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Ubuntu


Copyright © 2008 The Scholar Ship All text and images contained in this work are the property of their respective contributors. Full permission has been granted to publish all text and images in this book. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without permission of both the publisher, contributing authors, and contributing photographers. All rights reserved. Project Manager: Erik Wong Editors-in-Chief: Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala, Sara Manne, Jaimee Mayfield Copy Editor: Ashley Deiser Photo Editors: Anika Gerdes, June Hiatt Layout: Ja’hnette Coleman, Ip Wai Yin, Vaughn Rogers, Elaine Tai Additional Fact-Checking: Amy Wielkoszewski Cover Artwork: Sara Manne Printed and manufactured in Hong Kong.

Contents Forward

7

Open Mic Night

50

Drag Idol

80

Message from the Editors

8

Hunger Banquet

51

Snapshots

81

This is The Scholar Ship

9

India

Cape Verde

82

Our Community

10

AFP: Bangalore Independent Travel: Mamallapuram

52 58 59

Snapshots

86

Hong Kong

20

Valentine’s Day

60

Spain

88

The Scholar Ship: Crazy, Foolish, Reckless

22

Academics

24

Global Scholars

26

China

28

Visiting Hangzhou Independent Travel: Beijing

To learn more about The Scholar Ship please visit www.TheScholarShip.com

Student Voice

36

Clubs & Organizations

37

61

Star Wars

62

Digital Art Showcase

96

Research Workshops

63

Omissions

98

Seychelles

64

The Ubuntu Team

99

Onboard Atheletics

68

We are The Scholar Ship

101

Crew Talent Show

69

Notes & Autographs

102

South Africa

70

Onboard Research

38

Cultural Shows

40

Service Project: Cape Town 73 Cape Point and Penguin Tour 74 Skydiving and Sandboarding in Cape Town 76

Thailand

42

Casino Night

78

A Wedding

79

Independent Travel: Chiang Mai Independent Travel: Cambodia 2

31 34

Neptune Day

AFP: Barcelona Independent Travel: Madrid

46 49

92 94

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ubuntu (noun) Zulu word describing “the belief in a universal bond of sharing that connects all humanity”. Dedicated to the entire TSS family, both at sea and shoreside. “A person with ubuntu is open and available to others, affirming of others, does not feel threatened that others are able and good, for he or she has a proper self-assurance that comes from knowing that he or she belongs in a greater whole and is diminished when others are humiliated or diminished, when others are tortured or oppressed.” — Desmond Tutu

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5


Forward Having been in the cruise business for over thirty years, I am very

pleased to be a part of The Scholar Ship, which is unique in many ways: • • •

It is a very ambitious and successful combination of learning, travel, and discovery. It enjoys a high diversity of cultures and nationalities. The age of its participants varies, but is essentially composed of young people, with a great potential to become tomorrow’s leaders. A distinguishing factor is the high level of energy and curiosity, a desire to try the new and a propensity to test the different boundaries. The participants represent a nice combination of students from affluent, as well as developing countries and emerging economies.

The January 2008 voyage in particular has demonstrated among its cohort a strong ability to manage time and stress and combine serious work and relaxing activities while training to smoothly cross various cultural boundaries. The cohesion among the students, staff, and crew has been exemplary of how a heterogeneous community can achieve harmony and live together in peace, mutual care, understanding, and respect while constantly teaching and learning from one another. I have no doubt that many members of the January 2008 voyage will go very far and contribute to their own well being as well as that of the world around them. Dionysios Koutsoukalis Master Captain Oceanic II 6

The Second Voyage of The Scholar Ship has been most amazing. Sail-

ing around the world, following a rigorous academic program at sea, doing field study at ports and experiencing other cultures with varying degrees of distance from one’s own, both onboard the ship and ashore, has been incredibly rich and challenging. In a combination of pleasure and hard work, The Scholar Ship’s Second Voyage has provided an education that transcends national boundaries, fostering abilities to appreciate and celebrate various kinds of differences while collectively and collaboratively tackling global issues. Throughout the voyage I have often seen new students, faculty and crew come together as a community celebrating their differences while sharing human values of understanding, solidarity, and the concern for the common good of men, women, and their environment—so important, yet so threatened today. With the global knowledge and the intercultural and interpersonal skills acquired and practiced during the voyage, the participants have a strong basis for them to exercise and develop global leadership if they choose to do so. In over three decades of teaching and management in higher education, this semester has undoubtedly been the richest, most original, and most challenging, yet most gratifying. Driss Ouaouicha Executive Officer The Scholar Ship—January 2008 Voyage

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Message from the Editors Welcome aboard The Scholar Ship! 150 students, 50 faculty and staff, an ocean-crossing vessel with an incredible crew, an amazing will and a vision of a unique floating university: these elements are what allowed the Scholar Ship January 2008 voyage to become reality! Since the beginning of January, we have been sailing international oceans in an intercultural living environment, learning from faculty from all corners of the world as well as participating in cultural shows, national holidays and other events with peers representing over 35 nationalities. In port we have been discovering cultures we never thought we would be exposed to. It’s almost easy to take this for granted now, but as the semester draws to a close, we will surely miss all of this more than we could have imagined. Having been fortunate enough to participate in this amazing experiential journey, we editors-in-chief also feel privileged to have been part of the creation of Ubuntu, our semester book. We feel this book is a true collage of what has filled our lives for the past four months, as well as a representation of the people with whom we have shared this extraordinary time. Working on collecting our experiences between two covers has been a great challenge, and we feel proud to have created a way to preserve our memories of something that was a life-changing experience for so many—The Scholar Ship January 2008 voyage!

This is The Scholar Ship A bold educational and cultural initiative, The Scholar Ship is a unique study abroad opportunity for global-minded university students to live in a multicultural learning environment onboard a ship traveling to ten countries over the course of sixteen weeks. Eleven ports of call, 109 days, 200 students and staff from 35 countries: we are the January 2008 voyage of The Scholar Ship. We embarked on the voyage in Hong Kong on 2 January, a palpable sense of possibility in the air. This possibility unfolded into reality as we docked in China, Thailand, India, Seychelles Islands, South Africa, Cape Verde Islands, Spain, Turkey, Portugal, and finally Amsterdam. We have crossed oceans, the Equator, and the Prime Meridian. More significantly, our crossing of these cartographical boundaries reflects a larger change within ourselves. A microcosm of our increasingly globalized world, The Scholar Ship community celebrates difference and diversity as we learn about other cultures and share our own, in turn building a family whose fabric transcends geography, politics, and linguistics. This once in a lifetime experience has fostered friendships, leadership skills, networks, and intercultural competencies that we will carry with us always. The Scholar Ship is a call to action. Now, as we emerge from an experience that has changed each of us undeniably, we begin the act. — Ashley Deiser

Sincerely yours,

Sara Manne

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Jaimee Mayfield

Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala

“It’s an amazing experience where you learn about yourself, other people, and build lasting friendships.” — Hajar Bousfiha

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Residential Communities

Our Community Students onboard The Scholar Ship live in residential communities (RCs), small living and learning communities composed of an internationally diverse group of students. An average of 20 students make connections across cultures through community meetings, cultural activities, games, and competitions across RCs. More than just neighbors, residential community members explore similarities and differences and strive to take their relationships to a deeper level. Our eight RCs are named “Star” in eight languages: Setareh, Nyota, Inkanyezi, Dao, Bier, Stern, Stella, and Star. Like ship navigation through the ages, together the eight communities form a constellation to guide our way through the oceans. A learning circle (LC) onboard The Scholar Ship consists of a group of students and staff who share an academic interest. In other words, learning circles work as departments in a traditional university. Throughout the voyage, they also provide the opportunity to link in-port learning to studies on the ship. From International Business to Global Cultures and Social Change, students explore each port through the lens of their LC by attending four compulsory in-port Academic Field Programs. Twice this semester we held Learning Circle Conferences in which each learning circle presented their insight and adventures to the greater community. Educational discovery as our goal and experiential learning our means, we travel the globe in search of the world’s answers to questions new and old. — Amanda Cook

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Dao

Bier

Back to front, left to right: Arvid John (Germany), James William Hudson III (USA), Emmanuel Bidi (Ghana), Yuliya Gosnell (Russian Federation), Amy Bond (USA), Maho Kohga (Japan), Adam Hatch (USA), L. Michelle Burgess (USA), Ana Lucia del Toro Martinez (Mexico), Liu Lu (China), IRC Dana Vukajlovich (USA), Janet Lam (Hong Kong), Suana Wang (USA), Judy Chan (Hong Kong), Aries Jordan (USA)

Back to front, left to right: Verena Breitbach (Germany), Jesse Dolan (USA), Emmanuel Chapman Kodam Takyi (Ghana), Holly Flickinger (USA), Nathalie Suchaud (France), Jaimee Mayfield (USA), Youssef Mufarrej (Morocco), Sarah Jacome Boyd (Panama), Jorge Lopez Strozzi (Mexico), Cody Swede (USA), G. Taylor Corbett (USA), Fredick Sammy Boateng (Ghana), Benjamin Hunt (USA), IRC Ann Li (China), Mao Chending (China), Camila Luzarraga (USA), Paola Lopez (Mexico), R. Genevere Santoyo Millan (Mexico), Nhia Vang (USA) Not pictured: Alison Conway (Australia), Jenna Patterson (USA), Leslie Walker (USA), Rodrigo FelixMontalvo (Mexico)

“It’s a unique learning style, a new concept of home, and a challenging intercultural living environment.” — Simyllina

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Residential Communities

Residential Communities

12

Setareh

Inkanyezi

Star

Stella

Back to front, left to right: Ana Paula Saad Calil (Brazil), Nicholas Kelley (USA), IRC Amanda Cook (USA), Maureen Cahoon (Canada), Carene Fong Fong Chew (Singapore), Katie Lillie (USA), Brooke Hanna (Canada), Taha El Hajji (Morocco), Nicole Blees (Canada), Maija Mustonen (Finland), Jenny Ly (Australia), Kasee Moore (USA), Yuan Xuhui “Apple” (China), David Noorvash (USA)

Back to front, left to right: Nazrul Mojumder (USA), Amelia Brown (USA), Vaughn Rogers (USA), IRC Christiaan Coetzee (UK), Sara Gabriela Moreno Jurado (Mexico), Isaac Owusu (Ghana), Mildred Martinez Herrera (Mexico), Vitala Ramos Aramburu (Mexico), Ashleigh Smith (USA), Lin Li (China), Joanna Swanson (USA), Wang Meng (China), Tanja Kyllikki Kivi (Finland), June Hiatt (USA), Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala (Finland), KC Coden (USA), James Dickins (Australia)

Back to front, left to right: Stephanie Nieves (USA), Heidi Lelle (USA), Denny Hollick (Canada), Francisco Javier Elizondo Barba (Mexico), Kiersten Steckel (USA), Brennan Kasper (Canada), Theresa Dahl (Denmark), Sara Manne (USA), Stefania Gudrunardottir (Iceland), Candice Malcolm (Canada), Clarence Jolley (USA), Dorothy Jolley (USA), Adrina Durham (USA), Erica Salisbury (Australia), IRC Melanie Hanvey (UK), Liliana Oseguera Vela (Mexico), Malak Behrouznami (USA), Lamiae Bouqentar (Morocco), Juliana Cândido Tonidandel (Brazil), Matthias Matzner (Germany), Pang Bo (China), Martin Danso (Ghana)

Back to front, left to right: Sarah Powell (USA), Zeng Xiukun (China), Jakob Thomas (USA), Lilian Kennedy (USA), Tara Spence (USA), Elena Petsos (USA), Robert Wetton (Australia/South Africa), IRC Marcela Velera Cato (Mexico), Carlos Martinez Gonzalez (Mexico), Alexander LeBaron (USA), Meagan Puzacke (USA), Emma Yatteau (USA), Sara England (USA), Ip Wai Yin (Singapore), Simyllina Chen (Hong Kong) Not pictured: Alejandro Garcia-Alvarez (Spain), Michael Soter (USA)

“It’s an amazing experience. I have seen people from hating each other’s nations to becoming close friends.” — Yuliya Gosnell

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Learning Circles

Residential Communities

14

Nyota

Stern

Back to front, left to right: Nathan Fender (USA), Carlos Cuevas Garcia (Mexico), Saegan Swanson (USA), Manuel Diaz Rivera (Mexico), David Pedroza Castro (Mexico), Angelo Alfano (USA), Pablo Sanchez Santaeufemia (Spain), Ryan Secrest (USA), Kandyce Gnidovec (USA), Mohamed El Harrak (Morocco), Eva Leung (USA), Susana Alejandra Ordaz Villarreal (Mexico), Tai Man Leng (Macao), IRC Nancy Tom (USA), Andrea Briggs (Canada), Briana Lee (USA), Kate Buker (USA), Sarah Jane Mews (Australia), Megan Carpenter (USA), Felicitas Steinhoff (Germany), Maria Cañadas (Spain), Lai Sze Man (Hong Kong), Ja’hnette L. Coleman (USA)

Back to front, left to right: Amra Makarevic (Bosnia and Herzegovina), S. Kathleen Ireton (Canada), Julio Alvarez (USA), Megan Coontz (USA), Vladimir Zhumakhanov (Kazakhstan), Dennis Yavor (USA), Daniel Noonan (USA), Luis Ballesteros (Mexico), Jennifer Jones (UK), Anika Gerdes (Germany), Vanessa Bartley (Bermuda/USA), Lynnette Lee (Singapore), Kellie Batt (Australia), Hajar Bousfiha (Morocco), Samantha March (Jamaica), Corina Mihaela Paraschiv (Canada), Luisiana De La Garza Vela (Mexico), Camila Ribeiro (Brazil), Brittany Hurst (USA), Liam Steven Shaw Eady (Canada), Matthew Needham (USA), IRC Greg Walker (USA)

International Business Undergraduate & Postgraduate

International Communications Undergraduate & Postgraduate

“Adventures, experiences and incredible relationships—that is The Scholar Ship. We learn through a very unique lens and all of the above make our journey unforgettable.” — Luis Ballesteros

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Learning Circles

Learning Circles

International Relations

Worlds of Art and Culture Undergraduate

Postgraduate

Conflict Studies Undergraduate

Global Cultures and Social Change Undergraduate

Sustainable Development 16

Undergraduate

“I believe that expanding one’s horizons is a necessary facet in life. TSS has provided a global community with this enriching opportunity!” — Nate Fender

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Faculty & Staff Back to front, left to right: Rudy Meiswinkel (South Africa), Derek Brendel (USA), Dana Vukajlovich (USA), Isis Youssef Badawi (USA), Derek Shaw (Canada), Kerstin Pilz (Australia), David King (UK), Ashley Grisso (USA), Tim McGettigan (USA), David McGaffey (USA), Christiaan Coetzee (UK), L. Michael Guillory (USA), Grete Pasch (Guatemala), Ralph Berenger (USA), Deniz Veli (Bulgaria), Lorna Mabunda (USA), Marcela Valera Cato (Mexico), Cherine Badawi (USA), Kim Newman (New Zealand), Karen Stupski (USA), Stacey Mole (Australia), Elizabeth McGaffey (USA), Amy Lai (Hong Kong), Nancy Schaeffer (USA), Amanda Cook (USA), Frank Zappala (Italy), Sarah Woodside (USA), Bonita Walker (USA), Nancy Tom (USA), Clarisse Molad (Israel), Claire Fries (USA), Ann Li (China), Ashley Deiser (USA), Greg Walker (USA), Riikka Salonen (Finland), Melanie Hanvey (UK), Christy Cunningham (USA), Lowry Wyman (USA), Vanessa Harris (USA), Amy Wielkoszewski (USA), Yas Djadali (USA), Thea Bellos (USA), Driss Ouaouicha (Morocco), Pat Masters (USA), Cecil Bodibe (South Africa), Ruby Fries (USA) Not pictured: Erik Wong (USA), Ron Babcock (USA), Cecilia Reyes (Nicaragua) 18

The Oceanic II Officers & Crew “The crew put the holla in The Scholar Ship.” — Bonita Walker

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Hong Kong Unapologetically vibrant, fast-paced and dynamic, Hong Kong nests in the heart of the South China Sea as a beacon of economic activity, architectural innovation, and multicultural character. While over a century of British rule could have given this once traditional Chinese harbour city a somewhat schizophrenic personality, instead this towering metropolis with a population of almost 7 million has seamlessly integrated its Eastern and Western heritages into a unique cultural identity that has made it such an attractive destination for visitors, and such an endeared home to its residents. It’s the perfect city to kick-off a four-month long journey around the world that promises many more incredible destinations, and equally incredible experiences. On a chilly morning in early January, the students of this semester’s voyage of The Scholar Ship arrived at Ocean Terminal, where the Oceanic II was docked regally against the city’s iconic skyline. Individually and in small groups they appeared, emerging from taxis, buses, and straight off the streets. Some had already met each other during a welcome dinner and day trip to nearby Macau, arranged by The Scholar Ship for those who wanted to kick-start their experience early; others were getting acquainted with their future classmates and neighbours for the first time. A flurry of a day that included check-ins, settling into cabins, orientation sessions, and a community-wide welcome ceremony concluded with everyone gathered on the top deck to watch as The Scholar Ship set sail out of Hong Kong Harbour, and into the open seas. — Erik Wong

Ryan Secrest 20

“A lousy day traveling around the world beats a great day at home.” — Dan Noonan

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The Scholar Ship: Crazy, Foolish, Reckless We made it! It was so hard to believe that we were finally here and doing what seemed the impossible. They told me when I left home that I was “crazy, foolish and reckless”, but I wasn’t going to let it deter me. I always felt that I had to separate myself from everyone else in some way or form. I felt as if we all left home for the same reason: we were looking for something to take us to new levels and hope for higher dreams. I learned quickly that what separated everyone on The Scholar Ship from everyone else was that we are all risk takers. While everyone was back at home getting ready for their next semester of a typical, average, put mein-a-box-type experience, I was getting on a plane to do what everyone else said was “crazy, foolish, and reckless.” Several other students and I had a chance to talk before we left for Hong Kong, so we met at the infamous “Lee’s Garden.” I couldn’t think of a better way to start our international intercultural experience. The electricity in the air was amazing. Everyone we met was either anxious, excited, nervous, freaking out, or a combination of everything. Seeing all the faces at the welcoming dinner was quite the experience as well. Looking around everyone was asking the same questions: “Who the heck are all these people, and how exactly am I supposed to remember your name?”

David Pedroza

It wasn’t long before we were boarding the ship, and anxieties were high. We walked right up to check-in, again to see several more faces with no names. I had to constantly remind myself that although I was alone, so was everyone else. After check-in we started the walk down the gangway. I knew at this point there was no turning back. Each and every one of us was about to embark on a journey which would forever separate us from those who told us we were “crazy, foolish, and reckless.” — Denny Hollick

Adrina Durham

Ryan Secrest

Photos by Erik Wong 22

“My experiences on The Scholar Ship have taught me to love who I am and appreciate others for who they are. An invaluable lesson which I will carry through life.” — Kellie Batt

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Academics

Onboard Learning Resources Commonly known as the library for students and staff, the Learning Resource Center (LRC) houses the Scholar Ship’s collection of books, magazines, newspapers, and language resources. There are two computers for students to use for research; a third computer is solely for the purpose of using Rosetta Stone language CDs to improve language skills. The librarians as well as the student staff are always ready and willing to lend a hand to assist students in finding books and research materials for their term papers. Led by highly skilled staff, the Academic Support Center (ASC) is another tool available to students for ESL support as well as advice on how to improve papers and presentations.

Photos by Erik Wong

Academic life is the central component of The Scholar Ship experience. While traveling the seas, students continually work on individual assignments and presentations as well as group projects. The students are well equipped with the resources located onboard in the Learning Resource Center and Academic Support Center, and of course in port through Academic Field Programs. What makes The Scholar Ship learning environment unique is that students are constantly learning from international peers, professors, Global Scholars, and from our own experiences on land and at sea. As a student, my learning experience has been a true eye-opener. I have gained incredible friendships, life skills and a tremendous amount of global expertise. Compared to traditional study on land, I wouldn’t trade my academic experience at sea for the world. — Jaimee Mayfield 24

Photos by Erik Wong

— Adrina Durham

“I have never lived in a community where I feel I can go and talk to anyone, and everyone will respond, even though we didn’t speak the same language.” — Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala

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Global Scholars Through the Global Scholars program, The Scholar Ship Research Institute brings esteemed leaders from different backgrounds such as business, academia, government, science and international organizations to give seminars, lectures and mentoring to The Scholar Ship students. The goal of the Global Scholars program is to facilitate interaction between individuals who have demonstrated leadership in the international community and students, thereby contributing to the development of competencies and skills required of the future leaders of a global community. The Global Scholars participate in classes and Academic Field Programs, sharing their experience and perspectives regarding global issues, enriching discussion and promoting broader understanding about key elements in the international community. — Ana Paula Calil

Dr. Andrea Baker Research Fellow Marine Biological Association, Plymouth, UK

Dr. Yvonne Linton Coordinator, Mosquito Barcoding Initiative Natural History Museum, UK

Father Mathew Chandrankunnel Director of the Centre for the Studies of World Religions Dharmaram College, India

His Excellency Jan Axel Nordlander Swedish Ambassador for Human Rights

María del Carmen Aceña de Fuentes Former Minister of Education Guatemala

Dr. Ekaterina Stepanova Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Dr. Eduardo Gutierrez Senior Advisor to the UN Secretariat and UNDP

Prof. Alan Whiteside Director of the Health Economics and AIDS Research Division University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Branford Johnson Education Editor at the Bangkok Post

Dr. Kate Larkin Postdoctoral Researcher UK National Oceanography Centre

Dr. Raman Letchumanan ASEAN Secretariat

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“Life is a book. Those that don’t travel never make it past the first page; I now have a lifetime of stories.” — June Hiatt

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China After spending five days at sea adjusting to our new learning and living environment, the community looked forward to the voyage’s first port of call in Shanghai, China. Unfortunately a powerful, opaque fog at the mouth of the river leading to Shanghai prevented Oceanic II, along with hundreds of other ships and airplanes, from proceeding into Shanghai. We debarked in Shanghai two days behind schedule, committed to bracing ourselves against the brutal cold and cramming as much of China as possible into five days, two of which were designated Academic Field Program days. The sleet and snow served as a wet backdrop as students experienced the new smells, tastes, sounds, textures and sights that China has to offer. Some students ventured to the Great Wall in Beijing. Others explored urban Shanghai and its many cultural and historical landmarks, all the while adjusting to traffic of an intensity that few of us were used to. For Westerners visiting China for the first time, the cultural differences were striking. The language barrier in China was nearly insurmountable, and not having so much as a common alphabet character proved to be an amazing study in intercultural communication. East met West quite literally in China, as the Fudan University students also joined the The Scholar Ship at this point. — Ashley Deiser

Erik Wong 28

“I really enjoy the intercultural discourses which further my understanding of different cultures and will facilitate me for my future intended career..” — Matthias Matzner

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Visiting Hangzhou Visiting Hangzhou was an unforgettable experience. Michael, James, Babsi and I had decided to visit the city due to its reputation as “Heaven on Earth”—a place for relaxation and tranquility away from busy Shanghai. The day, however, turned out to be full of action and unexpected events. The train trip was comfortable and the scenery was absolutely breathtaking. After traveling for a few hours, we thought we heard the conductor call our stop, so we hustled off the train ready to see the legendary beauty of Hangzhou. This was cut short after we realized that trains arriving in Hangzhou also stop at an outpost station in the middle of nowhere in “Hangzhou Dong.” At the wrong station at the outskirts of the city, we felt like we experienced a part of real China, complete with live chicken fights and the locals staring at us foreigners. Finally we managed to take a taxicab to the center of the city, where we saw lakes and scenery that were absolutely beautiful. Even in the rain you could see where the city had gotten its nickname. We ate dinner, listened to a live band and watched it snow from a jazz bar until it was time to leave. It ended up snowing so much that trains stopped running and we had to take a taxi all the way back to Shanghai nearly three hours away! Even though our trip to Hangzhou had a few bumps in the road, it was a beautiful and rewarding place to visit.

Liliana Oseguera

— KC Coden

Nicole Blees Ryan Secrest 30

Thea Bellos

Nancy Tom

“Our experience today is a step to discover our potential for tomorrow’s task.” — Fredick Sammy Boateng

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June Hiatt

Rob Wetton 32

Erik Wong

Ryan Secrest

Kasee Moore

Vaughn Rogers

Janet Lam

Ryan Secrest

“You can’t discover who you are by staying where you’ve always been.” — Jaimee Mayfield

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Independent Travel: Beijing My visit to Beijing was amazing. We took the 8pm train from Shanghai. We were to spend the night on the train, and I was a bit skeptical about sleeping on a Chinese train. Surprisingly, it was the best train ride I have ever taken. We arrived early in the morning and it was freezing. In fact, it was cold the whole day and I did not feel my feet until we took the train back to Shanghai. Our group consisted of seven people in the middle of a totally different culture with many linguistic barriers. Lucky for us, we met a guy at the train station who offered to take us to the Great Wall for a reasonable amount of money in his friend’s minibus. I would describe it as our amazing race to one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It was breathtaking when I saw the Great Wall for the first time. I could see the greatness of mankind in a wall that can be spotted from the moon. I also felt lucky and grateful to be there. — Mohamed El Harrak Leslie Walker

David Pedroza 34

Erik Wong

Erik Wong

Ryan Secrest

Erik Wong

William Hudson

“I now possess a true understanding of diversity.” — Ja’hnette L. Coleman

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Student Voice

Clubs & Organizations

Erik Wong

Student Voice is a forum created and led by The Scholar Ship students for the duration of each voyage. Each residential community and learning circle elects student representatives, for a total of about 20, to work as facilitators in bringing up issues and concerns from students or staff that they feel need to be addressed inside the community. The objective of Student Voice is then to find the most viable solutions and maintain a harmonious working and living environment onboard the ship. Two mediators and various staff members also support Student Voice in reaching the best possible solutions for the community. Student Voice is divided into various committees that take charge of the different issues discussed in the meetings: Onboard Life, Academics & Academic Field Programs, Information Technology, Food & Beverage, Postgraduates, Solidarity Fund, Shore Excursions, etc. Each committee is responsible for the issues in relation to its specific area and must report the outcome or solution to issues presented in the following meeting. Meetings are usually held once per leg for a period of one hour and are coordinated via the use of minutes made available for the whole Scholar Ship community. — Susana Alejandra Ordaz Villarreal 36

Photos by Erik Wong

In a community whose members originate from all over the world and from all walks of life, everyone has something to offer. The students and staff of The Scholar Ship wasted little time after commencement of the voyage to take advantage of their fellow shipmates’ areas of expertise and form onboard clubs and organizations catering to a variety of interests. From language classes (Spanish, Arabic and Chinese, to name a few) to dance lessons to self-defense workshops, one can find a wide range of extracurricular activities to participate in any given day at sea. “The surprising, moving and inspiring memories from classes, friends and ports are worth being kept forever.” — Zeng Xiukun

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Onboard Research

Mosquito Barcoding Initiative The Scholar Ship Research Institute sponsors and hosts the Mosquito Barcoding Initiative onboard. The aim of this program is to barcode 80 percent of all known species of mosquito within two years. The Scholar Ship is helping to achieve this goal by providing a moving platform to collect voucher specimens from around the world and a high-tech molecular laboratory onboard for species identification.

Universities around the world build their reputations on an academic program of high quality and academic integrity coupled with cutting edge research, and in this respect The Scholar Ship is no different. The Scholar Ship Research Insitute offers students the opportunity for hands-on environmental science education. Oceanography and Atmospheric Science

Mosquitoes transmit human diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis, and due to climate change the distribution of these diseases is rapidly changing. Malaria alone kills more than 3 million people per year, and mosquito-borne disease seriously impacts socio-economic development of tropical countries worldwide. The Mosquito Barcoding Initiative is a response to a global need for a rapid and accurate mosquito identification system for the effective management of some of the world’s most important diseases.

The Scholar Ship Research Institute has established an oceanography and atmospheric science program onboard in collaboration with scientists from around the globe. The onboard research activities take advantage of the unique opportunity to gather scientific data across the oceans and seas in which it travels, some of which have never before been sampled or are under-sampled due to the high expense associated with chartering dedicated research vessels.

— Melanie Hanvey

Anika Gerdes

The research is focused on understanding the functioning of the earth’s ocean-atmosphere systems to tackle global issues such as climate change and human impact on the environment and its application to sustainable development through scientifically informed environmental policies and management strategies. One of the research highlights of the voyage was the deployment of a series of XBTs (expendable bathythermographs) in the southwest Indian Ocean to construct a temperature profile across the Agulhas Current. — Melanie Hanvey Dana Vukajlovich Dana Vukajlovich 38

Dana Vukajlovich

Dana Vukajlovich

Nicole Blees

“Being on this ship has been the most amazing experience of my life. To wake up and see the sunrise over the water, then have a class with such intelligent and different people has been completely satisfying and fun.” — Vita Ramos

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Cultural Shows

Erik Wong

Anika Gerdes

Matthias Matzner

Thea Bellos

Liu Lu

Thea Bellos

Soon after boarding The Scholar Ship, we recognized that we needed to take advantage of the potential and variety of talents and cultures onboard. We wanted to create something that would bring the community together in celebration of our cultural differences. More specifically, we wanted a forum in which people from different cultures could collaborate to represent a specific regional culture through music, drama, art, dance and other creative performances. After much brainstorming and many late nights, we gave shape to the concept of a TSS Cultural Show, eventually putting on a series of shows that showcased culture from Asia & Australia, Middle East & Africa, U.S. & Canada, Latin & Caribbean America, and Europe. By working toward a common goal with students and staff from other cultures, the participants experienced and learned about cross-cultural working styles as well as different traditions and values. Despite the limited resources that come with living onboard a ship, we managed to create a successful series at the end. The audience’s excitement and the nerves of participants before the shows made it all worth it. — Pablo Sánchez Santaeufemia 40

“This amazing ship makes me feel the world in such a romantic way—float on the sea and float on my dream.” — Wang Meng

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Thailand Thailand used to be a vague concept on the map for most of us, only known as a sunny tourist destination to others. Then we got off the ship and took it all in—bright pink cabs zooming by, the night market alight and noisy in the evening, red in the setting sun, the kids timidly feeding the elephants across the street. We explored much of the country, discovering the historical buildings and temples mixed with spontaneous vegetation in Chiang Mai, the scores of surrounding fish while island-hopping at Phi Phi, the old temples at Ayutthaya. From the north to the southernmost tip, Thailand offered much in the way of history, culture, and new experiences. But most of all, we’ll remember the kindness of people we met—people full of curiosity and altruism toward strangers. A young man told me on the bus ride back to The Scholar Ship: “When I look at your pictures, I understand how you see the world.  When I was small, my mother always told me I must try to understand how another thinks.  Because the other is just like me, he has a mind like me.  So I always make the effort to find out.” These words summing up the friendliness, understanding, and wisdom of all the Thai people we met, Thailand shall remain in our minds for a long time as ever-welcoming—the land of smiles and generosity. — Corina Paraschiv

Rob Wetton 42

“It’s an experience of a lifetime to explore the world, people, cultures and myself.” — Eva Leung

43


Liam Eady

Matthias Matzner

Youssef Mufarrej

Bonita Walker Nathalie Suchaud 44

June Hiatt

Sarah Jacome

“Trust in your instincts because they are never wrong.” — Nhia Vang

45


Independent Travel: Chiang Mai

Carlos Martinez

June Hiatt

Vanessa Bartley

Juliana Cândido Tonidandel

Bordered by Myanmar (Burma), Laos, and China, the Chiang Mai province in Thailand is a culturally diverse region. In Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, and semi-remote villages where the Karen Hilltribe resides (women traditionally wear gold rings around their necks), visitors see the array of different cultures through traditional dress and lifestyles. Trekking through mountain ranges on elephants to see hilltribes and chat about the lack of resources and the struggle to exist in an increasingly political, globalized world was a rich experience. I felt privileged to visit these villages as well as glorious temples and places of worship like Tham Chiang Dao caves, which contain a plethora of ancient Buddhas prominent in Thai history. The night bazaars in Chiang Mai are the best, from the delicious food, to the shopping for traditional handcrafts and products of the area, to the musicians playing in the streets.  Tourism in recent years has been a great source of income to these ethnic-minority tribes not recognized by the Thai state. — Heidi Lelle 46

Kate Buker

“Joining The Scholar Ship is absolutely the best decision I’ve made. I wouldn’t trade it for the world.” — Brooke Hanna

Rodrigo FelixMontalvo 47


Independent Travel: Cambodia If the temples of Angkor aren’t already on your life’s to-do list, I suggest adding them right now. A few students and I noticed how close the world famous historical site of Angkor Wat was to our port and could not miss the opportunity to grab our backpacks and take the bus from Bangkok to Cambodia. Sprouting out of the jungle at Angkor are dozens of temples which would easily take days to see in their entirety. Angkor Wat, the most famous of the temples, houses hallway after hallway of intricately carved stone walls depicting Hindu legends. The temples truly amazed us with their size and majesty. Jaimee Mayfield

Kandyce Gnidovec Brooke Hanna

Maureen Cahoon

After visiting Angkor in the north, we rode a bus down the bumpy rural roads to the capital city of Phnom Penh. We visited the Tuol Sleng Genocide Museum there—a stark contrast to the beauty of Angkor. Converted into a prison and torture camp in the 1970s by the Khmer Rouge, the former high school was truly haunting. Only seven of 17,000 prisoners of Tuol Sleng survived the terror, and walking the halls and seeing the conditions within the prison is an experience that will stay with me forever. Cambodia, Thailand’s small eastern neighbor, is a country on the mend. Visitors can still feel the darkness of its history, but today the overwhelming feeling in Cambodia is one of hope, and smiles are the most commonly exchanged currency.

Maria Cañadas 48

Suana Wang

Brooke Hanna

Brooke Hanna

“Sometimes you have to step out on faith and let the universe provide for you.” — Aries Jordan

— Brooke Hanna 49


Open Mic Night

Hunger Banquet

Erik Wong

Photos by Erik Wong 50

On the 2nd of February students and staff of The Scholar Ship joined together to participate in an Oxfam Hunger Banquet. This event was organized by the Social Justice Club, a student group working toward bringing social awareness to The Scholar Ship community and educating students about ways to make change in our world. The purpose of this event was to allow students to experience inequality imposed in society, simulated by assigning meals and seating based on a randomly given economic status which fell into one of three categories: upper class, middle class, and lower class. Based on their “status,” students were given either a complete three-course meal, rice and beans, or rice. Students from the upper class brought their meals to students in the classes below them. Soon after dinner the economic lines that were created began breaking and the students moved around mixing the classes and removing dividing lines. The goal was that students, regardless of economic status, race, or location, would leave this event with a greater understanding of global poverty. The evening, as well as the conversation it stimulated, was one that came with power and honesty and was truly eye-opening for all that participated. — June Hiatt ““Life on this ship is what everybody in this world needs to experience.” — Danso Martin

51


India India is intense. How do you share an imprint that is so distinct it’s blurred?  It’s straining to relive what it feels like to breathe in the thick dust that surrounds the city of Chennai, or the depth of gratitude you feel when you actually make it to your destination (and not a “friend’s shop”) intact after the insanity of riding in a rickshaw with the bright saris, dark shacks, unidentifiable smells, harmonizing engines and music passing in the fumes. From simply shopping to attempting to find a decent internet café to hoping what you ate or experienced won’t make you sick later, Chennai is a port one will not soon forget. Each city elicits its own level of shock, amazement, frustration and a range of other emotions you can’t believe can be encountered in a day’s time. Agra offers unmatched awe coupled with unmatched distress. The Taj Mahal was the culmination of many dreams as the dawn approached on this worldwide monument of love. But where was the love for the little girl from Agra that haunts my dreams? She is a walking cloud of dirt between cars on a busy road, the white of her eyes emphasized by the poverty that looms beneath them. Her hair is like mine, except not combed for days, maybe never, and filled with dirt; her brother could be my brother. She taps my car window with an extended hand. I don’t have enough to fill it. The issues are multiplying as dusk sets in and solutions seem to fade into the night. To wake up in the holy city of Varanasi is to recognize the power of devotion. The air transforms to ashes of loved ones that surround the city as people swim in the Ganga River, perform rituals of bathing and worship and continue to dance around the shore to the chiming bells up the labyrinth-like pathways beside cows and below monkeys, swirling around barefoot as they celebrate life and death. It all seems so far from reality now… no matter the experience, one thing is certain: India is intense. — Amelia Brown 52

Kate Buker

“What this whole voyage has repeatedly shown me is that the more I learn the less I appear to know.” — Nicole Blees

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Nhia Vang

Juliana Candido Tonidandel 54

Samantha March

Janet Lam

Kate Buker

Ryan Secrest

Ana Calil

Frank Zappala

“The Scholar Ship: where the diverse richness of different cultures is celebrated.” — Youssef Mufarrej

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George Taylor Corbett Rodrigo FelixMontalvo

Rodrigo FelmontMontalvo Rodrigo FelixMontalvo 56

Grete Pasch

Adrina Durham

“In four months, life on this ship gave me access to the entire world—ports, porpoises, foods and friendships.” — Nancy Tom

57


AFP: Bangalore

Independent Travel: Mamallapuram

As we International Business students prepare to board an overnight sleeper train to Bangalore, I wonder what The Scholar Ship has thrown me into. The condition of the train depot is unlike anything I have seen before. I’m on sensory overload as the intense smells of people, spices and decay fill the depot. The massive amount of people coming and going in every direction adds to my anxiety. As I settle in my compartment for the six-hour trek, I know this is going to be a trip to remember.

In Mamallapuram, a town about 60 kilometers south of Chennai, my friend Nicole and I visited an orphanage. This visit was simultaneously the happiest and saddest thing I did in India. We were met by the woman in charge of the Mariamma Children’s Home. She welcomed us and invited us upstairs to interact with the children. She showed us the storage room and six huge bags of rice she had bought with the money the last visitors had given her. We were showed the children’s records as well as their bedrooms and one of the little rooms they used for cooking, since they did not have a kitchen.

Once we reached Bangalore, the city known as the information technology hub of India, we were bused to different technology parks, learning how IT and customer service were merged to create new areas of focus for outsourcing. As night falls, we began the train ride back to Chennai, exhausted from the day’s activities. Though our Academic Field Program in India was focused on IT and outsourcing, the experiential learning came from taking a sleeper train and witnessing the everyday lives of Indian people in the train depots. The unforgettable sights and smells there changed me as a person. Who knew an AFP could have such an impact?

Thea Bellos Yuliya Gosnell Logacheva

— Matthew Needham

I had brought colored pencils, photographs from Finland, and a deck of cards. The staff of the Children’s Home were very pleased as we gave these to the children, as they could have never spent money to buy something like that for them. Our day spent drawing, talking and playing card games with the kids was one of the nicest of the voyage. It was amazing to see how much joy we could bring to somebody else’s life by such a small effort. — Tanja Kivi

An ancient tribute to the gods, the old adages carved into the living stone in Mamallapuram bears an abundance of stories for all to see. Outside of the city in an open-air, grassy area lies ancient artwork depicting storylines that are still remembered today. The exposed carvings have been softened and jaded by wind, sand, and time, but the faces of the gods that never age show their strengths and skill. There is Krishna, an aspect or avatar of Vishnu, the god of creation, who lifts a mountain to shadow his people from a terrible storm. Cows, men, women, and children are huddled beneath the mountain, putting their faith in their god to not lose his power, but keep them safe. Each of us who visited this place felt awestruck by the sheer time and effort it took to carve out these life-sized replicas of ancient Indian peoples and divine beings. Elephants, naga-deities, and gaunt holy figures tell the other stories of the Bhagavad Gita, the holy scriptures of Hinduism. — Vaughn Rogers

Thea Bellos 58

Matthias Matzner

Vaughn Rogers

“If life was a waterfall this trip would be my rainbow. Falling droplets of water, we were united with light to illuminate the world.”— Dennis Yavor

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Valentine’s Day

Neptune Day

Erik Wong

Thea Bellos

In honor of the “Holiday of Love,” the Social Events Committee hosted several events for the TSS community. “Candygrams,” sold for a dollar each, helped raise money for various charities and provided a fun way for the community to deliver Valentine’s messages to each other. As a surprise, the ship’s pastry chef prepared a special array of dozens of Valentine’s Day desserts at dinner that night. Later in the evening, the Student Centre was given an elegant makeover with champagne, red lights, balloons, and paper hearts. Dressed fabulously in semi-formal attire, dancing into the wee hours, all agreed that the Valentine’s Day party was a nice way for the community to share this special occasion together. — Kasee Moore Thea Bellos 60

Photos by Erik Wong

“If being forced to make out with a dead fish was the price to spend my birthday on a cruise ship crossing the equator, sign me up for next year, please.” — David Pedroza

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Research Workshops

Star Wars

28-29 FEB 2008 THE SCHOLAR SHIP CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

Keynote Address: REFLECTIONS ON TWENTY YEARS OF HIV/AIDS & LESSONS FOR THE FUTURE

Panel 1: ACCESS TO ANTIRETROVIRALS & TREATMENT

Panel 2: STIGMATISATION, SOCIAL MARGINALISATION & GENDER

Panel 4: PRIVATE ACTION & PUBLIC LEADERSHIP: COMPARATIVE VIEWS

Panel 3: ASSESSING SOCIAL & ECONOMIC EFFECTS

Panel 5: FUTURE STEPS: HIV/AIDS IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT

VISIT THE TSSRI PAGE ON MOODLE FOR MORE DETAILS. GET INVOLVED: CONTACT DANA VUKAJLOVICH OR MELANIE HANVEY

THE SCHOLAR SHIP RESEARCH INSTITUTE PRESENTS:

CONFRONTING THE HIV/AIDS EPIDEMIC: POLICY RESPONSES IN SOUTH AFRICA & INDIA A RESEARCH WORKSHOP

Janet Lam

Kate Buker All Students & Faculty are welcome to attend.

The Scholar Ship Research Institute organises and hosts onboard international social science workshops and natural science capacity building workshops.

Photos by Erik Wong

Social science workshops are integrated into the academic field programs, providing students with the opportunity to engage with some of the leading professionals in the field and focus on a current issue relating to the region that the Scholar Ship is currently visiting. This voyage the Scholar Ship hosted two successful workshops: in Bangkok, “ASEAN Disaster Management: Enhancing Multilateral Approaches across the Emergency Response Spectrum” and in Cape Town, “Confronting the HIV/ AIDS Epidemic: Policy Responses in South Africa and India.” Capacity building workshops provide the opportunity for young scientists from developing countries to receive training in the IT skills and tools which are becoming increasingly necessary for successful development and communication of scientific research. The Scholar Ship hosted its first capacity building workshop in Cape Town, “Information Technology Applications.” Erik Wong 62

Janet Lam

— Melanie Hanvey “Experiences in this voyage have marked another golden and memorable page in my life; sweet and bitter, joys and tears.” — Man Leng Tai

63


Seychelles At the beach, I talked with a local who said he had moved to the United States and lived there for over ten years. I asked him why he came back and he said, “It was time to come back to paradise.” An archipelago nation of 158 islands in the Indian Ocean, the Seychelles is the definition of an island paradise. I felt like I was living in a computer screensaver. Driving down the road, there was lush green jungle on the right and picture perfect beaches on the left, with sharp mountain cliffs jutting up in the distance. It was like looking at a living postcard. We spent our days snorkeling with rainbow fish, kayaking through turquoise waves, playing in waterfalls, hiking through mountain jungles, and sunbathing with good books. The night was spent in the tiny capital of Port Victoria, where we ate fresh seafood and a surprising amount of pizza. It was an exhaustingly beautiful two days, and with limitless opportunities for enjoyment, we all came back more tired than when we left. It’s impossible to be on this voyage and not be tired. There’s just too much to look at and too much to experience. If life is on a dial, then we are on maximum. Sleep can wait. — Ron Babcock

Anika Gerdes 64

“Beauty can last as long as stone statues against the test of time; memories, however, of that beauty, we keep with us forever.” — Vaughn Rogers

65


Pang Bo

Meng Wang 66

Yas Djadali

Alice Lai

Jaimee Mayfield

Ryan Secrest

Matthias Matzner

Samantha March

“WOW, how lucky am I, getting paid to travel the world doing a job I love with a fantastic bunch of people—it doesn’t get much better than this!” — Kim Newman

67


Onboard Athletics

68

Crew Talent Show

Kate Buker

Sarah Jane Mews

Nancy Tom

Adrina Durham

Photos by Thea Bellos

“Holy smokes… I live on a boat!” — Sarah Jacome

69


South Africa South Africa is a truly beautiful country. People are very friendly, from the township residents to those we met at the University of Cape Town. Like many of the countries we have visited in the past two months, South Africa is full of dualities. The feeling of safety one feels while wandering in the port or downtown, and the feeling of danger as soon as one leaves the tourist-oriented places. The quiet of the gardens, and the busyness of the port throughout the day and night. The abundance of shops and markets in one part of Cape Town, and the lack of books and chalk in the township school. Finding ourselves in the midst of all these contradictions unveiled a great inspiration: there is hope. For all the smiling children in the local school we helped paint on our day-long service project, there is hope. For the beautiful landscape and natural resources we witnessed while hiking Table Mountain, swimming with sharks and on safari, there is hope. There is hope for the children, women and men infected with HIV, as we’ve seen in company visits on Academic Field Programs and the conferences held on The Scholar Ship while docked here. South Africa is a vibrant country, alive and flourishing, full of hope just 14 years since the end of apartheid. — Corina Paraschiv

Vita Ramos 70

“Be careful and thoughtful among your peers because the desire to one is the undesired to another.” — Naz Mojumder

71


Service Project: Cape Town

Bonita Walker

Aries Jordan Ron Babcock

Corina Paraschiv

Halfway through The Scholar Ship’s week-long stay in Cape Town, about 45 TSS community members participated in a service opportunity sponsored by the Rotaract chapter of Wynberg. The group visited Entshona Primary School in Philippi, which caters to roughly 900 children. The school was formed without the support of government structures and funding, though recently the school was registered with the Department of Education. Regrettably funding and resources to the school remain substantially low, resulting in a negative learning environment and low morale. The TSS-Rotaract team spent the day interacting with the children, painting the walls in fun colors, replacing broken windows, and hanging curtains in an effort to brighten Entshona’s learning environment. — Ashley Deiser Kasee Moore 72

Ryan Secrest

Juliana Candido Tonidandel

“It is a journey of self- and human discovery—be open to whatever comes your way.” — Lamiae Bouqentar

Corina Paraschiv 73


Cape Point and Penguin Tour All I could see at Cape Point were different shades of blue. For a moment, I was lost—never had I witnessed the beauty of so many blues. The sky was a dazzling blue. Offset by the ocean mist, the mountains were the only thing that separated the blues of the sky and sea. The sea radiated energy as the waves continually splashed against the rocks. It was relaxing to stand at Cape Point and close my eyes, letting the gentle sea breeze caress my hair, listening to the waves crashing and breathing in the fresh ocean air. A visit to Cape Town would not be complete without visiting the gentlemen comedians of Cape Point: hundreds of little penguins in their adorable black and white tuxedos. Despite the fact that humans are about ten times their own size, the penguins mistook Alice, who was wearing black and white sneakers and a black t-shirt, as one of their own! They chased after her and nudged her with their beaks. Their antics certainly made the day complete. — Janet Lam Bonita Walker

Yas Djadali 74

Kasee Moore

Ryan Secrest

Matthias Matzner

Juliana Cândido Tonidandel

Janet Lam

“Just get lost… and enjoy the adventure.” — Thea Bellos

75


Skydiving and Sandboarding in Cape Town The moment I sent the email saying “Count me in!”, I knew that I was headed for an extreme experience and there was no turning back. Along with about thirty other The Scholar Ship students, I had signed up to skydive in South Africa. We spent the afternoon sand-boarding before doing our tandem skydive above Cape Town. To my surprise, I found out that my sand-boarding was better than my snowboarding ever was, and carrying our boards up and down the dunes turned out to be quite a fun workout. After lunch we drove through the beautiful Winelands to the skydiving spot. We boarded possibly the smallest aircraft I have ever seen in groups of two and three. On our way up my jumping partner and I couldn’t speak a word as we tried to comprehend soon jumping from a height of 10,000 feet. When the time came, our instructors took two minutes to explain how the jump was to be done as they attached themselves to our backs. The door opened on my left, the wind hitting my face as I saw the ground far below us. At this moment I would have done anything to cancel the whole thing, but in seconds we were on the edge of the opening—and falling! I screamed like I never knew I could. I had never felt such a sense of fear and an adrenaline rush at the same time. For minutes afterward I couldn’t speak or walk, only smile because I was recovering from the most intense experience of my life. — Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala

Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala

76

Ron Babcock

Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala

James Dickins

Ryan Secrest

William Hudson

Ron Babcock

“You never know in what far corners of the world you will find your true family. ” — Sarah Jane Mews

77


Casino Night

A Wedding

One of The Scholar Ship’s most integrated intercultural projects yet, Gianni Cocco and Kerstin Pilz’s wedding incorporated students, staff, faculty and crew. The ceremony began at 1700 as the wedding party walked down the back stairs of Riviera deck to Aloha aft to music played by a multicultural band of students and staff. Emceed by Kim Newman, the ceremony included our Greek Captain performing a traditional Christian service and Gianni and Kerstin exchanging their own vows. Pat Masters, our academic dean, then led us in a Buddhist ribbon-tying activity that symbolized our being tied together as a community to witness the couple’s life and love. Next the Moroccan students led us in a traditional wedding dance.

Matthias Matzner Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala

Erik Wong

Erik Wong

After the ceremony we had dinner outside on Lido deck before heading aft to cut the cake and toast the happy couple. At dark we watched several student dance numbers before concluding the evening with dance parties for students, faculty-staff, and crew.

Casino Night: Blackjack, Texas Hold’Em, palm-reading and much more. By the end of the night, most everyone was a winner. All of the evening’s proceeds went to the Solidarity Fund, a fund to support students on the ship who need some extra help with expenses. The whole community came out and participated in games and a ship-wide auction. A highlight was the pie in IRCs’ faces, and no one will forget when a student got a pie in the face from the academic dean. All agreed that Casino Night was a blast, and The Solidarity Fund raised $1,400 in the process!

— Ashley Grisso

— Bonita Walker

Erik Wong

Nancy Tom

Erik Wong

Erik Wong 78

“It does not matter how short your are, you can still see the skies; just look up.” — Isaac Owusu

79


Drag Idol

Kasee Moore

Matthias Matzner

Jaimee Mayfield 80

Jenny Ly

Jaimee Mayfield

Matthias Matzner

Jenny Ly 81


Cape Verde With limited time and a will to see everything the island had to offer, The Scholar Ship hit the shores of São Vicente knowing each second was precious relaxation time. The early morning streets were clear of pedestrians, the signs in Portuguese, and the colors of plants, buildings and posters vibrant beyond expectation. The plentiful alleys were often paved with cobblestone, giving an air of old European walkways with an island flare. The beaches were full of people by the afternoon, children playing in the sand with stray dogs while young men did flips off a sand hill with the aid of a discarded tire. A group of drummers stood in the shade of a tree and played with an intuitive, excited fervor. Drums ranging from small to huge barrel-sizes larger than even their musicians were banged with an old, deep-seated rhythm that only the instrumentalists seemed to understand. The sound carried so far. We took the sights in slowly as we soaked in the long-awaited respite after nine days at sea. Textbooks and papers were replaced with swimming and lounging despite the fact that finals were about to be in full swing. On this dry island off the coast of Western Africa, The Scholar Ship found its cure to cabin fever. — Vaughn Rogers

Samantha March 82

“Speak your story, say what’s true, and honour yourself and others.” — Amanda Cook

83


Nicole Blees

Jaimee Mayfield

Suana Wang

Juliana Cândido Tonidandel

Vanessa Bartley

Ron Babcock 84

Ana Paula Calil

“The Scholar Ship wasn’t about what I saw with my eyes, but rather who I experienced with my heart.” — Kandyce Gnidovec

85


86

87


Spain As we crossed through the Strait of Gibraltar into the Mediterranean Sea, we caught our first glimpse of Spain. With Spain lit up to the north and Morocco lit up to the south, we could only guess at what adventures were to come in beautiful Barcelona. Two days after our first sighting, we pulled into Port Vell, near the heart of the city, ready for the colors of spring but not the cold air. We stepped off the ship on Good Friday, and although the city was on holiday it was very much alive and ready to accept a new group of students. Las Ramblas was filled with the most amazing sights, sounds and smells. From street performers dressed as trees to flower shops coloring the sidewalk and the sound of Catalan filling the streets as the smell of the waffle and crêpes stands filled the air, we could think of no better way to be welcomed to this city. The alleys of the Gothic Quarter were filled with a beautiful sense of mystery, never knowing what was around the bend. Many ventured outside of Barcelona to visit nearby beach towns and cities. Several students took the cable car up to Montserrat to catch a glimpse of the mountains and have some much needed peace in the beautiful monastery. Many students were fortunate enough to be visited by loved ones during the week. Knowing that we will shortly be returning to Europe, Barcelona was a grand introduction to the ports that lie ahead in the last few legs of our journey. — June Hiatt

Ip Wai Yin 88

“I will always fondly recall the invigorating sensation of awaking to first view a new port of call from my cabin window.” — Derek Brendel

89


Nicole Blees

June Hiatt

Jaimee Mayfield

Thea Bellos

Ryan Secrest

Nicole Blees

Ryan Secrest

Erik Wong 90

“Be true to yourself and dare to share you with the world.” — Cherine Badawi

91


AFP: Barcelona For the life of the rich and famous, the European socialites and the stars of Hollywood, money is no object. The question is how to cater to such demanding clients. This was the mission of our Undergraduate Business Academic Field Program in Barcelona. We began our quest at one of the apartment buildings that Gaudí constructed for the affluent family that created the Chupa-Chup lollipop. We then headed to Le Fabre University, where an animated Spanish businessman and professor gave us our first lesson. He made it clear, that in order to cater to that market, we must sell an experience, a lifestyle, a dream. The following day, we traveled to a small village near the ancient city of Girona. Here in a village with more cows than humans, there was a very unique enterprise: Tramontana. Tramontana is a small company that produces luxury cars. Built as a car, modeled after a jetfighter, these cars are fast, tested to go over 350 kilometers per hour. We talked about their marketing, their consumers and about their future plans.

Nicole Blees Manuel Diaz Rivera

On our last day, we went to a designer bridal company, Pronovias, where we were learned about the bridal gown market before heading to a family-run jewelry company, Tous, where the owner’s daughter gave us a presentation. She presented the makeup of the company’s activities and future projections, emphasizing that in order to succeed one has to be different and make people feel that they are purchasing a unique piece of art, a recurring theme throughout the AFP. Luxury is an experience and a lifestyle driven by dreams. Our AFP in Barcelona gave us the ability to peer into the world of the rich and famous. — Luis Ballesteros

Adrina Durham

Adrina Durham

Erik Wong 92

“This voyage offered me more perspective than any other experience in my life.” — Christy Cunningham

93


Independent Travel: Madrid Barcelona and Madrid are two essential destinations for a complete journey to Spain. In Madrid, four of us walked to explore the beauty of the city—a 36-hour long walk with just a few hours of sleep. I felt lucky that Pablo, our TSS mate living in Madrid, offered us such a fantastic glimpse of his home city. Impressed by the city’s long history of art and culture, I knew that visiting the museums was a must in Madrid. I visited Museo Nacional del Prado, where I appreciated famous painters like Goya and El Greco. I was shocked by the masterpiece paintings and sculptures, and also the enthusiasm of the students we met there. They brought their drawing pads and made quick drawings through their observation of the details and shades of color and light. Walking along the streets and appreciating the beautifully designed architecture, monuments and museums, I wished time would stop so I could stay longer. Our long hours of walking were certainly worth it, having seen all the incredibly spellbinding and impressive scenes which are now deeply imprinted on my heart. I love Madrid. In short, I love Spain.

June Hiatt Suana Wang

— Elaine Tai

Matthias Matzner Elaine Tai 94

Judy Chan

Matthias Matzner

Judy Chan

“Work hard. Party hard. Recover quickly. Do it all again. Unforgettable traveling, amazing experiences, fantastic friends... memories to last a lifetime.” — Alison Conway

95


Digital Art Showcase From The Scholar Ship Photography Club. “This is how we view the world.”

Nate Fender

Amy Bond

Bonita Walker Bonita Walker 96

Ryan Secrest

Nate Fender

“Being on The Scholar Ship, you will discover that what is right is not universal.” — Stephanie Nieves

97


Omissions...

The Ubuntu Team

Although we are nearing the conclusion of Ubuntu, the January 2008 voyage of The Scholar Ship is far from over. The ports of Istanbul, Lisbon and Amsterdam still lay ahead in the coming days. The European and Latin American & Caribbean Cultural Shows are yet to take the stage. An original musical, written and performed entirely by members of The Scholar Ship community, will be making its debut before the end of the voyage. And, of course, the end-of-semester closing events and ceremonies are yet to transpire. All of these destinations and events promise many more compelling stories, images and acknowledgment. They deserve a place in Ubuntu. Unfortunately, due to the time constraints involved in having this book printed and shipped to Amsterdam by disembarkation day, it was a necessary to complete the book several weeks in advance. As a result, the story of the January 2008 voyage of The Scholar Ship is not complete within these pages. It is our sincere hope, however, that while we have not represented all of the destinations and experiences of this voyage in their entirety, we have captured the spirit of the voyage as truthfully as possible.

Coming from seven different countries and cultures we as the Ubuntu team have come to appreciate the purpose of international teamwork. While traveling from country to country, we worked on a common goal: Ubuntu—sharing the mission of creating a book capturing the high-lights of our voyage by photos in a timeless, yet, exhilarating book.

Finally, as we draft these final pages of Ubuntu, we cannot help but feel a certain sense of sadness that this project is reaching its end. But, as they say, every end is a new beginning and we look forward to all of the extraordinary new stories and images that will be created by the future voyages of The Scholar Ship.

Sincerely yours,

Traveling for four months to nine ports and two islands truly allowed our community to build close friendships, develop networking skills, and gain a greater respect for cultural differences. This adventure has definitely had a huge impact on all of our lives, and we hope at least part of our experiences were able to be shared through the pages of this book. In conclusion, we, the Ubuntu team, sincerely hope you enjoyed flipping through the pages of our story… our story from industrial ports, to remote islands, to community service projects, to onboard life events, and back. Indeed, we hope that you found this book as enthralling as it was for us putting it together.

The Ubuntu Team Back to front, left to right: Ashley Deiser, Bonita Walker, Vaughn Rogers, Sara Manne, Anika Gerdes, Ip Wai Yin, Elaine Tai, Ja’hnette Coleman, Erik Wong, Jaimee Mayfield, Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Arniala, Not pictured: June Hiatt

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“This was a semester of extremes: extreme challenges, extreme sightseeing, extreme joy and extreme learning experiences.” — Anika Gerdes

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We Are The Scholar Ship Australia Kellie Batt Alison Conway James Dickins Jenny Ly Sarah Jane Mews Stacey Mole Kerstin Pilz Erica Salisbury Robert Wetton Alexandra Williams Bermuda & USA Vanessa Bartley Bosnia & Herzegovina Amra Makarevic Brazil Juliana Cândido Tonidandel Camila Ribeiro Ana Paula Saad Calil Bulgaria Deniz Veli Canada Nicole Blees Andrea Briggs Maureen Cahoon Liam Eady Brooke Hanna Denny Hollick S. Kathleen Ireton Brennan Kasper Candice Malcolm Corina Mihaela Paraschiv Derek Shaw China Ann Li Lin Li Liu Lu Mao Chending “Jackie” Ouyang Qichen Pang Bo Wang Meng Yuan Xuhui “Apple” Zeng Xiukun Denmark Theresa Dahl 100

Finland Anna-Liisa “Babsi” Aarniala Tanja Kivi Maija Mustonen Riikka Salonen France Nathalie Suchaud Germany Verena Breitbach Anika Gerdes Christel Guillory Arvid John Matthias Matzner Felicitas Steinhoff Ghana Emmanuel Bidi Fredick Boateng Martin Danso Emmanuel Chapman Kodam Takyi Isaac Owusu Guatemala Grete Pasch Hong Kong Judy Hing Chong Chan Simyllina Chen Amy Lai Lai Sze Man “Alice” Janet Wing Ting Lam Iceland Stefania Gudrunardottir Israel Clarisse Molad Italy Giovanni Cocco Frank Zappala Jamaica Samantha March Japan Maho Kohga Kazakhstan Vladimir Zhumakhanov

Macao Tai Man Leng “Elaine” Mexico Luis Ballesteros Carlos Cuevas Garcia Luisiana De La Garza Vela Ana Lucia Del Toro Martinez Manuel Diaz Rivera Francisco Javier Elizondo Barba Rodrigo FelixMontalvo Juan Pablo Garcia Paola Lopez Jorge Lopez Strozzi Carlos Martinez Gonzalez Mildred Martinez Herrera Sara Gabriela Moreno Jurado Susana Alejandra Ordaz Villarreal Liliana Oseguera Vela David Pedroza Castro Vitala Ramos Aramburu Rosario Santoyo Millan Marcela Varela Cato Morocco Lamiae Bouqentar Hajar Bousfiha Taha El Hajji Mohamed El Harrak Youssef Mufarraj Driss Ouaouicha New Zealand Kim Newman Nicaragua Cecilia Reyes Panama Sarah Jacome Boyd Russian Federation Yuliya Gosnell Singapore Carene Fong Fong Chew Ip Wai Yin Lynnette Lee South Africa Cecil Bodibe Rudy Meiswinkel

Spain Maria Cañadas Alejandro Garcia-Alvarez Pablo Sánchez Santaeufemia United Kingdom Christiaan Coetzee Melanie Hanvey Jennifer Jones David King United States of America Angelo Alfano Julio Alvarez Ron Babcock Cherine Badawi Isis Youssef Badawi Malak Behrouznami Thea Bellos Ralph Berenger Amy Bond Amelia Brown Kate Buker L. Michelle Burgess Derek Brendel Megan Carpenter KC Coden Ja’hnette L. Coleman Amanda Cook Megan Coontz G. Taylor Corbett Christy Cunningham Ashley Deiser Yas Djadali Jesse Dolan Adrina Durham Sara England Nathan Fender Holly Flickinger Claire Fries Ruby Fries Susan Fries Kandyce Gnidovec Ashley Grisso Vanessa Harris Adam Hatch June Hiatt J. William Hudson Benjamin Hunt Brittany Hurst Clarence Jolley Dorothy Jolley

“Some experiences are a means to an end, but The Scholar Ship experience is an end in itself.” — Bidi Emmanuel

Aries Jordan Nicholas Kelley Lilian Kennedy Alexander LeBaron Briana Lee Heidi Lelle Eva Leung Katie Lillie Camila Luzarraga L. Michael Guillory Lorna Mabunda Sara Manne Patricia Masters Jaimee Mayfield David McGaffey Elizabeth McGaffey Tim McGettigan Nazrul Mojumder Kasee Moore Matthew Needham Stephanie Nieves Daniel Noonan David Noorvash Jenna Patterson Elena Petsos Sarah Powell Meagan Puzacke Vaughn Rogers Nancy Schaeffer Ryan Secrest Ashleigh Smith Michael Soter Tara Spence Kiersten Steckel Karen Stupski Joanna Swanson Saegan Swanson Cody Swede Jakob Thomas Nancy Tom Nhia Vang Dana Vukajlovich Bonita Walker Greg Walker Leslie Walker Suana Wang Amy Wielkoszewski Erik Wong Sarah Woodside Lowry Wyman Emma Yatteau Dennis Yavor

A consortium of leading, worldclass universities collaborated in the development of The Scholar Ship:

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Notes & Autographs

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Notes & Autographs

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Notes & Autographs

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Profile for Arturo Pelayo

The Scholar Ship - Ubuntu - January 2008 Voyage Book  

The Scholar Ship - Ubuntu - January 2008 Voyage Book

The Scholar Ship - Ubuntu - January 2008 Voyage Book  

The Scholar Ship - Ubuntu - January 2008 Voyage Book

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