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Lifestyles over 50

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Encouraging vibrant and healthy living in the greater Lehigh Valley!

FREE - Volume 6 Issue 7 - October 2011

1974 Year of Change

Things to do in the Valley 7 Part Time Jobs for Retirees Adult Day Care - A Preferred Alternative Healthy Eating During the Winter Months

www.Lifestylesover50.com


FROM THE EDITOR

surprised at how, what seemed like an extraordinary event at the time, has faded in memory.

many of us October is a favorite Formonth.

With the tree leaves changing, there is an explosion of color that leaves the countryside a beautiful mix of orange, crimson, yellow and other eye-pleasing colors. Make sure you take some time for yourselves to go out and take in the scenery. Winter will soon be upon us. Instead of staying indoors during the winter months we need to get out and do things. To help you to find out what is going on we publish our “Things To Do in the Valley� articles. There is always something interesting going on in our area and October is no exception.

Please feel free to contact me about articles you would like to see in the magazine. We want to hear from you. Lastly, I want to remind you that our publication is entirely funded by our advertisers. By doing it this way we can provide this magazine free of charge. Please consider using the goods and services of our advertisers.

Art

See you next month.

In this issue we provide information on adult day care services and facilities. Our parents are getting on in years. We need to help our them be as independent as they wish for as long as they can. Our nostalgia year is 1974. That was another amazing year highlighted by the resignation of Richard Nixon. I must admit that it is a favorite section for me. I really enjoy re-living the memories of those years gone by. I am always

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Lifestyles over 50 a THRIVE

Media publication

905 Harrison Street, Suite 104, Allentown, PA 18103

www.Lifestylesover50.com PUBLISHER

Jeff Tintle, 610-762-9011, jtintle@lifestylesover50.com

EDITOR

Art Villafane, 610-774-0919, editor@lifestylesover50.com

COPY EDITORS

Laura Putt, Vicki Bezems

DISTRIBUTION

Miguel Varela, Carlos Rodriguez, Phalon Carreno, Matt Solt, Karol Valdez, Delia Carreno

Never underestimate the power of a single person. AARP — a stronger voice for change Join us in making a difference in Pennsylvania through advocacy, education and community service. Volunteering is a wonderful way to help the community and gain a sense of personal enrichment.

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To place ads or subscribe call 610-762-9011 Cover photo; Photo of Daniel Vera by Ivan Vicencio of Santiago, Chile

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Join our Facebook fan page Lehigh Valley Boomers Lifestyles over 50 is distributed FREE throughout the greater Lehigh Valley. Copyright 2011 © Thrive LLC. Reproduction of any and all content is not permitted unless express written permission is granted. Opinions expressed in any commentary published in this magazine do not necessarily represent those of Thrive LLC and are not to be regarded as advice (legal, tax, investment or otherwise). Thrive LLC assumes no liability for the actions by any group or individual based upon such material. Advertising rates are available upon request. Publisher reserves the right to reject any advertisement or other information at any time. You can find copies of Lifestyles over 50 at: Libraries • Churches • Senior Centers Fitness Centers • Community Centers • Resource Offices Doctor & Healthcare Offices Independent & Assisted Living Facilities. Subscriptions are available for $20.00/year.

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October

Reasons to Celebrate

This Month:

Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, Caffeine Addiction Recovery Month, Class Reunion Month, Financial Planning Month, Go Hog Wild - Eat Country Ham Month, Halloween Safety Month, Long Term Care Planning Month, National Chili Month, National Liver Awareness Month, National Roller Skating Month, Rhubarb Month, Squirrel Awareness Month.

This Week:

1-2: Fallen Firefighters Memorial Weekend; 28: National Carry a Tune Week; 6-12 National Physicians Assistant Week; 9-15: National Metric Week; 9-15: National Work From Home Week; 10-16: World Rainforest Week; 16-22: National Food Bank Week, National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week; 24-30: Disarmament Week, Peace, Friendship and Good Will Week; 25-31: International Magic Week.

Days:

1: International Day of Older Persons; 2: Techie’s Day; 3: Alternative Fuel Day; 4: Improve Your Office Day; 5: World Teachers Day; 6: Mad Hatter Day; 8: National Pierogy Day; 11: National Face Your Fears Day; 12: International Top Spinning Day; 15: National Grouch Day; 20: Get Smart About Credit Day; 27: Cranky Co-Workers Day; 30: National Candy Corn Appreciation Day, Haunter Refrigerator Night; 31: National Knock-Knock Jokes Day. Birthstone: Opal

Smile, It’s Your Best Feature by Art Villafane, Lifestyles over 50

Dumb Restaurant Questions: “Is there chicken in your vegetarian gumbo?” -- Asked of a waitress.

“Just the chicken.” -- The response a waitress gave when asked if there were any dairy products in a soup. “Would you like cream and sugar with that?” -- Asked by a waitress when a customer specified orange juice instead of coffee as part of a breakfast meal. “Do you want cheese on that?” -- Asked when a customer ordered a plain cheeseburger. “You want fries with that?” -- Asked when a customer ordered an apple turnover. “Do you want onions on that?” -- A waitress, in response to a couple ordering a milk shake and a large cola. “Is there any meat in the veggie rolls?” “Do you get rice with your fried rice?” “I’m sorry, we only have six inch and foot long subs.” -- A waitress, when asked for a 12 inch sub. “What is the difference between the 10 oz. beer and the 20 oz. beer?”

Flower: Snapdragon

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Lifestyles over 50

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Things To Do with

Grandkids by Vicki Bezems, Lifestyles over 50 •

“Sylvester and the Magic Pebble”, Symphony Hall, 23 N. 6th St. Allentown, Oct 8, 2 p.m. Enchantment Theatre transforms this Caldecott Medal-winning book by the author of “Shrek” into a stage production with life-size puppets, magical illusions and an original musical score. www.allentownsymphony.org or 610-432-6715.

Rock the Fall Pre-Season Festival, Blue Mountain, Oct 10-11. Get a bird’s eye view of the fall leaves on beautiful Blue Mountain – with $5 Lift Rides. Outdoor activities, dozens of craft vendors, plus discounts on snow sports clothing and equipment. You may even win a day pass or season ticket! Open 11:00 am, show starts 2:00 pm. Festival entrance and parking are free. For info e-mail rockthefall@skibluemt.com, or 610.826.7700.

Visit Lehigh Valley Zoo for these fun events: Oct 24, National Kangaroo Awareness Day; Oct 29, Boo at the Zoo – Trick-or-Treat stations throughout the Zoo; and October 16-22, Wolf Awareness Week.

Go on a color hike. Either split up the colors, and have the kids find as many things in the color you assign them during the hike, or have the whole group count as many colored leaves as they can find. Get the kids to take pictures of the colors they see with a digital camera.

Play barnyard. Choose one person to be the farmer. His job is to think of 2-4 types of farm animals, then whisper one to each player. At “Go,” each player belts out his or her animal’s sound (a cow’s moo or a dog’s bark etc.) and runs to find other players making the same noise. The first group to herd itself together and sit down wins.

SouthSide Bethlehem Greenway, 318 S. New St. Bethlehem. Inaugural events offers vegetarian food providers, top national speakers and chefs, educational exhibitors, music, more. www.bethlehemvegfest.org.

5th Annual USO Dance with King Henry!

October 13, 2011 1 PM to 4 PM

Oktoberfest, SteelStacks campus, Bethlehem. Sept 29 - Oct. 2 and Oct. 6-9, 2011. Activities and attractions include barrel rolling competitions, dachshund racing, beer stein races, a bratwurst eating contest, a home brewing competition judged by Yuengling’s master brewers and a Yuengling Truck Pull, where teams of up to 20 people will pull a 40,000-pound Yuengling beer truck 100 feet while competing for a grand prize.

Doors open at 12:30

Fearless Fire Company

1221 S Front St, Allentown, PA 18103 Light Refreshments and Live Music. Free Door Prizes Will Be Awarded!

Kids enjoy free arts and crafts at Oktoberfest’s family fun area, while Kunstler Market will showcase vendors offering art, handmade crafts and collectibles. www. artsquest.org/festivals/oktoberfest/ or call 610-332-1300. •

Make a tree sculpture. Collect fallen sticks and branches and gently wedge them between two adjacent tree trunks, then decorate the sticks with fallen leaves.

Stuff a scarecrow. Break out an old shirt and overalls and stuff until firm. Complete with a pumpkin head and mount on a broomstick.

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October 2011




Things To Do in the Valley The Summer of Manufacturing is anchored by the Da Vinci Science Center’s presentation of the How People Make Things exhibit, inspired by the Mister Rogers’ Factory Tours. This blockbuster exhibit engages visitors actively through the entire manufacturing process for making crayons, golf carts, ice cream cups, baseball gloves, and other familiar products. For more information visit www.davincisciencecenter.org/ Oktoberfest at Stel Stacks Experience authentic German Oktoberfest with a special Pennsylvania flair. Highlighting the event is the 130-foot by 260-foot Yuengling Festhalle tent, featuring waitresses dressed in dirndl outfits, Bavarian-style food, beer, and German and polka music. 610-332-1300

Timber & Balloon Festival Oct. 16, 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.; Oct. 17 and 18, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Friday Night Balloon Glow. Enjoy Lumberjacks and Hot Air Balloons all in one weekend. Saturday and Sunday offer exciting and fun demonstrations, balloon launches and rides, great food and entertainment. Shawnee Mountain Ski Area, Hollow Road, Shawnee on Delaware, 570-421-7231, www.shawneemt.com

Need a Seat?

American Voices Allentown Symphony Classical Series Oct. 3, 8 p.m.; Oct. 4, 3 p.m. American composers, Gershwin, Copland and Bernstein, capturing slices of American life. Symphony Hall, 23 N. Sixth St., Allentown, 610-432-6715, www. allentownsymphony.org

Chairs, Tables, Barstools, Booths, Hospitality Seating, Healthcare, Church Chairs, Banquet Tables, Restaurant Tables...We Have It All. Indoor & Outdoor. Your local wholesale source for indoor and outdoor commercial furniture!

Jazz Cabaret Series Oct 16, 7:30p.m. - 10:00 p.m. A fabulous Jazz concert performed by Charles Fambrough in the Rodale Community Room of Symphony Hall, Allentown, Box office 610-432-6715,www. Symphony website photo allentownsymphony.org

Table tops

WK&S Railroad Halloween Ride Oct. 31One child (ages 3-11) in full costume rides free when accompanied by a paying adult. WK&S Railroad, Kempton, 610-756-6469, www.kemptontrain.com



Lifestyles over 50

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October 2011

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7 Part Time Jobs for Retires by Connie Challingsworth, Positive Life Decisions

M

“help desk” job that requires the kind of knowledge you have amassed over your lifetime of work.

any who are retiring have found that they need to supplement their income. Even those who don’t need the money want to keep working to stay engaged and mentally fit. If this is you, a part-time job may be for you. That doesn’t mean you have to get a paper route or babysit. Here are some other options to consider.

Monetize Your Talents and Skills Try to find a way to make money by utilizing what you’re good at doing. If you’re handy around the house, you may be able to find work as a handyman. If you’re good with a needle, you could do alterations. Get the word out by telling family and friends and posting fliers. Don’t discount your skills and talents!

The Same Job only Less Many professional jobs allow for a phased transition to retirement, in which you work fewer hours each year over several years. Or, keep your former employer as a client and work part time

Teach or Tutor To teach non-credit classes, often the only credential you need is experience. Try your local college or university, art center, or parks and recreation center. If you have aptitude and patience, you can tutor. Connect with local school principals, teachers or tutoring agencies to get started.

Consult or Freelance Many consulting companies need people on a project basis. Explore companies online and contact the person who heads up the unit you would want to work in. Organizations that are downsizing look for freelancers to fill gaps in their staff.

You probably won’t find jobs like these advertised. You have to go after what you want by networking and thinking outside the box, but it can be done.

Research for Businesses or Universities Researchers are often needed who can help scholars find the studies or do the data collection they need to complete their research projects. Let departments related to your area of expertise know you’re available.

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Think Seasonal Retailers need part-time workers during the holiday season. Don’t just think of Wal-Mart. There may be other fun things to get into. For example, if you’re interested in sports, try a sporting goods store.

PHOEBE Preferred

Customer Service Many mature workers excel at customer service. Some companies employ part time retirees who work from home as customer service agents. They still have the flexibility to travel and enjoy their retirement. A good choice is to find a

for our lifestyle.

Phoebe Terrace is a popular choice in retirement living. Conveniently located in the west-end of Allentown, Phoebe Terrace offers surprisingly roomy apartments, exceptional value, fine dining and a welcoming environment.

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Lifestyles over 50

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quit her job to full time care for her parents. Thankfully her boss was able to change some hours, work with her on accommodations for her case load, so between Brian, her dad and mother working as a team and the help of Adult day she was able to keep her job and do the best of care possible for her parents.

Robin had been caring for her parents, but working was becoming difficult. A choice had to be made as to whether she would quit her job to provide full time care for her parents.

A Caregiver’s Life

Late in 2008 her father passed away, leaving his wife Betty, Robin, and Brian to continue on. Robin had been very close to both of her parents, missing her dad she was becoming tired, depressed, but vowed to continue on caring for her mom. Again with the help of her fiancé’, her boss, Adult Day Care, and a little in home care to give Robin and Brian some alone time, she is still doing her best to keep mom comfortable in her home.

By Deb Miller, Sarah Care of Lehigh Valley

Peters was just another daughter, Robin caring for her parents as they aged.

Working, enjoying her life, stopping in at her home with groceries, fixing dinner, and enjoying her parents in the later years of their life. All of that changed in 2004 when her father John had health issues and needed kidney dialysis. Her mother Betty had stopped walking due to arthritis and was wheel chair bound. Dad still was a big help, making sure that Betty was cared for, grocery shopping and dinner was started by the time Robin came home from work.

Mom is doing fine; she is declining a little, but still knows how much her daughter loves her, and who her friends are at adult day. She loves polka, any music, and playful with jokes at the center, and loves new participants that come to the center, she is our welcome participant. This story is written with admiration for a daughter who is just like any other child. She has vowed to care for her parents in their aging years, for as long as she can, or until her care is not enough to give the best care to her mom. Robin is a wonderful daughter and I can only hope that all of our children will love us just as much in our old age. It is ok that not everyone is a caregiver but a good one such as Robin has the heart for it.

Her support system consisted of her fiancé’ Brian Lynn, her dad, and mom which kept her care giving to a comfortable level. Dad bought a wheelchair accessible van; so that Betty was able to travel everywhere they went, keeping the family together. In 2007 dad had declined, and mom needed more help than what was able to be given if Robin was going to keep working. That is when she started looking into other options to assist her family.

If you are 62 or older and own your home, you may qualify for the FHA Insured Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM). No income requirements or limitations and no mortgage payments to make until you move or sell.

Robin had made the decision to move in with her parents in 2008, but needed more help, that is when she found adult day care to take some of the pressure off of her father. Mother was never a social butterfly, her enjoyment was caring for her family, so it was not clear on how Betty would adjust to Adult Day care. Thankfully Betty has made many friends and discussion of the day she had, gave the family some laughter and stories for the evening.

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Robin had been caring for her parents, but working was becoming difficult, and a choice had to be made to



Lifestyles over 50

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Common Misconceptions

Declaration of Independence did not occur on July 4, 1776. The final language of the document was approved by the Second Continental Congress on that date, it was printed and distributed on July 4 and 5, but the actual signing occurred on August 2, 1776.

by Art Villafane, Lifestyles over 50 •

In ancient Rome, Romans did not build rooms called vomitoria in which to purge themselves after a meal. Vomitoria were the entranceways through which crowds entered and exited a stadium.

The United States Constitution was written on parchment, not hemp paper.

Napoleon I (Napoleon Bonaparte) was not particularly short. His height was recorded as 5 feet 2 inches in French feet. This corresponds to 5 feet 6.5 inches in modern international feet. Some believe that he was nicknamed le Petit Caporal (The Little Corporal) as a term of affection.

During World War II, King Christian X of Denmark did not thwart Nazi attempts to identify Jews by wearing a yellow star himself. Jews in Denmark were never forced to wear the Star of David. The Danes did help most Jews flee the country before the end of the war.

Nero did not “fiddle” during the Great Fire of Rome (violins had not yet been invented, nor was he playing the lyre). However, it is true that he blamed the fire on Christians.

There is no evidence that Vikings wore horns on their helmets.

There is no evidence that iron maidens were invented in the Middle Ages or even used for torture.

Christopher Columbus’s efforts to obtain support for his voyages were not hampered by a European belief in a flat Earth. Sailors and navigators of the time knew that the Earth was spherical, but (correctly) disagreed with Columbus’s estimate of the distance to India, which was approximately one-sixth of the actual distance.

There is a legend that Marco Polo imported pasta from China. Durum wheat, and thus pasta as it is known today, was introduced by Arabs from Libya, during their conquest of Sicily in the late 7th century.

Albert Einstein did not fail mathematics in school, as is commonly believed. Upon being shown a column claiming this fact, Einstein said “I never failed in mathematics... Before I was fifteen I had mastered differential and integral calculus.”

John F. Kennedy’s words “Ich bin ein Berliner” are standard German for “I am a Berliner”. An urban legend has it that due to his use of the indefinite article ein, Berliner is translated as jelly doughnut, and that the population of Berlin was amused by the supposed mistake.

Contrary to the popular image of the Pilgrim Fathers, the early settlers of the Plymouth Colony did not dress in black, wear buckles, or wear black steeple hats. Their fashion would have been based on that of the late Elizabethan era: doublets, jerkins and ruffs.

Written. Produced and Directed By

Noreen Bachman

Marie Antoinette did not actually use the phrase “let them eat cake” when she heard that the French peasantry was starving due to a dearth of bread. The phrase was first published in Rousseau’s Confessions when Marie was only 10 years old.

Music Directed By

Betsy Lichtenwalner

Lower Macungie Middle School 6299 Lower Macungie Road Macungie, PA

George Washington did not have wooden teeth. According to a study of Washington’s four known dentures by a forensic anthropologist from the University of Pittsburgh the dentures were made of gold, hippopotamus ivory, lead, and human and animal teeth.

Adults - $12.00, Seniors (62+) - $10.00 Students (K-12) - $8.00 A portion of our proceeds will be donated to: ‘The Eastern PA Down Syndrome Center’

The signing of the United States

Lifestyles over 50

October 2011




Helpful Information Is Within Everyone’s Reach

by Pat Nemetch, President APRN, Member, PA State AARP Long Term Care Committee

ooking back on the past several weeks L when nature pretty much threw the book at us with an earthquake, hurricane and massive flooding—I’m reminded how fragile our lives can be.

As I sat in the dark during the recent storms without access to my computer, I experienced the same frustrations facing older adults who haven’t embraced the latest technology. While computers and other devices of all shapes and sizes can deliver information instantly with just a few clicks, many seniors may be intimated by the technology or simply prefer doing things over the phone or in person. Fortunately, here in the Lehigh Valley, there is a wealth of information and resources that are just a phone call away. Our United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley is a national leader in offering programs specifically serving older adults. In fact, the United Way of the Greater Lehigh Valley’s Alliance of Aging (LVAA) offers a comprehensive, if not the most comprehensive, resource guide for older adults that covers everything from adult day care services to weatherization assistance, complete with local contact information. Flip the guide over and you’ll find a listing of key terms and definitions to help you understand all the specialized acronyms and language inherent in programs serving older adults. You can receive a free copy of the LVAA Resource Guide by calling (610) 807-5730. Lehigh Valley Aging in Place (LVAIP) also has been around for years and brings together resources from the private, public non-profit and business sectors to help older adults stay at home for as long as possible. LVAIP’s wonderful Resource Guide includes a list of services and

programs designed to help those needing assistance at home. In addition to contact information, the guide also features a short description of exactly what services are available. You can receive a copy of the guide by calling toll free 1-877-3348942. As a reader of Lifestyles Over 50, you may not be aware that this publication produces an excellent annual directory that lists local products and services specifically serving older adults in our community. The Lifestyles directory features charts that allow readers to instantly compare providers and lists services such as medical equipment companies that you may not find in other directories. You can receive a copy of the Lifestyles Over 50 Directory by calling (610) 762-9011. Finally, readers who are also members of AARP can access that organization’s extensive research, planning and education resources on a wide variety of topics affecting those 50+. You can reach the AARP state office in Pennsylvania by calling 1866-389-5654. I’d also recommend keeping the phone numbers for Lehigh County Aging and Adult Services (610-782-3200) and Northampton County Area Agency on Aging (610559-3270) handy for help with state and federal government programs serving older adults. Each of the resources listed above is unique unto itself but all are share a common goal. They exist to help older adults in our community live the most fulfilling life possible. So just let your fingers do the walking. My thoughts and prayers are with the families who experienced losses from the recent earthquake, hurricane and torrential rains that resulted in flooding throughout our area.

INDEPENDENCE COURT OF QUAKERTOWN Assisted Living Residence • Residential Living • 3 Delicious Meals Daily

• Medication Management • Daily Assistance With Care

OPEN HOUSE TUESDAY EVENINGS until 7pm & SUNDAYS 12pm - 3pm

• Socialization & Companionship • Short-Term Stays Available

As more and more seniors choose Assisted LIving, they discover the special qualities of Independence Court. Call Suzanne for more information or to arrange for a personal tour and complimentary lunch with us.

1660 Park Avenue, Quakertown • 215-538-7050

10

Lifestyles over 50

October 2011


Healthy Eating During the Winter Months by Susan Boggus, RN, Director of Patient Services, Focus Home Care

A

s the winter months creep up on us, we need to pay more attention to our eating habits so that our immune system stays strong, especially during flu and cold season.

can completely stop a cold in its tracks, a healthy immune system can help ward off the germs that cause colds and the flu. A healthy immune system can even minimize a cold’s duration. One way to boost the immune system is to maintain a vitamin C regimen. Studies have shown that 1,000 milligrams of vitamin C supplements may make colds milder and even shorten them by half a day.

It is a fact, that as it gets darker earlier, we get less exposure to the sun, which can lead to a drop in serotonin. That drop can cause depression and food cravings. We need to remind one another to find the sunlight wherever and whenever we can. Go outdoors, even if it is only to take a walk around the block on sunny days. Sunshine is still the greatest source of Vitamin D. You can also boost serotonin by eating healthy carbohydrates such as grains, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and squash.

Foods rich in Vitamin C include citrus fruit, cabbage, broccoli, pumpkin, sweet potato, and spinach. All these mentioned have benefits to the immune system. The best defense in preventing the cold and flu is to do whatever you can to give your body a fighting chance. Putting your winter nutrition top on the list will ensure you are off to a good start!

Killian McCarthy, Certified Personal Trainer through the National Council on Strength & Fitness states that most clients literally go into “hibernation mode� during the winter months where they sleep more, eat more and exercise less leading to obesity and illness. While nothing

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1974 Highlights Top Ten Movies

1. Towering Inferno 2. Blazing Saddles 3. Young Frankenstein 4. Earthquake . Chinatown 6. Godfather, Part II 7. Murder on Orient Express 8. Airport 1975 9. Great Gatsby 10. Death Wish

Henry Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s career home run record hitting his 715th

Top Ten TV Shows 1. All in the Family 2. Sanford and Son 3. Chico and the Man 4. Jeffersons . MASH 6. Rhoda 7. The Waltons 8. Good Times 9. Maude 10. Hawaii Five-O

Top Rock and Roll Hits 1. “Bennie and the Jets” Elton John 2. “The Loco-Motion” Grand Funk Railroad 3. “Nothing from Nothing” Billy Preston 4. “Come and Get Your Love” Redbone . “I Can Help” Billy Swan 6. “Dancing Machine” The Jackson 5 7. “The Joker” Steve Miller Band 8. “Sweet Home Alabama” Lynyrd Skynyrd 9. “Boogie Down” Eddie Kendricks 10. “Rock On”David Essex

Kidnapped and brainwashed by the SLA, Patty Hearst became “Tania”

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Pontiac Trans Am

A sloping Endura front end, highlighted by a slim bumper line and modification of Pontiac’s traditional divided grille led off the 1974 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am facelift. Trans Ams wore dual air scoops below the front bumper’s face, but kept their rear-facing hood scoop. Even though engines were being detuned each season, such devices as a shaker hood scoop -- plus a Firebird emblem that covered virtually the entire Trans Am hood -- retained at least the appearance of potency.

Trivia • • • • • •

• • • •

Miami beats Minnesota 24 to 7 at Houston January 13 in Super Bowl VIII. On February 5 publishing heiress Patty Hearst is kidnapped by the Symbionese Liberation Army. In April Intel releases the first 8-bit 8080 microprocessor; it had 5,000 transistors. Atlanta Brave Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth’s career home run record April 8 at Atlanta, hitting his 715th off a pitch by Al Downing of the LA Dodgers. The “Heimlich maneuver” is first described in the June issue of Emergency Medicine by Cincinnati surgeon Henry Jay Heimlich. On June 21 Federal District Court Judge W. Arthur Gerrity Jr. orders the desegregation of Boston’s public schools through busing of students. Violence erupts and in October Governor Francis W. Sargent calls out the National Guard to keep peace. On September 8 President Ford pardons former President Nixon granting Nixon a “full, free, and absolute pardon” for all federal crimes that Nixon “committed or may have committed or taken part in” while in office. Congress overrode President Ford’s veto of the Freedom of Information Act giving the public better access to public information. The computed axial tomography (CAT) scanner is developed in England. “Streaking” becomes a popular U.S. fad as male and female college students dash naked between dormitories. All the President’s Men by Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein is published. It is the story of Watergate and President’s Nixon’s involvement. On May 12, the Boston Celtics are the NBA Champions for the 12th time in 18 years.

• • • •

The national speed limit was lowered to 55 miles per hour. Cost of a Superbowl ad in 1974: $103,000 The post-it note is invented by Arthur Fry. It became widely used and available in 1980. Liposuction invented by Giorgio Fischer in Rome, Italy.

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For more information, call Admissions at 610-794-5300.


The Pursuit of Health, Happiness and Sports Injuries by Jennifer Gross-Edwards, DPM

ith the changing leaves and cooler W weather, fall is the perfect time of year for outdoor fun. Millions of adults

will participate in sports: football, soccer, basketball, baseball and softball, and running, to name a few. Whether you are skilled, an amateur, or enjoy individual activities—adults will get all of the health benefits exercise has to offer. However, for some people—particularly those who overdo or who don’t properly train or warm up these benefits can come at a price: sports injuries. The types of sports-and-exercise related injuries most commonly seen by a podiatric physician are the following:

Stress fractures are hairline breaks resulting from repeated stress on the bone. High-impact sports such as running, Ankle sprain is a common injury to the ligament, one of gymnastics, and volleyball can increase the risk of stress the bands of tough, fibrous tissue that connects two or more fractures. To prevent stress fractures, wear shoes that provide bones at the joint and prevents excessive movement of the sufficient padding and support when you walk, run, dance, or joint. Sprains that do not show improvement in three days perform any other activities that stress the bones of the foot. If should be seen by a podiatric physician. Investing in five to 10 continued pain persists, contact your podiatrist. minutes of stretching and warming up and wearing the right shoe for the sport you are participating in can help prevent Plantar fasciitis (heel pain) is caused by inflammation of this common athletic injury. the connective tissue that stretches from the base of the toes, across the arch of the foot, to the point at which it inserts in Muscle strain is defined as either a partial or total tear of the heel bone (the soles of your feet). Inflammation is caused muscle fibers in the muscle itself or the origin of the muscle. by overuse with excessive foot flattening and is aggravated Exercisers frequently strain their lower leg and foot muscles by tight calf muscles. Aerobic activities such as walking or during rapid movement sports such as tennis, basketball, running are usually related to this injury, but it can also result racquetball, running, and sprinting. Improper and inadequate from basketball, football, or softball. Customized orthotics warm-up and stretching are some of the contributing factors (custom devices for shoes), along with an appropriate in this type of injury. Minor strains should heal in 1-2 weeks stretching program, may be prescribed by your podiatrist to with rest. If pain lingers longer, consult a podiatrist. help alleviate pain. Tendinitis is a common type of ankle and foot problem, defined as an inflammation of the tendons—the tissue that connects muscles to bones. The most common, Achilles tendinitis, is where inflammation is located at the back of the leg where the tendon attaches to the foot (heel pain). In sports, a tendinitis injury is usually the result of abnormal foot biomechanics, excessive foot pronation (tendency of the arch of the foot to flatten out too much), and history of overuse in a specific sport (e.g., basketball, tennis, running, volleyball), which requires continuous high-impact repetitive movements. Contact your podiatrist if ankle pain does not improve or worsens after a few days of rest and ice therapy.

14

Why look back on the good old days when you can look forward to new ones. You’ll ask yourself why you didn’t move in sooner. Because when you move into our Senior Living Community, you wake to a variety of activities and personal support that make each day a pleasure. While your personal apartment offers you privacy and comfort, day trips to town give you the independence you cherish. Rest assured knowledgeable, compassionate licensed nurses and health care professionals are available if they are ever needed. To make a fresh start, visit or call us today.

A Senior Living Community Lehigh Commons

1680 Spring Creek Road Macungie, PA 18062 610-530-8089

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Lifestyles over 50

October 2011

We understand care, we practice compassion.

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• • • • • • •

Credulous and Incredulous Facts • • • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • •

Ostriches are often not taken seriously. They can run faster than horses, and the males can roar like lions. Sloths take two weeks to digest their food. Guinea pigs and rabbits can’t sweat. The natural diet of Lady Beetles consists of soft bodied insects such as aphids, spider mites, and young caterpillars. Adults can consume up to 100 aphids a day. The giant cricket of Africa enjoys eating human hair. Honeybees have hair on their eyes. In Redondo Beach, Calif., a police officer arrested a driver after a short chase and charged him with drunk driving. Officer Joseph Fonteno’s suspicions were aroused when he saw the white Mazda MX-7 rolling down Pacific Coast Highway with half of a traffic-light pole, including the lights, lying across its hood. The driver had hit the pole on a median strip and simply kept driving. According to Fonteno, when the driver was asked about the pole, he said, “It came with the car when I bought it.” A Hawaiian stamp of 1851 with a face value of 2 cents was the sole reason Gaston Leroux, a Parisian philatelist, murdered its owner, Hector Giroux. The exact geographic center of the United States is near Lebanon, Kansas. The only nation whose name begins with an “A”, but doesn’t end in an “A” is Afghanistan. The first man to distill bourbon whiskey in the United States was a Baptist preacher, in 1789. The Aztec Indians of Mexico believed turquoise would protect them from physical harm, and so warriors used these green and blue stones to decorate their battle shields. Henry Waterman, of New York, invented the elevator in 1850. He intended it to transport barrels of flour.

Lifestyles over 50

• •

John Greenwood, also of New York invented the dental drill in 1790. The corkscrew was invented by M.L. Bryn, also of New York, in 1860. Electrical hearing aids were invented in 1901 by Miller R. Hutchinson, who was (you guessed it) from New York. Medical researchers contend that no disease ever identified has been completely eradicated. The attachment of the human skin to muscles is what causes dimples. No one seems to know why people blush. Billiards great, Henry Lewis once sank 46 balls in a row. Four men in the history of boxing have been knocked out in the first eleven seconds of the first round. Prior to 1900, prize fights lasted up to 100 rounds. Theaters in Glendale, California can show horror films only on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday. You can’t plow a cotton field with an elephant in North Carolina. In Lehigh, Nebraska it’s against the law to sell donut holes. Under the law of Mississippi, there’s no such thing as a female Peeping Tom.

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October 2011

15


Apprise Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Plan Open Enrollment Sites For Lehigh & Northampton Counties October 15th through December 7th 2011 Bethlehem Public Library – South Side 400 Webster Street, Bethlehem, PA (610) 867-7852, Wed 2-5 PM, Beginning 10/19/11

Fellowship Terrace 3000 Fellowship Drive, Whitehall, PA 610-769-4301, Wed 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Beginning 10/19/11

Northampton Borough Hall 1401 Laubach Avenue, Northampton, PA 610-262-3646, Beginning 10/17/11

Rep Joe Emrick’s Office 5 Mt. Bethel Plaza, Mt. Bethel, PA 570-897-0401, Tuesdays, 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM Beginning 10/18/11

Catholic Charities 530 Union Blvd., Allentown, PA 610-435-1541 Weekdays 8:30 AM-4:30 PM Beginning 10/17/11

Lehigh County Government Center 17 S. 7th Street, Allentown, PA 610-782-3200, Tuesdays 9:00 AM-12 noon Beginning 10/18/11

Northampton County Intake & Referral Office 45 N. 2nd St., Easton, PA 18042 610-559-3270, Mondays 1:00 PM-4:00 PM Beginning 10/17/11

Rep. Doug Reichley’s Office 1245 Chestnut Street, Suite 5, Emmaus, PA 610-965-9933, Fridays 9:00 AM-12:00 PM Beginning 10/21/11

Country Meadows of Bethlehem III 4007 Green Pond Rd., 2nd Fl Bethlehem, PA 610-559-3245 Wed 1:00 PM-3:00 PM Beginning 10/19/11

Lehigh County Senior Center 1633 Elm Street, Allentown, PA 610-437-3700 Wednesdays & Thursdays Beginning 10/19/11

Rep Jennifer Mann’s Office 2030 West Tilghman Street, Suite 100, Allentown, PA Call 610-821-5577 Tuesdays, 10:00 AM – 2:00 PM Beginning 10/18/11

Slate Belt Senior Center 707 American Bangor Rd., Bangor, PA 610-588-1224, Fridays 8:00 AM-12 noon Beginning 10/21/11

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Lifestyles over 50

October 2011


Goodnight Irene by Alan Allegra

I just watched online videos of a tiny New Jersey city going offline, bathed with mud and fury by the mightierthan-usual Ramapo River. I was raised in Oakland, an unpretentious town in the northern Garden State. As I write, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s raining for about the 11th straight day since Hurricane Irene breezed through. That was only a few days after an earthquake shook 29 states. When I hear of floods, I think about my little house on a little plot of land on a little street next to a little river. I watched many a flood flow by the back yard and into the homes of those on lower ground. The winter floods were more â&#x20AC;&#x153;funâ&#x20AC;? because huge blocks of river ice floated by like miniature icebergs. To a kid with no responsibilities, this was exciting. To a family with a Super 8mm movie camera, this was theater. To residents of the riverside resort area called â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Colony,â&#x20AC;? this was disaster. Now that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a homeowner, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m concerned about floods, fires, falling fir trees, and finances. I no longer have a Dad who can take care of these problems while I play with toys or look on with childish wonder and a Polaroid Swinger in my hand. When things fall on the house, the responsibility to fix or finance them falls on me.

Although itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true I no longer have an earthly Dad to watch over me, I do have a heavenly Father Who cares for me. He doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a time machine; Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Father of eternity (Isaiah 57:15). He has no need of a crystal ball; He sees all (Isaiah 46:10). The Father doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lose sleep over storms; He brings them (Psalm 107:25) and calms them (Psalm 107:29). God is unmoved by earthquakes because He laid earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s foundations (Psalm 104:5). The Lord doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need homeowner insurance or bank loans because He owns all the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wealth (Haggai 2:8). When the bible says we should be casting all our anxieties on him, because he cares for us (1 Peter 5:7), we can bank on it! Storms and earthquakes are not always physical. We have events in our lives that can saturate us and shake us up. God promises His children that He not only cares for us but will walk through the storms and quakes with us: â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume youâ&#x20AC;? (Isaiah 43:2). The Lord doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say problems wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t comeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;He says He will be with us through them to keep them from destroying us.

Living without lights for four days after Irene, it was comforting to have the power back on. Jesus said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;And this is the condemnation, that the light has come into the world, and men loved darkness rather than light, because their deeds were evilâ&#x20AC;? (John 3:19). If you are living a dark and stormy night, come to the Light and be secure. Goodnight Irene, hello Immanuel! r ou g ity in n rs rv mu ea Se om 6 y c r1 fo

Storms are indiscriminate. They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t care when they show up or whom they blow down. At least, most of the time they announce themselves beforehand so you can prepare. Earthquakes are not that considerate. They come without warning so you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t prepare. Until science invents a time machine or crystal ball, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll never know for sure whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming to get us above or below the ground.

In light of the recent devastations wrought by tsunamis, tremors, and torrents, it is good to reflect on Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; warning about building your house on the solid stone instead of sandy soil (Matthew 7:24-27). The Living Stone says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am with you alwaysâ&#x20AC;? (Matthew 28:20).

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s !NENVIRONMENTDESIGNEDAFTERlVEYEARSOFRESEARCHBY dementia experts to maximize independence and self-esteem of our residents. s /URÂ&#x2014;MILEOFBEAUTIFULLYLANDSCAPEDWALKINGPATHSAND courtyard areas provide a place for our residents to safely EXERCISEANDSOCIALIZEWHILEENJOYINGTHEBEAUTYOFTHEOUTDOORS s 3PECIALLYTRAINEDSTAFFTHATISCONTINUALLYUPDATEDONTHELATEST memory caregiving techniques. s !RDEN#OURTSHASPROVIDEDHUNDREDSOFHEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALSWITHDEMENTIATRAININGTOASSISTTHEMAND the people they care for. We continue to provide monthly EDUCATIONALSEMINARSTOPROFESSIONALSANDFAMILYMEMBERS s 7EWORKWITHPHYSICAL OCCUPATIONALANDSPEECHTHERAPISTS WITHINOURCOMMUNITIESTOPROVIDEONE ON ONESERVICESWITHOUR RESIDENTS4HERAPYGYMSCANBEOVERWHELMINGTOAPERSONWITH MEMORYLOSS/URENVIRONMENTALLOWSTHERAPISTSTOACCOMPLISH MOREWITHIMPROVEDOUTCOMES s /URCOMMUNITYISCONVENIENTLYLOCATEDANDEASILYACCESSIBLE FROMLOCALHIGHWAYS


Adult Day Care: 5 Reasons It’s a Preferred Alternative to a Nursing Home by Lynn M. Grayson, Active Day, Inc.

dult day care centers are a preferred A alternative to nursing home or institutional care, providing activities,

opportunities for socialization, convenience, and independence all while providing expert health care dedicated to helping clients improve daily functioning or delay worsening of conditions. There are many reasons to consider adult day care, including the following benefits.

1. Prolonged Independence and Improved Daily Functioning Medical adult day care centers promote their clients’ ability to remain independent by supplementing the assistance they receive from family caregivers with a program of health care services and activities custom-tailored to each individual’s needs and interests. By taking part in these activities, clients receive cognitive and physical stimulation that helps to enhance well-being while delaying or preventing a decline in health that would ultimately lead to placement in an assisted living facility or nursing home.

costs for medical adult day care services are significantly less than those for other long-term care options. In many cases, services may be paid in part or in full by Medicaid, the Veterans Administration, or private long-term care insurance, although coverage varies by state and policy. Additionally, out-of-pocket expenditures may qualify as a tax-deductible medical expense. 4. The Convenience of Door-to-Door Transportation Some adult day care centers provide flexible, door-to-door transportation for their clients within a convenient radius of the center. In addition to transportation to and from centers, many also escort their clients to medical appointments when needed. This service is particularly helpful for caregivers who maintain full- or part-time employment outside the home, as it decreases disruption of and distraction from their work day. 5. Effective Management of Chronic Conditions When clients come to an adult day care center, they

In addition, many offer on-site specialists to provide physical therapy, speech therapy, and occupational therapy. These therapists work with clients to improve daily functioning by developing strength, range of motion, balance and cognitive abilities. 2. Nutrition and Medication Management is a Priority Ensuring that clients receive proper nutrition and medication each day in the absence of family caregivers is an important factor in fulfilling the commitment to help clients maintain the best possible quality of life and well being.

Abbe Hall Personal Care Home in the Heart of Historic South Bethlehem

Caregivers can be assured that nutrition is a top priority. Adult day care centers provide appetizing, wholesome meals and snacks that are approved by a dietician. Meals served at centers typically include provisions for diabetics, vegetarians, sodium-restricted or low-cholesterol diets and other special dietary needs. Additionally, the staff can administer medications and injections as prescribed, monitoring the effectiveness of the treatment and relaying this information to the client’s physician, caregivers and case manager.

INDEPENDENCE, PRIVACY & DIGNITY Located in the Heart of Historical South Bethlehem Beautiful, Well-Appointed Rooms Full Activities Program Housekeeping and Laundry Services Outstanding Cuisine Skilled Staffing FIXED FEE FACILITY...NO UP-SELLING

3. A Cost-Effective Alternative to Nursing Homes or Institutions Adult day care centers offer the most cost-effective longterm care option. While costs differ based on care level and geographic region, nationwide averages show that the annual

18

Lifestyles over 50

113 West Fourth Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015

610-866-6260 or toll free 877-866-6260 •

October 2011




SarahCare of the Lehigh Valley 7010 Snowdrift Road Allentown 18106 610-391-1576 www.sarahcarelv.com

Sharing the Caring Adult Day Services Center 41 N. 3rd Street Easton 18042 610-258-6271 www.thirdstreetalliance.org



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The Comfort Zone at Warren Hospital Hillcrest Professional Plaza 755 Memorial Parkway Bldg 302B Phillipsburg, NJ 08865 908-859-6797 www.warrenhospital.org

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Adult Day Care Facilities in Lehigh Valley Area

7:00-5:00 M-F

7:00-6:00 M-F Sat 9:00-2:00

• 7:30-5:00 M-F

typically receive a customized care plan that incorporates cognitive and physical activities as appropriate in order to help them remain active and intellectually stimulated throughout the day while maintaining or improving their present level of independence and functioning. Adult day care centers typically staff skilled RNs, LPNs, personal care assistants, activities staff, and therapists who play an important role in helping their clients address the challenges of chronic conditions.

caregivers and their loved ones. The convenience, health assurance, socialization, and cost all contribute to the many reasons that adult day care is becoming a preferred choice for caregivers.

The staff is able to help by assisting with daily personal care and hygiene, nutrition and medication management, blood pressure and blood sugar monitoring, tracheotomy care and tube feeding, and offering on-site physical, speech and occupational therapy. Additionally, many centers will work with families in the implementation of these health management and therapeutic techniques, so they can take an active role in the client’s care and treatment at home.

Lynn M. Grayson, Public Relations Account Manager for Active Day, Inc., works with more than 50 centers in seven states to help promote the benefits of medical adult day care for seniors and disabled adults. For more information on Active Day go to http://www.activeday.com or call the nearest center to you.

The decision for what type if care is best for your loved one can be difficult. Before making the decision, consider if adult day care may be the right choice for these reasons, and many more.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Lynn_ Grayson

Adult day care centers provide many benefits for both

Lifestyles over 50

October 2011

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Sudoku Maker

Sudoku Maker

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Puzzles Level 3

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puzzle number: 362819

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Wuzzles Free Word Puzzles - Wuzzle

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6488 Alburtis Road, Macungie, PA 18062

61 0 - 4 2 1 - 8 1 0 0

thevillageatwillowlane.com Wuzzle 11 - www.WuzzlesandPuzzles.com

Quality care 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. Short and Long Term Stays No hidden charges. No community fees. Call to schedule a visit and for more information.

20

Lifestyles over 50

Want All Natural Candy? Call - 610-530-0151

â&#x20AC;˘

October 2011

Tulips Back in 5 minutes One life to live First thing tin the morning Go through the motion The cost is clear

Individualized care by compassionate and dedicated caregivers with available licensed nursing care.


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15Far away Fit in 510Fit in Thrown off 1014Thrown off Curse 1415Curse Trademark Beget 1516Trademark 17 Veal 16 Beget Lift 1718Veal 19 Swiss-like cheese 18 Lift 20 Cancel cheese 19 Swiss-like 22 Waterway 20 Cancel 24 Vane direction 22 Waterway 25 Afloat (2 wds.) 24 Vane direction 27 Roof overhang 2529Afloat (2 wds.) Main artery 2732Roof overhang Elliptic 2935Main artery Defunct football league 3238Elliptic Building addition 3539Defunct Biased football league 3840Building Certifiedaddition public accountant 39 Biased 40 Certified public accountant

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Send to 905 Harrison St. 1 Syrian bishop 16 Allentown, PA 18103 or 19 1 Syrian bishop passes at bull 2 Matador’s editor@lifestylesover50.com 19 2 Matador’s passes at bull 3 Concerning 23 24 Volunteers 3 Concerning 23 24 4 Denial 27 28 4 Denial 5 Reduced (abbr.) Over 50 and just reaching your 27 28 5 Reduced 6 Tennis(abbr.) player Steffi peak? Fast growth American 32 33 34 6 Tennis player Steffi 32 33 34 company looking for mature 7 Revile individuals who can recruit, train 39 7 Revile 39 8 Result and support others. Call 1-8668 Result 384-2512 ext 123 toll free for 42 43 9 Swelling 42 43 9 Swelling recorded information. 10 Compass point 10 Compass point 47 47 Phoebe Home seeks compassionate Stows (2 wds.) 11 11 Stows (2 wds.) individuals to assist with our 50 50 Epochs 12 12 Epochs memory support neighborhoods. 13 Interbreeding population You will be trained in Montessori 13 Interbreeding population 5454 55 55 56 56 principles to create meaningful within a species within a species experiences by practicing person6161 6262 63 63 21 21 Constellation Constellation centered care. For a rewarding and fulfilling experience - 610-79423 23 Provoke Provoke 6767 68 68 5362 jwickel@phoebe.org. 26 26 Regions Regions 71 71 28 28 Adam's wifewife Meals on Wheels Northampton Adam's 30 Tender loving care 74 30 Tender loving care Cty and Calvary United Methodist 74 partner to provide meals to seniors 31 Birds “thumb” 31 Birds “thumb” in Easton area. Volunteers needed. 33 Part of a semester 33 Part of a semester Emily Vadasz (610) 691-1030 34 Paradise emilyv@mealsonwheelspa.org. 41 Gaps 34 Paradise 35 Ca. University 41 Gaps 43 To be Lutheran Home - Topton invites Ca. span University 36 35 __ and (very clean) volunteers to share musical talent, 43 Canned To be meat brand 44 36 __ and span (very clean) 37 Construct voice or instrument with residents. 44 Edge Canned meat brand 46 37 Construct Flex hours, days, eves, weekends. 39 Agreeable to the mind 46 Church Edge song 47 Agreeable to the mindCarol Miller: 610-682-1420, 41 39 Household cleaner brand 47 Land Church song millerc@diakon.org. 48 measurements Household cleaner brand 42 41 Zilch 48 Defense Land measurements 49 Volunteer Center lists agencies 45 42 CotZilch 51 49 Gods Defense needing volunteers. 610-807-0336, 47 45 Insinuating Cot www.volunteerlv.org. 54 51 Dummy Gods 50 47 Large vehicle Insinuating 57 54 Christmas Dummy month Compeer of LV volunteers 4 52 50 Sri Large __ vehicle 59 Fasten hrs. a month with Compeer 57 Christmas month 53 52 Huddle Sri __ 62 friend, a person who lives with 59 Smelled Fasten bad 55 53 Pope's governing mental illness. Do what friends Huddle 64 Absent 62 Smelled bad do together: listen, go for a walk, organization 55 Pope's governing 66 Mr. Ryan watch a movie, enjoy a cup of 64 Absent 56 Act 68 Iraq's neighbor organization coffee, etc. Main duty – Have Fun! 66 Mr. Ryan 57 Bonkers 610.435.9651. 69 Soft cheese from Greece 56 Act 58 Vessel 68 Iraq's neighbor 70 Kangaroo bear 57 Bonkers Heartland Hospice seeks caring 69 Pleasant Soft cheese from Greece 60 Applaud 71 volunteers to offer bedside support 58 Vessel 61 Corridor 70 Journey Kangaroo bear and presence to those facing 72 63 60 LegApplaud joint terminal illness. Comprehensive 71 Pleasant 73 Petition for a position training, flex hours. Janet Daly, 61 Corridor 65 Talk 72 Fence Journey 74 opening Coordinator. 610-266-0134 63 Leg joint 67 Negative Are you a “people person” wanting 73 Petition for a position 65 Talk to make a difference? Have skills 74 Fence opening and talents to use to “give back”? 67 Negative 16

Answers for puzzles are at www.lifestylesover50.com

Compassionate Care has a variety


of volunteer opportunities with a training and support program to help you use your talents. Loretta Kistler 888-680-6650 or email lkistler@cchnet.net Project Lifesaver Volunteer - need someone with good organizational and good computer skills (Word, Outlook) Would work with sheriff’s dept., families and organizations, Commitment of 1 year. debbiegralicki@lehighcounty.org

Social & Support Groups Not all groups listed meet during the summer months. Please be sure to check by first calling the phone number listed. Tues Oct 4 12PM Lower Macungie Seniors. Lower Macungie Ctr 610395-0782. Tues, Oct 4, 6 pm. Whitehall Senior Grp. Dinner, entertain, Whitehall HS Cafeteria $3. 610264-3721. Oct 4 & 18 Lower Macungie Township Seniors, Lower Macungie Twsp. Comm. Ctr. Brookside Rd. Wed, Oct 5 LV Vegetarians. Quaker Meeting House Rt. 512 half mile N. of Rt. 22 Twnshp. Pot luck dinner. 6pm. $3.50 610-709-8984 Wed, Oct 5 1 pm. Macungie

Do you have old classic records that you want to sell? Call Julius Vitali of VINYLALLY HEAR at

610-217-1629 (cell) 610-966-6202 (phone)

Buying classical records and collections

22

Seniors, Macungie Fire Company. Ruth, 610-965-9584. Thurs, Oct 6 AARP Chapter 4150 at Lower Macungie Twsp. Comm. Ctr. Brookside Rd. AARP Oct 6 Chapter #5415 St. Timothy’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 140 So. Ott St, Allentown. 610-437-4265. Program: Singer Tony Farina, biz meeting follows. Bring non-perishable food item for the Allentown Food Bank. Thurs, Oct 6 7PM Lower Milford Twnshp Fire Co. 1601 Limeport Pike, spaghetti dinner adults $7 children $4 salad bar, dessert. Sat, Oct 8 10:30AM Enjoy gardening, interested in peace issues? Jordan United Church of Christ, Rt 309 and Walbert Ave, Allentown, dedicated peace garden, custom peace sculpture, peace pole, worship areas, biblical plant, children’s bed, gazebo, swing, trails. Sat, Oct 8 Bethlehem Garden Club, share garden tips with local pros and hobbyists 610-838-1482. Tues, Oct 11& 25 Lower Lehigh Lions Club. Macungie Fire Co. Walnut St. Tues, Oct 11 1pm, St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 5th & Chestnut Sts, Emmaus. Emmaus Garden Club, Sandi 610.965.2062. Tues, Oct 11 7-8:30 pm. Prayer & Share Together for emotional wholeness, women’s support group struggling, or have family, struggling with depression, bi-polar, etc. Asbury Methodist Church, Allentown. Linda 610-395-8756. Tues, Oct 11 8:30 AM Lehigh Co. TRIAD free continental breakfast. Green Meadows of Allentown. 610-967-5454. Wed, Oct 19 LV Military Affairs Council – Saucon Manor in Hellertown. 12-1:30pm, 484-7880196, info@lvmac.org, or www. lvmac.org for info. Thur, Oct 13 7pm. LV Brain Injury Support Group - Good Shepherd Health & Tech Center, 850 S. Fifth Street, Allentown.

Lifestyles over 50

Thur, Oct 13 12PM Caregivers & Professionals Network Group. Country Meadows of Allentown, Bldg 3, 610-395-7160

palmercommunitycenter.org Wednesdays noon. Fogelsville Senior Group at Fire Company. Amelia, 610-395-2224.

Fri, Oct 14 10 am. People Meeting People Club, Senior Social Group. Fellowship Hall, Asbury United Methodist Church.

Wednesday 1pm St. Stevens Church Franklin & Turner St. Allentown. Cards, bingo & refreshments. Thursdays at 12.

Mon, Oct 10 7-8:30 pm. pray & share together for emotional wholeness, women’s support group struggling, or have family struggling with depression, bi-polar, etc. Ebenezer Bible Fellowship, Bethlehem. Linda 610-395-8756.

Schnecksville Senior Citizen Group. 610-395-8667 Schnecksville Fire.

Pet Grief Support Group. Meetings twice a month, 6:30-8:00PM. For West Allentown group call 610-437-6660, for Bethlehem call 610-865-0110. Mon Oct 10, 1PM St. John’s Friendly Fifties, 1343 Newport Ave, Northampton 1 PM in gym Wed Oct 26 Men of Retirement Age Club 1-2;30pm, Advent Moravian Church, 3730 Jacksonville Rd, Hanover. LV Chapter 1371 National Active and Retired Federal Employees Thurs, Oct 27 St. Peters Lutheren Church community room, 1933 Hanover Ave. Allentown, 12PM lunch. Program: Annemarie O’Neill - “Everyone wants your nest egg. Keep your mits off my money”, brief biz session concludes meeting. Current and former Fed workers invited. If 1st timer or want lunch ($8) call Ken 610-837-7246 before Sat, Oct 22. If just attending program arrive at 12:45 pm. Info: 610-231-0237 Mondays 10 and 1. “Loving Hands Quilting Circle”. Country Meadows. Allentown, Buildings 3 & 1, 610-395-7160. Mondays 11:30-2. JCC, Allentown Friendship Circle. Open to 50 and over. Programs and lunch. Ruth 610-865-3646, 1 week in advance. Tuesdays, 1 pm. Trexlertown Area Senior Group. Trexlertown Fire Co. 610-395-5316. Tues 1:30-4:30 Palmer Senior Group, meet seniors, play cards, share good times. Charles Chrin Community Ctr Palmer Township 610-252-2098

October 2011

Fridays 1 pm. Emmaus Senior Group, St. John’s Lutheran Church, Emmaus. Erma 610-966-2299.

Exercise Bethlehem YMCA. SilverSneakers 1 M/T/W 10:45AM M/W 3PM. SilverSneakers 2 T 8:30AM & F 10:30AM, YogaStretch Th 10:45 AM Sat 8AM, SilverSplash T/Th 9:15am Sat 8:15AM. Suburban Family YMCA. Adult aquatics classes: 610-867-7588. Silver Sneakers I: Mon, Tues, Thurs at 9:00am,Thurs: 10:00am. Silver Sneakers II Mon 10:00am, Fri: 10:00am Silver Sneakers YogaStretch- Wed: 10am. Allentown YMCA & YWCA Senior Fit M-W-F 9:00 am, Silver Circuit M-W-F 9:00 am, Silver Sneakers 1 Mon & Thurs 11:30 am, Silver Sneakers 2 Mon, Tues, Thurs. 1:30 pm, Silver Splash Mon, Wed 9:30 am, Fri 2 pm, YogaStretch Wed 1:30 pm. Dates of adult aquatic classes available. 610-434-9333 YMCA - Easton, P’burg & Vicinity. Silver Sneakers Cardio Mon1pm Tues 11am, Wed. & Fri. 12pm Silver Sneakers 1 Tues. & Thurs. 12:30pm. Silver Sneakers Yoga Wed. 12:50pm. Low Impact Aerobics Tues. & Thurs. 8am. Aqua Aerobics M-F 9:15am, Tues. & Thurs. 7:00pm. Arthritis Aquatics M-W-F 10:30am, Tues. & Thurs. 1:00pm www.familyymca.org Arthritis Aquatics M-W-F 11:0011:45 AM or 11:45-12:30PM. 3rd St. Alliance for Women & Children. Month:$38 drop-in: $6, more programs, memberships available. 610-258-6271. Aqua Pilates, Arthritis Aquatics, Aqua Aerobics. Rodale Aquatic Ctr Allentown 610-606-4670.


Mon & Thurs 7 PM. Memorial Hall, Liberty Fire Co. Stockertown. 610759-6811 Wed 5PM game at 6:45PM Volunteer Fire Co Fogelsville Ladies Auxiliary Cash Prizes 610-395-5479

Tai Chi and Qigong classes in LV, experienced instructor, reasonable rates. Hilary Smith, RN 610-7516090 or smith.hilarym@gmail.com

Dances

Wed 6PM game and 7PM Lehigh County Senior Ctr. Free coffee and snacks. $15 includes 4 double cards & 1 pack of specials.610-437-3700

Wed Dances Lehigh County Senior Ctr: 1-4 pm. 1st & 3rd Wed of month. $7.00 pp includes refreshments. 610-437-3700 www. lehighseniors.org. Sat. Eve Dance Lehigh County Senior Ctr: 8-11 pm. $7.00 pp. 610-437-3700. Wed 7:30. N. Penn Elks Club, Colmar, Pa West Coast Swing. Third Fridays Peppermint Dance Club. Church on the Mall, Plymouth Meeting. peppermintdanceclub.com

Classes and Lectures

Third Friday – Easton Dance Party at Third St. Alliance, N. 3rd St., Easton. 610-330-9950. Ballroom Dance Sundays at Fearless Fire Company in Allentown, Carol 610-398-8312 schedule and info. Allentown Area Swing Dance. Fearless Fire Co. 1221 S Front St. 610-390-7550. $9 includes lesson 7pm - 8:30, no partner needed. Oct 4 & 11 Salsa, Oct 18 & 25 East Coast Swing www. allentownswingdance.org. LVAIP presents free afternoon dance for seniors. Fearless Fire Company 1221 S.Front St. Allentown Oct 13 1-4:00PM, Free. Entertainment by King Henry & The Showmen 610258-9512. Fearless Fire Company Friday Night Dance Party with King Henry & The Showmen. Second Friday of month. Next dance Oct 14.

Bingo

Seniors Who Wish to Re-Enter Workforce. Lehigh County Senior Ctr 1633 Elm St. Allentown, computer classes limited to 8. Basic Computer I & II, Digital Camera, Digital Photos, Intro to Internet. Classes at center and Whitehall Library. 8- 1.5 hr. classes $40 members $80 nonmembers. Membership $20. 610-437-3700 or dndod@aol.com.

Alz. Support Groups 2nd Wed 5:30 pm Arden Courts 5151 Hamilton Blvd. Allentown 3rd Mon 1:00 pm Arden Courts 5151 Hamilton Blvd. Allentown 3rd Sat @ 3:15pm 410 Krocks Rd. Country Meadows Allentown 3rd Wed 3:00pm Phoebe Terrace 1925 Turner St. Allentown, 2nd Wed 5:30 pm Sarah Care Adult Day Care 7010 Snow Drift Rd. Allentown, 1st Thurs 1:00pm St. Andrew’s Church 1900 Pennsylvania Ave. Allentown 3rd Thurs 4:30 Westminster Village 2156 Hanover St. Allentown, 3rd Wed 6:30pm Country Meadows Living 4005 Green Pond Rd., Bldg. 4, Bethlehem, 3rd Tues 5:00 pm Kirkland Village 1 Kirkland Village Circle Bethlehem, 4th Mon 2:30pm Moravian Village 526 Wood St. Bethlehem,

Rebuild - Restore - Renew

Steven Chu, CPO Owner-Practitioner

610.770.1515

Community Events Caregiver Support Groups: Live, Love, Learn (special grp. for memory impaired and loved ones), 2nd Tues of month Sacred Heart Hosp, 4:30PM-2nd floor. Bangor Area High School Gary Moffett Memorial Scholarship in memory of deceased classmates. $500 award given to senior who exemplifies leadership, service, character and scholastic achievement. Lisa 215-997-2141, ljupright@msn.com. Phoebe’s Alzheimer’s Assoc. Support Group 3 to 4:30 PM 3rd Wed of month, Phoebe Terrace, 1940 Turner St, Allentown. For people who have loved ones with Alzheimer’s or other dementias to come together for support. 610794-5273. Phoebe’s Connecting Hearts Geriatric Care - service with athome personalized coaching to make dementia-related caregiving more manageable. Topics: Dementia Overview, Eating Difficulties, Activities of Daily Living, Home Safety and Mobility, Medication Management, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, Physical Behaviors, Expressive Behaviors, Psychological Behaviors, Legal Activities 610-794-5344. American Red Cross has critical blood shortage and issued an appeal for blood donors. Red Cross needs people now more than ever. All types needed especially O negative. 800RED CROSS (1-800-733-

• Lower & Upper Limb Prosthetics • Free House Calls with Referral • Latest Brace Designs • Full Service Laboratory Support • Detailed Patient Instructions • BIONESS Foot Drop System • 24/7/365 On-call Availability

2767) or redcrossblood. org. Fri. Nov 4, “Turning Chaos into Confidence” with Gail Sheehy 8AM-

www.valleypo.com

2200 W. Hamilton St., Suite. 201, Allentown, PA 18104

Lifestyles over 50

Last Monday 6:30 pm Traditions of Hanover 5300 Northgate Dr. Bethlehem, 3rd Wed 1:00 pm Street Alliance 41 North Third St Easton, 1st Wed 9:30am Moravian Hall Square 175 W. North St. Nazareth.

3PM, LCCC, 4525 Education Park Drive, Schnecksville, free seminar, pre-registration requested, optional $7.50 boxed lunch, register: 610-794-5135 or www.lccc.edu/phoebe, deadline: 10/24. Thurs. Nov 3, 6PM “Phoebe Institute on Aging Benefit” Lehigh Country Club, 2139 S. Cedar Crest Bvd, 610-794-5135, hhaas@phoebe.org, www.phoebe. org Thurs. Oct 6, Senior Information Fair hosted by Sen. Browne, Country Meadows of Allentown Bldg. 3, 410 Krocks Rd. Allentown. Info: 610-821-8468. Truth for Women’s 3rd Annual Fall Fashion Show & Silent Auction Sat. Oct 15 Faith Church, 6528 Hamilton Boulevard, Allentown 10:30 AM to 1:30 PM. $20 per person pre-registered or $25 at. door, 610-767-9138 Fri, Oct 14, 40th Anniversary Gala Meals on Wheels of Northampton County to benefit Meal Assistance Fund) 6:30 PM Eastonian Ball Room Holiday Inn Express, Easton. $75 per person. Features: Southwestern specialties by local restaurants, dessert, coffee, silent auction, country rock music by DJ Freddy Fredericks, Jr. Attire: Country Western Casual

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October 2011

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Lifestyles over 50 October 2011