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Connellsville Sustainable Design Sketchbook

JUNE 2012


Table of Contents Acknowledgements .................................................................................................................... i Preface .......................................................................................................................................ii Part 1 Traditional Urban Form ........................................................................................................... 1 Downtown Eastside Today .......................................................................................................2 General Economics ................................................................................................................... 4 Market Trends ........................................................................................................................... 6 Prospective Market Opportunities ......................................................................................... 12 West side Neighborhood and Great Allegheny Passage ........................................................ 14 Part 2 Charrette Sketchbook ............................................................................................................. 17 Site Context Map ..................................................................................................................... 18 Rumors’s Grille & Adjacent Lot 125 South Pittsburgh Street ............................................... 19 Odd Fellows Temple 109 South Pittsburgh Street ................................................................. 25 Sidewinders & Adjacent Lots 225 North Water Street .......................................................... 31 Redevelopment Authority of Connellsville 124 West Crawford Avenue............................... 35 Community Ministry (Former Burns Drug Store)110 West Crawford Avenue .................... 41 G. C. Murphy’s 109 West Crawford Avenue ........................................................................... 47 Masonic Temple 302 South Pittsburgh Street ....................................................................... 53 P. Jandura Building 111 South Pittsburgh Street ................................................................... 57 Double Dragon 142 North Pittsburgh .................................................................................... 59 Big Apple Gear 172 West Crawford Avenue ........................................................................... 61 Marshall Pence Building 314 South Pittsburgh Street ......................................................... 65 Carnegie Library (Auditorium Only) 299 South Pittsburgh Street .......................................69 Olsen Building 122 South Pittsburgh Street .......................................................................... 71 Cameron Court Fairview Avenue ........................................................................................... 75


Table of Contents Atkins Music Center 166 W. Crawford Avenue ..................................................................... 81 Vacant Lot Corner of S. Pittsburgh Street and E. Fairview Avenue ..................................... 87 Festival Plaza W. Crawford Avenue ....................................................................................... 90 Part 3 Overall Recommendations ..................................................................................................... 94 Additional Recommendations............................................................................................. 106 Appendix A.............................................................................................................................110 Appendix B............................................................................................................................. 115 Appendix C ............................................................................................................................. 118 Appendix D ............................................................................................................................ 119


Acknowledgements Redevelopment Authority of the City of Connellsville 124 West Crawford Avenue Connellsville, PA 15425 724-626-1645 phone Web Address: www.connellsvillera.org E-mail: jmedwards@zoominternet.net

Project Consultants Widmer Engineering Inc. 225 West Crawford Avenue Connellsville, PA 15425 724 -626-1909 phone Web Address: www.widmerengineers.com E-mail: connellsville@widmerengineers.com

J. Michael Edwards, Executive Director Glenn Wolfe, Project Engineer Project Consultants Environmental Planning & Design, LLC 100 Ross Street, Suite 500 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-261-6000 phone Web Address: www.epd-pgh.com E-mail: epd@epd-pgh.com

Zanetta Illustrations 1092 Glencoe Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15220 412-780-7971 phone Web Address: www.zanettaillustration.com E-mail: jj@zanettaillustration.com John Zanetta, Architectural Illustrator

Andrew JG Schwartz, RLA, AICP, LEEDÂŽ AP, Principal-In-Charge Jonathan D. Stilan, Project Director

McCollom Development Strategies, LLC 716 Oden Street Confluence PA 16424 814 -395-9139 phone Web Address: www.mccollomdevelopmentstrategies.com E-mail: cmccollom@mccollomdevelopmentstrategies.com

Guest Architects Brad Smith, Sterling Construction Peter Margittai, Peter Margittai Architects, LLC Cherie Moshier, Moshier Studio Paula Maynes, Maynes Associates Architects, LLC

Cathy McCollom, Principal Kent Edwards, RA, Director of Operations and Project Management


Preface In order to promote future investment in Connellsville’s downtown business district, the Redevelopment Authority of the City of Connellsville hosted a multi-day Sustainable Design Workshop that focused on guiding the production of site-specific re-use recommendations and suggestive design plans for identified properties. These recommendations and plans were developed with the intent of providing them to current property owners as well as potential investors as a guide for how they may go about restoring and/or marketing their properties, as well as how to leverage available public resources such as the Redevelopment Authority, grant incentive programs, etc. Properties included in the workshop were selected based upon several factors including property owner interest and participation, properties for sale, as well as high value/ profile properties in the downtown area. The ultimate goals of the Sustainable Design Workshop and associated Report are to catalyze the:

 Creation of a downtown cultural district featuring arts and entertainment venues;

 Increase in downtown commerce;  Leverage existing public sector investment (including Amtrak, Carnegie Library, ArtWorks Connellsville and many others);

 Creation of a safer, unified and more welcoming downtown for all users; and the

 Elimination of downtown blight and blighting influences.

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The following Report is organized into three (3) parts: Part 1 – Provides a brief background of Connellsville’s history and urban form, current physical and economic conditions, as well as market trends and opportunities. Part 2 – Highlights a series of individual “chapters” for each property studied and highlights current building use and conditions; necessary/recommended renovations and associated estimated costs; potential re-use opportunities; recommended building improvements to support re-use opportunities and estimated improvement costs; as well as inspirational designs and plans. Part 3 – Outlines potential funding opportunities for individual property owners to begin implementing improvements; provides a series of overall recommendations for empowering downtown revitalization; and identifies additional recommendations for how to take this study to the next step and transition from the planning to development and implementation phase.


Downtown-East Side Connellsville

Part 1

History and Urban Form The original plan for Connellsville had 180 quarter acre lots – eight to a block and arranged in a near-perfect square; four beside four bisected with an alley. There were four alleys that ran parallel with the river, and five that ran perpendicular. Three streets ran parallel to the river and four ran perpendicular, all with an alley in between. Spring Street was the main street (then and now a State Road – now known as SR 711) that extended from the river through town. It was named Spring Street after the bountiful spring that was located at what now is known as Brimstone Corner (currently the intersection of Crawford Avenue and Pittsburgh Street). Connellsville Borough was chartered in 1793 and officially incorporated in 1806. In 1911, Connellsville gained the status of a third class city of the Commonwealth – the first official city in Fayette County. In the decades that followed the founding of Connellsville, it has experienced periods of growth and decline through several successions of development and disinvestment. The site that attracted Stewart continued to serve as a node of transportation activities of various modes. Flatboats and other ships bound for the West took people to the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys. Railroad development was also emerging and the natural cut through the Chestnut Ridge also provided a natural site for transportation’s newest technological innovation. Soon, Connellsville became a node in the expanding railroad network of the USA. At times as many as five railroad companies converged here and had operating rail yards within the surrounding areas. But it was in 1833 when coal, which was near to the surface west of the Chestnut Ridge and north and south of Connellsville, began to be the fuel needed for the emerging heavy industries of iron, glass and steel. The boom of coal and coke had injected Connellsville with unimaginable economic expansion, but that expansion quickly went into decline when the boom went bust, and the mineral industries moved on to the next location.

Throughout Connellsville’s stages of economic advancements and declines, the only characters that can be found in every age are the river and the mountains it runs through. These two constants have been pivotal to every development stage Connellsville has experienced, either for the flat lands that the river has formed or for the mineral wealth found in sides of steep slopes. These two characters are pivotal to Connellsville’s next economic growth. Not only to be relied upon for their industrial productivity, but for the natural amenities they provide as recreation spaces to be consumed by visitors and residents. Combining the natural beauty of the Youghiogheny River Valley with industrial and cultural legacies of the region is the current and future economic engine of Connellsville and Fayette County.

Connellsville Borough (1793). Source: The Centennial History of the Borough of Connellsville Pennsylvania, 1806 - 1906

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Downtown-Eastside Today Connellsville’s downtown and Eastside areas have been heavily influenced by the river and the railroad. Today access to the Great Allegheny Passage (GAP) trail and Connellsville Bike Loop are the primary economic drivers. Overall Building Stock Many of the city’s downtown buildings were built around the turn of the last century and their condition varies widely. This is further complicated by absentee landowners and subsequent economic decline which has resulted in many building’s upper floors being vacated while only maintaining the ground floor store frontage. Being out of sight for so long, in many cases these upper floors have fallen into disrepair to the point that they are no longer weather tight and require significant improvements to maintain the current use of the building. Current and Proposed Zoning Recently, the city has developed a draft 2012 Zoning Ordinance which has been presented to the City Council for review. If adopted, all of the sites which were evaluated as part of the Sustainable Design Workshop will be located within the proposed C-1 Downtown Commercial district. This district is established to preserve and enhance the central business district, and permits a wide array of

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retail, office, entertainment and service-oriented businesses as well as residential uses. The C-1 district also establishes a pedestrianoriented development prescription with buildings situated close to sidewalks and parking located primarily on-street or to the rear of buildings. A summary of the proposed 2012 permitted and special exception uses within the C-1 district, as well as general zoning regulations can be found in the attached appendices. Connectivity Located approximately 1-1/4 hours southeast of Pittsburgh, the City of Connellsville is connected to the surrounding region primarily via the motor-vehicle arterials of U.S. Route 119 and PA State Routes 201 and 711. In addition, the city is well serviced by alternative forms of public transportation, including public bus service and Amtrak rail service. The Fayette Area Coordinated Transportation (FACT) provides daily bus service (excluding Sundays) to Uniontown and Pittsburgh, PA, while Amtrak’s Capitol Limited line, linking Washington D.C., Pittsburgh and Chicago, provides the city with once -daily east and west service. Furthermore, as a designated Trail Town on the GAP which links Washington D.C. to Pittsburgh, Connellsville provides a wealth of bicycle and pedestrian opportunities, including the Connellsville Bike Loop which connects Downtown with the GAP trail.


Available Infrastructure As its long history and economic decline would imply, the City of Connellsville overall has an aging infrastructure. The City of Connellsville provides public water, sanitary and storm sewers within narrow urban right-of-ways. Currently, system-wide there is a surplus capacity on these public services, and it is likely that the demands on these systems from any immediate development/redevelopment within the Downtown area would be able to be absorbed by the current infrastructure capacity. However, due to the age of these systems, it is possible that complications could be encountered depending upon the specific location and nature of a proposed development. In addition to the above mentioned public services, it is suspected that the majority of the city has been updated from coal based heating systems to natural gas systems. Parking Supply Currently in downtown Connellsville, parking is primarily located onstreet, or in lots to the rear of building fronting on the main streets. Many of these lots are city owned and provide over 450 parking spaces on the east side of downtown alone, far more spaces than what is currently necessitated by downtown businesses and residences. The city owned lots can also send mixed messages about downtown. When these largely empty lots are viewed from the main streets, they can convey a sense of urban blight. Furthermore, although most lots contain parking meters they are not monitored, which can be confusing to a visitor looking for convenient parking to downtown businesses and attractions.

network of smaller parks which service the various city neighborhoods, and include:

 12th Street - Basketball court and play area  Mountz Creek - 3 tennis courts, baseball field, and play area  Woodruff Park - Pavilion, concession stand, play area, basketball courts, softball field, and public restrooms  2nd Ward - Pavilion, play area, and basketball court

   

Pinnacle - Basketball court and play area Cameron - Basketball court Austin Field - Tennis court and baseball field South Side - Play area and basketball court

While the existing parks network is in relatively good condition, some sites are beginning to show signs of underutilization and disinvestment. Furthermore, there are also several vacant lots within the city’s downtown area which are currently being viewed as part of the green spaces network in the short-term in order to revitalize the area. The long-term goal is to return many of these vacant parcels to the tax rolls. Some of these sites, including Cameron Court and Festival Plaza, are being addressed as part of this project.

Open Spaces For a smaller city, Connellsville has been able to maintain a wealth of open space and recreation opportunities for its residents and visitors alike. The city’s two premier parks include East Park (three pavilions, public restrooms, play area, tennis court, basketball court, horseshoe pits, bocce court, baseball field, and a walking path) and Yough Park (two pavilions, restroom facilities, bike trails access, boat ramp, horseshoe pits, volleyball court and play area). There is also a

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General Economics The purpose of the following market assessment is to analyze the existing and emerging markets for additional retail, commercial, office and residential space in the Connellsville downtown commercial district in order to identify sources of funding and investment for specific buildings in this district. Within the downtown commercial district, there are several large vacant or underutilized buildings; the majority of which are in need of rehabilitation. This information will inform the decisions about the financial feasibility of rehabilitating a building to attract new investment or improving and expanding an existing business to attract a new market. In order to accurately determine the feasibility of any rehabilitation, restoration and reuse project, an understanding is needed of market trends to predict future opportunities; market rates to determine potential return on investment and market depth to mitigate risk. Economic data has been examined to help understand trends that may impact demand in the future. Potential rental rates for office, housing and commercial uses in the area were also examined. Understanding the general economic and marketing trends in the area will assist the local real estate community, municipal and civic leadership and business owners in marketing vacant and available properties in Connellsville’s business district. Another advantage of focused marketing efforts is the increase for business in existing retail operations and the expansion of new product lines in those businesses. Current Market Filling the vacancies in downtown Connellsville will assist in the continuing revitalization of the community. When considering potential uses for buildings that would be supported by existing or future markets, it is important to also consider uses that would create demand for other downtown businesses.

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A mix of uses in a large commercial space has proven to be a successful formula and is supported by potential funding resources as well. Mixed use of retail, office and housing also contributes to livelier street activity in a 24-hour period. In order to determine the feasibility of mixed use development for any of these buildings, all potential market factors must be taken into consideration. There are often building code and accessibility issues unique to mixed-use buildings and may increase the restoration or construction costs of a building. Preleasing is often one strategy that mitigates this concern but this is unlikely in the Fayette County market with the possible exception of Marcellus Shale drilling companies should their interest in the area expand beyond present day levels. Local Population According to 2010 census data, the population of the City of Connellsville is 7,546 . Its population has seen a 17% drop since 1990 and a 16% drop in population since 2000. Currently, the median age is 40.05 with a median household income of $30,073. The 2010 consumer spending in Connellsville was $103,056,000.


Retail Market The retail market in downtown Connellsville is fairly limited and standard in offerings: banks, casual dining, bars, discount stores, some clothing and other merchandise. There is a relatively new quality arts and crafts shop and an antique and salvage store. Many of the buildings that once housed traditional downtown retail like G C Murphy’s, two department stores, the pharmacy, are now either empty or house social service providers. The existing businesses are generally operating out of buildings owned by the business owner. The market rate for retail space is difficult to gauge as few comparable spaces are actively marketed for sale or lease. This analysis found a range of annual lease rates from $4.65 to $9.50/ square foot. Many of these properties were outside the traditional downtown area. The West Side and South Side of Connellsville have a more active real estate market and may be commanding rates above that which can initially be expected in downtown. The vehicular access to the downtown commercial district is good and a high volume of traffic travels through it daily. As a result, retail space in a renovated commercial structure on these main thoroughfares could be in the $5- $10 square foot range. Demand for downtown retail space is limited. This is partly a result

of the national economic picture and a preference for many retailers for space in retail or other centers with large areas of adjacent parking. However, many boutique and specialty retailers prefer to be in downtown locations; and more often than not, in historic buildings. Attracting investors from outside the area is more viable with a marketing approach that focuses on tourism. The older and wealthy demographic of the GAP user is attractive and many other communities have found investors capitalized on opportunities discovered while recreating in the area. Office Market The office market in downtown Connellsville is weak, and realistically not expected to improve in the near future. Social service providers and other nonprofit organizations represent the largest market and although providing much needed services to the population may not contribute significantly to the tax base. Professional services generally pay a higher rent but many now located in Connellsville own their own buildings. Current vacancy rates for office space have risen in Fayette County. At the end of the second quarter in 2011, the office vacancy rate was 33.9% with 193,936 square feet available. The vacancy rate has risen from 29% at the end of 2008, and is projected to continue to rise in the near term. Residential Market The residential market in downtown Connellsville is small. There are a limited number of houses listed for sale in the immediate downtown area and no apartments for rent are listed on any easily available web site. The nearest available rental apartments found in an extensive web search were those located at 30 miles from the center of Connellsville. Rental rates appear to range from $449 for a studio to $791 for three and four bedroom apartments. Close to 50% of the housing is renter occupied.

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Market Trends Tourism Tourism is the second largest industry in Pennsylvania. Connellsville is located in Fayette County, at the “southern gateway� to the Laurel Highlands region in western Pennsylvania. The Laurel Highlands spans portions of the three counties of Fayette, Westmoreland and Somerset and is an area of spectacular natural beauty and resources offering a myriad of year- round outdoor recreational opportunities. Home to eight state parks and two state forests, the area offers outdoor options including hiking, biking, swimming, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, downhill skiing, fishing, hunting, wildlife viewing and motorized and non- motorized boating. Four seasons of activity are available in the Laurel Highlands and actively marketed by the highly-regarded Laurel Highlands Visitors Bureau. In Pennsylvania, tourism has continued to increase annually in the Laurel Highlands despite the economic recession. In 2009 an estimated 2.6 million visitors stayed overnight in the Laurel Highlands and another 4.7 million visited for the day. Research has determined that across the board outdoor recreational activities, both passive and active, are growing in large measure due to the baby boomer generation. Nearing retirement in better health and more active than previous generations, the 45-65 age group have made heritage and eco-tourism significant economic engines for many regions across the country; regions that had heretofore not focused on natural resources as economic assets. Outdoor Industry Foundation recently reported that outdoor recreation contributes $730 billion each year to the US economy, supporting 6.5 million jobs. Connellsville is well-positioned to take advantage of this growing trend of outdoor recreational users. Surrounded by parks and forests, the community is only 17 miles from the largest and most popular park, Ohiopyle State Park. At 20,500 acres, Ohiopyle State Park is one of the largest parks in the

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The number of Americans who participate in outdoor recreation activities:

Commonwealth and with 1.3 million visitors each year, Wildlife Viewing 66 million the second most visited state Bicycling 60 million park in the country. Trails 56 million Ohiopyle not only offers four Camping 45 million classes of white water rafting Fishing 33 million from beginner experiences to Paddling 24 million Olympic class but also Snow sports 16 million connects directly to Hunting 13 million Connellsville via the GAP trail as well as the Youghiogheny River. A 25-mile trip from Ohiopyle to Connellsville along the Youghiogheny River on the GAP is arguably one of the most scenic of the entire 150-mile trail corridor. Connellsville is also an easy drive from Laurel Hill State Park, Laurel Ridge State Park, Laurel Hills Summit State Park, Kooser State Park, Laurel Mountain State Park, Mammoth Park and Youghiogheny River Lake; destinations that offer year round activity from hiking, fishing, hunting, camping, boating, skiing and wildlife viewing. Connellsville also boasts the quiet portion of Youghiogheny River, perfect for float trips and fishing.


The economic impact of trail and river users is well researched and has repeatedly been objectively quantified. A chart from the national Rails-to Trails organization outlines some of the studies available on the economic impact of trails throughout the country, rural as well as urban areas, long distant as well as shorter distance trails. One of the most thoroughly researched rail trails in the country is the GAP which travels through Connellsville rather than around it as is true in all other communities bordering the GAP.

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The GAP runs 138-miles from just outside downtown Pittsburgh to Cumberland, Maryland. In Cumberland, the trail joins with the C & O Canal Towpath and traverses another182-miles to Washington D.C. The distance from downtown Pittsburgh to Connellsville is 60 miles, an achievable distance for even a moderate biker and the expected distance for those planning to travel the entire trail making Connellsville the perfect overnight location for a weekend or multiple day trek. A Campos market research study looked at economic impact directly related to the GAP for the 2008 and 2009 season and credited the trail with over $40 million in direct spending related by trail-users and $7.2 in employee wages at trail-related businesses. A program launched in 2007 working in the towns bordering the GAP has noted 54 new and expanded businesses have created 83 new jobs in eight small rural communities. The investors in these businesses often first discovered the opportunities in the towns while riding the trail. Since the typical rail trail user is of the baby boomer generation, there is a significant number nearing retirement age; looking for a possible second vacation/weekend home, a more rural setting for retirement or an opportunity for the long considered retirement business. Along the GAP, several new and successful businesses fit that profile.

Trails have a strong legacy of attracting investment in their towns:

 A retired Naval officer and his wife, a retired school teacher, fell in love with Confluence, PA while using the GAP. They sold their home in Arlington Virginia and purchased a home in Confluence. The next summer they purchased and renovated a large commercial building and now operate a repair and bike shop; offices for professional services and are presently busy restoring the top floor for apartments. Their brother and his wife followed a year later and are now also settled in Confluence.

 A marketing director of a non-profit in Pittsburgh, discovered the Levi Deal Mansion B & B in Meyersdale. Her husband, still commutes to his job in DC, but they operate the Mansion as a successful B & B on the GAP. This particular business had previously been owned and originally restored by a couple from Baltimore.

 A retired teacher in West Newton partnered with a local man who had been downsized out of job and together they turned a local convenience store into a restaurant, and outdoor patio café and bar. The Trailside in West Newton is one of the most popular stops along the trail and has expanded three times in five years.

 The operator of a successful retail imported glassware business just outside of Pittsburgh, moved with her husband (retired) three years ago to Connellsville to operate a fine glassware boutique and B & B in now fully restored building near the trail.

 Confluence, a town of 654 full time residents now encourages visitors to remain overnight with 13 bed and breakfasts, dozens of guest houses and longer term vacation rentals. Several of the latter are available when local residents purchased older homes and restored them for rental properties. The community, which at one time printed t-shirts NO BIKERS, now is so welcoming that on busy weekends several bed and breakfast establishments have been known to offer guest rooms in their own homes to stranded visitors.

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Maryland, connected by the GAP through the C & O Canal towpath, is a viable market for Connellsville and one that enthusiastically embraces outdoor activity. Maryland’s Governor Martin O’Malley recently released the first comprehensive study of visitor spending in Maryland State Parks and the economic benefit to local economies and to the state was calculated at $650,000 million each year. This information demonstrates a strong recreational market in Maryland and opportunities for cross marketing might be explored with like-minded agencies and communities in this state. Early in the Trail Town effort, civic and municipal leadership from Connellsville visited Cumberland to explore mutual opportunities and to exchange information. This relationship could be further explored; particularly in view of the success of Cumberland in revitalizing its historic downtown inventory. The former mayor of Cumberland estimated over 50% of the historic previously vacant buildings in downtown Cumberland were restored and reopened by out of town investors who discovered the opportunity while visitors to Cumberland, most often cyclists.

GAP typical trail user demographics:

 The majority of trail users are 35 and older; with a significant percentage 45 -54 and up.

 The typical trail user traveling 50 or more miles will spend twice as much as the trail user traveling less than 50 miles.

 The household income levels of overnight trail users are significantly higher than average with 34.8% over $100K.

 The average expenditure of an overnight trail user is $98; day trippers on average spend $13/day.

 Packaged trips are growing in popularity and the average package is $350/person. The value of properties located next to or near trails has also been extensively studied:

 Manon Trail, Indiana homes within ½ mile of the trail sold for 14% more than comparable homes in the area.

 Pinellas Trail, Florida median home sales prices adjacent to the trail escalate faster than county wide.

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Many of the communities along the GAP have realized new investment from the trail but this is not the only asset available to Connellsville. The Youghiogheny River and newly improved Yough Park offer additional attractions for visitors and should be further explored to ensure safe and easy river access.

establishments, restaurants, grocery stores, and service stations. Non-locals spent an average of $414-498 per trip, or $46 per person per day.

Economic Effects of River Recreation Kayaking is one of the top ten adventure activities for baby boomers, following fresh or saltwater fishing, biking, hiking and motorcycling. According to the Outdoor Industry Association 17.8 million Americans participated in kayaking, canoeing and rafting in 2008, with 7.8 million paddling kayaks alone. These paddlers made 174 million outings, averaging 10 days per participant. Approximately 47 percent of kayakers make it out on the water one to three times per year.

Communities with developed  The number of Americans who tourism infrastructure bicycle is double the population situated close to wellof Canada. traveled waterways appear most successful at capturing visitor dollars. Although land  More Americans paddle (kayak, canoe, raft) than play soccer. and water trails are most used in warmer weather  Active outdoor recreation months, the opportunities employs five times more for tourism attraction to Americans than Wal-mart. Connellsville are year-round. Seven Springs, the largest ski resort in the state is less than 25 miles away; Fallingwater, the internationally known Frank Lloyd Wright designed masterpiece is 17 miles away; Nemacolin Woodlands, a five star, four season resort and the likely location for the newest casino in Pennsylvania in the near future, is 20 miles in distance from Connellsville. The Flight 93 National Memorial Park near Somerset is a winding country road trip of only 45 miles. Vehicular access to Connellsville is quite good with major state roads with north-south and east-west access.

The Outdoor Industry Association names the number one reason for people not going kayaking more often is simply the lack of time, though the top reason for going is for relaxation. Outdoor and adventure retail is estimated to be a $20 billion a year industry, with 149 million outdoor enthusiasts checking out all the best new gear and outdoor adventure technology progressive growth in the future will be outstanding. The Travel Industry Association of America claims 55.1 million Americans are “Geotourists”, interested in sustainable and eco tourism, including adventure tourism activities like kayaking and canoeing. This trend is growing by approximately 10 per cent every year. The Northern Forest Canoe Trail Association has worked with communities along a water trail traversing New York, Vermont, Quebec, New Hampshire and Maine to develop amenities and to recognize the trail as an economic driver. Results of a survey indicate that approximately 90,000 visitors paddled the waterways in the six study regions. Their spending in local communities created $12 million in total economic impacts, supporting about 280 jobs. The median paddler group spent about $215 per trip, primarily at lodging

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According to a 2006 Outdoor Industry Foundation Study:

 More Americans camp than play basketball.


Marcellus Shale Based Gas Production A potential positive impact on the Fayette County economy is the emergence of Marcellus Shale related natural gas development. Neighboring counties are at the forefront of Marcellus Shale drilling, with activity moving eastward toward Fayette County. This activity may provide economic benefits to Connellsville from leases and royalties to property owners and related small business growth supporting the industry. Employment brings money into local economy through purchases of services and goods from local business. Additionally, there is a strong need for temporary housing for out-of –state workers. In the booming drilling period in the northern tier of Pennsylvania, hotels and motels were booked solid with miners and visitors had difficulty finding lodging in that region. This influx of drillers has not yet proven to be as intense in this area, but lodging is still being sought. Campgrounds are springing up in Washington and Greene Counties to accommodate this market and could serve a future use for visitors once the drilling operational needs cease. While there have been surveys and studies on the impact of the Marcellus Shale industry at the state level, most of the economic impact analysis has been anecdotal. A survey of downtown business agencies and economic development agencies conducted by the Penn State University Cooperative Extension College of Agricultural

Sciences in 2011 indicated restaurants, one-stop gas stations and bars have seen more business from Marcellus shale activity. Other industries such as bookstores, office supplies and durable goods have also shown increased activity. There may also be evidence of legal service needs and research based on property rights and ownership issues associated with the mining industry. Given the need for lodging, it is possible that mining companies might look for lodging opportunities more desirable and longer term than local hotels thus opening the opportunity for apartments, condos or long stay hotels. Recognizing that communities need more information on how to position investment opportunities for this industry, the Marcellus Shale Coalition recently launched a new program, Marcellus on Main Street to provide a resource for small and mid-sized businesses to connect with the industry. Community Based Demand Former residents of Connellsville represent another potential source of demand. Although Connellsville and the region have experienced declining population as a result of long-term economic conditions, former residents frequently return to visit family members and attend community events. Many also return annually for school and family reunions, holidays, weddings and funerals. Repeatedly community leaders have articulated the need for accommodations to satisfy this market and although there is no official research or data to quantifiable the demand, all local anecdotal evidence concurs. Research should be conducted to quantify the demand and support this conclusion. Potential investors will most likely be attracted with strong, quantified evidence of demand.

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Prospective Market Opportunities Specific business opportunities have been identified appealing to the outdoor recreational market in particular but clearly of interest to other markets as well through previous planning efforts and community assessments and dialogue indicate these gaps in existing services:

establishments in town, nor is there a deli shop, specialty coffee shop, wineries or micro-brewery. The latter three types of food establishments have been shown to have great appeal for trail users. Trail users also have shown preference for local and organically grown foods.

Lodging There is one bed and breakfast located in town; and one guest house. There is a nearby motor lodge, and a brand name hotel a few miles away. There is a campground three miles north of town and a few Adirondack shelters along the trail.

Local foods have been shown to make up five out of the 20 top food trends in a National Restaurant Association survey of chefs. More people than from any other time in recent history are now thinking about where their food comes from. Successful, growing restaurants understand this phenomenon and are reacting accordingly. Opportunities are here for producers- local farmers; farm to table marketing.

A 2008 hotel study noted a clear demand for 40 additional rooms in the community. This study noted that the potential and demand for a boutique style hotel. This hotel style is generally considered to be fewer than 100 rooms and not associated with a national chain. These types of hotels, along with bed and breakfasts have a proven appeal for the market demographic associated with trail and river recreational users. This same demographic applies to heritage tourists and matches research of Fallingwater clientele. Attractive, well-run bed and breakfasts in the area should be strongly encouraged and an aggressive campaign to attract a boutique hotel operator is quite correctly a high priority for the community. The 2008 Campos market research study on the GAP traffic and economic impact included a survey of businesses along the GAP and 32.5% of existing lodging facilities either expanded or planned to do so within the next year because of overall impact felt from the GAP. Food and Drink There are several bars and restaurants in Connellsville and one established facility, Bud Murphy’s has expanded twice in recent years. Most are within biking distance from the trail and walking distance from the river. Most of the eateries are family-oriented, modestly priced. There are no fine dining, white-table dining

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Trail User Services Lodging and food and drink are the most frequently needed trail services but research has also demonstrated that significant amounts of visitor spending occurs in local arts and crafts shops, gift shops and galleries and antique stores. This data fits quite nicely with retail studies that show similar demographics for those services and shops with that of outdoor recreational users. Those retailers though must be prepared for this market and recognize that shipping services is a necessity should they wish to capitalize on the potential. A recent development related to the GAP has been the addition of “roll on; roll off” service on Amtrak lines from Washington DC to Pittsburgh (the Capitol Limited). With the improvement of the Amtrak station in Connellsville, this represents a tremendous opportunity to package bike with train experiences. Positioning Connellsville as a “visitor” center for Laurel Highlands activities makes perfect sense given its assets and location. With the addition of the Amtrak experience, the attraction is increased.


Marcellus Shale Downstream Services In addition to the documented need for lodging in three to six month stretches, the industry represents other opportunities that can be explored. The first full scale drilling operations have been underway in the Pennsylvania Wilds region of the Commonwealth for several years now and impact data which is just beginning to be released, should be closely studied. Early results show increase in restaurant and bars patronage from this industry as well as the well-documented need for longer term overnight accommodations. Recreational Tourism With the recognition of the growing recreational market, and given its location and vehicular access, Connellsville can easily focus on growing this market and build on the increase in visitation to the Laurel Highlands and to its neighboring communities. With the addition of the Flight 93 National Memorial Park opening, and the additional anticipated trail completions in both Somerset and Fayette counties, visitation to the area is anticipated to increase in the upcoming years. Keep in mind that visitors represent potential investors and Cumberland Maryland and Confluence Pennsylvania can quantifiably demonstrate that point. Consider packaging with other Trail Town businesses; the ski resorts and other nearby attractions. Convene a meeting of marketing expertise representing these potential partners and specifically inquire how Connellsville and its assets can contribute to itineraries, existing visitor packages, cooperative advertising, marketing initiatives related to outdoor events and bike and river activities. Aggressively solicit input from outfitters and tour operators. Encourage bed and breakfast and camping development (factor in Marcellus Shale driller needs as well). Examine zoning and other restrictions that might make this type of development difficult and address alternatives. The Bike Loop developed and marketed through the Connellsville Redevelopment Authority is a great connecting piece to encourage trail users to travel through town; encourage its wide distribution. Heritage Tourism/Arts and Culture

Heritage tourists appreciate culture, art and historic buildings. A community with a story to tell and one that can tell it with art and culture is much sought after. The heritage signs and self-guided walking tour developed by the Connellsville Cultural Trust are excellent attractions and the murals, public art on and near the trail add to the “story.� Capitalize on the burgeoning cultural and arts initiative underway in Connellsville. Explore the motorcoach market. Consider possible retail sites for antique shops. Coffee shops, microbreweries in historic buildings, wineries and restaurants and taverns with outdoor dining, will appeal to both eco-tourists as well as those visitors interested in arts, culture and heritage and the demographics are often the same. Buy Local Travel across the country to smaller rural communities is expected to reach record levels in the next few years. Visitors to small towns want to do more than watch an event; they want to be part of it and they want their spending to be part of something larger. The Buy Local; Shop Local credo is becoming a way of life for people and shows every sign of growing. Connellsville is already participating in Buy Local initiatives and should market those initiatives aggressively. Encourage restaurants to feature locally grown produce and meats and retail to feature local products. Marcellus Shale Encourage local businesses to participate in the Marcellus and Main Street Program offered by the Marcellus Shale Coalition. Support Connellsville and Fayette Chamber of Commerce efforts to attract business related to this industry. Become familiar with the Marcellus Shale Coalition job search vehicle and consider actively soliciting businesses who might be interested in available commercial properties in Connellsville highlighting location and competitive cost.

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West Side Neighborhood and Great Allegheny Passage As noted in the preceding sections, one of Connellsville’s biggest assets is the GAP which can be leveraged to spur revitalization efforts. Any revitalization efforts in the east side neighborhood should include considerations for how to better connect to and leverage the trail development occurring on the west side of town. Located in the city’s West Side Business District, the west side neighborhood has already seen the positive impacts the GAP can have in providing a solid clientele base for B&Bs, restaurants and trail related businesses. These impacts will continue to grow as the final trail links are completed, and as the GAP becomes connected to other “mega greenways”. However, the Youghiogheny River currently acts as a natural barrier between the West and East Side Business Districts. This barrier must be overcome and connections need to be strengthened in order for historic downtown Connellsville (the East Side Business District) to fully leverage the GAP. The city has already taken some initial steps in developing connections between the east and west side neighborhoods, including the development of the Connellsville Bike Loop designed to encourage GAP users to take a brief detour from the trail and explore the city’s neighborhoods and downtown area. Bike loop maps which are distributed by the city, as well as a bike loop signage system assist in guiding users between the east and west side neighborhoods. However, these

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types of connections could be further enhanced through the implementation of a more comprehensive signage and wayfinding system that includes a hierarchy of signage types for the entire city. The signage system could be based on the GAP signs that are currently installed in the city.


Furthermore, additional programs can be developed which are designed to get visitors and GAP users to move between the east and west side neighborhoods, including:

 Historic Walking Tours with designated stops at area businesses in both the east and west side neighborhoods;

 Art/Architecture Tours;  Local business directories, location maps and flyers located at the GAP trailheads;

 Unified streetscape improvements and furnishings which signify primary routes and connections throughout the city, etc.

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Charrette Sketchbook

Part 2

Design Charrette The Redevelopment Authority of Connellsville envisioned a severalday design charrette and community workshop that would guide the production of site-specific re-use recommendations and suggestive plans designed for buildings and open spaces to promote future investment in Connellsville’s business district. The plans include architectural restoration/renovation recommendations as well as cost estimates to complete the work. Specific goals of the project include the following:

 The creation of a downtown cultural district featuring arts and entertainment venues

possible alternative uses for several buildings were considered. Costs associated with necessary repairs and building upgrades to accommodate new uses are provided for some structures. The level of analysis and subsequent design recommendations was determined by the team’s ability to inspect/access individual structures and the level of owner/occupant cooperation/involvement. Historical characteristics of the properties included in the workshop were captured from a series of historical technical maps known as Sanborn maps. The maps provide a wealth of information, such as building outline, size and shape, windows and doors, street and sidewalk widths, boundaries, and property numbers. Plans often include details on construction materials and building use.

 The elimination of downtown blight and blighting influences  An increase in commerce in downtown Connellsville  The creation of a safer, unified and more welcoming downtown for all users

 An increase in private sector investment accomplished by leveraging existing public sector investment including Amtrak, Carnegie Library, ArtWorks Connellsville and many others

 To provide private property owners with a guide for how they may go about restoring and/or marketing their properties, as well as how to leverage available public resources such as the Redevelopment Authority, grant/incentive programs, etc. Buildings were first visually evaluated for structural and related issues that need to be addressed to bring the building up to current code. Based on discussions with community members,

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Site Context Map

N Page 18


Rumor’s Grille & Adjacent Lot 125 South Pittsburgh St. Building History

Current land use/activity

The 1924 Sanborn map identifies this structure as a side-by-side structure designated as storefronts with a wall dividing only the first floor. The 1947 Sanborn map shows the same, with a restaurant in the lower left storefront.

This building is currently home to Rumor’s Grille, a bar/tavern. The upper floors of the building are currently not in use and have largely been abandoned.

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Building/Lot Assessment Based upon an April 4, 2012, cursory visual review of the Rumors Building located at 125 South Pittsburgh Street, it has been determined that the structure is in a condition that would allow for its general repair and rehabilitation. Significant challenges exist in the structural components of the building. The following items should be taken into consideration: Advantages The Rumors building has a number of advantages that could lead to a successful rehabilitation.

1. Stone foundation appears to be in sound condition 2. Structure appears to have brick exterior bearing walls 3. Exterior brick work appears to be in good condition at rear and both sides. Misc pointing is needed.

4. Single story addition at right side appears to be in good condition 5. First floor wood floor framing has been reinforced in basement with additional steel columns and appears sound

6. Floor framing appears to be sound at middle and rear of both second and third floors

7. The structure has a rear porch that will allow for the construction of a third floor emergency exit

8. First floor storefront area appears to be in good condition 9. Power is available at right front 10. Water and gas service is available in front

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Disadvantages—Priority The Rumors Building has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Front brick facade has a significant bow (3� to 6�) between the second and third floor. The owner has stated that he has monitored the wall ever since he has owned the building and has not identified any additional movement. The wall does not appear to be a load baring wall. This condition should be farther investigated and secured within a timely manner. Construction cost: $10,000 to $15,000 2. Foundation extends below the sidewalk. Metal decking and supporting steel angles are heavily rusted. Steel column at left side appears to be failing. This is a very difficult condition to address from below. The steel members that support the steel decking and concrete sidewalk above are corroding. A steel column supporting the rear edge of the sidewalk is heavily corroded and appears to be failing. The full extent of the corrosion was not identified. Additional investigation is required.

Prior to jacking the floors back to a level condition, identify cause and repair or provide additional structural supports. Construction cost $5,000 to $15,000 4. First floor framing header is deteriorated in front right corner. Replace framing and floor decking. Construction cost $2,000 to $5,000 5. Second and third floor windows and doors are boarded over. Window frame at third floor right center is unsecured. Install new windows and doors. Construction cost $30,000 to $40,000 6. Brick at right front uppermost corner appears to have shifted slightly. Brick above several windows is in need of repairs. Utilize a mason to investigate and reset brick work as needed. Construction cost $6,000 to $10,000

Replace failing members, seal cracks and penetrations, paint steel and apply water proofing intended for interior applications or relocate existing utility meter(s), block up opening, fill void with stone and replace concrete sidewalk. Construction cost $8,000 to 20,000 3. Floor framing of the second and third floors has settled around front stair tower. Additional investigation is required. No obvious structural issues were identified on the first floor to cause this condition.

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7. Roof has leaked or is leaking in several locations. Conduct a roof inspection to identify problem areas. Repair roof membrane, insulation and decking as warranted. Construction cost $5,000 to 20,000 8. Floor decking is missing on the third floor in several locations. Replace decking. Construction cost $2,000 to 4,000 9. Electrical, plumbing and HVAC system have been removed or appear to be in disarray on the second and third floors. These floors have been gutted for remodeling. Reinstall or reestablish utilities. Construction cost varies significantly based upon proposed use. $30,000 to $60,000 Disadvantages—Secondary Additionally, there is a secondary disadvantage that should be considered in the course of repairing and rehabilitating the Rumors Building. The first floor addition has a floor level that is two steps above first floor of the main structure. This is a building feature to be incorporated into the design plan.

The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

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Potential future uses/activities Ground Floor The bar/grille is reasonably maintained and will hopefully remain the same occupancy even if the property is sold.

 Existing tenant/usage to remain Upper Floors Similar to the Odd Fellows Building, the dimensions and geometry, of the upper floors lend themselves to housing.

 2-3 units per floor  Possible loft style  ADA compliant elevator Although total demolition of the interiors of the upper floors would be required (some has already been gutted) 2 – 3 units per floor could be accommodated, even allowing for two means of egress and an ADA-the compliant elevator, facilitated by the separate entrance to the upper floors from the Pittsburgh Street side. Like the Atkins Building, consideration should be given to removing a portion of the 3rd floor, providing a loft space for sleeping and a dramatic, two-story living space. The basement is currently vacant and could be used as storage or support for activities on the ground and/or upper floors.

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Renovation/Redevelopment Cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Basement  1,600 SF

 Existing to remain Ground Floor  Selective demolition (interior) – None, existing business to remain  Renovation – Retail – None, existing business to remain Upper Floors  5,700 SF

 Selective demolition (interior) – $7 - $9/SF ($39,900 – $51,300)  New construction - $75 - $110/SF ($507,700 - $655,900) Façade  Front façade - $69,200

 Sides & rear (replace windows only) - $62,600

Floor Plan Plan shown for upper floors. Potential configuration shown for multi-unit housing.

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Odd Fellows Temple 109 South Pittsburgh St. Building History

Current land use/activity

The 1886 Sanborn map shows this site as a small structure . The 1914, 1924 and 1947 Sanborn maps show this temple in place, with a lodge on the third floor and store fronts and offices on the street (shoe shine, meat market, and foreign bank).

The second and third floors of this building house the Odd Fellows meeting and function rooms. The first floor contains two rental business spaces, both of which are currently unoccupied.

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Building/Lot assessment Based upon an April 4, 2012, cursory visual review of the Odd Fellows Building located at 109 South Pittsburgh Street, it has been determined that the structure is in a condition that would allow for its general repair and rehabilitation. The following items should be taken into consideration: Advantages The Odd Fellows Temple has a number of advantages that could lead to a successful rehabilitation.

1. Stone foundation appears in sound condition 2. Structure appears to have exterior brick bearing walls 3. Exterior brick work appears to be in good condition 4. Two emergency exits are available for each floor (except left store front).

5. Front decorative window treatment and facade appear to be in good condition

6. Roof leaks were not identified 7. Storefront and second floor access appears to be in fair condition 8. Water and Gas service is available at front 9. Power is available at front 10. Basement has a drainage system below the rough concrete floor

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Disadvantages (Priority) The Odd Fellows Temple has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building.

5. Rear parapet edges have some loose brick that need to be pointed. Conduct pointing of mortar joints as needed. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000

1. One section of the stone foundation (left side) appears to have been removed for utility installation and has not been repaired. This condition appears to be an uncompleted utility modification. The wall does not appear to support the first floor above; however, it does appear to act as a retaining wall. Reconstruct stone wall. Construction cost $2,000 to $4,000 2. Foundation extends below the sidewalk and access hatch is not sealed against the elements. This is a very difficult condition to address from below. The steel members that support the steel decking and concrete sidewalk above are corroding. The full extent of the corrosion was not identified. The existing hatch has openings that allow water and rodents to enter. Replace hatch, seal cracks and penetrations, paint steel and apply water proofing intended for interior applications or relocate existing utility meter (s), block up opening, fill void with stone and replace concrete sidewalk. Construction cost $4,000 to 16,000 3. Roof framing of left rear first floor addition has some deterioration and deficiencies. Inspect roof membrane below fire escape for leaks. Repair roof as needed, replace deteriorated framing members and decking. Construction cost $2,000 to 10,000 4. Emergency fire escape has sections that are heavily rusted. Inspect attachment, steel pieces and replace parts, repaint as needed. Construction cost $4,000 to $8,000

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Disadvantages (Secondary) The Odd Fellows Temple has a number of significant disadvantages that should also be addressed in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Two decorative keystones above the front windows have moved slightly. Utilize a mason familiar with stone to investigate and reset keystones, if needed. Construction cost $2,000.00 to $3,000.00 2. Several first floor joints have been charred from a previous fire in the basement. The strength of the floor framing appears to be solid. Repairs are not anticipated. 3. Neighboring brick chimney at left appears to be leaning onto the Odd Fellows building. The owner should notify the neighbor of this situation. It does not appear to be causing any issues with the Odd Fellows structure.

The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

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Potential future uses/activities Ground Floor Existing tenants to remain. Should they decide to leave, possible uses include several of the commercial uses/needs identified in previous studies and during the 2012 workshop:

      

Informal café Microbrewery/brew pub Wine bar Bar/restaurant with craft beers Coffee shop Upscale dining Ice cream/candy/snack shop

Upper Floors Separate entrances at 103 S Pittsburgh and 109 S Pittsburgh suggest that housing on the upper floors may be more readily achievable than in other properties since these could serve as reasonably remote exits from the upper floors that frequently do not exist in most storefront configurations. The dimensions of the upper floors could allow for 2-4 units per floor, resulting in generous unit sizes while minimizing the renovation costs. (Kitchens and bathrooms are the most expensive spaces per square foot, so the fewer of these spaces the better. This decision has to be offset by the total square footage of each unit. One kitchen and one bath in a 3,000 SF unit, which is more apartment than most tenants are willing to pay for as a general rule, should be avoided.) Basement Vacant, possibly some storage for ground and upper floor tenants.

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Renovation/Redevelopment Cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  3,000 SF

 Selective demolition/renovation – None; existing tenants to remain. Façade  $7 - $9/SF ($11,500 - $14,800) Upper Floors  2nd & 3rd – 5,300 SF

 Selective demolition – $5 - $7/SF ($37,200 - $47,900)  New construction - $89 - $115/SF ($472,900 - $611,100)

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Sidewinders & Adjacent Lots 225 North Water St. History

Current land use/activity

The 1886 Sanborn map identifies this structure as the Central Hotel and the currently vacant properties to north (left side) as the Baltimore Hotel

Sidewinders currently operates as a bar/tavern with the upper floors of the building unoccupied.

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Potential future uses/activities Ground and Upper Floors Sidewinders’ location near the train station and its’ proximity to the river and the bike trail make it an ideal location to attract outdoor recreation customers, as well as be a destination for other travelers and regional customers. A multi-faceted hospitality occupancy would be the ideal future usage, including:

     

Restaurant, including light breakfast Bar Brew pub Wine bar Bike or trail-themed café Ice cream/candy/snack shop

Working with its location, an ideal use for the upper floors of sidewinders is an inn or boutique hotel. Basement The basement is currently vacant. Its future use would likely be storage or a support area for ground and upper floor activities.

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Renovation/Redevelopment Cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  approximately 3,100 SF

 Selective demolition/ renovation – Unknown; access not available Façade  7,200 SF

 Clean brick - $49,900  Replace 24 windows – upper floors only - $59,800 Upper Floors  Approximately 2,100 SF per floor  Selective demolition/ renovation/new construction – Unknown; access not available

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Redevelopment Authority of Connellsville 124 West Crawford Ave. History

Current land use/activity

The 1924 Sanborn map shows this structure as a Bank (Yough National Bank [Yough, not Youghiogheny]) with two wired glass skylights and an office space in the rear.

This building is currently occupied by the Redevelopment Authority of the City of Connellsville; the offices occupy the ground floor. The upper floors of the building are vacant.

Page 35


Building/lot assessment Based upon an April 3, 2012, cursory visual review of the Connellsville Redevelopment Authority Office Building located at 124 West Crawford Avenue, it has been determined that the structure is in a condition that would allow for its general repair and rehabilitation. The following items should be taken into consideration: Advantages The Redevelopment Authority Building has a number of advantages that could lead to a successful rehabilitation.

1. Stone Foundation appears sound. 2. Foundation does not appear to extend below the sidewalk. 3. Structure appears to have exterior brick bearing walls. 4. Front facade appears sound. 5. Front storefront and second floor access appears to be in good condition.

6. Exterior brick work appears to be in good condition. 7. Concrete and steel safe in basement. 8. Significant power is available at rear. 9. Water and Gas service is available in front. 10. Emergency exits are available at rear of each floor.

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Disadvantages—Priority The Redevelopment Authority Building has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Roof is leaking in several locations along the right side. Conduct a roof inspection to verify problem areas. Repair roof membrane, insulation and decking as warranted. Cost $10,000 to 15,000 2. Roof framing and wood decking appear to have been damaged and structural repairs are likely. Replace deteriorated wood decking and framing. Construction cost $4,000 to $12,000 3. The upper most stone work on the left front corner appears to leaning forward slightly. Utilize a mason familiar with stone to investigate and reset corner if needed.

4. Rear basement door is partially blocked due to two temporary support columns. These columns are suspected of supporting damaged wood framing above the plaster ceiling. Conduct structural repair to joist. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000 5. First floor wood floor framing has received some additional wood beams and columns for additional support. Investigate farther to determine if additional supports are sufficient and increase if necessary. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000 6. Steel fire escape is suspected of needed repairs. Inspect attachments, steel pieces and replace parts, repaint as needed. Construction cost $6,000 to $15,000

Construction cost $4,000 to $6,000

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Disadvantages—Secondary The Redevelopment Authority Building has a number of additional disadvantages that should be a consideration in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. The wood floor framing of the third and second floor generally appear sound; however, damaged could be occurring due to water running behind the wall finishes. Remove finishes to investigate and repair/replace framing if needed. Construction cost $1,000 to $3,000 2. Stone foundation is damp. Due to the nature of the basement configuration and construction materials it will be difficult to create a basement area that is not damp. Basic repairs to minimize moisture can be conducted. Construction cost $2,000 to $5,000 3. Stone foundation is missing stone and mortar in the rear right corner. This condition appears to be uncompleted plumbing modifications. Reinstall stone and mortar as needed. Construction cost $2,000 to $4,000

4. Concrete basement floor is heaved in one area. This condition does not appear to be recent. Monitor and address if movement continues. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000 5. First floor has two elevations (8”+/- difference). This is a building feature to be incorporated into the design plan. 6. Minor brick pointing may be needed. Conduct pointing of mortar joints as needed. Construction cost $2,000 to $4,000 7. Second floor rear exit door has cracking above the lintel. Inspect for failing or corroded steel lintel, repair/replace and repoint. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000

The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

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Potential future uses/activities Ground Floor Current use is an operating office and should remain. The relatively narrow width of the parcel (25’) would present some challenges to the inclusion of a space sufficient for other uses. Consideration should be given to partnering with the Big Apple Gear and potentially putting a coffee shop in this building. Upper Floors Small floorplates like those in this building are difficult to costeffectively bring up to current building codes for a multi-unit occupancy. Potential future uses include:

 Vacancy  Live/work space  Loft style

office on the first floor and owner/occupant residential on the upper floors. A more modern twist is to remove part of the third floor, creating a loft space usually devoted to a master bedroom and bath, and a high ceilinged, living dining/kitchen area below. The resulting effect is a spacious and open feeling with plenty of daylighting that is much more marketable to todays’ self-employed city dweller. If an elevator is desired, it can be a Personal Service Elevator (PSE) which can be installed at a much lower cost than a commercial elevator. Whether by stair or elevator, a ten foot vertical commute to work every day is very appealing to those focused on saving time and money, and is a very eco-friendly lifestyle. Live/work occupancies in existing buildings is specifically addressed in the latest edition of the state-wide building code, in recognition of buildings like this one.

Two means of egress, reasonably remote from each other, exit corridors and an ADA-accessible elevator take up much of the available floor space (in many cases over 50%), leaving relatively little rentable area on the upper floors, and reducing the rentable area on the first floor. In addition, current codes require a fire separation between retail and housing occupancies, usually a 2 hour floor/ceiling assembly between the first and second floors, a level of construction almost never found in historic buildings. As a result, the most likely future use is, unfortunately, vacancy, the fate of most upper floors in older buildings located within commercial business districts. A very viable future use is an old approach that has become new again in larger cities, but is relatively unknown in smaller cities like Connellsville: live/work space. It used to be fairly common for the shop keeper to live above the store, and was one of the driving reasons why narrow fronts and deep sidewalls became popular in the first place (taxes based on frontage was the other reason). As a result, buildings like the Redevelopment Authority work very well for retail/

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Renovation/Redevelopment Cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  Selective demolition/renovation – None (existing business) Upper Floors  Selective demolition (interior) – $10 - $12/SF (1,375 SF = $13,750 - $16,500)  New interior construction – 2nd & 3rd Floors - $89 - $115/SF (1,375 SF = $122,375 - $158,125)

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Community Ministry (Former Burns Drug Store) 110 West Crawford Ave. History

Current land use/activity

The structure appears on the 1947 Sanborn map as the McCrory’s Department Store (which operated until the 1970s-1980s). Shown with nine wire glass skylights in the rear of the building.

Connellsville Community Ministries maintains offices in this building as well as storage and operations for their food pantry and thrift store. They are currently creating additional conference/meeting spaces on the first floor for their use and as rental units. The upper floors are vacant.

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Building/lot assessment Based upon an April 3, 2012, cursory visual review of the Connellsville Community Ministries Building located at 110 West Crawford Avenue, it has been determined that the structure is in a condition that would allow for its general repair and rehabilitation. Advantages This building has a number of advantages that could lead to a successful rehabilitation.

1. Stone Foundation appears to be in sound condition 2. Basement concrete floor is in good condition 3. Front basement wall appears to stops at facade for most of the front elevation

4. Floor framing of the first and second floors appears in sound condition

5. Structure appears to have exterior brick bearing walls 6. Front facade appears sound 7. Second floor has a separate entrance 8. Front storefront and second floor access appears to be in reasonable condition

9. Exterior brick work appears to be in generally good condition 10. Significant power is available at rear 11. Water and gas service is available in front 12. Decorative skylights on second floor 13.Full usable basement Page 42


Disadvantages—Priority The Community Ministry Building has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building.

6. Second floor windows have been boarded over and are deteriorating. Install new windows, repair existing and repair plaster. Construction cost $15,000 to $20,000

1. First floor and second floor roof have evidence that the roof is or has had minor leaking. Conduct a roof inspection to verify problem areas. Repair roof membrane, insulation and decking as warranted. Construction cost $5,000 to 10,000 2. The rear left brick corner is cracked and has shifted slightly. Utilize a mason to investigate and reset brick work as needed. Construction cost $2,000 to $6,000 3. The steel lintels at the rear elevation have rusted and cracked the brick above the windows. Utilize a mason to investigate, point brick and address steel lintels as needed.

7. A second emergency exit from the second floor was not visible. Review building codes to verify that a second emergency route is required. Install interior or exterior emergency route. Construction cost $10,000 to $15,000 8. A second emergency exit from the basement was not visible. Review building codes to verify that a second emergency route is required. Install interior emergency route. It does not appear that an exterior route is possible. Construction cost $8,000 to $12,000 9. First floor unit heater support bolts extend through the second floor flooring. Provide alternate mounting hardware.

Construction cost $2,000 to $6,000 Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000 4. The decorative concrete or stone molding above the second floor windows on the front exterior has several pieces that appear to be delaminating. Utilize a mason to investigate and repair or replace as needed. Construction cost $2,000 to $6,000 5. The skylights are in need of repair and appear to be leaking. Conduct a roof inspection to determine if the either the flashing or the window (or both) need to be repaired. Replace broken glass and structural elements as needed. Construction cost $1,000 to $5,000

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Disadvantages—Secondary The Community Ministry Building has a number of additional disadvantages that should be a consideration in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Foundation extends below the sidewalk in the front left corner. Steel decking is beginning to deteriorate. This is a very difficult condition to address from below. In its current condition the area appears to be structurally sound however the water limits the use of the space. Seal cracks and penetrations, paint steel decking and apply water proofing, intended for interior applications. Construction cost $1,000 to 2,000 2. Moisture is moving through the front foundation stone wall. Seal cracks and penetrations and apply water proofing, intended for interior applications. Construction cost $1,000 to 2,000 3. The first floor slopes to the left. Based upon the owner’s comments, this is an original design feature. This is a building feature to be incorporated into the design plan. 4. Minor brick pointing is needed. Conduct pointing of mortar joints as needed. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000

The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

Page 44


Potential future uses/activities Basement and Ground Floor Existing tenant to remain. Grade level access to the basement level at the rear of the building is highly advantageous for loading/unloading. Existing conveyor system may eliminate the need for a new elevator to be a freight elevator. Upper Floor Currently vacant, but ground floor tenant may be eligible for funding to expand their operation to the upper floor. Second means of egress presents a potential problem, since the second floor is only half the size of the ground floor. Potential uses/needs currently identified are:

   

Ministry Hostel Retreat/spiritual center

Short term housing (trainees)  Social services/job training

 Worship

Page 45


Renovation/Redevelopment Cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  Selective demolition/renovation– None, existing tenants to remain Upper Floors  Selective demolition – $6 - $8/SF (4,300 SF = $25,800 $34,400)  New construction – $30 - $45/SF (4300 SF = $128,700 $193,050) Façade  Restore original cornice and sign panel. Building façade possesses a modest level of architectural character and detail and could be a contributing factor to the Crawford Avenue streetscape with a minimal restoration effort  $25,000 Floor Plan Plan shown for upper floors. Potential configuration shown for social services / job training. Other proposed uses would require a substantially different configuration at substantially greater cost. For example, short-term housing would require a bathroom and small kitchenette for each unit, significantly increasing the cost of the build -out. Each proposed use would need to be analyzed separately, both in terms of cost and code compliance.

Page 46


G. C. Murphy’s 109 West Crawford Ave. History The 1947 Sanborn map shows this structure as a storefront with steel joist construction and six wire glass skylights. Note: It lists the façade as “Tile Br. Faced”, possibly indicating that the current façade is original.

Current land use/activity This building is currently vacant.

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Building/lot assessment Based upon an April 3, 2012, cursory visual review of the Mongell – G.C. Murphy Building located at 109 West Crawford Avenue, it has been determined that the structure is in a condition that would allow for its general repair and rehabilitation. The following should be taken into consideration: Advantages This building has a number of advantages that could lead to its successful rehabilitation.

1. Poured concrete foundation is hidden behind finishes. No issues identified.

2. Tile block and brick facing of second floor appear in good condition

3. Steel columns, steel beams and steel bar joist appear to be sound. 4. Exterior brick appears to be in good condition 5. Stair tower at rear of all floors 6. Open stair between basement and first 7. Full usable basement 8. Concrete floors appear to be in good condition 9. Front facade appears to be in fair condition 10. Considerable power at rear 11. Foundation does not appear to extend below the sidewalk 12. Water service is available at front Page 48


Disadvantages—Priority The G. C. Murphy’s Building has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Structural crack in freight elevator wall extends from basement through second floor. The movement does not appear to be new and appears to be isolated. Access to the elevator shaft and roof were not available. Additional study and monitoring is needed to develop an appropriate action plan, if any. The elevator may also be involved.

Construction cost $3,000 to $10,000 5. Front facade tile needs pointed which appears to be allowing moisture into the area above the second floor front windows. Conduct pointing of mortar joints as needed. Construction cost $2,000 to $4,000

Construction cost $5,000 to 25,000 2. Ponding water (could be two feet deep) in lower basement boiler room. Unclog drain or replace failed sump pump. Investigate to determine the source of the water. Construction cost $1,000 to 12,000 3. Roof has leaked along left side and center area. Conduct a roof inspection to verify problem areas. Repair roof membrane, insulation and decking as warranted. Construction cost $2,000 to 10,000 4. The rear stair tower has moisture coming through the exterior walls at or below grade. Additional investigation is needed. The foundation appears to be poured in place concrete with plaster finish. Water sources could include failed exterior door threshold and trim, chimney flashing, moisture from ponding water or the rear alley may be slope toward the building.

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Disadvantages—Secondary The G. C. Murphy’s Building has a number of additional disadvantages that should be considered in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Floor slopes to the right at the front area on the first floor. This is a building feature to be incorporated into the design plan. 2. Neighboring building to the left abuts the structure in an awkward manor. No action is needed. 3. Water service is available at the front (residential meter. Depending upon proposed future use the size of the water service may need to be increased

The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

Page 50


Potential future uses/activities Ground Floor The large floor plate of the former GC Murphy Building makes it highly unlikely that a single tenant can be found that would lease the entire building, or even the entire first floor. A more likely scenario is for a public market to be established:

 Public market  Lease individual booths to retail vendors of all types  Emphasizing local arts & crafts and other products produced or manufactured within the region  Rows of booths approximately 10’ x 10’ would fit easily into the bay spacing of the existing ground floor, serviced by power, data and communications connections.  On-site Wi-Fi would be highly desirable

possible, the size and location of the building make them unlikely. It has also been suggested that only the first two or three bays of the existing building be renovated, an option worth pursuing if the public market approach is deemed to be infeasible. Upper Floors The upper floor will most likely remain vacant, although there may be a market to rent the space as compartmentalized storage rentals, since there is a freight elevator on the premises near the rear of the building. Individual wire storage cages could be constructed for considerably less than the storage buildings with overhead doors frequently seen off to the side of major highways, so the rental rate may be very competitive analysis. Further, the space would only need to be kept dry: no heating or cooling would be required. A detailed pro forma of this type of usage is beyond the scope of this workshop but may be worth investigating as a way to generate some revenue from otherwise unusable space.

A market study would be needed to determine whether or not the public market could include local produce, meat, dairy products or fresh flowers. Retail space offering such products frequently cost more to build out, with higher electrical costs and sometimes requiring refrigeration equipment. Although free parking is available directly across the street, crossing a busy vehicular street to shop for food is not something consumers are used to doing, a behavior pattern that is not likely to change. Free parking on the same side of Crawford Avenue would likely be required for a public market to be successful. Other uses for the former GC Murphy Building include studio space for artists, a youth program center, a call center or a banquet/ catering hall. While all of these uses are

Page 51


Renovation/redevelopment cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  Selective demolition – 10,700 SF/FL - $5 - $7/SF ($53,500 $74,900)  Renovation – Public market – (large open area serviced by power/data/telephone) - $15 - $25/SF ($160,400 - $267,300) Upper Floors  Selective demolition – Same as 1st floor

 New interior construction – Wire mesh storage cages - $10 - $15/ SF ($106,900 - $160,400) Façade  The façade has been substantially modified over the years, with no current indication of what the façade looked like originally. The existing panels would have to be removed in order to determine whether restoration or a new façade suitable for a public market would be more appropriate.  Demolition only - $7,500

Floor Plan Ground floor plan shown for potential arrangement of booths in a public market.

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Masonic Temple 302 South Pittsburgh St. History

Current land use/activity

The 1924 Sanborn map identifies this structure as a Gas Office and store front occupying the street face with a wall dividing the first and second floors. The third and fourth floors are identified as a lodge.

The first floor of the Masonic Temple Building is currently used as a gym and karate studio. The second and third floors are apartments and the top floor is unoccupied.

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Page 54


Potential future uses/ activities Ground Floor The Building currently has two tenants on the ground floor, a karate gym and a fitness gym. The exterior of the building is very rich in architectural character and detail, although maintenance and repair is needed in a few selected brick and stone areas, and the infill material and windows on the 4th floor should be replaced with a more historically correct material and window configuration. There are a number of potential future uses for this building including:

   

Restaurant Event spaces Ballroom

Bring Your Own Bottle (BYOB) restaurant/ establishment  Office rental space The character of the building and its’ important location on S Pittsburgh Street is sufficient reason to restore the exterior and market it as an excellent location for a “white linen” restaurant, with catered events such as reunions and wedding receptions in the 4th floor ballroom. An increasingly popular option would be to open as a Bring Your Own Bottle (BYOB) establishment, with an increasing number of fine dining customers willing to pay for high quality, well-prepared food if they can check out the menu online first and then bring their own wine, depending upon what they plan to order. Another option could be to market the property as a prestigious address for a bank, real estate company or government agency.

Page 55


Renovation/Redevelopment Costs All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  Selective demolition/renovation – None, existing tenants to remain

 Should the existing tenants elect to leave, the cost of converting the ground floor into a fine dining usage would require a detailed investigation into the existing conditions, but similar conversions in recent years have ranged from $175 to $250/SF  The primary consideration affecting the cost is whether or not there is any food preparation space and equipment currently in place (in particular the existence of an exhaust hood over the cooking surfaces) and, if so, what the condition of the food preparation equipment is Upper Floors  Selective demolition – Unknown – interior access was not available Façade  Exterior improvements

 $7 - $9/SF ($17,500 - $22,500)

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P. Jandura Building 111 South Pittsburgh St. History

Current Land Use/Activity

The 1914 and 1924 Sanborn maps show this as a three-story structure with a first floor street store front (groceries and fruit) and an open space to the rear. The 1947 Sanborn map shows this structure to be a three-story storefront with a rear section of cement block construction that is level with the ground.

This building is currently for sale with the ground and second floors vacant. The third floor is used as a residence.

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Page 58


Double Dragon 142 North Pittsburgh St. History

Current land use/activity

The 1886 Sanborn map shows this site to be a Baptist Church. The 1914 Sanborn map shows this structure to be a Hall/Lodge on the third and fourth floors, with store fronts on the street (a Drug Store/ Confectionary and a Bank). The 1947 Sanborn map shows this structure as a restaurant.

Still locally known as the Citizens National Bank building, this structure is also known as the Markell Building and today houses a locally owned restaurant.

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Page 60


Big Apple Gear 172 West Crawford Ave. History

Current land use/activity

The 1886 Sanborn map identifies that on the site of this structure was once a boarding house with store fronts (a candy store, barber, book shop and shoe shop). The 1914 Sanborn map identifies that on this site was a Tobacco Shop and News Stand.

This building is used for retail on the first floors and apartments on the upper floors

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Page 62


Potential Future Uses/Activities Ground Floor Current use is a retail store and should remain. Should the current tenant elect to leave, the high visibility and accessibility of this location would make it ideal for any of the following business needs identified in early studies and at the 2012 workshop:

       

Informal café

code requirements. Exterior The front (south) façade has a moderate level of architectural detailing but needs some restoration and repair. The west wall of the building is highly visible from Crawford Avenue, the river and the bike trail, and is an ideal opportunity for a mural that would serve as a signpost that something significant is happening in the city east of the river. Themes of geraniums or lumber are two possibilities that would identify unique aspects of the city’s history.

Bike or trail-themed café Wine bar Bar/restaurant with craft beers Coffee shop Light breakfast Ice cream/candy shop Bakery

Upper Floors The need for housing in Connellsville has been well documented in previous studies, e.g. The Connellsville Community Design Workshop, December 2008. As a result, the upper floors are already and should remain residential, assuming they comply with current building codes. Should the owner decide to modernize or upgrade the housing on the upper floors, the presence of an existing exit door in the center of the front façade greatly enhances the current building code requirement for two means of egress, reasonably remote from one another. Stairs and exit access corridors to the exit doors would also need to meet current

Page 63


Renovation/Redevelopment Cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground Floor  Selective demolition – None (existing business)

 Renovation – None (existing business) Upper Floors  Selective demolition – None Façade  Replace the windows with more historically correct yet energy efficient windows  Restore the cornice at the gutter line and also the cornice and sign panel above the storefront  Clean the brick

 Tuck and point the joints as needed.  Remove the stone from the front façade and replace it with historically sensitive detailing  Remove any unattractive signage from the west wall. If a mural cannot be provided, consider an advertising “billboard” to generate revenue but frame it to be compatible with the historic character of the window details  $55,700

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Marshall Pence Building 314 South Pittsburgh St. History

Current land use/activity

The 1924 Sanborn map identifies this structure as the Crawford Motor Car Co. with steam heat and electric lights and the capacity for 200 cars.

The Marshall Pence Building currently houses an automotive repair and upholstery shop, a tattoo parlor and a beauty salon on the first floor. The upper floors are apartments.

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Page 66


Potential future uses/activities Ground Floor Similar to the GC Murphy building, the large floor plate of the Marshal Pence Building makes it highly unlikely that a single tenant can be found that would lease the entire building, or even the entire first floor. Several uses could be considered including:

   

Open air market Open air market with covered parking Storage for the market on upper floors

shared covered parking for the market (during the day) and parking for adjacent business, i.e. a hotel, overnight. Upper Floors The upper floor will most likely remain vacant. The large floor plate makes it difficult to convert to housing and there is limited demand (and abundant supply) for upper floor office space in Connellsville in general. Storage for the open air public market is another option.

Combination with adjacent lot and demolition

The building does not possess any particularly distinguishing architectural character or detail, and the brick exterior is in very poor condition on the side and rear of the building. In addition, the odd, non-rectilinear geometry of the floor plan presents some layout problems. The large, arched openings on the Pittsburgh Street side could lend themselves to potentially attractive, individual storefronts for multiple tenants, but considerable work would need to be done to the brickwork on the existing façade, which currently consists of four different colors of brick and several other materials which have been added to the mix over time. If the property could be combined with the adjacent lot, consideration should be given to demolition. One possibility is to convert the ground floor into an open air (but under roof) public market. Such markets are very popular in many cities but would be a unique attraction in the Laurel Highlands and along the GAP. Since the farmer’s market is doing well and has proven that the concept has appeal, a more permanent market selling fresh produce, meat, dairy products and flowers could become a regional attraction. A variation on the public market approach would be to use part of the building as the public market and the remainder as

Page 67


Renovation/redevelopment cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included. Ground floor  Selective demolition – $5 - $7/SF (37,300 - $39,900)

 Renovation – Retail space – (minimal – open air market) $15 $20/SF ($111,700 - $148,900) Façade  Demolition of infill at ground level – upgrade infill on 2nd floor – brick infill in arches to remain - $7,500 Upper floors  Selective demolition (interior) – None; assume vacant for the foreseeable future.

Floor Plan Ground floor plan shown for potential arrangement of booths in an open air market. Remove all material currently infilling the large arched openings on the Pittsburgh Street façade and expose the ground floor as an open air, public market with booths visible to passing vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Page 68


Carnegie Library (Auditorium only) 299 South Pittsburgh St. History In a letter written on April 22, 1899 from Andrew Carnegie to Dr. J. C. McClenathan of Connellsville, PA, Mr. Carnegie writes: Dear Sir: - In reply to yours of the 19th, I will be pleased to give $50,000.00 for the desired library building, provided a suitable site is furnished and the council agrees to grant a fund annually to maintain and operate the library‌

In a subsequent agreement, the School Board agreed to divert monthly payments in support for operation and maintenance of the Library. J. M. McCollum of Pittsburgh won the successful competitive design (of eight) on March 12th, 1901. The contractor was J. A. Nixon of Titusville, PA with a construction bid of $39,850.00(lowest bidder). Construction began in May 1901 and the corner stone was laid on Wednesday, July 31, 1901. The site is a former cemetery

Current land use/activity The Carnegie Library is still in use as a library. The auditorium is used in limited capacity for public functions but has problems that restrict its usefulness.

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Page 70


Olsen Building 122 South Pittsburgh St. History

Current land use/activity

The 1924 Sanborn map shows this to be a three-story structure with a storefront on the street.

The Olsen Building is currently unoccupied.

Page 71


Building/lot assessment Based upon an April 4, 2012, cursory visual review of the Olsen Building located at 122 South Pittsburgh Street, it was determined that the structure is in a condition that would not allow for its cost effective repair and/or rehabilitation. The structure has sustained significant structural damage to the wood framing at multiple locations and on multiple floors. The following advantages and disadvantages should be taken into consideration: Advantages Although this structure is in poor condition, it does have several advantages that should be noted if repair and/or rehabilitation is to be considered. 1. Second floor has separate entrance 2. Stone foundation appears sound 3. Gas service located at front 4. Concrete basement floors appear to be in fair condition 5. Front facade appears to be in fair condition 6. Electrical service available at front

Page 72


Disadvantages—Priority The Olsen Building has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building.

5. Rear basement stairs to grade and rear basement door have been removed. Replace stairs and door. Construction cost $2,000 to 4,000

1. First floor rear roof structure has collapsed. Remove rear first floor roofing material, identify extent of structural damage. Replace roof framing members, decking, insulation, roof membrane and electrical. Construction cost $10,000 to 20,000 2. First floor rear roof is leaking and has saturated the majority of the first floor wood floor framing. Inspect first floor framing, identify extent of structural damage. Replace framing members, decking and electrical. Construction cost $15,000 to 25,000 3. Basement extends below the sidewalk. Decking below sidewalk and steal beams under front facade are corroded. This is a very difficult condition to address from below. The steel members that support the steel decking and concrete sidewalk above are corroding. The full extent of the corrosion was not identified. Seal cracks and penetrations, paint steel and apply water proofing intended for interior applications or relocated existing utility meter (s), block up opening, fill void with stone and replace concrete sidewalk. Construction cost $4,000 to 16,000 4. Electrical plumbing & HVAC System Investigation. Due to extensive water damage, these systems will require repairs. Construction cost $15,000 to $25,000

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6. A portion of brick is missing at the left rear and right rear second floor area. Utilize a mason to investigate and repair .

should be considered in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Debris is scattered throughout structure. Remove debris.

Construction cost $2,000 to $6,000 Construction cost $2,000 to $5,000 7. Exterior wall framing and siding have been removed at the second floor kitchen area. Replace wall framing and siding.

2. Second floor has two steps up to the kitchen area. This is a building feature to be incorporated into the design plan.

Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000 8. Portions of exterior siding (shingle type) are missing. The wood siding at the left side appears to need flashing at the foundation interface. Repair or replace siding and flashing. Construction cost $2,000 to $8,000 9. Second and third floor windows are boarded over. Install new windows or repair existing. Construction cost $6,000 to $12,000 10. Interior stairs to basement need repairs. Repair stairs. Construction cost less than $500 11. Removal of adjacent building has created openings below sidewalk. Verify extent of condition. Repair with masonry. Construction cost $500 to $1,000 Disadvantages—Secondary The Olsen Building has a number of additional disadvantages that The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

Page 74


Cameron Court Fairview Avenue History

Current Use/Activity

The 1924 Sanborn map shows this parcel as partial location of the Cameron Public School

Cameron Court is an existing open space with a well-used basketball court. Its location along Pittsburgh Street is prominent in the downtown area and a good choice for additional programming and activities.

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Potential Future Uses/ Activities Cameron Court is a well-used space but its appearance and elements could be improved in line with its prominent location in downtown. Next door to the library and a popular church, this space has many potential users who are not currently engaged with the space. A series of outdoor rooms with themes like butterfly or kitchen garden plants would take advantage of the expertise and talents of the Connellsville Garden Club, the organization currently taking care of the maintenance and annual plantings in the park. The updated Cameron Court could include:

     

Council ring Butterfly garden Bird garden Improved basketball court Improved picnic areas Gazebo or garden structure

Additional improvements to Cameron Court would improve entrances to make them more visible and connected to nearby buildings like the library. ADA access would be provided via the rear of the park near the basketball court and across the street from the church. The addition of an ADA marked parking space would complete this improvement. Circulation will be improved with ADA accessible crushed granite or limestone walkways. There is a the possibility of creating an additional entrance on Pittsburgh Street to increase access and visibility of the park. This would be a long-term improvement but plantings near the corner should be mindful of the possibility of a future access point in that area.

Page 77


Cameron Court Plan Fairview Ave.

Pittsburgh St. Page 78


Garden Rooms

Butterfly Garden

Common Name

Scientific Name

Black-eyed Susan

Rudbekia hirta

Butterfly Milkweed

Asclepias tuberosa

Wild Bergamot

Monarda fistulosa

Mistflower

Eupatorium coelestinum

Purple Coneflower

Prairie Garden

Common Name

Scientific Name

Tussock Grass

Deschampsia cespitosa

Red Switchgrass

Common Name

Scientific Name

Serviceberry

Amelanchier canadensis

Teaberry

Gaultheria procumbens

Bearberry

Arctostaphylos uvaursi

Lowbush Blueberry

Vaccinium angustifolium

Highbush Blueberry

Vaccinium corymbosum

Northern Bayberry

Myrica pensylvanica

Black Raspberry

Rubus occidentalis

Panicum virgatum

Sporobolus heterolepsis

Little Blue Stem

Schizachyrium scoparium

Echinacea purpurea

Bottlebrush

Wood Betony

Berry Garden

Elymus hystrix

Pedicularis canadensis

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Priorities Immediate Priority Several items related to safety and general usability of the park need to be addressed in the near term as priority items.

Site Improvement ADA Improvements 1. Hardscape Improvements a. ADA Parking Space b. ADA Accessible Crushed Limestone Walkway c. Brick Edging

Estimated Quantity

Units

1 375 1,376

EA SY LF

Estimated Typical Unit Improvement Cost Cost

$1,500 $67.50 $15 Subtotal:

 ADA accessible paths and parking space  Drinking fountain  Sign at the corner of Pittsburgh and Fairview Mid-Term Priority Several items need to be addressed in the mid-term that relate to the usability of the park but are not serious safety or accessibility concerns.

 Resurface basketball court  Repair stairs near library  Increase signage within and at the perimeter Other Improvement Opportunities Overall improvements can be made to the park as funds and volunteers become available.

   

Garden rooms Additional access from Pittsburgh Street Additional drinking fountain Additional seating areas

Renovation/redevelopment cost The following estimates are 2012 costs for labor and materials and assume that prevailing wage requirements would apply. By utilizing volunteers, competitive bidding for a contractor, grants and other resources, significant savings can be realized.

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Central Walkway Improvements 1. Hardscape Improvements a. Plaza Paving b. Concrete Seatwall c. Crushed Limestone Walkway d. Brick Edging e. Concrete Stairs @ Fairview Ave. f. Concrete Stairs @ E. South St. 2. Amenities a. Pedestrian Lights b. Metal Benches c. Trash Receptacles d. Decorative Planters

SF LF SY LF Stairs Stairs

$25 $75 $67.50 $15 $750 $750

$10,800 $2,400 $8,438 $3,360 $11,250 $3,750

6 2 2 7

EA EA EA EA

$6,000 $2,400 $2,200 $2,000

$36,000 $4,800 $4,400 $14,000

Subtotal:

$99,198

Stairs SY LF

$750 $67.50 $15

$15,000 $20,250 $1,500

EA

$2,500

$2,500

Subtotal:

Other Park Improvements 1. Amenities a. Drinking Fountain; ADA accessible with pad 2. Landscaping a. Ornamental Trees b. Ornamental Plantings/Garden Rooms

$47,453

432 32 125 224 15 5

Entrance @ Corner of S. Pittsburgh St. and Fairview Ave. 1. Hardscape Improvements a. Concrete Stairs 20 b. Crushed Limestone Walkway 300 c. Brick Edging 100 2. Amenities 1 a. Park Signage Court Area Improvements 1. Hardscape Improvements a. Court Resurfacing b. Crushed Limestone Seating Area 2. Amenities a. Metal Benches b. Trash Receptacles c. Drinking Fountain d. Backboards and Baskets

$1,500 $25,313 $20,640

$39,250

610 15

SY SY

$9.50 $67.50

$5,795 $1,013

4 1 1 2

EA EA EA EA

$2,400 $2,200 $14,000 $550

$9,600 $2,200 $14,000 $1,100

Subtotal:

$33,708

1

EA

$6,000

$6,000

10 14,050

EA SF

$900 $16

$9,000 $224,800

Subtotal:

$239,800


Atkins Music Center 166 W Crawford Ave. History This structure is not in place on the 1886 Sanborn map The 1914 Sanborn map shows this structure to be in place. Use is undeterminable. The 1924 Sanborn map shows this structure as a storefront on the street with warehouse space in the rear.

Current land use/activity Atkins Music currently occupies the ground floor of this structure. The upper floors are rented as apartments.

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Building/Lot Assessment Based upon an April 3, 2012, cursory visual review of the Atkins Music Center Building located at 166 West Crawford Avenue, it has been determined that the structure is in a condition that would allow for its general repair and rehabilitation. The following should be taken into consideration: Advantages The Atkins Music Center Building has several advantages that should be taken into consideration.

1. Stone Foundation of front third appears to be in sound condition. 2. Poured in-place concrete foundation of rear third appears to be in good condition.

3. Basement concrete floor (front and rear thirds) 4. Front store front/display area appears to be in good condition. 5. Original second floor entrance from sidewalk has been covered over and stairs are still in-place.

6. First floor has a small balcony hidden above the ceiling tile. 7. Front basement wall appears to stops at faรงade. 8. The upper metal portion of the front facade appears to be in good condition.

9. Exterior brick work appears to be in good condition. 10. Power is available at rear. 11. Gas service is available in front.

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Disadvantages—Priority The Atkins Building has a number of significant disadvantages that should be a priority in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Rear basement (rear left corner) is wet due to openings in the access hatch. Hatch is in poor condition and appears structurally unsafe. Replace hatch with suitable structure to allow for vehicle loading and to prevent water entry. Verify property boundary and coordinate with city if needed. Construction cost $5,000 to 10,000 2. Exterior asphalt siding is in poor condition. Replace siding at sides and rear. Construction cost $10,000to 15,000

Construction cost $5,000 to 10,000 6. Birds are nesting above the third floor windows (behind trim. Repair trim and flashing to prevent entry. Inspect façade to determine other points of entry. Construction cost $2,000 to 8,000 7. Floor boards of third floor have buckled in one area. Replace floor boards. Construction cost $1,000 to 2,000 8. Second floor and third floor windows have been boarded over and are deteriorating. Install new windows and repair plaster. Construction cost $8,000 to $12,000

3. Left side downspout at beginning of single story is leaking, and interior framing is exposed to elements. Repair gutter, siding, soffit and fascia. Construction cost $3,000 to 6,000 4. Structural tile at left rear corner is missing mortar. Point and repair masonry. Construction cost $1,000 to 2,000 5. Roof has leaked or is continuing to leak in several areas. Conduct a roof inspection to verify problem areas. Repair roof membrane, insulation and decking as warranted.

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Disadvantages—Secondary The Atkins Building has a number of additional disadvantages that should be considered in the repair and rehabilitation of the building. 1. Brick chimney appears to need pointing. Conduct pointing of mortar joints as needed. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000 2. First floor and second floor framing of the rear addition appear to deflect more than normal. This condition could be due to excessive loading, under sized framing members or an undetermined condition. It may or may not be a structural issue and requires additional investigation. Construction cost, if needed, unknown. 3. Stone foundation is damp at front area. Due to the nature of the basement configuration and construction materials it will be difficult to create a basement area that is not damp. Basic repairs to minimize moisture can be conducted. Construction cost $1,000 to $2,000

The review of the above property is subject to monetary restraints, time allowances, lighting and scope limitations. Given those limitations and conditions, Widmer Engineering Inc. has made what, in its opinion, is a reasonable investigation, limited to visual observations. Design analysis of building systems and a building code review have not been performed. Widmer Engineering Inc. has also relied upon general comments with the understanding that independent verification is beyond the scope of Widmer’s work. The information contained in this document, is presented as being the best of Widmer’s knowledge, given the limitations of the scope of work. Assumptions regarding the overall condition of the property have been developed based upon limited observation of what are believed to be representative areas of the building. As such, the conclusions and associated costs for the correction of various components are limited with respect to completeness and cannot be guaranteed. Investigations for the presence of asbestos containing building materials, PCBs, CFCs radon and other environmentally hazardous materials are not part of this review.

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Potential Future Uses/Activities Ground Floor Current use is an operating retail store and should remain, although the owner is willing to consider changes:

retail/office on the first floor and owner/occupant residential on the upper floors. A more modern twist is to remove part of the third floor, creating a loft space usually devoted to a master bedroom and bath, and a high ceilinged, living dining/kitchen area below.

 Coffee shop within the retail space  With “open mike” events that would complement the music store. The relatively narrow width of the parcel (20’) would present some challenges to the inclusion of a space sufficient for even small performances. Consideration should be given to partnering with the Big Apple Gear and potentially putting the coffee shop next to the Atkins Music Center but in the adjacent building. Upper Floors Long, narrow floorplates like the Atkins Building are very difficult to cost-effectively bring up to current building codes for a multi-unit occupancy. Two means of egress, reasonably remote from each other, exit corridors and an ADA-accessible elevator take up much of the available floor space (in many cases over 50%), leaving relatively little rentable area on the upper floors, and reducing the rentable area on the first floor. In addition, current codes require a fire separation between retail and housing occupancies, usually a 2 hour floor/ceiling assembly between the first and second floors, a level of construction almost never found in historic buildings. As a result, the most likely future use is, unfortunately, vacancy, the fate of most upper floors in older buildings located within commercial business districts. A very viable future use is an old approach that has become new again in larger cities, but is relatively unknown in smaller cities like Connellsville: live/work space. It used to be fairly common for the shop keeper to live above the store, and was one of the driving reasons why narrow fronts and deep sidewalls became popular in the first place. (Taxes based on frontage was the other reason.) As a result, buildings like the Atkins Music Center work very well for

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The resulting effect is a spacious and open feeling with plenty of daylighting that is much more marketable to todays’ self-employed city dweller. If an elevator is desired, it can be a Personal Service Elevator (PSE) which can be installed at a much lower cost than a commercial elevator. Whether by stair or elevator, a ten foot vertical commute to work every day is very appealing to those focused on saving time and money, and is a very eco-friendly lifestyle. Live/work occupancies in existing buildings is specifically addressed in the latest edition of the state-wide building code, in recognition of buildings like the Atkins Music Center.

Renovation/redevelopment cost All prices quoted are 2012 construction costs. Soft costs are not included.

Ground Floor  Selective demolition – None (existing business)  Renovation – None (existing business) Upper Floors  Demolition & renovation – None (existing apartments to remain)  Upper floors – live/work occupancy  Selective demolition – $10 - $12/SF (830 SF = $8,300 - $9,960)  New construction – 2nd & 3rd Floors - $89 - $115/SF (2,490 SF = $221,610 - $286,350)

Façade  Replace upper floor windows with historically correct units/clean and repair brick and cornice  $19,1008

Floor Plan Existing to remain, since the space is currently rented as apartments. Plans showing a potential live/work occupancy are included for reference only.

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Vacant Lot corner of S Pittsburgh St. and E Fairview Ave. Lot History

Current Use

The 1924 and 1947 Sanborn map shows this was a three-story structure with a storefront on the street.

This lot is currently vacant.

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S. Pittsburgh St.

Vacant Lot Plan

Paved Area

E. Fairview Ave.

Shrubs

Seating Lawn Flowering Tree

Renovation/redevelopment cost The following estimates are 2012 costs for labor and materials and assume that prevailing wage requirements would apply. By utilizing volunteers, competitive bidding for a contractor, grants and other resources, significant savings can be realized.

Potential Uses/Activities The desire is to eventually find a use for this lot to return it to the tax rolls—one that is associated with the adjacent building or a new structure on the lot. In the meantime, the site can enhance this important gateway to downtown when motorists, cyclists or pedestrians are traveling north on South Pittsburgh Street. The lot could make an important contribution to the creation of a strong corner on this important downtown road. A small seating area with a flowering tree and paved area provides pedestrians with a quiet place to rest, while the hedge walls mimic the walls of the building that was previously on the site creating a visual link to the past and the future use of the site. Cleaning up the walls of the adjacent building and adding one or more murals will reinforce the branding of Connellsville:

    

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Fishing Railroads Trails Kayaking “You can play here”


Potential Uses/Activities

Site Improvement 1. Hardscape Improvements a. Precast Modular Concrete Retaining Wall b. Plaza Paving 2. Amenities a. Metal Benches b. Decorative Planters c. Painted Mural; includes surface preparation 3. Landscaping a. Ornamental Trees b. Hedge c. Ground Cover d. Lawn Area

Estimated Quantity

Units

Typical Unit Cost

Estimated Improvement Cost

60 325

SF SF

$45 $25

$2,700 $8,125

2 2 1

EA EA LS

$2,400 $2,000 $30,000

$4,800 $4,000 $30,000

1 75 440 4,405

EA LF SF SF

$900 $24 $6 $0.25

$900 $1,800 $2,640 $1,101

Total:

$56,066

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Festival Plaza W. Crawford Ave. Current Land Use/Activity Festival Plaza is currently a vacant lot.

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Potential Uses/Activities

Renovation/redevelopment cost

Festival plaza is envisioned as a public gathering and open green space in downtown with the ability to facilitate larger community gatherings and special events.

The following estimates are 2012 costs for labor and materials and assume that prevailing wage requirements would apply. By utilizing volunteers, competitive bidding for a contractor, grants and other resources, significant savings can be realized.

The focus of the space is on a large open lawn area that has a stage at the south end, brick arcade at the back of the stage that acts as a backdrop and mimics the arches that appear elsewhere in the rich architecture of Connellsville as well as in the Gateway to the Laurel Highlands and the four-way arch on the corner of Pittsburgh Street and Crawford Avenue that was constructed to commemorate Connellsville’s centennial. The southern end of the site slopes and becomes a planted rain garden mitigating any runoff that might be caused by the development in the lot. Street Site Improvement trees on eastern side of the site 1. Site Preparation & Infrastructure Improvements reinforce the streescape and Grading and Drainage (underdrains) define the Festival Plaza Electrical Conduit & Wiring 2. Hardscape Improvements “room.” Cast-In-Place Concrete Retaining Wall Brick Arcade and Arch Seating areas, an Plaza Paving informational kiosk and Plain Concrete Walkway (along Art Works) ornamental plantings 3. Amenities complete the plaza to provide Pedestrian Lights pleasant areas for people to Landscape Uplights Metal Benches relax as well as provides Kiosk Signage separation from street activity. Decorative Railing 4. Landscaping Shade Trees Ornamental Trees Rain Garden Plantings Ornamental Plantings Lawn Area

Units

Typical Unit Cost

Estimated Improvement Cost

1,150 355

SY LF

$3.00 $35

$3,450 $12,425

24 1 1,310 1,600

LF LS SF SF

$100 $25,000 $25 $9

$2,400 $25,000 $32,750 $14,400

5 6 2 1 64

EA EA EA EA LF

$5,000 $3,200 $2,400 $5,000 $175

$25,000 $19,200 $4,800 $5,000 $11,200

6 3 1,600 1,025 6,510

EA EA SF SF SF

$1,500 $900 $10 $16 $0.25

$9,000 $2,700 $16,000 $16,400 $1,628

Estimated Quantity

Total:

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$201,353


Festival Plaza Plan 10’ Wide Sidewalk Pedestrian Lighting Ornamental Planting

Arcade

Porous Pavers Stage Area

W. Crawford Ave.

Archway Connecting Arcade and ArtWorks Building

Seating Area

Great Lawn

Street Trees

Kiosk/ Interpretive Signage

Rain Garden to handle normal storm event (with overflow drain connection to nearby storm sewer)

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Overall Recommendations Downtown Connellsville The Redevelopment Authority of Connellsville can undertake actions in downtown Connellsville to work in conjunction with property and open space improvements to promote future investment in Connellsville’s business district.

 Consider all funding sources from local to federal and assist in the packaging of financing—in particular programs to eliminate blight and rehabilitate historic properties.

 Work with other local organizations to develop and implement a branding campaign for Connellsville.

 Work to create a unified streetscape that supports the Connellsville brand and creates a welcoming atmosphere for pedestrians, cyclists and businesses.

 Consider how developing retail can aid in enlivening downtown Connellsville, especially non-traditional retail development like public markets and pop-up stores.

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Part 3


Financing and Community Development Programs Financing for community development projects has become more constrained given the state of the economy. On the public and private side resources have declined over the last several years. Despite this fact, there remain a number of programs that the Redevelopment Authority of Connellsville or individual property owners may qualify for to address blighted buildings, restoration needs, faรงade improvements, sustainable development and community revitalization. Although there are very few programs that provide grants for privately-owned facilities, there are a few that might be possible as part of a larger financial package. There are also opportunities for favorable loans to private owners and in some cases recoverable grants. The ideal approach generally is to combine a number of different funding sources together in order to get to a project that is financeable. Private Program Summaries Private Bank Financing: Project finance starts with determining how much private debt can be supported. Current underwriting standards have banks lending at 70% - 80% of a projects appraised value. In projects like those in this study, appraised value is likely to be significantly less than project cost. Banks that are already familiar with the market and the organization are the most likely to lend to a project. After the bank debt is determined, look at a variety of other sources in order to fill the gap between project cost and the amount a bank is willing to lend.

community development corporation. CDFIs are certified by the United States Department of the Treasury which provides funds to the CDFI through a variety of programs. The CDFI may also seek other funding to supplement its lending packages. The primary mission of CDFI is one of community development, serving a targeted market and providing loans and technical assistance. CDFIs, although funded in part from government sources, is a non-government entity. Foundation Funding: Private Foundations have invested grant and program related investment dollars in these types of community based real estate projects. This funding is competitive, and it is best to start with local foundations that have an interest in and a familiarity with downtown revitalization. Awards are typically less than 10% of project costs, which can be critical to filling the last piece of project financing. Federal Program Summaries New Markets Tax Credits: This is a funding source for commercial or mixed-use projects in areas that are targeted for reinvestment. A project needs to find an institution that has been granted tax credits and a private investor that is willing to purchase those credits in exchange for making an investment of cash equity into the project. The structuring of this project is fairly complex, but the result is that this source can typically fund 20% - 25% of an eligible project. The project must have at least 20% of its income from non-residential uses (i.e. retail, office, etc.).

Community Development Financial Institutions: A community development financial institution (CDFI) is a financial institution which provides credit and financial services to underserved markets and populations. A CDFI may be a community development bank, a community development credit union (CDCU), a community development loan fund (CDLF), a community development venture capital fund (CDVC), a microenterprise development loan fund, or a

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To be eligible for the 10% Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit the building must have been built before 1936 and must not be used for rental residential purposes. The rehabilitation project must be “substantial,” meaning that the amount of money spent on the rehabilitation project must exceed the value of the building (or $5,000, whichever is greater). Seventy five percent of the building’s external walls must be retained, with at least 50% of the building’s external walls remaining as exterior walls. Seventy five percent of the building’s internal structural framework must also remain in place. Projects must be completed and the building placed in service within two years, and the building must be owned by the same owner and operated as an income producing property for five years after the credit is taken. Unlike most grants, these tax credits are available to individuals and for-profit entities, rather than municipalities and non -profit organizations. The tax credits can be sold to investors that invest cash equity into the project. These credits can be combined with New Market Tax Credits.

Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credits (Historic Tax Credits): Because building rehabilitation strengthens communities and fuels local economies, there are federal tax credits available to those who rehabilitate existing buildings for income-producing use. There are 2 levels of Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credits available: 20% for a historic building and 10% for a non-historic building, with different qualifying criteria for each rate. Because properties must be listed in the National Register of Historic Places AND income producing to be eligible for the 20% Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit, none of the properties considered in this study are eligible. However, each of the properties that will be income-producing could be eligible for the 10% tax credit.

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Small Business Development Centers: The Office of Small Business Development Centers (SBDC) provides management assistance to current and prospective small business owners. SBDCs offer one-stop assistance to individuals and small businesses by providing a wide variety of information and guidance in central and easily accessible branch locations. The program is a cooperative effort of the private sector, the educational community and federal, state and local governments. The SBDC that services Fayette County is located in Latrobe at St. Vincent College. The SBDC offers significant technical assistance for business owners including instruction on business planning, budgeting, business growth, and business financial packaging. Another business resource located with the regional SBDC in Latrobe is SCORE (Service Corps of Retired Executives), a volunteer-driven organization providing technical assistance and workshops for business owners.


State Program Summaries Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED): This state agency is charged with managing programs to encourage community revitalization and business growth in the Commonwealth. Most of the state programs related to community and business development are handled through this agency. Over the last several years DCED’s budget allocation has declined and many programs have been combined with less available funding. Always competitive, the grants and loan programs offered through DCED are now fewer in number, less robustly funded and thus even more competitive. However, there are a number of remaining programs that apply to the opportunities offered through this study. Several specific programs are noted on the appendix to this report but the web site, www.newpa.com offers a comprehensive look at the all through the Funding & Program Finder a tool for exploring all initiatives offered by DCED.

requires legislative approval. Keystone Historic Preservation Program: The Keystone Historic Preservation Grant is one financial tool that could be available to assist with the rehabilitation of historic properties in Connellsville. Offered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC), this funding is available to nonprofit organizations and local governments for planning or small construction projects for publicly accessible historic resources—those properties that are listed in or eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. Of the properties considered in this study, only the Carnegie Free Library is currently listed in the National Register. Other properties would require documentation and evaluation in order to be eligible for the Keystone Historic Preservation Grant program. In recent years, grants have been between $5,000 and $25,000, with a 50/50 cash match requirement. The grant deadline is subject to change, but is typically early in the year. More information about this program can be found by contacting Karen Arnold at (717) 783-9927 or kaarnold@pa.gov.

Neighborhood Assistance Partnership Program Tax Credits: These are tax credits through the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development that are used to encourage businesses to invest in projects that improve distressed areas or neighborhood conservation. Tax credits are available up to 55% of the project budget. Neighborhood Assistance, Neighborhood Partnership Program: This is a corporate tax liability credit for businesses that sponsor a neighborhood organization to develop and implement a neighborhood revitalization plan by contributing a substantial amount of cash per year over an extended period of time. Tax credit equals 75% of approved project. Total tax credit is limited to $500,000 annually. Redevelopment Capital Assistance Program: This program has been curtailed recently and its future is uncertain; however, it should be monitored as the project moves forward. This program provides grant funding to community projects. Matching funds are required and prevailing wage rates apply. This is a competitive program that

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Preservation Fund of Pennsylvania: Preservation Pennsylvania, the state-wide preservation non-profit, has a grant/loan program that may also be a useful tool in rehabilitating historic properties in Connellsville. This fund is intended for use by those who want to buy threatened historic properties and rehabilitate and maintain them. Applicants may obtain up to $50,000 through this program, with 1/3 coming in the form of a grant if used for acquisition, and the remainder being a loan. If used for other purposes, such as construction or gap financing, the entire balance is available as a loan. This revolving fund is currently all out on loan, but is expected to open again in 2014. More information about this program can be found here: http://www.preservationpa.org. Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency: The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA) provides affordable homeownership and rental apartment options for older adults, low- and moderate-income families, and people with special housing needs. PHFA has provides mortgage and investment programs for multi-family housing. a tax incentive to owners of affordable rental housing. In addition to loan programs available to a variety of developers including corporations and for profit companies as well as municipalities and nonprofit community development organizations, PHFA offers a Low Income

Housing Tax Credit Program (LIHTC) The incentive is an annual tax credit (a dollar for dollar reduction in the tax payer’s federal taxes) earned in the initial ten years following the year the units are placed in service. A developer markets or “syndicates” the credits allocated to the development to investors whose contributions are used as equity in the development’s financing plan. Homeowners Choice Program (HCP): This program provides funding for the development and / or rehabilitation of single family homes, for purchase, in urban communities. Initiatives within the HCP also provide for the rehabilitation of the upper floors of store fronts on the commercial corridors of urban neighborhoods and core communities to provide either rental or ownership housing opportunities. The Homeownership Choice Programs consist of three Initiatives:  The Homeownership Construction Initiative promotes the development and construction of new single family homes, for purchase in distressed urban areas or core communities. This Initiative requires a sponsoring partnership of a municipal entity, a for-profit developer and a non-profit developer. Funding must be matched by the sponsoring entity on at least a one to one basis, with 50% of the matching requirement being provided by the municipality.

 The Mixed Use Facility Financing Initiative encourages the rehabilitation of mixed-use buildings in commercial districts; buildings with street level retail with residential apartment space in upper floors.

 The Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative promotes the development and renovation of existing structures and construction of new infill single family homes for purchase in core communities. This initiative is intended to address vacant residential structures or infill homes for purchase on vacant lots in residential areas.

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Local Program Summaries Local Economic Revitalization Tax Abatement (LERTA): This program aims to encourage the improvement of deteriorated industrial, commercial or business property that is located in a city-defined deteriorating area or any property that is vacant, condemned or demolished. Improvements must be repair, construction or reconstruction, including alterations or additions, for rehabilitating a deteriorated property so that it becomes habitable or attains higher standards of safety, health, economic use or amenity or is brought to code compliance. Fayette County will assess improvements on the property and a five year tax exemption will be applied for the value of the assessment increase.

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Analysis and Recommendations The costs of renovating the buildings and lots in this study are quite significant and it is obviously important to find any and all funding sources that can leverage additional resources. There might also be some thought given to which of the buildings and lots can be packaged either under single private ownership or donated to the Redevelopment Authority. Larger real estate development projects are often more attractive to investors or developers. Nonprofit, municipal ownership of properties widens the grant and subsidy opportunities making non-viable deals feasible. Given the age of these buildings, the 10% Rehabilitation Investment Tax Credit should be carefully considered. Both the Low Income Housing and New Markets Tax Credit programs could bring significant equity to the project, particularly if buildings are bundled. As the project moves into active predevelopment, the project team should include professionals with expertise in this regard. The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency offers some significant programs for housing opportunities. The Mixed Use Facility and Neighborhood Revitalization Initiatives are of particular applicability and should be researched thoroughly. DCED’s Keystone Communities Program, the successor to the Commonwealth’s Main Street Program, should be explored as there are opportunities such as Façade Restoration and Anchor Building grants offered on a priority basis to Keystone designated communities. (Details of the Keystone Communities Program are outlined in the appendix.) Raising funds for these projects will likely occur in stages. The next stage will be the predevelopment phase involving additional architectural work and other due diligence activities such as environmental and structural engineering reviews. Foundations, the Fayette County Growth Fund and the Keystone Historic Preservation Program are potential sources that can cover the costs for the parcels owned by the Redevelopment Authority or other nonprofit organization.

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Branding Concepts Connecting the natural resources of water and ridges with Connellsville’s unique connection to industrial history through Henry Clay Frick, the quality historic building inventory from that period and the wildly popular GAP there are opportunities for attracting both heritage and eco-tourists. These particular tourist types also represent the highest spenders and cross over naturally demographically. Eco-tourists one day become heritage tourists the next. Discussions which took place during the Sustainable Design Workshop focused on developing a branding campaign that is designed to improve and expand existing businesses, as well as to assist the local real estate community market vacant and available properties in the Downtown District for reinvestment. Key to developing a successful branding campaign is to assist existing businesses to understand the market and consider expanding specific product lines and/or services to address that market. One branding slogan that seemed to rise to the top during the Workshop was “You can play here”. Other nearby communities, with similar market demographics have successfully capitalized on similar campaign strategies, such as Confluence’s “The playground of the Laurel Highlands” and West Newton’s “Building our future, respecting our past”.

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Streetscape Streetscape features such as lighting, trees and street furniture can contribute to the unique character and branding of a community. Based on the background analyses and input at the charrette, it is evident that Connellsville needs something more than a typical streetscape design. The downtown/Eastside area, in particular, has unique needs. An improved streetscape should align with the kind of vibrant city that Connellsville’s community envisions: 1. Builds on the inherent character and image of Connellsville as a pedestrian place; 2. Emphasizes the history and art resources associated with the city; 3. Provides the necessary streetscape infrastructure for the effective functioning of a commercial district; 4. Responds to the community needs and aspirations of the Connellsville residents, property owners and visitors; and 5. Defines a logical sequence of implementation that responds to economic and political realities. The commitment and cooperation of the Connellsville Redevelopment Authority of the City of Connellsville, Chamber of Commerce, individual residents, property owners and the neighborhood’s political leaders is needed to transform this vision into a reality. The vision for Connellsville’s streetscape will create a pedestrian friendly place that provides durable and timeless streetscape amenities, offers construction flexibility, functions efficiently and enhances the physical and economic wellbeing of the corridor. Seating, Benches and Bus Stops and Bus Shelters Seating and bus shelters should be grouped together as much as possible and be placed at busier pedestrian nodes or gathering places. Benches should follow the city standard. Benches and other seating should be placed to maximize pedestrian comfort and the vitality of the city’s street life. Public Art Public art should be physically and intellectually accessible. It should tie to the history of Connellsville or tell a story significant to the city. Local artists/sources should be used as much as possible. Public art should be part of a collection or program, not a single piece.

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Lighting Street and pedestrian lighting should be located as part of the streetscape and function as a unifying element of other streetscape items including trees, benches and paving. The existing city standard light should be used and lights should be located at the same distance from the street edge along the length of the entire street. Kiosks Kiosks should be used for retail or to impart community information to the public. They should be positioned to complement and respect other street furnishings such as benches and lighting. Consideration should be given to both fixed and mobile kiosks to allow for permanence or flexibility—depending on the location. Litter Receptacles Trash receptacles should be located conveniently for pedestrian use and service access in significant areas and gathering places. They should be permanently attached to deter vandalism and have sealed bottoms with sufficient tops to keep contents dry and out of pedestrian view. Existing receptacles in the city blend with the surroundings and should continue to be used. Bicycle Racks Bike racks should be permanently mounted and placed in convenient locations throughout public spaces to encourage bicycle use within the city and encourage trail users to spend time in Connellsville. Existing racks in

the city are a simple and attractive design that should continue to be used. Bollards Bollards should integrate with and aesthetically complement the overall streetscape concept. They should be set back from curbs to allow unobstructed opening of parked car doors and may be chained or cabled together to define pedestrian areas. Newspaper/Flyer Dispensers Newspaper racks should be grouped together as much as possible and be placed at busier pedestrian nodes or gathering places. Planters Planting pots and planters should be used in addition to landscape planting areas to compliment the surround streetscape by adding color and variety. They can be placed anywhere pedestrian or vehicular traffic is not disturbed but may also function as a separation between pedestrians and vehicles. They are ideal near seating areas, but plant materials should not interfere with circulation or comfort.

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Street Trees Street trees should be located strategically, at key intersections and side streets and be used to define streets. They should be placed to minimize impacts on business signage visibility. Tree grates should be used wherever a tree is placed in a high traffic area. Swag Lights Swag lights are permanent street/decorative lighting that is strung across streets. It could be used to designate Connellsville’s special places like Crawford Avenue’s historic area. Crosswalks Crosswalks contribute to a safe and well-defined system of pedestrian and vehicular circulation especially in areas with heavier vehicular traffic. All crosswalks should be marked with painted symbols. Bricked intersections at key points will provide additional emphasis and further help to slow traffic and facilitate pedestrian movement. Banners and Streamers Banners and streamers should be designed as part of a comprehensive signage and wayfinding program. They can be installed temporarily, semi permanently or permanently and can be used to mark neighborhoods, advertise upcoming events or celebrate special years in Connellsville. Gazebos

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Outdoor structures can be used to draw people to outdoor spaces or host planned events. They provide protection from sun and rain and should be placed within sight of sidewalks to attract people to parks or other outdoor spaces. Bicycle Lanes Connellsville has defined a bike loop and installed ‘share the road’ signs along this route. Painted bicycle lanes will further emphasize this route, contributing to the safety of cyclists and creating an inviting atmosphere for trail users who ride into the city. Parking Management System In light of Connellsville’s abundance of parking, the city should consider selling or redeveloping strategically selected municipal lots. Alternatively or in conjunction with this strategy, spaces on the periphery of the lots should be developed into landscaped buffers and screens to reinforce a unified streetscape. Although the city no longer charges for parking, parking meters still exist in the municipal lots. This can be confusing for the kinds of visitors Connellsville is trying to attract. The meters should be removed. If removal cannot be accomplished, meters should be covered with meter hoods and signage should clearly indicate that parking is free. This streetscape palette helps to define a hierarchy of vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian spaces. It provides durable, cost-effective and historically contextual streetscape amenities and allows incremental installation of a variety of streetscape amenities by individual property owners or the City of Connellsville.


Pop-Up Retail

that left landlords looking for short term leases.

Pop-up retail has been a part of the retail landscape in the US for more than ten years. A concept that is intended to create buzz and exclusivity, it is used by all levels of retailers from local artists cooperatives to large-scale retail establishments like Wal-mart and Target. The trend has grown in part due to the real estate downturn

As part of a comprehensive effort to enliven downtown Connellsville, pop-up retail could serve the community, visitors, property owners and business owners alike. It would offer:

 A unique experience for visitors.  A draw for people using the GAP trail who might not normally venture into the city.

 An opportunity for local residents to develop businesses without large up-front storefront expenses.

 New and different retailers for local shoppers.  Short term rentals and minor property improvements for landlords. The Redevelopment Authority should coordinate with the Chamber of Commerce and other organizations to facilitate pop-up stores during existing events, festivals or anticipated busy weekends. The Redevelopment Authority should:

 Act as a one-stop-shop to match up landlords with vendors.  Promote coordinated retail activities such as business hours and length of lease.

 Recruit and encourage local and regional retailers or vendors to participate.

 Actively promote pop-up stores as a tourist attraction in the region.

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Additional Recommendations

 Actively pursue funds to acquire, renovate and then sell strategic properties.

As part of the overall vision to uplift and enliven Connellsville, the Redevelopment Authority can undertake a number of additional actions to work in conjunction with current and future efforts.

 Encourage business participation in the Greater Connellsville Chamber of Commerce and associated activities.

 Provide guidance to individual property owners regarding potential funding/grant sources and how to request funds.  Produce “how to” guides with step-by-step instructions

for the most popular or relevant grants.

 Engage the local real estate community and provide information on specific target properties.  Host real estate breakfasts to showcase available

properties/businesses.

 Coordinate citywide branding/marketing campaigns with the Chamber of Commerce.

 Target landmark structures and buildings with absentee

owners.

 Encourage development of trail associated businesses, facilities and amenities to capitalize on the GAP.

 Encourage and patronize public art.  Develop a comprehensive wayfinding system and associated streetscape/circulation improvements.

 Continue to work with the city to enforce code violations.  Strengthen connections between east and west side neighborhoods across the Crawford Avenue and Memorial Bridges.

 Coordinate with the Allegheny Trail Alliance to promote businesses/events in Connellsville.  Provide articles for

the trail newsletter.  Facilitate a GAP pop

-up store at the Connellsville trailhead.

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Zoning Potential amendments to the proposed zoning requirements will help the new ordinance better align with the conclusions of the Sustainable Design Workshop. These recommendations come from round table discussions during the workshop about uses within downtown and the realities of an evolving economy that is increasingly focused on tourism.

 Upper floor apartments are currently proposed to be special exceptions. Because special exceptions require a property owner to go before the Zoning Hearing Board, there is an additional cost associated with the public hearing required prior to being approved or denied for such uses. Based on building assessments and current market trends the most cost effective use for many of these spaces is not office use. Residential use/development most likely will be less costly especially when a modest number of residential units are developed. Council should consider permitting upper floor apartments in downtown in order to aid

property owners in occupying/developing the upper floors of the buildings. If there is concern about providing market rate housing, a potential way that Council could address this is to consider establishing minimum unit sizes. This will guide property owners to develop market-rate housing.

 Areas where bed and breakfast establishments are currently allowed is restricted to R-1 only. Based on the market assessment, there is potential for the local economy to absorb more of these businesses. Council should explore the possibility of permitting bed and breakfast establishments in more residential areas as well as the C-1 downtown commercial district.

 The list of land uses that are permitted by right should be considered for expansion to include more specialty/tourismrelated uses like brew pubs and wineries. Addressing uses like these specifically in the ordinance can be useful because they can be different from common land uses and allowing them as permitted uses can help capitalize on trail users as well as local residents.

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Sustainability Guidelines In addition to the identification of appropriate uses, a sustainability analysis was also conducted to identify opportunities for incorporating sustainable elements or “green development� aspects into any future site designs and improvements within downtown Connellsville. The inclusion of sustainable elements will not only protect and/or enhance valuable /sensitive natural /cultural resources, but it can also reduce long-term infrastructure costs for the City and private property owners. The following sustainability elements provide a checklist for the City and property owners to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of incorporating sustainable design elements into their project prior to completing

Sustainability Element 1. Site Design & Construction A. Re-use/rehab existing buildings and infrastructure

Opportunity (Y/N/Limited)

N

B. Use vegetation to minimize building heating/cooling requirements; includes green roofs, planting deciduous and coniferous trees, etc. Plant deciduous trees on south site of buildings for cooling in summer; plant coniferous trees on north side for heating in winter

Y

C. Minimize and consolidate turf lawn and development areas; provide lawn only in playfields, picnic areas and other appropriate locations and plant longer grass or wildflower meadow where lawn will not be used

Y

D. Plant natives and perennials plant species, where possible

Y

E. Provide topsoil and soil amendments prior to installing any landscape areas or athletic fields; includes 12" minimum topsoil

Y

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Sustainability Element 2. Water and Stormwater Management

Opportunity (Y/N/Limited)

A. Manage all stormwater on site

Y

B. Provide natural stormwater management features (vegetated swales, rain gardens, bioswales, rain barrels, green roofs, etc.)

Y

C. Minimize area of impervious coverage D. Promote groundwater infiltration and eliminate runoff through the use of permeable surfacing on parking lots, trails and walkways as well as, replacing constructed surfaces with vegetated surface and/or open grid paving

Limited N


Sustainability Guidelines Opportunity (Y/N/Limited) Sustainability Element 3. Conserve Energy / Integrate Green Design and Construction Practices A. Use building materials that incorporate Y recycled/sustainable content; including rubber mulch, recycled plastics, etc. for all park amenities/materials. B. Green design and construction practices will be integrated through the use of "LEED速" guidelines

Y

C. Reduce potable water use; includes minimizing energy use for water application, maximizing the use of gray water and conserving potable water. Gray water shall be collected from parking lots, building roofs, fields, etc. in underground cisterns to be used for irrigation

Y

D. Reduce outdoor and indoor energy consumption on site; includes using compound fluorescent light bulbs, pushbutton lighting for athletic fields, timers on all outdoor/indoor lighting, LED and solar lighting, etc.

Y

E. Use clean and alternative sources of energy; including residential style wind turbines, solar panels, etc.

Y

F. Reduce light pollution; programming lights to turn-on/shut-off at appropriate times

Y

G. Provide for the storage and collection of recyclables

Y

Sustainability Element 4. Connecting People to Nature

Opportunity (Y/N/Limited)

A. Provide optimum site accessibility (meeting all Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) guidelines), safety and way-finding

Y

B. Provide opportunities for outdoor physical activity; includes, trails and bikeways, playgrounds, sports facilities, spray parks, play structures, and other programs, etc.

Y

C. Educate or build public awareness of the sustainability and the outdoors; includes use of interpretive signage, environmental education programs, etc.

Y

D. Provide outdoor spaces for social interaction and mental restoration

Y

E. Protect and maintain unique cultural and historical places

Limited

F. Connect site to nearby recreation facilities/walkways/bikeways and regional trail networks

Y

G. Provide access to the site through public/alternative forms of transit rather than motorized vehicles

Y

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Appendix A Appendix A COMMUNITY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUNDING RESOURCES

Developed for the Connellsville Sustainable Design Study May, 2012 GRANT SOURCE

CONTACT INFORMATION

PROJECT

APPLICANT

Fayette County Tourism Fund

www.laurelhighlands.org

Tourism-related; marketing

For profit; nonprofit; municipality

Community Foundation of Fayette County: Chevron

http://www.cffayettepa.org

Community revitalization Nonprofit

Community Foundation of Fayette County Growth Fund

http://www.cffayettepa.org

Community revitalization Nonprofit and development

Community Foundation of Fayette County: Atlas Energy

http://www.cffayettepa.org

Community revitalization Nonprofit

Sprout Fund Seed Grant

www.sproutfund.org

Art related

Kresge Foundation

www.kresge.org

Sustainable Communities Nonprofit; municipality state wide program

Surdna Foundation

www.surdna.org

Sustainable Communities Nonprofit statewide program

PennDOT Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety www.drivesafepa.org

Nonprofit

PennDOT, through its Municipality Public Safety Program: Yield to Pedestrians, is distributing free Yield to Pedestrian signs to municipalities

Port of Pittsburgh WPC/Dominion

http://www.port.pittsburgh.pa.us/home Related to river www.paenvironmentdigest.com/newsletter Related to river

Home Depot Community Impact

https://corporate.homedepot.com/wps/por Community revitalization Nonprofit; municipality; community tal/Grants residents

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Nonprofit; municipality Watershed group


GRANT SOURCE Three Rivers Community Foundation

CONTACT INFORMATION http://trcfwpa.org

Kodak American Greenways Program

http://www.conservationfund.org/kodak_awards Related to land or water trails

Nonprofit

Bikes Belong

http://www.bikesbelong.org/grants/

Nonprofit; municipality

PA. Partners in the Arts PA Humanities Council DCNR: Community Conservation Partnership Program DEP Environmental Education

PROJECT Arts and culture related

Related to land-based trails http://pacouncilonthearts.org/pca.cfm?id=42&le Arts and culture vel=Third http://www.pahumanities.org/programs/grants.p Arts and culture hp http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/brc/grants/CCPPBr Outdoor conservation; ochureFinalRev.pdf land and water trails, parks http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/co Education mmunity/environmental_education/13903/grant s/588549

APPLICANT Nonprofit

Nonprofit Nonprofit Nonprofit; municipalities

Nonprofit, municipalities; business

DEP Cleanup and Brownfields

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/co Brownfield remediation mmunity/environmental_education/13903/grant and redevelopment s/588549

Nonprofit; municipalities

Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/co Historic Buildings mmunity/grants_and_funding/3748

Nonprofit; Municipalities

State Farm Insurance Company

http://www.statefarm.com/aboutus/community/ Safety, Community Nonprofit; Municipalities grants/company/company.asp Development, Education

Multi municipal DCED: Municipal Assistance Program http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-for(MAP) funding/funding-and-program-finder/municipal- planning; shared services; flood assistance-program management Keep PA Beautiful; Fresh Paint Days; http://keeppabeautiful.org/GrantsAwards/FreshP Painting supplies Greenway grants aintDays.aspx

Municipalities

Nonprofits; municipalities

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GRANT SOURCE Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation

CONTACT INFORMATION

PROJECT http://www.rbff.org/uploads/Education_Ima River related education

APPLICANT Nonprofits; schools and clubs

ges/Grant_Guidelines_Application_FY2013_ 120911.pdf HUD Sustainable Communities

Do Something Seed Grants

http://blogs.planning.org/policy/2011/07/28/hu Community Municipality d-funding-for-sustainable-communities-grants/ Development; emphasis on housing; distressed http://www.dosomething.org/grants Community revitalization Nonprofit (involving young people)

Outdoor Nation

www.outdoornation.org/grants

Small Business Advantage Grants

www.dep.state.pa.us

Center for Rural Pennsylvania

http://www.rural.palegislature.us/resources. Community revitalization; multiple html#jan4b

Youth and river recreation Energy efficiency

Nonprofits; individuals Business

Municipality; Nonprofit

programs

National Endowment for the Arts Our Town Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

http://arts.gov/grants/apply/ourtown/FAQ.html Community revitalization Municipality

www.phmc.state.pa.us

Historic buildings

Nonprofits; municipality; private but with public access

Keystone Historic Preservation Project and Construction Grants Department of Environmental Protection: WREN Grants

http://www.depweb.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/ Water conservation; community/growing_greener/13958 education

Nonprofit; municipalities

Mantis Awards for Community and Youth Gardens

www.kidsgardening.com/grants.asp

Nonprofit; schools; clubs

Community enhancements: gardens

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation http://www.nfwf.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section= Conservation river and Home wildlife US Dept. of Transportation TIGERGrants@dot.gov Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER)

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Nonprofit; municipalities Municipality


GRANT SOURCE Department of Community and Economic Development: Municipal Assistance Program

CONTACT INFORMATION Municipal Assistance Program Grants (MAP) http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/municipalassistance-program

PROJECT APPLICANT Formerly LUPTAP; Land Municipality Use Planning and Technical Assistance; three groups funded: shared services; community planning (including zoning) and Floodplain management

Department of Community and Economic Development:

Keystone Communities

Community Development Corporation; Municipalities

Keystone Communities Program

http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/keystonecommunities-program

Community Revitalization; replaces Main Street Program

Department of Community and Economic Development: Neighborhood Partnership Program

Neighborhood Partnership Program

Community Revitalization

Community Development Corporation; Municipalities

Community Revitalization

Community Development Corporation; Municipalities

Department of Community and Economic Development: Keystone Innovation Zone Program

http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/keystonecommunities-program http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/ http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/keystoneinnovation-zones

Department of Community and Economic Development: First Industries Fund Department of Community and Economic Development: Industrial Sites Reuse Program

http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/firstindustries-fund-fif http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-program-finder/industrialsites-reuse-program

Community Revitalization: agriculture and tourism

Municipalities; Community Development Corporation

Community Revitalization: brownfield remediation

Municipalities; Community Development Corporation

Department of Community and Economic Development: Infrastructure Development Program

http://www.newpa.com/find-and-apply-forfunding/funding-and-programfinder/infrastructure-development-program

Community infrastructure projects

Municipalities; private developers (loans)

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GRANT SOURCE CONTACT INFORMATION Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency http://www.phfa.org/about/default.aspx

PROJECT Housing programs: affordable and senior

Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency: http://www.phfa.org/developers/preservation/ Preservation through Smart Rehab Program

Energy conservation in multi-family affordable rental housing

Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency: http://www.phfa.org/hsgresources/hcp.aspx Homeowners Choice Programs:

Municipalities; Private and Nonprofit Development and / or rehabilitation of single developers family homes for purchase. Rehabilitation of upper floors of store fronts in the commercial corridors for housing

Multi Unit Facility Finance Initiative

APPLICANT Municipalities; private developers; Community Development Corporation Private and Nonprofit housing developers

Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative Coca Cola/KAB Recycling BIN Grant Program

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http://bingrant.org/apply-for-grant/

Recycling

Municipality; universities


Appendix B KEYSTONE COMMUNITY PROGRAM SUMMARY Under the new administration, the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) adopted new program guidelines for the Keystone Communities Program in November, 2011. Communities that apply for and receive designation under the Main Street, Elm Street or Keystone Communities programs will receive be given priority for all DCED program funding, which could provide significant financial resources for economic development in the Connellsville. When applying for designation, you define the area where you will focus your economic development efforts. This can include just the downtown or Main Street, traditional residential neighborhoods or Elm Street, or a combination thereof. The Keystone Community designation is the most flexible, and would likely be the most appropriate for Connellsville. As a Keystone Community, you could combine proven strategies from both the Main Street and Elm Street programs, and fold them into your own revitalization efforts. BENEFITS OF KEYSTONE COMMUNITY DESIGNATION Priority for all DCED program funding will be given to designated Main Street, Elm Street and Keystone Communities. So, while you technically do not need to be designated to apply for funding, all designated communities will be considered for funding first, and then if any money is “left over,” non-designated communities will be considered. The budget for these programs has dropped from over $28 million to just over $10 million in this year’s proposed budget, so chances of there being any money left over after designated communities are funded is slim.

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Connellsville would be eligible for and get priority consideration for funding from the following programs over 5 years, if designated: Program Name Implementation Grant

Maximum Amount Program Notes $50,000 One time grant for newly designated communities. To be used for projects such as office start-up costs for the manager, promotional activities and advertising, signage, events and activities, etc. May not be used to pay staff salary or benefits.

Planning Grant

Faรงade Grants

$25,000 Planning for a Business or Neighborhood Improvement District, Downtown Paring Management Plan, soft costs associated with a streetscape, anchor building or other development project, etc. $50,000 each year

Up from $30,000, but otherwise the same as existing program

(= $250,000)

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Anchor Building Grant to Loan

30% of project cost up This is a grant for a specific building project (ie/ to $500,000 Cadillac Building) to the Borough, which they use as a revolving loan, setting their own terms of repayment. Once it is repaid, the Borough can then lend it out for another project.

Redevelopment Grant to Loan

30% of project cost up This grant to the borough funds a revolving loan to $500,000 fund, just like the Anchor Building grant to loan, but does not have the same building requirements as the Anchor program. Projects can be smaller or non-historic building, or located outside of downtown (ie/ Waterfront)

Public Improvement Grant

$500,000 with dollar for dollar match required

Provides assistance to housing development projects, public improvements such as streetscapes, etc.

TOTAL

$1,825,000 or more

And this is from DCED sources alone. A community development coordinator could also apply for funding from other sources, such as USDA, PHMC, etc.


Additionally, businesses located in designated Keystone Communities are eligible to apply for 25% Enterprise Zone Tax Credits under the Neighborhood Assistance Program. This is a direct credit or reduction off of their corporate/business taxes, and could be a HUGE incentive/ benefit for our local businesses. Financial incentives could then be extended past five years; as long as the borough’s commitment to economic development continues, designation will almost certainly be renewed. REQUIREMENTS OF KEYSTONE COMMUNITY DESIGNATION Completing the application for designation as a Keystone Community would be much like completing the Main Street application, which you did recently. So most of the information already exists and would just need to be updated. The biggest catch is that in order to be considered for designation, you must show that you have the financial resources to hire and support a full-time staff person for at least five years. This could be done by the City or a local non-profit, as long as they have the budget and track record to demonstrate to DCED that they have the capacity to fund such a position. Funding a full-time staff person would require a financial commitment on the part of the city/ community, but the value to the community would far outweigh that cost. For the Keystone Community Program, there has to be a full time staff person on board for five years. However, with Keystone Community designation (rather than Keystone Main Street designation), that staff person only has to be committed to the program 60% of their time. The remaining 40% can be devoted to other (hopefully related) activities, or similar activities outside of the target area. Keystone Community Designation allows for more flexibility, and shared staff with other related programs. It is quite likely that you could re-define the job description for someone already working in revitalization in the city to satisfy the DCED requirements, rather than creating an additional position for this purpose. WHAT IT COULD ACCOMPLISH Just as you would work together as a community to define the focus area for community revitalization, the community could work together to write the job description for the Community Revitalization Coordinator. Among other things, this staff person would coordinate ongoing community revitalization efforts in the city, write and manage grants to advance community revitalization effort, and take on and manage targeted projects. They could serve as an ambassador to property owners conducting or considering building rehabilitation projects, or businesses thinking about coming to Connellsville. Regardless of the specific activities they are tasked with, having a staff person in Connellsville who is devoted (at least 60% of the time) to community revitalization efforts would encourage private investment in the community, allow for public financial incentives to leverage that investment, and help to improve property values and the quality of life in the community. HOW IT COULD WORK By committing to a full time staff person who spends at least 60% of their time on revitalization efforts in the target area (at an estimated cost of $300,000 over 5 years), the Community Revitalization Coordinator could bring in as much as $1,825,000 in economic development funding from DCED alone. Of this, at least $1,000,000 would stay in the community as a revolving loan fund, to ensure that revitalization efforts continue past the first round of projects. And tax credits would be made available to local businesses through the Neighborhood Assistance Program. Additional public funding and incentives could also be obtained through the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, the United States Department of Agriculture, and other sources. Thus, measured only in cash and not including the less tangible community benefits, by funding this position necessary for Keystone Community designation through DCED, Connellsville could expect a 600% return on investment, if not higher.

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Appendix C New Market Tax Credits

leveraged transaction. Sale and lease-back could be an option.  Transaction costs to a leveraged structure can be significant.

Eligibility Criteria One or more of the following must apply:

Federal Historic Tax Credits

 Must be an income producing property or a business that employs low-income residents.  Must be a in a high poverty or low income census tract (Union Trust Building qualifies).  Real estate projects can not be 100% housing. At least 20% of the project rent must come from commercial occupancy.

Eligibility Criteria  Must be an income producing property (i.e. rental real estate).

 Must be a contributing structure to a National Register Historic District or individually listed on the National Register. The Theatre is within a National Register Historic District and therefore should be eligible.

Administration  Eligibility and the awarding of credits determined by the U.S. Department of Treasury.  Compliance monitored by the IRS.

Administration  Rehabilitation specifications reviewed and approved by the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission and National Park Service. The review encompasses all of the renovation work, interior and exterior.  Compliance monitored by the IRS.

How it Works  Credits are awarded to intermediaries known as Community Development Entities (CDEs).  A total of a 39% credit taken over a 7 year period for the eligible investment.  It is a competitive process to get the tax credit.

How it Works  20% of qualified rehabilitation costs qualify for the credit. You get the credit after the work is complete and certified.  It is a non-competitive process to get the tax credit.

 Investor contributes cash equity for the tax credit. Pricing for the equity ranges from $.70 to $.80 of cash per $1.00 of equity depending on the project.  Most projects involve leveraging or the use of other financial resources. These transactions typically have at least $5M in project costs to make using the tax credit worth it. Analysis  Ownership of the real estate would have to be examined, as typical requirement is that a taxable entity on the real estate in a

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 A taxable entity (the investor) must be a partner in the ownership of the project.  Investor contributes cash equity for the tax credit. Pricing for the equity ranges from $.80 to $1.00 of cash per $1.00 of equity depending on the project. More Resources http://www.nps.gov/hps/tps/tax/incentives/index.htm


Appendix D 2012 Proposed Permitted Uses and Uses by Special Exception

General Use Dwellings: Single-Family Detached Single-Family Attached Duplex Townhouse Apartment Building Other Residential Uses: Group Home Group Residence Personal Care Home

Permitted

Special Exception

X X X X X X X X

2012 Proposed Permitted Uses and Uses by Special Exception

General Use Non-Residential Uses: Bank Bed & Breakfast Business Services Club, Private Commercial School Convenience Store Day Care, Adult Day-Care Center Emergency Services Facility Essential Services Forestry Funeral Home Hospital Hostel Hotel or Inn Landscaping Center/Nursery Library Manufacturing, Light Marina/Docking Facility Museum Office, Business, Large Office, Business, Small Office/Clinic, Medical Personal Services Place of Worship Public Building Public/Private Works Facility Recreation, Indoor, Private Recreation, Indoor, Public Recreation, Outdoor, Public Restaurant, High-Turnover no Drive Thru Restaurant, Low-Turnover Retail, Small Retail, Medium School Social-Service Agency Tavern/Bar Terminal, Bus/Train Theater University/College Veterinary Services Warehousing/Distribution Wholesale Business

Permitted

Special Exception

X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X

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2012 Proposed Development Dimensional Requirements Min. Building Setbacks (Feet) Front Side Rear General Use Dwellings: Single-Family Detached or Duplex Single-Family Attached Townhouse Apartment Building Non-Residential Uses: Permitted/Special Exception

Min. Lot Min. Lot Area (Sq.Ft.) Width (Feet)

Max. Lot Coverage (%)

Max. Building Height (Feet)

2,400

24

5

0

10

90

35

2,400 2,400/du 4,000

24 100 75

5 5 5

0 10 10

10 15 15

90 90 90

35 35 60

2,400

24

0*

0

10

90

60**

* In the C-1 district, the front setback shall be a maximum of 0 feet, but shall not prevent recessed entryways or architectural features so long as a majority of the front faรงade of the building meets the setback requirement. ** For Buildings fronting Crawford Avenue in the C-1 district, the minimum building height shall be 24 feet (2 stories).

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Connellsville Sustainable Design Workshop  

Connellsville Sustainable Design Workshop 2012

Connellsville Sustainable Design Workshop  

Connellsville Sustainable Design Workshop 2012