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NOVEMBER 2019 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


XX We a groundbreaking partnership withwith Weare areexcited excitedtotoannounce announce a groundbreaking partnership highly regarded contemporary French auction house PIASA for highly regarded contemporary French auction house PIASA for our AUTUMN 2020 auction in Cape Town. Aspire and PIASA will our AUTUMN 2020 auction in Cape Town. Aspire and PIASA will present the best quality fine art lots with a focus on Modern & present the best quality fine art lots with a focus on Modern & Contemporary African Art.

Contemporary African Art.

INVITING CONSIGNMENTS

INVITING CONSIGNMENTS

AUTUMN 2020

AUTUMN 2020

Modern & Contemporary African Art

Modern & Contemporary African Art

Cape Town, February 2020

Consignments close end-December 2019 Cape Town, February 2020

Consignments close end-December 2019

ENQUIRIES & ART VALUATIONS

ENQUIRIES CAPE TOWN & ART VALUATIONS +27 21 418 0765 | +27 83 391 7235 | ct@aspireart.net

CAPE TOWN +27 21 418 0765 | +27 83 391 7235 | ct@aspireart.net JOHANNESBURG +27 11 243 5243 | +27 84 444 8004 | enquiries@aspireart.net

JOHANNESBURG

+27 11 243 5243 | +27 84 444 8004 | enquiries@aspireart.net

Marlene Dumas

b.1953 South Africa

Oktober 1973

www.aspireart.net

oil on canvas Marlene Dumas 183.5 x 122.5 cmAfrica b.1953 South Estimate: R3 000 000 – 5 000 000 Oktober 1973 accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist

oil on canvas 183.5 x 122.5 cm


@ict_artfair

@ICTArtFair

@ICTArtFair


Clement Seneque, 1896 - 1930, Yachting Linocut Early 1920’s, 55 x100 mm, signed by the artist

Dealers in100 years of SA Fine Art Prints www.printgallery.co.za Woodstock, Cape Town


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CONTENTS

Art Times November Edition 2019 12 M.O.L. 3 – THE BUSINESS OF EMOTION Ashraf Jamal Column 20 INFECTING THE CITY Cape Town’s favourite Public Art Fest 26 ICTAF 2020 Statement from curators 28 UCT IRMA STERN MUSEUM A Splendid Summer Send Off 34 THE RUPERT MUSEUM New Space New Outlook 42 KIRSTEN BEETS Helios 50 ANDA MNCAYI A Reconsideration of Worlds 58 MURMURS FROM THE GLASS HOUSE Jake Michael Singer’s first solo show 70 WHAT MAKES AN ARTIST By Emma Lancaster 74 ABANDONMENT Explored Through a Group Exhibition 80 HELEN VAN STOLK Bursting Into Life 88 BUSINES ART Auction Action Galore 106 ARTGO 124 NEWBLOOD NOV 2019 COVER Kirsten Beets A Safe Place 2019 Oil on linen 500 x 650 mm

Willem Pretorius, Abandoned Pool Senekal, 54 x 40cm, oil on canvas


From the editor SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

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e live in the best times ever, surrounded by great artists, thinkers, innovators and Christopher Peter’s, who’s dedication to the exceptional adds that blaze of Glory and Hallelujahs’ to our short days spent on our beautiful earth. Christopher Peter’s started as a young curator at The Irma Stern Museum - appointed by the then last of the ‘Renaissance man’ type linage of Michaelis Directors, Neville Dubow (whom on the first day of enrolling at art school, I accidentally stiffly saluted). Appointing the young Christopher as Director to the newly established, then rag tag museum was, I believe Dubow’s finest hour. Since then how many of us for the last colourful 40 years have gone through the doors of the Firs, Rosebank, entering as young minds into Irma Sterns magical world. A contemporary colourful palace where Queen Irma held court through human drama, love, tragedy and ambition. It’s incredible that through the daily labours of special individuals that so much love, magic and heart can be created by a small and motivated staff at the Irma Stern Museum. Here wishing Christopher Peters a creative retirement and many more colourful and heartfelt years. This month it has been incredible to hear of the successes of middle and larger sized galleries promoting South African art to the world. In essence galleries like Salon 91, Candice Berman, Chris Moller, Everade Read, Barnard and other larger galleries have reported good sales via their selling through art fairs around the world. Furthermore, February 2020 looks to be a great start to the Art calendar with the Cape Town Art Fair, Zeits Mocca, Norval programs, etc joined by The Stellenbosch Triennial - the first of the ‘country’ Art Events to join the Art Fair Hub. We live in incredible times full of life, drama and colour. I would like to thank you all for supporting our publication for over fourteen incredible years - producing more monthly art editions than any other previous local art magazine. I hope with your assistance and beautiful art input - here’s to the next colourful 14 more. Thank you again from all of us.

Gabriel Clark-Brown

CONTACT ART TIMES Tel: +27 21 300 5888 P.O Box 428 Rondebosch 7701 EDITOR Gabriel Clark-Brown editor@arttimes.co.za ON THE KEYS Brendan Body ADVERTISING & MARKETING Eugene Fisher sales@arttimes.co.za SEND AD MATERIAL sales@arttimes.co.za DIGITAL MEDIA & EVENT LISTINGS Jan Croft subs@arttimes.co.za ARTGO CONTENT info@artgo.co.za RIGHTS: THE ART TIMES MAGAZINE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY MATERIAL THAT COULD BE FOUND OFFENSIVE BY ITS READERS. OPINIONS AND VIEWS EXPRESSED IN THE SA ART TIMES DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE OFFICIAL VIEWPOINT OF THE EDITOR, STAFF OR PUBLISHER, WHILE INCLUSION OF ADVERTISING FEATURES DOES NOT IMPLY THE NEWSPAPER’S ENDORSEMENT OF ANY BUSINESS, PRODUCT OR SERVICE. COPYRIGHT OF THE ENCLOSED MATERIAL IN THIS PUBLICATION IS RESERVED.

@ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

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Johannesburg | Fine Art & Design Auction 25 & 26 November 2019 The Killarney Country Club, 60 5th Str, Houghton Estate Preview 22, 23 & 24 November, 10am - 5pm Informative walkabout with Luke Crossley Saturday, 23 November, from 11am For more information please contact our Johannesburg office on 011 880 3125 or email us on info@swelco.co.za. Register for our newsletter on our website for regular updates and news

Pieter Wenning | Still Life With Ginger Jar, Vase and Red Plate Estimate R 300 000 - R 500 000

www.swelco.co.za


M.O.L 3

THE BUSINESS OF EMOTION – LONDON By Ashraf Jamal

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t the Tate Modern book-shop I came across a volume with the intriguing title, Our Happy Life: Architecture and Well-Being in the Age of Emotional Capitalism. Designed for the distracted reader it was stuffed with pictures and graphs and interviews, but Francesco Garutti’s introduction, ‘The Happiness Plan’, was worth the read. In fact, Garutti, like a skilled optometrist, adjusted the lens I needed to look at art in London.

And if Garutti is deeply sceptical of Monocle’s objective, it is because he sees in this lifestyle magazine – and here we can include the entire industry – a calculated decision to administer taste as a by-product of an elective want. We desire what makes us feel good, but fail to consider the fact that in today’s postsecular world – fuelled by a new market-driven psychographic complex – in which the apex of longing and fulfilment centres on spirituality and well-being.

What immediately struck me was Garutti’s criticism of the lifestyle magazine, Monocle, ‘an influential tool’ that ‘sells the luxury of pursuing luxury – through consumption rather than ethics – as the means of being happy’. Garutti’s catchy phrase for this nefarious enterprise is emotional capitalism. I couldn’t look at the shrine to Rothko’s paintings – focused through a dim light – without asking the question: How are our emotions staged and plotted? And what role, more generally, do museums and galleries occupy in a world ground down by hate and in desperate need of a consoling balm? For art, it seemed, was no longer a matter of personal encounter but a collective ritual devoted, fundamentally, to the recovery of some lost joy. The pleasure these shrines to art were designed to ensure is akin to a drug. The soft lighting in the Rothko room summoned a latent quiet in our otherwise disorienting and busy lives.

Why, one wonders, should this complex, this alchemical drug, prove to be the elixir of our age? Why should the equation of spirituality and wellbeing prove our decisive and greatest need? The immediate answer is obvious: Ours is an ugly and brutalised age in which incommensurable differences have assumed dominance and resulted in the bankruptcy of conversation and mutual understanding. We no longer understand each other. Our friendships and professional and familial allegiances are compromised. Why? Because hate defines the current ethos. Because the ideal of democracy – a recent 18th century confection – is on the verge of extinction. In its place we have the collective virus of our age – populism, tribalism, nationalism, protectionism, isolationism, fascism – in short, a monomaniacal desire to quarantine ourselves and to re-order what, from an extremist point of view, is conceived as a disordered world. BREXIT is the obvious trope for this desire to exit-and-right the world. And it is against this toxic tendency that the art world has chosen to do battle. Its museums and galleries are, in principle, democratic fora. What they, ideally, seek, is to connect us rather than divide us. And what better place to achieve this than through the emotions, a zone policed, which can be recalibrated, opened up, and become more generous.

During my short stay in London the notion of ‘emotional capitalism’ assumed centre-stage in my frontal lobe, invaded my unconscious, as well as every cell of my body. Art, I realised, trafficked in the business of emotion. This has always been the case. Whether one is looking at Giotto or Rothko, at religious or secular art, what matters is how the drug manages us.

“We have the collective virus of our age – populism, tribalism, nationalism, protectionism, isolationism, fascism – in short, a monomaniacal desire to quarantine ourselves and to re-order what, from an extremist point of view, is conceived as a disordered world.” Opposite Page: Mark Rothko (1903-1970), Untitled (Red, Black, Orange and Pink on Yellow), 1954, oil paint, egg and glue on canvass.

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Above and Left: Olafur Eliasson’s solo show at the Tate Modern – In Real Life.

This is certainly the governing principle behind Olafur Eliasson’s solo show at the Tate Modern – In Real Life. What the Danish-Icelandic artist wants us to feel – and this is a touchy-feely exhibition – is our connectedness. Against isolation – and the toxicity of a programmatic Isolationism – he believes that we can best understand ourselves by understanding each other. Empathy is the core drive, which is why his products are less about things than they are about the immersive power of things and our relation to them. The transactions he generates are inter-subjective. His works are engineered to be immersive. In this regard they assume the role of a secular religion – a religion for atheists – in which spirituality and well-being assume a central place. As to just how well Eliasson’s wellness machine in fact is, is disputable. While I was drawn repeatedly to his ‘Blind Passageway’, lining up to re-enter a corridor in which the seeing eye is confounded, one’s need to touch invisible walls paramount, I was nevertheless reminded not only of the fallibility of my self-possession, but also of the gimmickry intrinsic to the work’s conception. Here, I thought, in this admittedly

wondrous piece of illusion, their lay the ageold trickery one associates with the fairground and the ghost-train. That the art world should unabashedly traffic in this deception is not surprising. We are dealing, after all, with the business of emotion, in which it is precisely trickery of such a nature that affirms our desperate need to enter a drama that mirrors our acute sense of loss and purposelessness. To Eliasson’s credit, his immersive art proved restorative, for despite the illusion upon which it is built, it nevertheless triggered core needs in our desperate hour. In short, Eliasson’s grand solo show – In Real Life – attests to the need in all of us for some imagined and deferred Reality which, at every turn, is being stolen from us. As to whether his show is in fact the best testament to the Real is debatable. I, however, refuse to be churlish on God’s day and am prepared to accede to the enormity of the personal and collective pleasure which his show generates. As to its sustainability – as an idea, as a feeling – I remain doubtful. Which is why, as a counter to Eliasson’s confection – which I finally read as little more than an opiate for the masses – I

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Above and opposite page: Anthony Gormley’s solo show at The Royal Academy

“Gormley gives us that which we most urgently seek – our Truth” now turn to Antony Gormley’s solo show at The Royal Academy which, in truth, proved to be my most profound encounter in London. Here I found no gimmickry, here no self-satisfied conviction of goodwill, no advertorial trickery that convinces one of a given virtue. Unlike the Eliasson show, the promo for which possesses the cool insouciance of an advertorial or some idealised company policy, Gormley’s text conveys a truth that thrives beyond the intentional or ideal. Body-centric - the human body is everywhere in Gormley’s work – his sculptures are situational and experiential, for he too is providing us with an immersive event. The difference however is crucial, for Gormley’s expressions – and our intersection with those expressions – is pure. The ‘body as a “place”’, is his core fixation, ‘a place of experience, emotion, consciousness, memory and imagination’. We are invited ‘to rediscover this interior realm, the space we each inhabit, through a series of encounters that heighten our attention to our bodies and our surroundings’. The sentiment is age-old, but also urgently current. For what are we if not our beleaguered bodies in search for some

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grace, some peace, in a rancorous and divisive world? If Eliasson gives us the arcade and the fairground – admittedly more rarefied and elegant – then Gormley gives us that which we most urgently seek – our Truth. The impact of the entire experience is minimalistic, stark, and yet, in its rudimentary elegance, we are taken, overcome, bodied forth. There are very few artists, today, who understand the longing of the physical for the metaphysical. If we enter the Gormley show in tatters we emerge transubstantiated. For his is an elegiac art. An art, conceived upon a fallen earth, that has the power to generate a profound state of grace. That Gormley does so with zero manipulation is astonishing. This is because he is not invested in the business of emotion, but in the power of art to heal. This distinction is critical. For as I’ve noted at the outset, emotional capital is the new order for a new day. A day – this day – obsessed with the pursuit of happiness, some joy in an abraded and ruinous time, which, mistakenly, we imagine ourselves able to attain simply by purchasing or interfacing with the object-asexperience which we so desperately desire.

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Grayson Perry, Yoga Mat

Grayson Perry’s exhibition, Super Rich Interior Decoration, glaringly epitomises this complex of consumption and happiness. For the exhibition – running till December 20 at Victoria Miro – Perry produced a yoga mat for 95 pounds. This relatively affordable and sly product is directed towards our increasingly hysterical craving for spirituality and wellness, a fall-out of our bankrupted neo-liberal ideals, thrust as we now are before the brutal spectre of global fascism. Perry of course is a wit and an optimist, not one to bemoan our damnation, not matter how acutely he recognises it. His yoga mat sports an arse, presumably his own, scored with the tag ‘my spiritual side’ together with a galaxy of star signs. Literally, the signage is tongue-in-cheek. But like the exhibition’s title, it broaches a bigger question: The inevitability of commodification.

How do we account for our grotesque excesses, or the ‘self-satisfied placebo effect’ derived from consumerism?

For Perry, however, if everything has become commodified it does not follow that the corruption built into it is wholly bad. Whether this is indeed the case is debatable. As for the bespoke yoga mat – conspicuously on sale in a dealership that courts the superrich with their glam interiors – it is both a wry commentary on the corruption of ideals and an acknowledgement that corruption is inevitable. ‘We are now in a post-materialist consumerist world where what we actually buy now is status around our virtue’. What virtue one wonders?

It was in this unresolved and tense moment that I found myself in London’s art world, seemingly immune to the ugliness both within its sanctified confines and everywhere abroad. Art is supposed to speak the truth and not be compromised by opinion. Ideally, at any rate. In this regard, Gormley’s solo show – simply titled Antony Gormley – proved a masterclass in a time as unscrupulous, as misguided, as dangerous as ours.

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‘Our new emotionalised economy offers a market of possibilities in which the dream of selfinvention has become a defining feature of what the neo-liberal condition offers the individual’, Garutti declares. However, the question persists: How fit for purpose is neo-liberalism today? Two LED’s at the Victoria station exposed the contradiction which afflicts all of us – those in the West, and the Rest. GET READY FOR BREXIT, the one sign stammered, while the other, championing duo-lingualism, advocated the need to learn Dutch. It could have been Mandarin, or Portuguese. But what was starkly in evidence was a war between parochialism and internationalism, hate and empathy.

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Image © Jake Michael Singer

IN MURMURS The new solo show by artist Jake Michael Singer

30 October – 06 December 2019 Opening 30 October 2019, 18h00

52 Waterkant Street, Cape Town www.thkgallery.com


INFECTING THE CITY

Cape Town’s favourite public arts festival set to make a strong return

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he Institute for Creative Arts and curator, Jay Pather, have once again teamed up to transform Cape Town’s public spaces into open-air galleries, theatres and performance venues for the popular public arts festival, Infecting the City (ITC). For seven days, from 18 to 24 November, a series of day-time and night-time programmes will see audiences traverse city blocks following 50 acts, from giant puppets and vertical dancers to traditional cleansing and burial ceremonies. Included in this year’s diverse programme are award-winning and young and upcoming artists from across the country and as far as Namibia, Zimbabwe, the  Netherlands, France, and Switzerland. City parks, shopping and transport hubs, from the Station to St George’s Mall,  to the  Cathedral and various city museums will be activated with live performance, installations and artistic interventions. “An emerging  theme from this year’s proposals is work based in classical African tradition. Works that explore how classical African performance and rituals work inside of  the  urban space. This is also to create atmospheres of cleansing and interiority within these commercially driven, materialistic spaces,” says Jay Pather. Joining Pather as a curatorial fellows for  the  festival are internationally acclaimed dancer and choreographer of African Indigenous and cross-cultural dance, Elvis Sibeko, who brings extensive experience with traditional African productions and young up and coming curator, Amogelang Maledu. “Working alongside emerging voices in public art curation is critical to developing the vision and reach of Infecting the City”, says Pather. “ Where were you, Photo by Oscar O' Ryan

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Sibeko will be co-curating two programmes for ITC featuring work by artists and performance companies such as Siwela Sonke, Indoni, Mandla Mbothwe, Mzo Gasa, Kwanele Thusi, Aaraadhana Indian dancers and Zamanani Brothers. Maledu is co-curating a one-day programme of 15 art installations, some with performative elements, spread in clusters around Church Square, the Slave Lodge, Government Avenue and the Company’s Gardens. The programme, on Thursday 21 November, will run from 10am to 3pm, with a map guiding visitors, in their own time, from one work to the next. Artists include Sydelle Willow-Smith, Asemahle Ntlonti, Qondiswa James, Nicolene Burger, Spirit Mba and Well-Worn Theatre Company with their Swarm Theory – a big hit at this past year’s National Arts Festival. ITC features a large body of work by women artists, performers, choreographers and curators, “Women traverse a thin line of security in our public spaces. Foregrounding these issues in a public space is essential. And no amount of bringing this to  the  center and in public will be enough”, says Pather. Pather continues, “The festival features work that create visibility of all of the City’s identities, publics and cultures and not just the mono culture that often dominates Cape Town.”

Above and Left: MovingStoriesTheatreOrg. Photo by MovingStories Theatre.

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Diagonale Ascendante (Company Retouramant)

“City parks, shopping and transport hubs, from the Station to St George’s Mall, to the Cathedral and various city museums will be activated with live performance, installations and artistic interventions.” The  ITC public arts festival is  the  longestrunning public arts festival in South Africa. Pather explains that as our environment becomes more trying, riddled with complexities and debates around land, poverty, race, safety and security and the environment, there is growing insularity. Public art creates the circumstances for emotions to be stirred, and for discussions to take place publicly. He goes on to say that public art combines  the  intimacy of art with  the  public encounter.  Infecting  the  City  creates a space for issues to be raised and debated, which is needed in the country now more than ever. More than 20 years into democracy, South Africa is still one of the most unequal countries in  the  world and spaces where we can feel and think together are becoming increasingly important.

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For information about artists and works represented at this year’s event, visit www. infectingthecity.com. Follow  Infecting  the  City  on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for programme updates and festival information. Infecting the City is presented by the Institute for Creative Arts in association with the University of Cape Town, Africa Centre, Institut Francais Afrique du Sud and Pro Helvetia. The festival is supported by the City of Cape Town and with venue support from  the Centre for Theatre, Dance and Performance Studies at UCT, Company’s Garden, Iziko, Castle of Good Hope, District Six Museum, St George’s Cathedral, PRASA, Metrorail and others.

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A BIRD’S EYE VIEW ON THE MASTERS OF TIME PAST AND PRESENT.

The Rupert Museum showcases One Hundred years of South African Artists making Art. See the Masters from the 20th Century and experience the Contemporary Masters in full colour. Original artworks from Bhengu to Bester, Stern to Siopis, Pinker to Kentridge are courting your consideration. Stay for a cup of coffee in our new Café and contemplate the day in the garden.

Stellentia Road, Stellenbosch Tue – Fri: 10h00 – 17h00, Sat – Sun: 10h00 – 16h00 Entrance Complimentary | www.rupertmuseum.org info@rupertmuseum.org | 021 888 3344


INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 2020

14 – 16 February 2020 Statement from ICTAF 2020 curators, Luigi Fassi and Nkule Mabaso investeccapetownartfair.co.za

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hat tools and survey methods can the section of a fair activate to intercept some of the most significant experiences within the current contemporary art scenario? Tomorrows/Today 2020 tries to respond to such question by offering an updated and unpredictable insight into the practice time of 10 emerging international artists, most of them having tight connections to contemporary African culture but active also in other continents such as North America, Europe and Middle East. The strength of the section lies in being  a field research that has engaged us curators for several months in search of innovative, complex and multifaceted artistic proposals. Tomorrows/Todays intersects three parallel stories: the participating artists, the galleries supporting them and the curators, who carry out research and invite the galleries to exhibit at the Fair. Not to count the role of the museum directors and institutional curators, who will act as jurors to award the section’s prize to

ICTAF 2020 Curator Luigi Fassi

one of the artists during the fair’s days. The section is not built predetermining thematic or narrative sectors and there are no ideological focus or privileged conceptual models to define its nature. Its architecture is given rather by the emerging force of the projects on view, which all bear witness to a critical and uncompromising urgency with regard to artistic work, capable of raising questions and reflections on the current changes underway in the world geopolitical scenario. Tomorrows/Today is thus characterized as a hub, a place in which some decisive artistic achievements are intensively concentrated, as the title of the project suggests - between the now and the yet to come, or more precisely, to emphasize an anticipation of the future in the present. All this is confirmed by the fact that most artists will  present works  realised specifically for the occasion of the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020. In these months to come, the work of we as curators is to accompany the participating artists in the most inspiring formulation of their works in the fair, by adding critical reflections to them and curating a kaleidoscope of proposals in which different expressive languages manifest and interact. For more information regarding the ICTAF 2020 visit www.investeccapetownartfair.co.za

ICTAF 2020 Curator Nkule Mabaso

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Counter Current group exhibition Showing until the end of November

+27214224145 | 69 Burg Street,Cape Town info@eclecticacontemporary.co.za | www.eclecticacontemporary.co.za


A SPLENDID SUMMER SEND OFF….

Christopher Peter retires as director of UCT Irma Stern Museum

Above: One of Christopher Peter’s beautiful flower arrangements. Right: Christopher Peter, UCT Irma Stern Museum.

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y career at the Irma Stern Museum began on a rainy, wintery Wednesday on the 1st August 1979. The curator’s cottage awaited me, the wall to wall carpets and the en suite bathroom had been the major drawcard for applying for the job, having come from a cold water cottage in Andringa Street, Stellenbosch where I had been working at the Stellenbosch Museum. In those days Cape Town in winter was wonderfully cold and wet and atmospheric. “The Firs”, Cecil Road, Rosebank with its overhanging gum tress, lonely atmosphere, pitch dark nights with the wind and the rain rattling the zinc roof of the cottage, was like my favourite poem come true – The House Beautiful by Robert Louis Stevenson – “A Naked house, a naked moor, a shivering pool before the door”

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These words could have been written for The Firs, Cecil Road, Irma’s home for 40 years just as it was to become mine: 34 years in residence, and 6 years independently, with my having acquired an apartment in Green Point in 2013. My old flat was turned into a useful new extension to the Museum in 2014. In the beginning, I can describe my situation as being one of being governed by remote control, in a lonely province, from the capital city Michaelis! Prof. Neville Dubow, Director of the Michaelis School was also Director of the Irma Stern Museum. As a 25 year old, I was a child curator! And was fortunate to have an encouraging boss who believed in me. I must say it was all rather intimidating. I was carried along by the fact that I adored Irma’s work,

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Irma Stern Museum: Christopher Peter in his old office

the house, her style, the story of her life, her extraordinary discipline, her passion and her emotional despair and romantic longing. She was a genius, suffered for it – driving herself in the face of ill health. To sum it all up in her own words she writes in her journal that she paints with “the blood of her heart” Very early on Prof. Dubow encouraged me to do flowers – “no reason not to fill the rooms with flowers, Christopher!”. Say no more, this became my lifeline to the outside world, as it was initially a very lonely place for a relatively

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young person who had, as his colleagues, 5 retired gentlemen of great dignity, who looked upon me as their boss and supervisor not to mention the fact that they were ten times more clued up on the collection. The Museum in the 70’s was only 7 years old having opened in 1972. It became clear that it would need to be more than a carefully and aesthetically designed art museum, based on the home of a great artist and her collection. Temporary exhibitions and cultural events including music became a necessity.

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Michael Pettit portrait on the cover of Living Magazine painted in the curator’s cottage in 1988. Sasol Art Collection

Newspaper cutting: Christopher Peter and Elizabeth Powell

In the early 80’s a series of thematic Irma shows started the ball rolling. I recall hectic trips around town loading up important Irma’s and supporting them on foam strips on the back seat of my rusty red Fiat. Owners were delighted to participate in these exhibitions and with the aid of an in/out receipt book, insurance figures were quickly decided upon, and one drove home like a huntsman with a wondrous sack of game! The exhibitions quickly spread to include contemporary artists in Cape Town and

nationally. Practically all the great artists of the 20th century in South Africa were to be seen here via various exhibitions, either solo, in a group, or on loan from a National Institution. To date, hundreds and hundreds of exhibitions later we are still at, and it’s a life blood, through sales and commissions, and an extended visitor profile which brings in new interest. The Museum too has changed, having become more colourful and possibly more opulent. Way back in the early 90’s,it was decided by


Irma Stern Museum Library (photographer: Sean Wilson) Opposite Page: Irma Stern Museum Entrance passage (photographer: Sean Wilson)

“A statement on the Irma Stern Museum would be to expound! that it is a jewel in the cultural heritage of South Africa.” Prof. Dubow and myself that we would paint the rooms rich colours, as they had been painted white at the time of the Museum’s establishment in the early 70’s. Visitors adore the colours, some of which were original at some stage to the earlier house , as we must remember that the property dates back to the mid 1850’s. Traces of subtle Victorian colours are often detected by peeling paint. We have concentrated on what Irma would have lived with, having gleaned some of this information from her descriptions in her letters and journals. The various tones of yellow in her studio, together with the orange wall , are a direct reference to a letter written in the 20’s. In a career spanning 40 years, there have surely been low days, high days and dramatic events. In relation to dramatic events I would say that the startling discovery of the immense value of “The Buli Stool” after its lengthy authentication process was completed by experts, was one, and of course the spectacular price achieved for “The Arab Priest” by Irma which had

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been on loan to us since 1978 until the time of its extraordinary sale, in 2011, for nearly 40 million rand, to its new owners, the Qatar Orientalist Museum. The Museum can also boast of extraordinary visitors, in 1997 on an official visit, the King and Queen of Sweden and more recently unofficially, a wonderful surprise visit from the Queen of Norway who took many many photographs, and proclaimed that she greatly admired the Museum. A statement on the Irma Stern Museum would be to expound ! that it is a jewel in the cultural heritage of South Africa. Hopefully it will be celebrated and supported for always. It has the WOW factor. Christopher Peter Director ISM Oct 2019

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THE RUPERT MUSEUM New Space New Outlook rupertmuseum.org Photo: Wilhelm van Zyl


Exhibition view. The Johannesburg Station Panels, by JH Pierneef. Transnet Foundation Collection. Opposite page: Exhibition view Eliot Malekuto (1988) by Keith Dietrich.

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he Rupert Museum was established in 2005 by the late Dr Anton and Mrs Huberte Rupert, a visionary project for a space to share their private and corporate collections with the public. As of mid-May this year the museum reopened its doors after a short but extensive renovation period under the guidance of Hanneli Rupert. Ms Rupert’s vision for an inclusive and collaborative space for its community is taking shape through new exhibitions, public and educational programming and the recently launched Social Impact Arts Prize. Exhibitions currently on show: The Cape Town Triennials – Then & Now (on exhibition ‘til mid-February 2020) This exhibition presents a selection of works by celebrated contemporary South African artists, who exhibited in The Cape Town Triennial shows between 1982 and 1991. The Cape Town Triennial was one of South Africa’s most established art exhibitions. Political turmoil during this period in South African history reflected in what is generally referred to as “Resistance Art”. Sociopolitical commentary

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gave powerful meaning to rising artistic voices while emerging artists established their visual practices inside this canon. With the selection of a few artists, guided by the artworks in the Rembrandt van Rijn collection, the artworks from the Cape Town Triennials are paired with more recent work by the same artists. Casting an eye on the artists’ development and relevance of work in the last 20 years. The exhibition showed the work of William Kentridge, Keith Dietrich, Willie Bester, Philippa Hobbs and Peter Schűtz in its first rotation. Currently in its second rotation, the work of Penelope Siopis, Diane Victor, Deborah Bell, Helen Sebidi and Steven Cohen are featured. The Johannesburg Station Panels (on exhibition ‘til end May 2020) Artist JH Pierneef’s most acclaimed public commission was completed between 1929 and 1932. The Johannesburg Station Panels have been characterised as the epitome of the South African landscape genre. The Rupert Art Foundation as custodian of these acclaimed panels have ensured their presence and public display since 2004.

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Rupert Museum, MakerStudio, Photo Wilhelm van Zyl

Rupert Museum interior

The influences of Art Nouveau and Art Deco are widely recognizable in the work of JH Pierneef, especially with the Johannesburg Station Panels initially created for a space primed by architectural and decorative furnishings inspired by both art movements. This exhibition looks into the finer details of the art movement’s influences on Pierneef’s practice through his paintings and graphic works. BookWorks (on exhibition ‘til end February 2020) Artists’ books lie at the intersection of disciplines in both the visual arts and literature, and include poetry, prose, playwriting, illustration, picture books, the graphic novel, graphic design, typography, photography, printmaking, drawing, painting, papermaking and bookbinding. Many, however, transgress the boundaries of the conventional book form by entering the arenas of sculpture, installation and performance, as well as the now escalating field of digital and screenbased media. Although many examples might not even be identifiable as books, they play with the meanings associated with books and book making. The exhibition showcases the multi-layered aspects of artists’ books with the work of Keith Dietrich and Heléne van Aswegen.

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Rupert Museum Cafe, Mural by Vladimir Tretchikoff

Faces & Figures – Selected 20th century South African Artists (on exhibition ‘til mid May 2020) Portraiture captures the relationship between sitter and artist in holding the likeness of the sitter. In figurative studies, the artist strives to understand human form and gestures. Faces and Figures explores the work of the following 20th century South African artists - Gerard Bhengu, Irma Stern, Anton van Wouw, George Pemba, Maggie Laubser, Gerard Sekoto and Moses Kottler. These artists contributed to the South African Modern

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Art genre in the mediums of painting, drawing, and sculpture. They are among the most prominent artists of the 20th century and they represent the vast and unequal circumstances affording artistic production of their time. The selected works show a variety of artists that negotiated a spectrum of patrons in public or private spaces, whether the result of creative exploration through township scenes or dictated by an audience, the consumer or a wealthy benefactor.

The Social Impact Arts Prize The Social Impact Arts Prize is a new art prize with a focus on social impact that has a direct measurable effect on individuals and communities, as a result of an arts-based activity, project or programme. South Africa has a deep pool of untapped creativity. Artists, architects and engineers, landscapers, environmentalists, creative visionaries and other experienced community creatives are invited to submit impactful, creative and meaningful ideas and concepts for consideration. It aims to provide a platform


Exhibition view, Faces & Figures. Foreground, The Carrier (c1938), by Moses Kottler. Pretoria Art Museum Collection

to stimulate and support this pool of talent. The prize focuses on specific categories in South Africa where social impact can be measured, including Education, Employment, Community, Environment, Technology and Direct Arts. For more information visit www.socialimpactartsprize.org Public and educational programmes: The Rupert Museum’s all new look is not just on the inside. Visitors can enjoy a trundle through our new garden, visit our cafe and get active in the MakerStudio. On the last Saturday of each month join us for a full programme of activities from artist talks, workshops, live music to wine tastings. Our Museum Saturdays offer activities for museum visitors of all ages. Our public programmes provide mid-week activities too. We host Senior Tuesdays as well as Wednesday and Friday  museum walkabouts. Thursdays are about Wellness so join us in your lunch hour for Yoga Thursdays. Our Sunday offering includes  specials at our Museum  Café  featuring the Tretchikoff fireplace. We keep things interesting with many other activities woven into the programme. The Rupert Museum is positively buzzing with a little something for everyone this season. Stay up to date by keeping an eye on our facebook page, and make sure to book your spot.

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Senior Tuesday Offers our visitors over 60 walkabouts with the curator, workshops, demos or a garden tour, all with a complimentary glass of wine. Museum Walkabouts The museum offers free walkabouts for groups and individuals of our current exhibitions every Wednesday and Friday at 11am and 1pm. Join us for an insightful 45 min guide through the gallery. Yoga Thursday Each Thursday use your lunch hour to take a time out and focus on your wellness. Join us for a yoga session at the Rupert Museum’s MakerStudio with Yolande Riekert. Sunday Specials at our Museum Café While away your Sunday in our gem of a café and enjoy our range of sweets and bakes. Our delicious, brunch and lunch menu offers freshly prepared meals with satisfying homey goodness at great prices. Sunday specials change regularly so do enquire ahead of time. Open Tuesday to Sunday from 10am. Hours: Tues - Fri: 10h - 17h Sat - Sun: 10h - 16h Entry complimentary info@rupertmuseum.org / 0218883344

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KAT’EMNYAMA continued

Tony Gum Opens Fri 22 Nov @ 6pm www.christophermollerart.co.za; @christophermoller_gallery


KIRSTEN BEETS Helios, at Salon Ninety One By Natasha Norman Photos: Zan Wimberley, Salon Ninety One, Kirsten Beets and Bryan Viljoen

There are no clouds on the horizon for Kirsten Beets. She has wowed Australian and international audiences with a sell-out exhibition at the fifth Sydney Contemporary Art Fair and is set to enchant Cape Town audiences again with her latest solo exhibition, Helios, at Salon Ninety One this month. Full Sun, 2019. Oil on board. 925 x 1225mm


Neon and Nips, 2019, Oil on paper, 150x200mm. Opposite Page: Pink Sphinx, 2019. Oil on paper. 200x150mm

Beets is humble about her success in Sydney this September. She says she saw the new market as a challenge and is delighted her tidal pool swimmers and sun worshippers found appeal there. In preparation for the fair she focused on the shared realities of Cape Town and Sydney, deciding that a common Southern Hemisphere sun was key. Her work is characterised by minimalistic flat planes of colour that host photorealistic figures bathing, playing ball games, snorkelling and other outdoor leisure activities. Among these figures at rest is a taciturn threat: a snake among the sunbathers or a shark in the tidal pool waters. Beets’ fresh and contemporary commentary in colour, form and content describes living along

the Tropic of Capricorn with universal appeal such that her collectors at SCAF ranged from across Australia, to London and even the USA. Her forthcoming solo exhibition, Helios, is set to open at Salon Ninety One in Cape Town on the 30th of October 2019. The show builds on the theme of sun worshipping with a focus on works that explore scale and texture a little further. Some of the new works enlarge the figures of tiny bathers and snorkelers seen in her previous canvasses and explore textured marks and loosely rendered scenery juxtaposed with photorealistic elements. While the works for Sydney make particular comment on spaces of leisure, Helios promises a more

“The show builds on the theme of sun worshipping with a focus on works that explore scale and texture”

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Goldfish, 2019, Oil, acrylic on board, 325 x 325mm

Lucky 13, 2019, Oil, acrylic on board. 325 x 325mm

Cat Lady Abroad, 2019, Oil, acrylic on board. 325 x 325mm. Opposite Page: Skydive, 2019, Oil on board, 645 x 490mm

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Sphinx, 2019, Oil, acrylic on board. 325 x 325mm

“Beets has always been interested in the tension between wild and tame natures in both humanity and its environments.� diverse range of subjects that sees Beets revisiting themes from previous exhibitions with a more nuanced mythological element emerging in her conception.

leopards. Between the sun bathers and holiday makers a crime is committed. Helios explores the mythology of a sun-soaked Eden replete with the serpant in the garden.

Beets has always been interested in the tension between wild and tame natures in both humanity and its environments. Helios carries this idea further in a metaphorical placement of objects and figures within her signature compositions. Among the manicured spaces of the suburban garden roam tigers and

It promises to be a hot summer for Kirsten Beets fans with an exciting range of works on offer for all audiences. For more information, please contact the gallery at enquiries@ salon91.co.za or call +27 21 424 6930.

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bursting

into life Helen van Stolk • Solo Exhibition 23.11.2019 • 17.12.2019

AITY GALLERY The Yard, 38 Huguenot Road, Franschhoek, 7690 Email art@artintheyard.co.za | Phone +27 (0) 21 876 4280 www.artintheyard.co.za


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ANDA MNCAYI Eclectica Contemporary www.eclecticacontemporary.co.za

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nda Mncayi is currently exhibiting his work at Eclectica Contemporary, part of the group exhibition Counter Current which is up until the end of November. Amongst a strong cohort of engaged and challenging artists, Mncayi’s work has sparked interest and the attention of many. With intense colours, swirling graphics and imaginative depictions, the work is offered as a prompt for feeling. The works call for a reconsideration of worlds through the use of technology and relishing in imagination.

Describing his early memories of wanting to make art he explains “I’ve loved drawing for as long as I can remember. Growing up my friends and I would sit for hours on end, drawing our favourite comic book super heroes and characters from anime”. Mncayi grew up in the Eastern Cape, in East London and moved to Cape Town to pursue his interests in creative industries. Beginning with Graphic Design at CPUT before moving on to study Concept Art at the Academy of Digital Arts, where he is now, Mncayi has worked across commercial and personal projects which has helped developed his focus and distinct aesthetic. (Detail) Dreaming-Awake, 2017, A2 Inkjet, True Fibre 51


consideration of materials, mediums and art practice, his answers offer further insight into his understandings, intentions and drives: EC: Do you see art as a kind of visual vocabulary? Does it serve a greater purpose than being something that goes on a wall? AM: The best way I can explain it at this moment in time is that my art makes people feel some type of way, in a good way. The greater purpose is how the viewer connects with it and what they see. EC: How does background in illustration and graphic design influenced your thinking in relation to contemporary art? Do you think there’s a big difference in how people interact with the different spaces?

Above: Enki, 2016, Inkjet, True Fibre Opposite Page: Connetome 2019, Inkjet, True Fibre

When describing his artistic process, he described starting with a concept first. The work then begins to take shape as he then begins to look for inspiration around the concept for ideation. Or, as he mentioned, “sometimes I will freestyle and see what I come up with”. Because of his training in design and concept art, he draws from a variety of lenses and perspectives, describing his work as entwined in alternative realities and in a conversation with futurism. Mncayi is a passionate, committed and diligent worker, explaining that “I am usually the most happy with my latest artworks until I work on something new again. The reason for this is because I want to level up from my last piece”. It is through this incentive that he advises aspiring artists to work at it and do what they love, and suggesting that to deal with any sort of creative block the best is to just keep going. However, concurrently Mncayi also recognizes that “it could be you need rest or you should switching things up” and that sometimes, “it’s best not to force things”. We interviewed Anda Mncayi to prod and prompt some of the ideas which his work has given rise to. Within the context of the Counter Current exhibition, which asks for a critical

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AM: I value my background in design. it informs how I move on the daily and my thinking process. With the current advancements in Technology the lines are getting blurred between the different spaces, especially if you are looking at the creative industry as a whole. Contemporary art is part of it. EC: Do you think about your work in connection to abstraction or augmented / alternative reality? What can abstraction allow for as an inclusion in your work? AM: Yes, I do. I mostly depict spaces and forms that aren’t familiar to the eye. The imagery displays a kind of omnipresence. EC: Where do you look for inspiration? Or who do you admire? AM: It’s always an amazing feeling discovering a new artist that has a very high power level, I admire many and find online platforms really useful. I have connected with various artists through social media platforms. I am grateful that so many platforms exist today enabling artists to connect and share art, in addition to traditional platforms like art galleries. This is important to me because there weren’t many art galleries in the city that I grew up in, so growing up I didn’t have any references of artists I could follow in the industry.

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Control, 2016, A2 Inkjet, True Fibre

“I mostly depict spaces and forms that aren’t familiar to the eye. The imagery displays a kind of omnipresence.” The only artist I knew of at the time that I could relate to was Loyiso Mkhize (Ta Loyd). I have had the honor of working and assisting him in some projects. To be able to witness first-hand the level of artistry he possesses is inspiring, and he is genuinely a great human being! And of course, I am also very inspired by my peers, homies that I went to school with. EC: Can you speak a bit about the use of colour in your work? AM: I generally apply colour depending on how I feel, so I will keep on mixing till it feels right. The digital mediums are really conducive for this because I am able to explore a much wider range of colours and variations. EC: What is your most important artist tool? Is there something you can’t live without in your studio?

EC: Could you describe your practice in three words? AM: Visionary Concept Art Exhibiting new talent can be both challenging and exciting. At Eclectica Contemporary, we are thrilled to be in a position where we are able to showcase both well established and new talent. Anda Mncayi, has sparked the attention of many gallery visitors already and will surely engage the imaginations of others to come. Counter Current has opened up a conversation around contemporary art practice, imagination and the gallery environment and we are pleased to present Anda Mncayi’s work amongst a strong cohort of engaged and challenging artists.

AM: My most important tool would be a pencil. Even though I could draw using my wacom, I still would rather draw on paper first.

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THK Gallery is proud to announce participation in two leading International Art Fairs:

AKAA (Also Known As Africa) – Paris - 08 – 11 November 2019 Cologne Fine Art & Design – Cologne - 21 – 22 November 2019 THK GALLERY 52 Waterkant Street, Cape Town www.thkgallery.com Image © Andrew Kayser


MURMURS FROM THE GLASS HOUSE Jake Michael Singer’s first solo show at THK Gallery CT 30 October – 06 December 2019 www.thkgallery.com

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usually wake up and things are already happening. I guide processes in the studio. On a cold day steel melts slower, it’s getting hotter these days and I am slower. One day, Roy, the lead technician is sick, another day I am. I’m always cleaning. Sometimes there is a riot outside and tear gas comes into the studio and then the church singers, who I hear in the morning and night, stop singing. Silence broken by the hollow sound of a car moving through the dark street. A glass bottle breaking. On their way to school, kids walk past the ruins of a dead house with even dead-er men sticking needles in their arms. Again, the air smells like burning plastic. Silence broken by maskandi music in a taxi. People getting by. Silent fortitude. Always a hapless someone shouting on the street, always sounding like the same person. Some people can’t leave this place so easily. I can. Dostoevsky describes the crystal palace in Notes from Underground as the epitome of Western enlightenment and idealism. I translate this into our contemporary context as The Glass House. It probably refers to one of those new buildings in Sandton and I’m using this metaphor because, it’s subject, still remains something that people want to post on Instagram. Rich n’ sexy. I think about this a lot because I almost come from that life and I often wonder if this is what the future of the world looks like.

Murmur and Fold, 2019. Opposite Page: Jake Michael Singer in studio, 2019. Photographer: Brett Rubin

The world had a beginning. And now its translating and transitioning, hopefully upwards towards something great. I wonder if this applies to South Africa or are we in a spiral state? I wonder if this applies to The World or are we in a spiral world? Since the Earth is spinning in orbit, the latter is more likely true.

a bird. Probably because birds are envoys of the divine; the higher plane. Even though most aren’t remarkably smart, they still have the advantage perspective. Everyone is obsessed by The Glass House because they want to mate real bad and displaying those thing means you’re likely to attract a mate and earn respect. Even if it’s to the detriment of the planet, even if it’s to the detriment of everyone you ever set your eyes on, digitally or otherwise. The problem is people either lack perspective or they aren’t close enough to the divine.

I have asked people on Tinder what animal they would be if they could choose. Most girls choose a fox. I haven’t asked any guys and neither guy nor girl has yet asked me, but since we’re here I’m going to tell you. It’s

I think it’s the artists role to index something that is just beyond the obvious. This thing that is doing the indexing, like a forefinger, should be miraculous in its construction so that it looks as fascinating from close as from

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Whirl and Conflict, 2018. Opposite Page: Escalation Incident with Spiral, 2019

far; so that you stay transfixed and then after looking at it for so long, as soon as you think you know it, you don’t. If you know quantum physics, you don’t. If you know the Tao, you don’t. Same same. In Murmurs is an exhibition comprising sculpture, photography and painting. I have called it In Murmurs for two reasons. One: The main corpus of the show comprises my Murmurations. Two: I think a murmur is the perfect way of speaking because its soft and gentle, yet echoes everlastingly. It’s an expedient and effective gesture, fulfilling its role and then passing away like a breathe,

like an orgasm, like that small quark of energy that keeps us alive and vanishes in death. Big things start in the small. “Some things lead and some things follow Some breathe gently and some breathe hard Some are strong and some are weak Some destroy and some are destroyed.” Jake Michael Singer’s first solo show in Cape Town, In Murmurs, will be held at THK Gallery from 30 October – 06 December 2019.

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NWU GALLERY

Rinus van Niekerk - Echoes of the Northwind Banele Khoza – Seeking Love services.nwu.ac.za/nwu-gallery

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Echoes of the Northwind presents work by young artist Rinus van Niekerk. Originally self-taught, van Niekerk is the only South African artists to have apprenticed with the Norwegian Master Odd Nerdrum. His predominant inspiration comes from the old Masters, specifically the later works of Titian and Rembrandt. The narratives which inspire him have often been forgotten and neglected by modern historians and the contemporary art world. Using the same traditional studio practices from the sixteenth century, as taught by Nerdrum, his work involves stretching his own canvases by hand and preparing them with recipes found in old manuscripts from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This exhibition showcases works created over the last three years, following van Niekerk first stay at the Nerdrum school in Norway (2017) and his training at the Orieto workshop with Vincent Desiderio and Bernardo Siciliano in Italy (2018). Exhibition runs from 1 - 29 November 2019, NWU Botanical Garden, Monday – Friday, 09:30-16:00.

Above: Rinus van Niekerk, Silence and Solitude. 1,5m x 1,3m. Left: Rinus van Niekerk, The city of light. 1,8m x1,65


Banele Khoza, Projecting myself

Banele Khoza, Behind closed doors Opposite Page: Banele Khoza, Sikiti

“Love is a desire we all share; however, a lot of people will not admit that they are seeking a loving relationship. I love the idea of love and do wish for romantic love. I guess honesty is what I am also putting forward for people to be in better relationships with themselves and others,” Banele Khoza – Seeking Love “This exhibition is an open love letter to whoever is watching or reading my work – also to God/All/The universe. I am confessing that I am ready, and I am letting go of the search,” says Khoza. “Beginning the body of work was a little hard to be honest, especially having created a body of work in 2017-18 that ended up being showcased in institutions that I did not imagine would happen in my lifetime. However, I had to ground myself in everyday practice.” That meant bringing in his muses from the past and newly encountered ones: Lehlonolo Ramathe, Lerato Masters, Francis Buseko and Sandile Mhlongo. They sat for different pieces over a period of 4 months and became the foundation of his ideas and inspiration.

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The finished collection of works reflects that inspiration but also the complex nature of love, how important it is to acknowledge the heart’s desires and also to learn self-love – which he wants people to walk away from the exhibition thinking about. “Love is a desire we all share; however, a lot of people will not admit that they are seeking a loving relationship. I love the idea of love and do wish for romantic love. I guess honesty is what I am also putting forward for people to be in better relationships with themselves and others,” he says. Exhibition runs from 1 - 29 Nov 2019, NWU Main Gallery, Monday – Friday, 09:30-16:00.

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THE MELROSE GALLERY The Gallery of The People www.themelrosegallery.co.za

A leading Pan African Contemporary space. Opposite Page: Aza Mansongi, Parcours du Combattant

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ubbed ‘The Gallery of the People’ by Pitika Ntuli, The Melrose Gallery is a leading Pan African Contemporary space perfectly located in the economic hubs of Melrose Arch in Johannesburg and One&Only Cape Town. Passionate about African culture and traditions, the gallery has become a home in which artists, collectors and the public gather as a community to present and celebrate their stories, lives and creative practices in contemporary ways. Our stable boasts iconic names of the likes of Dr Esther Mahlangu, Mam Noria Mabasa, Dr Willie Bester and Professor Pitika Ntuli amongst others. These globally celebrated stalwarts provide a stable foundation for an exciting group of young guards who are swiftly rising from the African Continent.

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The Melrose Gallery coordinates a busy exhibition calendar of solo and group shows with well attended openings that are a highlight of the South African arts calendar. We coordinate SculptX, the largest annual sculpture fair in South Africa, every September. The third instalment in 2019 was a resounding success featuring over 290 sculptures submitted by more than 90 artists. We participate in several Art Fairs each year and also conceptualise and implement importantnon-commercial exhibitions with museums and national galleries. The Melrose Gallery – Johannesburg The Melrose Gallery is a beautiful 350 sq m space situated in the exclusive Melrose Arch urban precinct. We host regular solo and group exhibitions with extremely popular openings.

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Melrose Arch is conveniently located and provides a safe retail experience with ample parking, hotels, restaurants and outdoor areas that allow for an exciting urban sculpture park that runs throughout the year. The gallery is open from Mon to Sat from 9 to 6pm and from 9 to 4pm on Sundays. The Melrose Gallery – Cape Town The Melrose Gallery is an intimate space located at One&Only Cape Town, one of the most exclusive hotels in South Africa, situated at the V&A Waterfront. We curate 4 captivating exhibitions per year in this space that work to expose our talented stable of artists to international and local art collectors and enthusiasts who live and visit Cape Town. The gallery is manned from 9 to 5pm from Monday till Friday but access can be granted over weekends by the reception or concierge.

Dr Mbongeni Ngema and friends perform at the media launch of the Nelson Mandela Musical

Above: Esther Mahlangu, Abstract Left: Paul Blomkamp, Summer Cipher’s


Clint Strydom, Red Shoes/Prison Number Four

“The gallery has become a home in which artists, collectors and the public gather as a community to present and celebrate their stories, lives and creative practices” Adejoke Tugbiyele – BISO and Prizm 2019: We are pleased to be showing Adejoke Tugbiyele at BISO ( the International Biennial of Sculpture of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso) in October and November 2019 and at the Prizm Art Fair in Miami early in December 2019. Adejoke has been awarded the Prix Leridon at BISO 2019. Adejoke Tugbiyele is a talented, awardwinning international visual artist, sculptor, filmmaker, writer, activist and Fulbright scholar. Born in Brooklyn but of Nigerian descent, Adejoke has a Bachelor or Science degree in Architecture from the New Jersey Institute of Technology and a Masters in Fine Arts in sculpture from the Maryland Institute College of Art. She has exhibited at The Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, The Brooklyn

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Museum, Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, The Newark Museum, The Jewish Museum of New York, The United Nations Headquarters in New York, The Museum of Arts and Design and the Centre for Contemporary Art in Lagos Nigeria amongst numerous others. She was awarded the Rinehart School of Sculpture’s Amalie Rothschild Award in 2013, the Janet and Walter Sondheim Prize in 2013 (semifinalist) and the William M. Phillips Award for best figurative sculpture in 2012. Bold and exploratory in her work, she challenges deeply held complacency and disturbing notions about her own gender and sexual identity in society. She currently lives and works in Johannesburg.

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WHAT MAKES AN ARTIST…

The Cape Gallery Cape Town 7th – 28th November By Emma Lancaster www.capegallery.co.za

1. What is currently inspiring you? 2. What do you feel is integral to the work of an artist? 3. What is the best response you have ever had to a work? 4. How do you want people to react to your work? I asked the subjects of the Cape Gallery’s next exhibition; Simon Jones, Peter Van Straten, and Lambert Kriedemann, to choose one of these questions to answer. These questions may seem simple and a little cliché, but I find sometimes the simplest of questions yield the most interesting of answers. Simon Jones decided to answer the first question, several times, leading me to admire his commitment to finding just the right words to express his process and inspiration. With that in mind I will now let Simon speak for himself: “A current theme of choice is people in harmony with nature, ideally by the sea. The music I paint to plays a pivotal role and contributes greatly to the essence of my work. My predilection for sacred music lends a zen-like quality to the creative proceedings.” Peter Van Straten answered all my questions, but the overwhelming theme of the answer was how his art, and art in general should be received, and how it should affect how they relate to the world. “The greatest purpose I can demand of a painting - which like curtains, or a kitchen clock, hangs visible for all to see, all day, every day - is that it acts as a reminder to live more profoundly. In my ideal world every artwork would remind you of one particular, crucial facet of human being, a facet likely to be lost in the dense mist of mundanity, were it not for that artwork on the wall. It is a tragic reality of human existence that the mundane, which is meant to secure the space in which the spectacular

Above: Simon Jones, Just don’t sing. Opposite Page: Peter Van Straten, Fantasy for human and fish

might occur, hypnotises us to the point where the spectacular becomes impossible. It is the artist’s job, using the most mundane tools, to remedy this egregious situation.” Lambert Kriedemann describes the best reaction he has had to one of his works, as he recounts the process of painting for an audience: “I’d been a keen student of Tai Chi for about ten years and then joined a circle dance group and I wanted to express some of the sheer joy of movement. To do that effectively I needed a really big painting, so that I could make big, sweeping movements – a sort of mixture of painting and dancing…It seemed clear that in order to do what I planned, I’d need an audience… When everyone arrived, I explained that I’d be painting for an hour, to music. During that time, I asked everyone to remain absolutely silent… When the music stopped at the end of the hour, so did I. … I would stand them in front of it and ask two questions: “What do you see when you look at this painting?” and “How do you feel when you stand in front of it?”

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Lambert Kriedemann, Skedoxis. Opposite Page: Lambert Kriedemann, Mountains

I particularly remember the response of a close friend. “Lambert” she said after a while, “Do you know what you’ve done?” I don’t remember her exact words after that, but I remember the awe in her voice. An elderly gentleman answered both of my questions in a single sentence: “I see spirits, and they’re calling me home”. Several people said that they felt they were in the presence of angels.”

Lambert Kriedemann, Beach

Art is not just for the benefit of the viewe, it is also a way for artists to express their feelings on the world around them in away that aims to alter our reality for the better. These 3 artists may all have different styles, goal, and outlooks, but they all have a profound love of art and its effect on humanity. Simon Jones, Peter Van Straten, and Lambert Kriedemann will be on show at the Cape Gallery from the 7th of November until the 5th of December, 60 Church Street, Cape Town.

Lambert Kriedemann, Wave.

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“ABANDONMENT”

Explored through group exhibition at RK Contemporary Gallery www.rkcontemporary.com

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n evocative selection of artworks by renowned contemporary artists which explore the topic of “Abandonment” will be on exhibit at RK Contemporary gallery in Riebeek Kasteel from 3 – 24 November 2019. Owner and curator Astrid McLeod invited selected artists to submit two-dimensional paintings that explore the visual and social significance of abandonment – asking them to delve into the beauty of the absent and the intrigue of the neglected, discarded and deserted. “This has resulted in a diverse collection of artworks from artists Anthony Harris, Willem Pretorius, Danielle Jordaan, and Chris Kriek,” explains McLeod. “Each of them have a very different take on abandonment.” Landscape artist Anthony Harris, who has chosen abandoned land as his subject matter, says that he uses the landscape as a metaphor. “My work explores the complexity of the terrain in ways that challenge the viewers’ own boundaries. These landscapes hold within them aspects other than pure nature the panorama is composed of elements that bear witness to change and evolution.” Willem Pretorius, who has been a top 40 finalist in Sanlam’s Portrait Awards four times (2013, 2015, 2017,2019), has created a series of work that portray abandoned homes, swimming pools and buildings. The subject of his work is mainly concerned with the decay and abandonment of places within the South African Platteland.

Willem Pretorius, Abandoned Pool, Nelspoort’, 54 x 3cm, oil on canvas, (Detail)

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Chris Kriek, Abandoned 3, charcoal on fabriano, 44.5 x 55.5cm

Chris Kriek, Abandoned 4, charcoal on fabriano, 44.5 x 55.5cm. Opposite Page: Danielle Jordaan, The space in between (ii), 50 x 30cm oil on wood panel

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Anthony Harris, DEEP TIME, Communication Lines, 50 x 50cm

“By painting these scenes I want to capture their essence, stripped of all pride. Almost like a snapshot in oil, a moment frozen in time. I like to document these man-made structures and the way nature reclaims them. I find beauty in the decay and find these empty, wide open spaces, devoid of humans, very evocative. It’s almost as if they mirror our own inner landscape and feelings of loneliness, abandonment and disillusionment. I think it reminds us of our own transcience and the brutality of time,” says Pretorius. Young Stellenbosch based artist, Danielle Jordaan has chosen to paint a series of abandoned interiors and says that she finds intrigue in the duality that lies between the inside and outside spaces and places we inhabit. “The distinction between what is sacred and the everyday is broken down in my work and I took

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inspiration from scenes abandoned by human presence, depicting places I’ve travelled to and contrasted with everyday bedroom scenes.” Cape Town based Chris Kriek, who specialises in analogue art photography explains that for this exhibition he worked with 8mm film that he collected from second hand shops over the years. “The actual abandoned nature of the film footage started my exploration into the memories we choose to abandon as oppose to the ones we keep. And on a more personal note, which parts of the social belief systems from our cultural heritage we choose to abandon – those connected to religion, masculinity, gender, environment and more.” www.rkcontemporary.com Email art@rkcontemporary.com

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BURSTING INTO LIFE

Helen van Stolk Solo Exhibition 23 Nov – 17 Dec By Gita Claassen

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nce again, AITY Gallery is proud to present Helen van Stolk’s organic botanical abstracts in a solo show by the artist. Helen’s lively paintings take on a distinct earthiness this time around and reminds of the woody scents of fynbos after rain – one can almost hear the bees and the Yellow Bishops just beyond sight. The muted colours are modern and right on trend while simultaneously retaining a classic quality, so should be a delight to anyone looking to add art to their interior space this season. Helen’s abstracts have structure seldom seen in this genre – clear foreground, middle- and backgrounds can be detected, with placement of main elements in strong positions within the frame. Where abstracts can often feel chaotic, the diagonally placed objects, even though overlapping, retain a certain spaciousness and harmony. The fragmented “bushes” and “flowers” are free and flowing, never confined, and deliciously whimsical. Bursting Into Life, 2000 x 1650

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Magic in your World, 1150 x 1150

The Garden Party, 1000 x 1000. Opposite Page: A Dragonfly’s Delight , 910 x 1200


“This exhibition is a beautiful reminder of the restorative impact the natural world can have on the human spirit.” She uses oils in conjunction with other materials, which lend a luxurious feel on the canvas, and the various mark-making techniques lend texture and mood. Most of Helen’s paintings are perfect for interior spaces in which one wants to relax – tranquillity avails, with just enough contrast to keep interest. BURSTING INTO LIFE is Helen van Stolk’s third solo exhibition. She takes the viewer on an exploratory journey of her intuitive process, allowing them to become joint-creators through thought and share in the creative pleasure. Her work has a freedom like never before and captures the energizing effects nature can have on us. Her practice involves regular inspirational top-up trips out of the studio and into nature – sketching, writing and feeling. These moments are held internally to gradually and meditatively unfold on the canvas. This exhibition is a beautiful reminder of the restorative impact the natural world can have on the human spirit. Artist Statement; “To suggest and express the energy, mood, and feeling an object, space or person gifts me: that is the dream. It is not the external, the case it comes in, not the façade and the tangible, but the spirit I wish to portray. I follow the path; a feeling or story takes me down, and I let the work unfold, exploring detail with awe, but letting it diminish into moments of meditation. I use a variety of materials – ink, pencils, acrylic, oil and collage, to get in touch with my subject matter, allowing the process of working and playing to intuitively guide me. The act of mark-making, putting down, taking away, placing, shifting and being still takes me to a place where I want to be. Light and positivity has always been important in my work, which is why there are visible traces of embracing these elements in the work I do.” Who says plants don’t talk, 1150 x 1150

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HERMANUS FYNARTS 2020 & the Tollman Bouchard Finlayson Art Award hermanusfynarts.co.za

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ermanus FynArts festival enters its eighth year from 5 – 16 June 2020 with a programme that continues to grow with new treats, twists and tweaks. The festival programme will be launched early in 2020. In the meanwhile sign up for the newsletter at hermanusfynarts.co.za to keep up with news about confirmed events, artists, presenters and musicians in the line-up for FynArts 2020.

As the popular Tollman Bouchard Finlayson Art Award and unique exhibition of finalists enters its seventh year artists and festival goers can expect an enhanced and refined competition and exhibition. We are deeply grateful for the continued support and encouragement of the Tollman family and the staff of the Bouchard Finlayson Winery.

Winning work, Still Life water colour (The theme was Harmony)

– The theme for 2020 is Biomimicry – design inspiration from nature Developments and innovations include the following: – exhibition of finalists will be increased to 70 artworks – lighting will be installed to accommodate the increased size of the exhibition – opening hours for viewing will include both Sundays – times will be announced in the FynArts programme booklet – an increased number of judges – from three to five – will include well-respected artists as wel as one representative from Bouchard Finlayson and one representative from the FynArts Advisory Board – a minimum diameter of 40cms for each tondo will be introduced to allow for a visually improved exhibition As in previous years, the work of the finalists will be exhibited in the working wine cellar at Bouchard Finlayson. This exhibition will remain in place for an extended period until 31 August 2020. The Rules, including criteria for artists, and registration/entry forms can be downloaded at hermanusfynarts.co.za

Winner, Neeske Alexander

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H E R M A N U S

5 - 16 JUNE 2020 A C E L E B R AT I O N O F S O U T H A F R I C A N A RT S


Business Art News

STRAUSS & CO

November sale explores South African art’s love affair with Paris www.straussart.co.za

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trauss & Co is pleased to announce details of the theme for its forthcoming Johannesburg sale, due to be held at its Houghton offices on Monday, 11 November. The summer sale will focus collectors’ attention on the strong influence Paris has exerted on South African art throughout the twentieth century.

“Paris was a beacon for countless South African artists,” says Susie Goodman, executive director at Strauss & Co. “The first South African artist to study in Paris was Robert Gwelo Goodman, in 1895. The list of local artists who followed in his footsteps is as remarkable as it is long. The top three lots in our upcoming sale are by Alexis Preller, William Kentridge, and Penny Siopis, highly acclaimed artists who each spent time in Paris early in their careers.” The top lot is Preller’s Icon Barbare (Adam), an oil painting quoting his powerful 1969 intaglio Adam (sold by Strauss & Co in 2016 for R6.8 million). Shown on the artist’s 1972 Pretoria Art Museum retrospective, Icon Barbare (estimate R8.5 – 10 million) depicts the biblical first man with Prelleresque flourishes. “The Christ-like beard and hair are ambiguously transformed with green and leaf-like tendrils thus assuming a pagan quality,” notes artist and Preller expert Karel Nel. “The transmuted presence feels more like an icon of Pan, the Greek god of nature, of fertility, the mountains and wilds.” The November sale includes a 1954 sketch for the upper part of the central panel of the large three-panel All Africa mural, installed at the former Receiver of Revenue (now SARS) offices, Johannesburg (estimate R400 000 – 600 000). Assuredly loose in style, this oil on canvas reveals Preller’s admiration for French Fauvist painter Raoul Dufy, a lifelong friend of painter Othon Friesz. Penny Siopis, Act I Scene II, oil on canvas, 120 x 120cm, R 2 800 000 - 3 500 000

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Alexis Preller, Mapogga Wedding, oil on canvas, 62 x 52cm, R 2 000 000 - 3 000 000

William Kentridge, Iris, mixed media with collage on paper, 142 x 118cm, R 3 000 000 - 5 000 000. Opposite Page: Alexis Preller, Icon Barbare (Adam), oil and gold leaf on panel, 60 by 50cm R 8 500 000 - 10 000 000

Preller met Friesz, a teacher at Académie de la Grande Chaumière, in 1937 during his first trip to Paris. Lacking funds to study at his art school, Preller invested his energies in the “tireless examination of the works of modern artists on view in galleries,” according his biographer Esmé Berman. During these expeditions Preller recognised in Gauguin “a guide to the direction he himself might follow”. This influence is evident in Mapogga Wedding (R2 – 3 million), a 1952 oil depicting a bride and groom set slightly askew with Gauguinesque figures in the background.

million), which was interrupted by Siopis’s stay in Paris and completed upon her return to Johannesburg à la Melancholia. This lot includes various pictorial elements (tortoise shell, porcupine quills, classical statuettes, red arum lilies) appearing in Melancholia.

The influence of Paris is also evident in the work of contemporary masters such as William Kentridge and Penny Siopis. In 1981 Kentridge studied mime and theatre at a Paris acting school founded by Jacques Lecoq. A decade later, having decisively returned to making art, he produced the collage Iris, a highly unusual colour work portraying a single flower in Van Gogh’s Provencal tones of blue and purple (estimate R3 – 5 million). Five years later, Siopis undertook a sevenmonth residency at the Cité Internationale des Arts after winning the Volkskas Atelier Award with her well-known painting Melancholia. The forthcoming sale includes a companion work, Act I Scene II (estimate R2.8 – 3.5

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The upcoming sale is an opportunity for collectors and art lovers to explore South African art’s indebtedness to Paris. Artists from various periods are represented in the catalogue, including Ruth Everard Haden, Clément Sénèque and Maud Sumner, who all studied in Paris during the interwar years. Sumner’s Woman Seated at a Mirror (estimate R350 000 – 500 000) is an intimate domestic scene in the style of Bonnard and Vuillard. Postwar painters also feature prominently. They include Erik Laubscher, who studied at the Académie Montmartre under Fernand Léger, Bettie Cilliers-Barnard, Sydney Goldblatt and Anna Vorster, who all studied at the Paris art school founded by cubist painter André Lhote. Standout lots include Laubscher’s School of Paris work from 1956, Abstract Landscape (R250 000 – 300 000) and Cilliers-Barnard’s international style Abstract Composition (estimate R80 000 – 120 000) painted a year later.

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Diane Victor, There’s Fire in the Thatch, charcoal and chalk pastel on paper, 60 by 50cm, R 300 000 - 500 000

Paris was more than simply a workshop for painterly innovation; it provided shelter for dissidents and exiles. Following in the footsteps of pioneering abstract painter Ernest Mancoba, who settled in Paris in 1938, Gerard Sekoto chose to leave apartheid South Africa for the City of Lights a decade later. A highly collectible artist, Sekoto is represented in a wine-coloured composition from 1968, Three Figures (estimate R350 000 – 500 000). Highlights from the contemporary selection include Diane Victor’s There’s Fire in the Thatch (estimate R300 000 – 500 000), a large charcoal and chalk pastel drawing portraying six figures locked in an embrace hovering over a burning landscape. Victor won the 1988 Absa l’Atelier Art Competition and – like Siopis – stayed at the Cité Internationale des Arts. During her ten-month residency

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she produced drawings combining classical references with contemporary social comment and autobiographical detail. All these works will go under the hammer on Monday, 11 November at Strauss & Co’s new sales and exhibition space at 89 Central Street, Houghton, in Johannesburg. The Paristhemed sale will also include a collection of Edoardo Villa bronze sculptures from the estate of Aldo Carrara, a lifelong friend of the artist, as well as a number of noteworthy landscape scenes by JH Pierneef. Strauss & Co will be hosting an extensive programme of public talks and social events in the lead-up to this sale.

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Art, antiques, objets d’art, furniture, and jewellery wanted for forthcoming auctions

John Koenakeefe Mohl, oil on board SOLD R100,000 View previous auction results at www.rkauctioneers.co.za

011 789 7422 • 011 326 3515 • 083 675 8468 • 12 Allan Road, Bordeaux, Johannesburg

5th Avenue Fine Art Auctioneers Maggie Laubser, Oil - Sold for R 950 000

Next Auction, December 8th, at 10am ~ Now accepting entries for this auction www.5thAveAuctions.co.za

Enquiries: stuart@5aa.co.za ~ 011 781 2040


Business Art News

STRAUSS & CO

October results bode well for the Pierneef market www.straussart.co.za

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H “Henk” Pierneef demonstrated his enduring appeal at Strauss & Co’s R55million Spring sale, held in Cape Town on 7 October, achieving a total of R9.65 million from nine lots sold. The top lot, a monumental study of interlaced camelthorn trees in a landscape near Thabazimbi, sold for R2.73 million. The results marked a welcome return to form for Pierneef, whose prices had been diluted by a recent fire sale by a distressed collector. This short-term market trend has been corrected by Strauss & Co, and bodes well for its forthcoming November sale in Johannesburg. The upcoming sale features 14 lots by Pierneef, all paintings, each demonstrative of his great facility within the landscape genre. Works in Pierneef’s later, monumental style have long represented the summit of achievement for serious collectors. The upcoming sale includes two lots representative of this style. A 1946 work titled Landscape (estimate R2 – 3 million) is a stylised bushveld scene featuring a choreographed vista encompassing trees, mountains and billowing clouds. The desaturated tones of this work contrast with the rusted red and browns of Landscape with Trees (estimate R1.5 – 2 million), which is dominated by canopied camelthorn, familiar patriarchs of Pierneef’s later landscapes. “Bury me under a camelthorn tree,” Pierneef once said, “with its straight, manly character guarding me and its roots deep in the soil of Africa.” His utterance was an expression of love, not a dictum, a fact evident in another major Pierneef lot on offer.

Landscape with Trees. oil on board, 46 by 59cm, R 1 500 000 - 2 000 000

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Marone, District Lydenburg (estimate R2 – 3 million) depicts a settled landscape about to be moistened by light afternoon rain. Dated 1948, the artist’s bushveld landscape unusually features a pair of pawpaw trees as its central arboreal feature. This impressive painting, showcasing Pierneef’s ability to balance harmoniously naturalistic description and stylised invention, was based on an earlier watercolour study, sold by Strauss & Co in March 2017 for R102 312. “How wonderful, now, that the present lot, the magnificent conclusion of the study, has come to light,” says Strauss & Co senior art specialist Alastair Meredith. “Much larger and worked up in oils on canvas, the painting is as dramatic as it is assured, and shows the artist at his latter-career peak.” Notwithstanding his predilection for tried and tested subjects – camelthorn trees, mountains, cumulous clouds – Pierneef’s body of work contains many surprises. A highlight of Strauss & Co’s October sale was Gold & Green, Rooiplaat, N.T., a phenomenal neoimpressionist study of a riverine landscape northeast of Pretoria. Bidders visibly sat up when it went under the hammer. The work more than trebled the pre-sale estimate when it sold for R2.73 million. The upcoming sale includes another gem from Pierneef’s earlier career. Replenishing rain is the central feature of An Approaching Storm (estimate R350 000 – 450 000), an evocative canvas painted in 1926 after his return from an influential European tour. Meredith, who is an expert in earlier twentieth-century South African art, describes Pierneef’s works from this period as “thrillingly experimental, stylistically varied and fearlessly expressed”. A visionary artist who replenished himself through travel, the upcoming sale includes a number of works by Pierneef recording his wanderings across southern Africa. Matopos (estimate R500 000 – 700 000) depicts the granite mounds in present-day Matobo National Park in southwest Zimbabwe. The two small-scale oils, Kameelberge naby Johan Albrechts Hoogte, SWA (estimate R200 000 – 300 000) and Hartbeeshuisie (estimate R220 000 – 280 000), derive from Pierneef’s two trips to Namibia (formerly South West Africa) in 1923 and 1924. The former depicts

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an outcrop in southern Namibia and features dramatic, dusky pinks, while the latter is a gestural portrayal of a home and coop sheltered by trees. Commenting on the latter painting, Meredith says: “It is the kind of picture in which critics of the time recognised a deliberate attempt at founding a particular South African School of painting: it captured a unique, local light, and gave prominence to the country’s vernacular architecture.” The artist’s ability to use pigment to translate an ephemeral appreciation of light is abundantly

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Marone, District Lydenburg, oil on canvas, 50 by 65cm, R 2 000 000 - 3 000 000

clear in Extensive Landscape, Dusk (estimate R250 000 – 350 000), a small painting that nonetheless compacts vastness, solitude and awe into a horizontal frame. Pierneef’s work is a felicitous part of the Strauss & Co story. In 2009, at the company’s inaugural sale in Johannesburg, Pierneef’s woodcut of Meerlust was the second lot to go under the hammer. Since then, Strauss & Co has successfully sold a total of 340 lots by this master, achieving nearly R200 million in sales. Fashions may shift, headwinds may blow, clouds may gather, but Pierneef’s status among collectors is assured.

Strauss & Co’s offering of 14 lots by JH Pierneef will go under the hammer on Monday, 11 November at 89 Central Street, Houghton, in Johannesburg. The sale will also include a collection of Edoardo Villa bronze sculptures from the estate of Aldo Carrara, a lifelong friend of the artist, as well as feature a segment devoted to South African artists linked to Paris. Strauss & Co will be hosting an extensive programme of public talks and social events in the lead-up to this sale.


Business Art News

ASPIRE ART AUCTIONS

Collecting Contemporary African Art for Contemporary Africans www.aspireart.net

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spire has a firm and stated commitment to expanding its expertise and its reach beyond South Africa’s borders into the rest of Africa. This is not only because the company wishes to see the local art market grow and diversify into different countries, but also because it feels that art from the rest of the continent could be making a contribution to how the South African market is made up and what serious collectors should be paying attention to. It’s often remarked upon that Africa is the ‘last frontier’ art market, with the International Monetary Fund pointing out that six of the ten fastest-growing global economies are in Africa. ArtPrice and other sources also point out that there has been a spike in presence and museum shows for modern and contemporary African artists in the European and US markets. And yet, internal to the African continent itself, there remains a lingering reputation that the African market represents risky business. Organic growth is slow, with not many new African collectors buying work in their domestic markets. Coupled with this is the long-standing tendency for African collectors to buy directly from artists. Another stumbling block to growth in African markets across the continent, apart from African work moving to major US and European markets to be bought by collectors there, is the tendency to consider African Art as one phenomenon or market – this in a continent with 54 countries and over a billion people.

Yomi Momoh, Bathers II

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Ato Delaquis, Inner City Market Rust. Opposite Page: Titus Agbara, Figures in a street

“Africa is the ‘last frontier’ art market, with the International Monetary Fund pointing out that six of the ten fastest-growing global economies are in Africa.” More positively however, African markets are also demonstrating exciting growth trajectories, with a rise in museums, new and prestigious art schools, a growing number of high net worth individuals and rapid urbanisation. Global attention is also growing, with the aforementioned rise in dedicated museum shows for African art happening alongside a jump in the number of Art Fairs showcasing art from the continent. Many of these are in South Africa, but the North and West African markets are also where an explosion of activity is taking place. In its first foray into the art market in the rest of Africa, Aspire offered in their Summer sale a special section of work from Nigeria and Ghana. The global market for Nigerian art was long dominated by the likes of Ben Enwonwu, who developed in the early twentieth century, much like many black South African modernists, a distinctive response to European

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modernist influences. Since then, Nigerian art styles have diversified considerably, with both Igbo and Yoruba traditions feeding into new stylistic innovations. Aspire has also just announced a groundbreaking new partnership with highly regarded French auction house PIASA. PIASA is one of the largest and most innovative auction houses in France, and is also the biggest dealer in contemporary African art at auction in that country. The companies will collaborate on consigning a properly African art auction, combining South African lots with art from the rest of Africa, in Cape Town in February 2020, in what will be a first for the South African art auction market. In developing and executing the collaboration, Aspire is announcing its intention to expand and diversify its market approach and collector base.

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Business Art News

STEPHAN WELZ & CO. Final live auction of 2019 www.swelco.co.za

Jacob Hendrik Pierneef, Magaliesburg, oil on canvas, 61,5 by 92cm, R1,500,000 - R2,000,000 102

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tephan Welz and Co. will hold their final live auction of 2019 in Johannesburg, in November, at the Killarney Country Club, and will feature a superb collection of works by South African masters such as J.H. Pierneef, Alexis Preller, Pieter Wenning, Maud Sumner and Hugo Naudé.

Leading the auction is a wonderful collection of works by the architect of the Cape Impressionist style, Pieter Wenning, which includes, among others, works such as Landscape With Vineyard, Constantia which featured in Boonzaier and Lipschitz’s book on the artist, and the lush and textured Still Life With Ginger Jar, Vase and Red Plate. Alongside the works of Wenning are J.H. Pierneef’s rich and expansive Magaliesburg landscape, which features rolling clouds above undulating hills, with small houses nestled at the heart of the landscape. Contrasting in scene and setting to this work by Pierneef is Alexis Preller’s intimate homage to Vincent van Gogh. Painted in 1935, the year after Preller’s initial arrival in London, it is the South African master’s version of van Gogh’s Seated Zouave, created as the young artist began to explore his influences and techniques far from the comforts of South Africa.

Pieter Willem Frederick Wenning, Landscape With Vineyard, Constantia, oil on canvas, R400,000 - R600,000

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Alexis Preller, Vincent Van Gogh, 35,5 by 30,5cm, R300,000 - R500,000. Opposite Page: Alexis Preller, Guna Massyn, oil on canvas, 61,5 by 51cm, R800,000 - R1,200,000.

Alongside these works will feature a range of works by artists including Nita Spilhaus, Dorothy Kay, Nelson Makamo, Sam Nhlengethwa and Walter Battiss, amongst others. Following their successful October auction at their new office space at 14 Dreyer Street in Cavendish, the Cape Town branch of Stephan Welz and Co. is actively consigning for their upcoming February 2020 auction, and the Johannesburg branch is currently consigning for their upcoming March 2020 auction.

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If you are interested in having your artwork valued, with a view to consigning for sale, please contact Stephan Welz and Co. Contact: info@swelco.co.za, 011 880 3125 (Johannesburg), 021 794 6461 (Cape Town) Whatsapp 079 431 9415 for a confidential and professional evaluation.

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ONGOING SHOWS OPENING EXHIBITIONS NOVEMBER 2019 Heather Auer, Acrylic on canvass


ONGOING SHOWS: NOVEMBER 2019

GEORGE MUSEUM CENTENNIAL A CENTURY OF SOUTH AFRICAN ART FROM THE SANLAM ART COLLECTION 1919-2018 UNTIL 08/11/2019

NELSON MANDELA METROPOLITAN MUSEUM ART OUR PASSION- MUSEUM OUR HOME UNTIL 08/11/2019

UNTIL 08/11/2019

UNTIL 08/11/2019

GOODMAN GALLERY CPT CLIVE VAN DEN BERG LINE OF BEAUTY UNTIL 16/11/2019

THE MELROSE GALLERY, MELROSE ARCH, JHB

SMITH

IN HOW I FORGOT THE COLOURS OF THE RAINBOW BRETT CHARLES SEILER SOLO EXHIBITION UNTIL 12/11/2019 WWW.SMITHSTUDIO.CO.ZA

UNTIL 12/11/2019

MATERIAL IDENTITIES ARTWORK BY ADEJOKE TUGBIYELE UNTIL 17/11/2019

WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM

WWW.THEMELROSEGALLERY.COM

UNTIL 16/11/2019

UNTIL 17/11/2019

UNTIL 19/11/2019

STEVENSON CAPE TOWN PAULO NAZARETH UNTIL 23/11/2019 WWW.STEVENSON.INFO UNTIL 19/11/2019 108

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UNTIL 23/11/2019


ONGOING SHOWS: NOVEMBER 2019

STEVENSON CAPE TOWN PAUL GUSH WELCOME TO FRONTIER COUNTRY UNTIL 23/11/2019 WWW.STEVENSON.INFO

WWW.ARTB.CO.ZA

OLIEWENHUIS ART MUSEUM PHATSHOANE HENNEY NEW BREED ART COMPETITION EXHIBITION UNTIL 24/11/2019 WWW.NASMUS.CO.ZA

UNTIL 23/11/2019

UNTIL 24/11/2019

UNTIL 24/11/2019

DYMAN GALLERY DOMINIQUE ZINKPE SOLO EXHIBITION UNTIL 25/11/2019

UJ ART GALLERY CONVERSING THE LAND UNTIL 27/11/2019

DYMANGALLERY.CO.ZA

WWW.ARTS.UJ.AC.ZA

UNTIL 25/11/2019

UNTIL 25/11/2019

UNTIL 27/11/2019

ARTIST PROOF STUDIO UNTIL 30/11/2019

DYLAN LEWIS SCULPTURE GARDEN ALL VISITS BY APPOINTMENT UNTIL 30/11/2019

WWWARTISTPROOFSTUDIO.CO.ZA

INFO@DYLANART.CO.ZA.

WALL ART GALLERY 2ND FLOOR, OLD PORT CAPTAIN’S BUILDING, V&A WATERFRONT UNTIL 30/11/2019 0214181953

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

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ARTB GALLERY CERAMICS EXPO UNTIL 24/11/2019

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ONGOING SHOWS: NOVEMBER 2019

ECLECTICA ART & ANTIQUES JOHANNES MEINTJIES UNTIL 30/11/2019 WWW.ECLECTICAARTANDANTIQUES.CO.ZA

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

ECLECTICA CONTEMPORARY COUNTER CURRENT GROUP EXHIBITION UNTIL 30/11/2019 WWW.ECLECTICACONTEMPORARY.CO.ZA

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

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UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

SA PRINT GALLERY 109 SIR LOWRY ROAD, WOODSTOCK, 021 462 6851 UNTIL 30/11/2019

SALON NINETY ONE HELIOS A SOLO EXHIBITION BY KIRSTEN BEETS UNTIL 30/11/2019

PRINTGALLERY.CO.ZA

WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA

UNTIL 30/11/2019

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UNTIL 30/11/2019


ONGOING SHOWS: NOVEMBER 2019 - MARCH 2020

WHAT IF THE WORLD JOHN MURRAY SOLO EXHIBITION UNTIL 30/11/2019 WWW.WHATIFTHEWORLD.COM

ECLECTICA PRINT GALLERY AN ECLECTIC MIX OF PAST MASTERS AND CONTEMPORARY PRINT MAKERS UNTIL 01/12/2019 WWW.ECLECTICAPRINTGALLERY.CO.ZA

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 30/11/2019

UNTIL 01/12/2019

PALETTE FINE ART GALLERY OPEN AT CAPE QUARTER SQUARE UNTIL 01/12/2019

STANDARD BANK GALLERY A RESILIENT VISIONARY: POETIC EXPRESSIONS OF DAVID KOLOANE UNTIL 06/12/2019

THK GALLERY JAKE MICHAEL SINGER: IN MURMURS UNTIL 06/12/2019

WWW.PALETTESCULPTUREGALLERY.CO.ZA

WWW.THKGALLERY.COM

UNTIL 01/12/2019

UNTIL 06/12/2019

UNTIL 06/12/2019

SMAC CAPE TOWN MARLENE STEYN DEEP SHE DIVE HER UNTIL 07/12/2019

NORVAL FOUNDATION IN PURSUIT OF VENUS [INFECTED]: LISA REIHANA UNTIL 20/01/2020

WWWSMACGALLERY.COM

LA MOTTE MUSEUM LAND REWOVEN / LAND HERWEEF: MJ LOURENS IN CONVERSATION WITH J H PIERNEEF 09/08/2019 UNTIL 12/01/2020 WWW.LA-MOTTE.CO.ZA

NORVAL FOUNDATION.ORG

UNTIL 07/12/2019

UNTIL 12/01/2020

UNTIL 12/01/2020

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WWWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

NORVAL FOUNDATION WHY SHOULD I HESITATE: SCULPTURE WILLIAM KENTRIDGE UNTIL 23/03/2020 WWW.NORVALFOUNDATION.ORG

ZEITZ MOCAA WHY SHOULD I HESITATE: DRAWINGS WILLIAM KENTRIDGE UNTIL 23/03/2020 WWW.ZEITZMOCAA.MUSEUM

UNTIL 05/03/2020

UNTIL 23/03/2020

UNTIL 23/03/2020

ZEITZ MOCAA

WWW.ZEITZMOCAA.MUSEUM

RUPERT MUSEUM FACES AND FIGURES - SELECTED 20TH CENTURY SOUTH AFRICAN ARTISTS UNTIL 12/04/2020 WWW.RUPERTMUSEUM.ORG

UNTIL 30/03/2020

UNTIL 12/04/2020

ART@AFRICA WATER WARS UNTIL 05/03/2020

SOUTH AFRICAN ART TIMES SA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

MICHAELIS SCHOOL OF FINE ART AND SO THE STORIES RAN AWAY UNTIL 30/03/2020

JUNE EDITION 2019

JUNE 2019 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

LIST YOUR EXHIBITION TODAY ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


OPENING EXHIBITIONS NOVEMBER 2019 WEEKS 1-4

Chris Kriek, Abandoned 2, charcoal on fabriano 44.5 x 55.5cm, RK Contemporary


WWW.ARTGO.CO.ZA OPENING EXHIBITIONS: NOVEMBER 2019 WEEK 1

NWU GALLERY BANELE KHOZA – SEEKING LOVE 01/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019

01/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

NWU BOTANICAL GARDEN GALLERY RINUS VAN NIEKERK – ECHOES OF THE NORTHWIND 01/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019 01/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

02/11/2019 UNTIL 14/11/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

RK CONTEMPORARY ABANDONMENT WILLEM PRETORIUS, ANTHONY HARRIS, CHRIS KRIEK, DANIELLE JORDAAN WWW.RKCONTEMPORARY.COM

UCT IRMA STERN MUSEUM

A SPLENDID SUMMER SENDOFF CELEBRATING CHRISTOPHER PETER’S 40YRS AT UCT IRMA STERN 02/11/2019 UNTIL 16/11/2019

WWW.IRMASTERN.CO.ZA 02/11/2019 UNTIL 16/11/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

BERMAN CONTEMPORARY VOICES FROM THE EARTH INGRID BOLTON, NATALIE FIELD, MARIAN HESTER RAND STEAM SHOPPING CENTRE 02/11/2019 UNTIL 14/11/2019

02/11/2019 UNTIL 09/11/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

03/11/2019 UNTIL 24/11/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

ART@AFRICA ARBOR ONEIRICA GROUP EXHIBTIION 06/11/2019 UNTIL 06/12/2019

GALLERYONE11 NEW MEDIA “HIDDEN WORLDS” 06/11/2019 UNTIL 03/12/2019

WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

WWW.GALLERYONE11.COM

06/11/2019 UNTIL 06/12/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER 118

06/11/2019 UNTIL 31/12/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A

06/11/2019 UNTIL 03/12/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER


Heather Auer, Walking with Angels, acrylic on canvas,120 x 90 cm (Detail)

The Heather Auer Art Studio Visit us at Glencairn, Simonstown (By Appointment Only) South Africa: +27 (0)82 779 2695 / Email: info@heatherauer.com

AN EXHIBITION BY KIRSTEN BEETS

30 OCTOBER - 30 NOVEMBER

91 KLOOF STREET GARDENS. CAPE TOWN WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA


WWW.ARTGO.CO.ZA OPENING EXHIBITIONS: NOVEMBER WEEK 1 - 2

GROUND ART CAFFE WHERE THERE IS LIFE BY LIFFEY JOY 07/11/2019 UNTIL 03/12/2019 WWW.GROUNDARTCAFFE.CO.ZA.CO.ZA

07/11/2019 UNTIL 03/12/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

HOLISTIC HEALTH AND CREATIVE CENTER THE SUBTLE BODY EXHIBITION PENELOPE JACK 7/11/2019 UNTIL 5/12/2019 7/11/2019 UNTIL 5/12/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

07/11/2019 UNTIL 07/01/2020 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY CONNECTED BY FIRE WOOD FIRED CERAMICS GROUP EXHIBITION 12/11/2019 UNTIL 13/12/2019 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

THE CAPE GALLERY SIMON JONES, PETER VAN STRATEN, AND LAMBERT KRIEDEMANN 07/11/2019 UNTIL 05/12/2019 WWW.CAPEGALLERY.CO.ZA

GALLERY 2 FLOATING - A SOLO EXHIBITION BY FIONA POLE 09/11/2019 UNTIL 20/12/2019

07/11/2019 UNTIL 05/12/2019 WEEK 1 NOVEMBER

09/11/2019 UNTIL 20/12/2019 WEEK 2 NOVEMBER

12/11/2019 UNTIL 13/12/2019 WEEK 2 NOVEMBER

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY JOHAN COETZEE RICHTERSVELD - SOLO EXHIBITION 12/11/2019 UNTIL 13/12/2019

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY STAIN BAM - SOLO EXHIBITION 12/11/2019 UNTIL 13/12/2019

EVERARD READ JHB MANIPULATED IMAGE LIONEL SMIT 14/11/2019 UNTIL 15/12/2019

WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA

12/11/2019 UNTIL 13/12/2019 WEEK 2 NOVEMBER

12/11/2019 UNTIL 13/12/2019 WEEK 2 NOVEMBER

14/11/2019 UNTIL 15/12/2019 WEEK 2 NOVEMBER

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WWW.GALLERY2.CO.ZA

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OPENING :: 22 OCTOBER 2019 18:30 FOR 19:00 WALKABOUTS 26 OCTOBER & 09 NOVEMBER 2019 11:30 - 13:00 T 011 559 2556/2099

GALLERY HOURS M O N D AY – F R I D AY 09:00 – 16:00 CLOSED ON WEEKENDS + P U B L I C H O L I D AY S

K I N G S WAY C A M P U S CNR UNIVERSIT Y ROAD + K I N G S WAY AV E N U E AU C K L A N D PA R K


WWW.ARTGO.CO.ZA OPENING EXHIBITIONS: NOVEMBER WEEK 2 - 4

NELSON MANDELA METROPOLITAN MUSEUM THROUGH OUR EYES: JOURNEY TO AMERICA 14/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019 14/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019 WEEK 2 NOVEMBER

UNISA END OF YEAR MULTIMEDIA & BVA STUDENTS EXHIBITION CAPE TOWN, DE KORF BUILDING, BLOCK C, TIME: 18:00 19/11/2019 UNTIL 29/11/2019 WEEK 3 NOVEMBER

INFECTING THE CITY PUBLIC ARTS FESTIVAL 18/11/2019 UNTIL 24/11/2019 WWW.INFECTINGTHECITY.COM 18/11/2019 UNTIL 24/11/2019 WEEK 3 NOVEMBER

BERMAN CONTEMPORARY SECRET LANGUAGE STEFAN BLOM 19/11/2019 UNTIL 02/12/2019 RAND STEAM SHOPPING CENTRE 19/11/2019 UNTIL 02/12/2019 WEEK 3 NOVEMBER

UNISA END OF YEAR MULTIMEDIA & BVA STUDENTS EXHIBITION DURBAN ART GALLERY TIME: 14:00 21/11/2019 UNTIL 06/12/2019 WEEK 3 NOVEMBER

UNTIL 22/11/2019 WEEK 4 NOVEMBER

UNISA UNISA END OF YEAR MULTIMEDIA & BVA STUDENTS EXHIBITION PRETORIA UNISA ART GALLERY TIME: 12:00 23/11/2019 UNTIL 17/12/2019 WEEK 4 NOVEMBER 122

26/11/2019 UNTIL 02/12/2019 WEEK 4 NOVEMBER W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A

LIST YOUR EXHIBITION TODAY ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


invites you to

3rd Year Print Exhibition Vuyisile Koahela - Embrace of the serpent Mother - 2019

Date: Saturday 30th November 2019 Venue: Artist Proof Studio Time: 12:00 for 12:30pm The Artist Proof Studio 2019 3rd year graduate show excavates our immediate landscape and interrogates South Africa’s current social and political climate. The works reflect the revolutionary minds of emerging contemporary South African artists.

ArtistProofJHB

Artist Proof Studio

gallery@artistproofstudio.co.za | 011 492 1278 www.artistproofstudio.co.za


NOVEMBER NEW BLOOD WINNER ANNOUNCED www.arttimes.co.za/newblood

November Winner: Georgia Bergh, Springfield Convent School, Grade 11, In the papers today. Opposite Page: Meghan Wright, Grade 11, Clarendon Girls’ High School, Self Portrait

New Blood Art NPC is a valuable platform for SA Schools Art Departments to share artworks by Grade 10-12 learners – to learn about issues that are important amoungst the youth and for enjoying growing trends and influences by the next generation of SA Artists. By participating in New Blood Art your work will be seen by the SA arts community and art lovers from around the world that read the Art Times, publishers of New Blood Art. Hosting The NBA Award is a great honour for us, but the most important is that you participate, we want to hear your voice and reflection here.

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How to send your art work Email: art@newbloodart.info with 1-3 images a month, include your Name, Age, Grade and School Terms and Conditions (1) Learners can submit up to 3 artworks per month (2) Work should be submitted by 15th of the month to be considered for publishing in The Art Times Magazine (3) Work submitted must be done by the learner and produced in 2019 (4) Entries open to learners ages 15-19 at time of entry (5) Please try to keep files Jpeg and less than 5Meg. Call New Blood Art 021 300 5888 www.newbloodart.info

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Tamaryn Hess, Fragility, Grade 12,The Settlers High School


Grace Gibbs, Grade 12, Herschel Girls School

Lutho Siganagana, Grade 12, Clarendon Girls’ High School, Rape Culture

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ART TIMES SUMMER HOLIDAY SUBSCRIPTION SPECIAL A perfect gift for the ones you love

Get your 2020 Art Times delivered for only R380 - And receive the Dec/Jan Bumper Season Edition free The Art Times is a monthly 132 page gloss perfect bound South African Art Publication available in print, online and on mobile. If you would like to subscribe to The Art Times please email proof of payment with your full name as reference to subs@arttimes.co.za or 021 300 5888 to confirm your subscription. Pay: ARTLIFE (PTY) LTD Bank: FNB Acc Number: 62752894058 Branch Code: 260209

 





A SPLENDID SUMMER SEND OFF . . . . . 40 years and more than 40 ARTISTS a celebratory exhibition

marking Christopher Peter's retirement from the Museum and UCT   ^W<Z^ 

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