location
 that
 you
 are
 planning
 to
 visit
 well
 in
 advance.
 Gather
 thoughts
 on
 what
 you
 want
 to
 shoot.
 Work
out
which
is
the
best
time
of
the
day
to
shoot
it.
Have
a
chart
of
the
sunrise
and
sunset
times
in
that
area.
Some
 people
even
go
to
an
extent
of
working
out
tides
and
the
angles
of
the
sun.
It
may
sound
crazy,
but
then,
when
you
see
 the
results,
all
the
planning
shows
up.
It
is
better
to
scour
the
internet
for
a
few
minutes
looking
at
what
the
location
has
 to
offer
than
finding
it
the
hard
way
by
walking
a
few
hours,
Isn't
it?
 I
 know
 that
 I'm
 committing
 heresy
 by
 adding
 photoshop
into
 this
 mix.
 But
let
us
face
it
‐
it
has
become
an
inevitable
part
of
photography.
I'm
 not
arguing
on
where
the
lines
are
to
be
drawn
‐
it
is
entirely
up
to
you.
 I'm
 a
 big
 fan
 of
 getting
 it
 right
 on
 the
 camera,
 however,
 I
 do
 embrace
 photoshop
 to
 get
 my
 shots
 a
 slight
 facelift
 in
 terms
 of
 sharpness,
 saturation
etc.,
 And
 last
 but
 not
 least,
 participate.
 Engage
 with
 the
 community
 in
 a
 constructive
way.
Most
of
you,
who
are
reading
this,
are
already
doing
 this
part.
However,
one
more
thing
that
I
would
like
to
push
for
is
being
 constructive
in
your
comments
and
when
you
encounter
criticism,
be
a
 sport
and
take
it
in
the
right
sense
and
strive
for
perfection.
 To
 summarize
 it
 all,
 remember
 this
 mantra
 (adapted
 from
 the
 British
 Army
 Adage):
 
:D
 
 Proper
 Planning,
 Practice,
 Patience
 and
 Perseverance
Prevents
Piss
Poor
Photography
 Where
can
we
see
your
work?
 Facebook
:

https://www.facebook.com/meramphotography







 Photostream
:
http://www.flickr.com/me_ram




 Blog:
http://www.arreosambar.com/







 Google+
:
https://plus.google.com/104178046050349421716/



Editor’s
Picks
 
























































 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Photograph
by
Kumar
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Photograph
by
Sudarshan
Gopalan



Photograph
by
Ganesh
S
 
 



 



 



 



 



 
 
 































“Some photographers take reality... and 




































 
 
 
 impose 
 the domination of their own thought and spirit. Others come before reality more tenderly and a

photograph to them is an instrument of love and

revelation.”


 





























































































- Ansel Adams 


Photograph
by
Sekhar
VC







































































































 


Photograph
by
Anjali
Venkidusamy



 These
are
a
collection
of
photographs,
as
chosen
 






































































































































































 by
the
Editor
from
the
photographs
submitted
to
 
 the
date
wise
albums
on
the
group’s
Facebook
 


















































































































 Page.



Naturalist’s
Angle

 Kesavamurthy.
N


Name
:
Baya
Weaver
 Male
 birds
 have
 a
 yellow
 head
 and
female
birds
are
brownish.
 Commonly
 found
 near
 lake/ponds
 and
 open
 shrub
 areas.
 Difficult
 to
 photograph
 as
 they
 move
very
fast
and
they
are
shy.
 They
can
sense
human
presence
 easily.
 Tip:
 Need
 to
 hide
 to
 approach
 near
 

 


Name
:
Pied
Buschat
 A
bird
of
countryside,
open
scrub
 or
 grassland,
 where
 it
 is
 found
 perched
 on
 the
 top
 of
 short
 thorn
 trees
 or
 other
 shrubs,
 looking
out
for
insect
prey.
 



 About
the
Author
 Keshavamurthy
 N,
 is
 a
 trained
 naturalist
 with
 good
 knowledge
 on
 resident
 birds.
 He
 loves
 to
 travel
 and
 photograph
 wildlife
of
any
form,
large
or
small.
Some
of
his
wildlife
photography
can
be
viewed
on
his
Facebook
Profile
Page.
He
has
 also
captured
a
few
natural
history
moments
through
his
lens
for
others
to
enjoy.
Kesava
started
Connect
with
Nature,
 to
educate
children
about
nature.
To
learn
more,
please
visit
–
https://www.facebook.com/connect.nature.



LET
THERE
BE
LIGHT 
 Wide
Angle
Mission
 Share,
inspire
and
promote
the
art
of
photography
 Wide
Angle
's
objectives:

 • • •

Promote
art
 Inculcate
learning

 Create
Opportunities


To
achieve
these
objectives,
the
following
activities
are
 carried
out
 • •

• • • •

Photo
walks
(local
and
global)

 Mentor
Programs
(for
beginners
&
by
 accomplished
personalities
to
interested
 members)
 Photo
Workshops
(on
various
topics)
 Guest
Speakers
(lectures
by
experts)

 Webinars
(for
global
members)
 Exhibitions
and
Publications



 
 Forum
Management
 Uma
Ganesh
 Pratap
Venkatesan
 Arun
Balaraman
 Anjali
Venkidusamy
 Veena
Kannan
 
 Competitions
&
Interpretations
 Prabhakar
Sambandam
 Kesava
Murthy
 Visaka
Guru
 Sapna
Reddy
 
 Photowalks
(Chennai)
 Vinoth
Chander
 Kishore
Iyer
 Keshav
Kandhadai
Mukund
 Ramasubramaniyan
Krishnamoorthy
 Ganesh
Chandrasekaran
 
 Photowalks
(Bangalore)
 Kesava
Murthy
 Visaka
Guru
 Ramesh
Shimoga
 
 Photowalks
(Singapore)
 Maharajapuram
Ramachandran
 
 Portraits
of
India
 Kausthub
Desikachar
 K.P.Krishnan
 


Editorial
Team
 Sekhar
VC
 Shruthi
Venkatasubramanian
 Arvind
Balaraman
 
 Workshops
(Chennai)
 Jay
Venkatesan
 Arvind
Balaraman
 Narasimhan
K
 K.P.Krishnan
 Amar
Ramesh
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 To
join
the
group
please
visit

https://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/prabhagraphy/
 
 For
all
inquiries
please
send
email
to
wideangleacademy@gmail.com



Flash Magazine