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MARCH 2021 ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


Johannesburg Auction 23 & 24 March 2021 Fine, Decorative & Oriental Art, Furniture, Silverware, Fine Jewellery, Watches & Collectables

Preview, register and bid on www.swelco.co.za Contact us for viewing appointments or condition reports on 011 880 3125 or email support@swelco.co.za

Consign for our forthcoming auctions. Contact us for an obligation-free valuation on 021 794 6461 or email support@swelco.co.za

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Norman Clive Catherine | SERENADE | Estimate R 10 000 - R 15 000


Art Times March 2021 Edition

CONTENTS Cover: Diane Johnson-Ackerman, Karoo Threshold, acrylic on canvas, 350 x 450mm

10. M.O.L 17: ANALOGUE DORP Ashraf Jamal Column

20. NOCTURNES

A night in the artist’s mind’s eye By Ashraf Jamal

26. NOSTALGIA

Quiet Romanticism By Wendy Malan

INTRODUCING MOHAMMAD RABIE Egyptian heritage

36. LIVESTOCK

Touch the notes that sway gently on their own axis

40. ART BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA Nurturing emerging South African artists

46. DIVE DEEP & FLYING HIGH

Harmonious compositions of great splendour

52. IN BARDO

Solo exhibition by Leanne Olivier

54. Business Art 56. Stunning Portrait From Irma Stern’s Zanzibar Epiphany At Bonhams African Art Sale

62. Art Theft In Lockdown By Gail Bosch

80. ARTGO

March Exhibition Highlights

Michèle Nigrini, Scarlet Cross Section I, 2021, 60 x 60 x 5cm, mixed medium on wooden canvas, Imibala Gallery, Graaff-Reinet

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Editors Note

B

e it as it may, this time last year no one had any idea of what was to come with Covid, and even after a year no one knows for sure how things will end - and then when the world begins again. One thing for sure is that no one has remained financially unscathed by the Covid 19 Pandemic - not just South Africa, but the whole world over. Having assessed this- it is certainly time to put some space behind us and peer into the front windscreen and to realise that certain future things were inevitable. While the pandemic has simply sped things up – like online marketing and sales practice, and in doing so, opened up the world to everyone, especially to those who have engaged in technology. Some technology has worked like Zoom where Frank Kilbourn of Strauss & Co admitted that it was simply the only way of keeping their clientele informed and buying at the beginning of lockdown. Other technologies such as online walkabouts and timed auctions have helped together with newsletters to promote online shows. In my last editorial, The Art Fairs were without a doubt the kingmakers of sales and now the highest point of sales is the relationship and referralbased sales where previous purchasers are happy to buy more of the same artist or from the same gallery. What is seemingly new however is the pairing of galleries’ primary markets with secondary markets of the auction houses. Previously Auction houses sought the provenance of the artist’s primary market prices to attain value and sales, but now are quickly encroaching, with some galleries blessing to absorb the primary market of the artist for themselves. Galleries have forever held a select list of top buyers to have first dibs on select artist’s new work, so why can’t auction houses have the same relationship with their clients? I believe that this is one of the many ways of new marketing that may well evolve from this chaos. Another shakeup on the local arts landscape would be the moving of The Cape Town Goodman Gallery, with Aspire Art Auctions to 37A Somerset Road, Waterkant. The two businesses have moved from Bree Street and Woodstock respectively to move into a nunnery, a beautiful, well-lit exhibition space with plenty of fresh air and floor space. The Nunnery is fairly close to the Waterfront, as well as around the corner from Bakoven and the likes of the mega-wealthy collectors’ homes. It would be interesting if Woodstock can maintain its cultural hub versus its neighbor next door in Salt River - given the collapse of the colossal Cape clothing industry (Rex Truform being the latest casualty) which opens kilometers of floor space to affordable rentals. Many cultural projects like cinemas and viewing rooms have started in Salt River, however not too many galleries yet. Furthermore, Russell Kaplan Auctioneers are moving a little further up the road to larger, more spacious rooms for gatherings and exhibition space, something which Russell says was on the cards for a while. Lastly, I would like to thank everyone for their tremendous support for our Art Times Magazine, without it we wouldn’t be here today, at least in such form. The Art Times has been here since February 2006, it has been a great honour and pleasure to scan the daily income of artwork and figure out how this incredible art world works and thrives. I don’t at the end of the day believe that it’s about getting rich in the art world. I believe the longest-serving people in the art world stick around because it’s magical and special and there’s nothing like it. Covid, or non, it’s a great space to be in. Thank You.

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

CONTACT ART TIMES Tel: +27 21 300 5888 109 Sir Lowry Road, Woodstock, Cape Town PUBLISHER Gabriel Clark-Brown editor@arttimes.co.za ADVERTISING & MARKETING Eugene Fisher sales@arttimes.co.za DIGITAL MEDIA & EXHIBITION LISTINGS Jan Croft subs@arttimes.co.za ON THE KEYS Brendan Body ARTGO CONTENT info@artgo.co.za Rights: the Art Times magazine reserves the right to reject any material that could be found offensive by its readers. Opinions and views expressed in the sa art times do not necessarily represent the official viewpoint of the editor, staff or publisher, while inclusion of advertising features does not imply the newspaper’s endorsement of any business, product or service. Copyright of the enclosed material in this publication is reserved. Errata: Hermanus FynArts - would like to apologise for omitting the name of Karin Lijnes from the list of artists who are exhibiting at Sculpture on the Cliffs - 2020. Her work, Freedom Tree comprises of a large steel mobile of five ceramic bird forms.

Gabriel Clark-Brown @ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

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But there are no rules 80 x 80, mixed medium

OUTSIDE IN

Solo exhibition by Michèle Nigrini | 5 March - 15 May 2021 Imibala Gallery, 30 Church Street, Graaff-Reinet

IN CONVERSATION WITH COLOUR SYMPHONY

Group exhibition | 5 March - 5 September 2021 Jan Rupert Art Centre, Middelstraat, Graaff-Reinet www.rupertmuseum.org | www.imibala.com


M.O.L 17

ANALOGUE DORP

Roger Ballen

Ashraf Jamal

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’m 20ks inland on the Breede River, paging through Roger Ballen’s book of photographs on dorps. An American photographer long domiciled in South Africa, Ballen remains a stranger. It’s what gives him the perspective he needs to find the kinks in what we commonly and unthinkingly see, old buildings, empty streets, a man with ‘a strange collection of objects, prints from Egypt, old family pictures … piles of pristine white pillows on various beds and odd pieces of furniture throughout the house’. Ballen’s interiors and exteriors are off-kilter, he has a voyeur’s eye for the strange. For some his photographs are invasively peculiar, absurdly eerie. For me, however, they capture the fact that everything deemed familiar is never thus.

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There is ‘something special’ about small towns and villages, says Ballen, something ‘odd and quixotic’. I picture Cervantes’ Man from la Mancha with lance outstretched, atop a bony horse, prodding at imaginary windmills. The dictionary definition for quixotic reads, ‘extremely idealistic; unrealistic and impractical’, but one wonders, paging through Ballen’s collection of photos of small and remote towns, whether his vision is solely surreal. Under a yearlong lockdown, with increasing numbers forced to work remotely, small towns – especially those within a 3hr radius of cities – have become increasingly appealing. These towns, once seen as holiday getaways, are now the favoured retreats for fulltime occupation. Are dorps the new normal where we can permanently decompress? No longer, or not quite, part of ‘a disappearing South African aesthetic’, dorps are experiencing a new lease of life. Ballen believed he was recording ‘the elements of a dying culture … arresting the utter extinction of the South African dorp’, today, however, this is not quite the case. In Richmond in the northern Karoo we have an annual literary festival and MAPSA – Modern Art Project South Africa – an artists’ residency and permanent exhibition devoted to works inspired by arte povera, in the Riebeeck Valley there’s the olive festival started by my late wife, Christine Solomon, in 2000, as well as a host of other inspired cultural initiatives elsewhere. Whether remotely located, or in close proximity to urban hubs, small towns are rejuvenating. There’s a spring in the step, a determined self-belief that life is possible, economically, culturally, humanly. ‘Utter extinction’, in this time of extinction, is being avidly combatted. Perhaps this rebirth is quixotic after all, as idealistic as it is absurd and beautiful.

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Graham Abbott in front of the Spookhuise, Barrydale.

“No longer, or not quite, part of ‘a disappearing South African aesthetic’, dorps are experiencing a new lease of life.” This was certainly the case when I visited Barrydale, three hours from Cape Town, and an hour from my river retreat. The occasion was the launch of the town’s first monumental exhibition devoted to analogue photography. Ballen’s dorp series was showcased, as were works by David Goldblatt and many others in Barrydale’s ‘Art Hotel’ and ‘Spookhuis’, long ago a ‘nagmaal huis’ where boer farmers from remote zones huddled and prayed, and traded. If dorps need a ‘hook’ to survive, a lure, Barrydale has chosen analogue photography. As to whether this new venture is sustainable we cannot know for sure, but what it tells us is that creative enterprises, deemed quaint, have a far greater life than we in our digitised

age typically imagine. The photographic equivalent of vinyl records, a booming trade, analogue photography, which enshrines Cartier Bresson’s ‘decisive moment’, asks us to reconsider the preciousness of making a photograph instead of merely taking it. In an image saturated world – a world reduced to the image – Barrydale’s analogue venture is all about the stilled wholly inhabited moment. The project is the brainchild of Graham Abbott, a former fashion photographer who has lived in Barrydale for nine years. Inspired by the death of his beloved friend and fellow photographer, Johann Wilke, the hastily cobbled show was in more ways than one a commemoration of all that is lost, or


Opposite page top row: Tim Hopwood and Gerda Genis. Jonathan Rees playing his Gramaphone at the Exhibition in the Spookhuise. Centre Row: Paul Wineberg and John Hog’s Photos. Graham Abbott’s Exhibition in the Spookhuise. Bottom Row: Johan Wilke Exhibition. Obie Oberholzer, Jellyfish.

on the verge of being lost. The analogue reproduction of colour photography no longer exists, says Abbot. We are looking at the quirkily surreal and lurid image of jellyfish on a beach created by Obie Oberholzer, spot lit, infused with an unearthly glow. It is wonder one experiences. Given that only two images exist of each of Oberholzer’s photographs amplifies their rarity. Here we are in the midst of a well-nigh ‘utter extinction’ of a particular technique. However, black and white analogue photography is here to stay. Abbott informs me that two darkrooms have been created, workshops afoot, and Barrydale’s youth encouraged to attend classes, with a view to developing careers in the field. If the exhibitions will be an annual December event, the life-cycle of workshops is continuous. Visitors to Barrydale will come to identify the town through photography. If analogue colour prints are no longer possible, the machines obsolete, hand developed black and white images – wet plate and cyanotype – are here to stay.

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The analogue project took three months between the initial conception and 11th hour hanging, ‘with no sponsorship and no budget’. That the event was realised in lockdown is all the more remarkable. Once the word was out, enthusiasm spread. Jonathan Rees secured the support of Ballen and Brenda Goldblatt, who expressly asked that her father’s images be hung in the spookhuis with relatively unknown photographers. The other participants included Gerda Genis, Simon O’Callahan, Tim Hopwood, Herman van Wyk, Paul Weinberg, Rashid Lombard, Roger Bosch, Eric Miller, and the man who inspired it all, Johann Wilke. The list is great, though Abbott tells me that wokesters were unimpressed by the fact that most of the participants were ‘old white guys’, a predictable, and predictive rote observation. Race, gender, and privilege will have its way with us for years to come. However, to emphasise this matter at the expense of what remains an astonishing achievement in a small town is also churlish. Abbott is sincere about inclusivity, evident in his active involvement with growing food and wattle construction in Smitsville, Barrydale’s ‘opperdorp’. But his greater commitment to development is invested in analogue photography, keeping the darkrooms running, growing talent with his Photo Voice Project, and sourcing it nationally. Of his own photographs – stunningly choreographed urban scenes – Abbot reaffirms Bresson’s vital influence. The decisiveness of the moment of seeing and absorbing the world is revealed by the black edges of the negative – ‘nothing gets cropped’. Back at the Breede, paging through the Ballen book on dorps, I’m struck by a key dimension of photography – light. ‘Light is the essence of photography’, says Ballen, ‘you can go back to some places which had seemed interesting and find there is nothing there at all. Conversely, with the progression of daylight, things can evolve from the ordinary to the magical’. ‘When night falls, there is very little to do as a photographer. Often staying in a shabby hotel, all I wish for is morning and the light’. Light is different in different hemispheres.

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Photographers at the Wetplate workshop, The Studio Barn.

“The analogue project took three months between the initial conception and 11th hour hanging, ‘with no sponsorship and no budget’. That the event was realised in lockdown is all the more remarkable” Is there such a thing as a South African light, a dorp light? In Age of Iron J.M. Coetzee is none too kind about a South African light. It lacks ‘an air of looming mystery’, he claims. ‘No one has done that for South Africa: made it into a land of mystery. Too late now. Fixed in the mind as a place of flat, hard light, without shadows, without depth’. Is this true? Does our world vision, our photographs, our stories, lack mystery? Walking through the Barrydale Art Hotel on a sun-struck afternoon, through a warren of shadowy rooms, stopping in front of photographs by Gavin Furlonger and Gerda Genis, Oberholzer’s weird jellyfish, Ballen’s uncanny dorp scenes printed by Dennis da Silva – one in particular, ‘Old Man, Ottoshoop, 1983’ – a portrait more compelling than most, perfectly lanced

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with shadow and light, the eyes glittering shards, beard echoed in the weave of the coat with its single gloaming button, Coetzee’s dismissal seems gratuitous and false. While it may be true that South African black and white imagery in art photography, as opposed to press photography, tends to blur edges, mute contrasts, capture the world in a bleached high noon glow, it does not follow that this ‘take’ – and here one cannot ignore the immense impact of those who print the analogue works of our leading photographers – wholly defines a South African vision. Looming mystery remains. This is certainly the view of those involved in the Barrydale Analogue Photography Festival, for whom, contra Coetzee, it is not ‘too late now’.

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NOCTURNES

John-Michael Metelerkamp

20 Feb – 10 Apr deepestdarkestart.com

DEEP EST DARK EST


OUTSIDE IN

Solo exhibition by Michèle Nigrini 5 March – 15 May 2021 Imibala Gallery, Graaff-Reinet www.michelenigrini.com

Abundance, 100cm x 100cm, mixed media on wooden canvas, 2021

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n collaboration with the Rupert Museum and the Imibala Gallery, Rosendal based artist Michèle Nigrini will be opening her much awaited solo exhibition “Outside In” in Graaff-Reinet on 5 March 2021. “Outside In” is Michèle’s latest body of work in which she physically and metaphorically pulls her exterior environment into her studio space. As a result of the first pandemic lockdown, she had to move her studio to her home. Her new workspace included a repurposed ‘potting shed’ which is partly open to the garden, thus physically connecting her to the outside. Reflecting our times and Michèle’s personal space, this body of work explores a nostalgia for that which lies on the exterior, in the hopes of bringing a part of it within. Through working ‘in the garden’, Michèle has been able to explore the abundance and energy of her environment, using the confinement of the lockdown as a gift to narrow her focus to the immediate, to be more mindful of beauty in the everyday.

Between life and death there’s a library, 80cm x 80cm, wooden canvas, mixed medium, 2020

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Nigrini’s work using various unconventional tools.

Returning to the original inspiration for her 1993 work, ‘Colour Symphony’ (a 16meter panel consisting of 395 individual works), which was acquired by the Rupert Art Foundation in 1993, Michèle observes her garden with new eyes, seeing that which surrounds her as a vehicle for exploring line, mark and colour. With her signature, mixed media approach to mark making, Michèle guides her viewer through the process of looking at the mundane with renewed perspective. Her work is made using various unconventional tools, many of them from the garden - twigs, plants, handmade brushes and brooms - in order to search for interesting marks that are outside of the artist’s control. She then systematically ‘curates her chaos’ to complete her image. “Outside In” is presented in conjunction with a group exhibition of works by 37 artists who drew inspiration from ‘Colour Symphony’ through the Rupert Museum’s Open Call. The group exhibition titled ‘In conversation with Colour Symphony’ will be on show with the iconic Michèle Nigrini panel at the Jan Rupert Art Centre, GraaffReinet from 5 March – 5 September 2021. For more information and the exhibition catalogues please visit the Imibala Gallery at www.imibala.com and the Rupert Museum at www.rupertmuseum.org Cake tin design, 2021, 30cm x 30cm

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NOCTURNES

JOHN-MICHAEL METELERKAMP Ashraf Jamal www.deepestdarkestart.com

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ight consumes the paintings, a night in the artist’s mind’s eye, the way he sees and inhabits the world. However, while they are brooding, they nonetheless possess an uncanny ability to deliver us from darkness, because, under the cowl of night, all is a-glimmer, as though light emerges out of darkness.

One senses the artist’s life, the throb and thrum of human and elemental energy, the consuming silence and darkness. But most of all, it is the light that breaks through, flecked, scattered, or pooled, which, finally, reassures and calms us.

‘What is colour’, Andrew Marr asks, if not ‘the brain’s apprehension of the energy of the cosmos’? ‘There must be something – of shapes in the paint. Where will these shapes come from? From the world around the painter’. Marr’s view, intimately expressed in A short book about painting, reveals a further synergy – for what Metelerkamp delivers is the utterly engrossing language of paint itself. His forms emerge through paint, because of it. Unmixed and uncontaminated – squeezed directly from tube to canvas – the artist’s approach reminds us that this world, the one we live in, is expressed through us. Like tubes of compacted colour, we merge our beings with the darkness all around. It is how we live, what we express, that determines our relationship with a consuming void.

‘I don’t paint light’, says Bridget Riley, ‘I present a colour situation which releases light as you look at it’. While he is an expressionist rather than an abstract artist, Metelerkamp nevertheless approaches the mystery of light in a comparable fashion. Light is what we stumble upon, what momentarily holds us. In Metelerkamp’s case, the colour palette is strange. His is an empurpled, violet, greenly orange world which appears, to me at least, as utterly natural. If his take on light is remarkable, so is his approach to paint. The density of its application is immediately evident. One senses a man who, in the moment of painting, is searching for an intangible yet distinctive moment when something is revealed. If enigmatic veils cloud our vision, sometimes it is possible to make sense of things, bring them palpably alive to the surface.

In ‘Nocturnes’ – a series of paintings inspired by the solemnity and beauty of the music of Chopin and Debussy, and by the Garden Route, the artist’s life in Knysna – it is the partiality of human existence that comes to the fore, the glimmers of apprehension of a world, a cosmos, rich in mystery. Because what Metelerkamp does is not record what is seen or known, but what is intimated and unseen. The suite of works – portraits and urban scenes – eschews the photographic record in favour of an immersive experience.

Looking at Metelerkamp’s paintings, I’m reminded of Matthew Collings’ remark in Matt’s Old Masters: ‘The type of painting I find gripping is the type where you can say, “Well, the paint is everywhere here”, regardless of what the subject matter is or what’s known about what was going on in society at the time’. I get Collings’ purist take, but somehow, looking at Metelerkamp’s gloaming suite of paintings with its sensation not only of night but of twilight – worlds between worlds – I cannot forget that they were largely painted in

“One senses a man who, in the moment of painting, is searching for an intangible yet distinctive moment when something is revealed.” The Drift, 65 x 50 cm, Oil on Canvas 20


Gray Street, 55 x 72 cm, Oil on Canvas. Opposite Page: Parking Lot in Woodmill Lane, 52 x 42cm, Oil on Canvas

Underground Parking Lot at Mall, 45 x 61 cm, Oil on Canvas 22

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Parking Attendant on Waterfront Drive, 52 x 42 cm, Oil on Canvas

Queen Street 2, 72 x 55 cm, Oil on Canvas

2020, a year more introspective than any other, more confounded, more searching. And what strikes me as I look at these paintings, wrought from the darkest time in living memory, is the artist’s sincerity. It is as If Metelerkamp is responding to all the world’s perplexity and dread. If his play of light and dark tells us anything, it is that we needn’t fear the isolation we are all experiencing.

will to thrive because of and in spite of the asphyxiating grip we are all experiencing. If his is a shot psyche, it is also aglow with promise. In the commingling of ‘chaos and form’ Metelerkamp draws out the good that lingers in the dark. This he achieves through ‘experimentation’, by embracing risk. ‘Forcing thought opens up possibilities of a journey through the painting. Colours dictate colours and forms dictate forms’. The moment a painting is arrested, when painting stops, when we, the audience, arrives upon it, everything remains volatile.

‘I believe that my job as an artist is to simplify the complexities of my life’, says the artist, ‘Or at least my experience of it. The sense of overstimulation I feel and a propensity for chaos lingers around every corner of my psyche. That tension between chaos and form is a primary informer of the work I strive to make. Translating what I feel and see into a visual language is about focussing on something that I find interesting. And I may not be able to pin down the exactness of my curiosity; but I feel the ned to challenge these thoughts and feelings and show myself what it looks like in a visual sense, with paint’. The aching honesty of Metelerkamp’s words and works is what we avidly need. It is not an answer to living which he gifts us, but the

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There is no closure, only endless apertures, endless possibilities. There is something exhilarating and liberating about Metelerkamp’s paintings. They allow us to trust ourselves, even when we are most vulnerable. The artist reminds me of George Condo’s words, ‘Don’t step back until you think you have something to look at’. Standing in front of Metelerkamp’s paintings, my eyes dart hither and thither, pulled, dragged, buoyantly tossed about, then momentarily eased … stilled. What more could one require from a painting in this uncertain time?

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04.02.21

29.04.21

11:11 group show

Achuli Design Aimee Lindeque Ben Coutouvidis Douglas Condzo Georgia Lane Haldane Martin Imiso Ceramics Ibrahim Khatab Justin Dingwall Kyu Sang Lee Madoda Fani Melissa Barker Mlondolozi Hempe Mohamed Rabie Natasha Barnes Samson Mnisi Serge Diakota Mabilama Tshepiso Seleke Wiid

eleven

eleven


NOSTALGIA

Diane Johnson-Ackerman Solo Exhibition www.princealbertgallery.co.za Written by Wendy Malan

Garingbome, etching

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he Prince Albert Gallery will be celebrating the paintings and prints of Diane Johnson-Ackerman in a solo exhibition from 31 March - 2 May 2021. Diane studied under Prof Brian Bradshaw at Rhodes University and exhibited with the Grahamstown Group. She has worked consistently and prolifically since graduating in 1973, participating in many shows, including the Stellenbosch Woordfees, the KKNK and South African Society of Artists exhibitions. Diane has completed important commissions including a series of paintings of historical buildings related to the University of Stellenbosch Faculty of AgriSciences Centenary Celebrations during 2018. Diane Johnson-Ackerman is a painter and printmaker of extraordinary technical ability and draftsmanship. Her etchings (a notoriously difficult medium) are flawlessly executed. Diane’s work has always attracted me because of its quiet Romanticism, its mysterious and sometimes disquieting atmosphere. Romanticism is a label that has often been abused because it has been associated with the term sentimentality. Diane’s work is all but sentimental and has a quality which is more easily detected in the visual arts than defined. It is not a style but an attitude of the mind.

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Karoo Church, acrylic on canvas, 450mm x 320mm


Tankwa Landscape, acrylic on canvas, 1200mm x 840mm Opposite Page: Karoo Threshold, acrylic on canvas, 350mm x 450mm

Vondeling Station, acrylic on canvas, 450mm x 300mm

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Verlatenheid, acrylic on canvas, 80mm x 600mm

“There is an element of nostalgia and yearning, of the passing of time and human frailty” Romanticism has to do with the choice of subject matter. It reflects a general tenor of feeling and a spiritual engagement. There is an element of nostalgia and yearning, of the passing of time and human frailty, in these beautiful works. The uninhabited houses, buildings and empty chairs in Diane’s work evoke a particular presence, a past, a life. She creates this mood largely by a masterful use of light and shade. “I love the mystery of shadows within Karoo buildings, contrasting with the clarity of the light outside”, she always says. “I love simplicity, cleanliness, detail and definition, mood is an integral part of my message, done through tonal contrast in light and shade”.

a lifetime of living and working in close proximity to nature and in particular the forests of the Mpumalanga Escarpment and the Midlands of KwaZulu-Natal. Diane and her husband Pierre live in Somerset West but have a home in Prince Albert where they spend much of their time. Diane has a deep love and understanding of the Karoo and captures its unique atmosphere. Diane has been exhibiting at the Prince Albert Gallery for many years and this solo exhibition will be a unique opportunity to see her work.

Trees are also a favourite theme, once again not merely accurate botanically but reflecting her love of trees. This stems from

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S A LON N I N E TY O N E P RES ENTS

J E AN N E H OF F M AN . F R AG M E N T G A RD E N , 2 0 2 1 . A C RYL I C O N I T A L I A N C O T T O N .

WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA

Jea n n e Ho ff ma n 3 1 .03 - 0 1 .0 5. 202 1


INTRODUCING MOHAMMAD RABIE www. eclecticacontemporary.co.za

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ohamed Rabie is an artist deeply engaged in and interested with the identity and symbolisms of his hometown, Minya, in Egypt. He was born in Minya in 1986 and went on to study at Cairo’s Faculty of Fine Arts and is now also a member of the Fine Arts Association and the General Federation of Arab Archaeologists. As such, his interest and passion for the arts goes beyond his multi-layered canvases, while also contributing to and informing his creativity as he works. His painting practice borrows from different eras and cultures present within his rich heritage and grapples with questionings of historical entanglements and contemporary geographic dynamics. Looking at the theme of ‘Egyptian heritage’ his work includes a querying of graphic texts and visual languages, translating them into a contemporary context. Using broad brushstrokes and large swathes of colour across the picture plane, Rabie offers fragmentary clues from history and rearticulates them within the gestures of his work. This results in a strange sense of familiarity and recognition within each painting, as though recalling a forgotten story and familiar narrative.

(Detail) Untitled, 2019, Oil on canvas,120 x 80 cm. Right: Oil on canvas,1350 ×140, 2020

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Untitled, 2020, Oil on canvas,180 x 220 cm

“Since the beginning of time, nature has been the primary provider and teacher of man, and a main constituent of his evolution” Rabie muses. He has tries to study it and uncover its secrets, while becoming fascinated with the minute creatures and forces at play. He continues: “These and many more have become part of our heritage. With this collection of work, I poured all visual stock of this nature buried in my memory.” In 2011, he won an incentive award from the University of Helwan, followed by a grant from the Ministry of Culture. His artworks

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have been acquired for private collections in Egypt, Dubai and can also be found in the permanent collection at the General Authority for Cultural Palaces. His paintings have been exhibited in over 15 group shows in Egypt, including the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Cairo Opera House and the Museum of Modern Art, among others. Mohammad Rabie’s work is available in South Africa at Eclectica Contemporary, Cape Town. Visit eclecticacontemporary.co.za

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LIVESTOCK

Arlene Amaler-Raviv and Dale Yudelman www.themelrosegallery.com

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he Melrose Gallery presents a new edition of limited edition prints of LIVESTOCK, a collaboration between painter Arlene Amaler-Raviv and photographer Dale Yudelman. This body of works was originally released to wide acclaim at the Eighth Havana Biennial in Cuba in 2003. The original installation of fourteen panels on cloth, each measuring 2x1m, were suspended from an intricate aluminium wire system. The series of works recollects the image of a row of flags outside an international symposium venue. In this case it is the New York Stock Exchange. Each Southern African currency’s intricate design and patterning serves as a background for the painted mark. The original notes, worn and torn, have passed through many hands, giving feedback of the history, memories and human lives. Although the works combine banknotes with painted and printed images that relate to each specific country they also illustrate on a broader level that cattle were central to traditional Africa – from ceremonies to a measure of wealth and status. Through this installation of suspended images, a walkway is created for people to interact with and touch the notes that sway gently on their own axis. The fragility and weightlessness of these notes are contrasted – and paradoxically linked – with the massive electronic wiring system of the New York Stock Exchange. The aerial view of this marketplace with its live wires is connected to the bloodline of livestock in the African homeland. This edition of 11 images will be presented at The Melrose Gallery (Johannesburg) and on a viewing room on www.themelrosegallery. com from 25th February to 28th March 2021.

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NYSE, Amaler Raviv Yudelman

The prints are 128x77cm in size and this is a limited edition of 40. Arlene Amaler-Raviv: Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, Arlene Amaler-Raviv received a BA Fine Art Degree from the University of the Witwatersrand where she studied under Robert Hodgins. In the 70’s she was involved in art education, workshops, teaching and teacher training programmes.

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From 1979 she has held many solo exhibitions at Everard Read Gallery, Market Theatre Gallery and group shows both in South Africa and abroad. During the 1990’s she lectured at the University of Pretoria, FUBA and at the Katlehong Art Center (BACA).In 1996 she lived in the Netherlands where she assisted in the curatorship of the exhibition of ‘Africa meets Africa’ at the Museum of Ethnology, Rotterdam.

1997 Amaler-Raviv moved to Cape Town where numerous projects developed. A twenty-meter sight-specific installation for the District Six Sculpture Project ‘Dislocation Relocation’; large oil paintings on glass ‘Departure’ at Mark Coetzee Fine Art and two collaborative exhibitions with photographer Dale Yudelman – ‘One’ at the Association for Visual Arts and ‘Where the Mountain meets the City’ at 232 Long Street.


Livestock - Mozambique, 2003,

Arlene Amaler-Raviv & Dale Yudelman

Livestock - Zambia, 2003,

Arlene Amaler-Raviv & Dale Yudelman

In 2000 Vodacom commissioned AmalerRaviv to create an installation of seventeen oil paintings on aluminium. Spier acquired a 2m x 2m portrait of Mandela for their collection in 2002. Many of her paintings and works hang in private collections around the world and publicly in major art collections in South Africa. Dale Yudelman: Dale Yudelman’s career in photography has led him through two eras of South African history as well as across several continents. Born in Johannesburg, and inspired by creative parents, he began photographing at a young age under the tutelage of his father. He was barely out of his teens in 1979 when he started working as a staff photographer for The Star Newspaper. In 1986 he moved to London and then Los Angeles, working freelance for various newspapers and magazines. Returning to a newly democratic South Africa in 1996, he began collaborating with artist Arlene AmalerRaviv. Together they produced three major exhibitions and a number of commissions – their final show, ‘Livestock’ was exhibited at the 8th Havana Biennale in Cuba.

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Livestock - Zimbabwe, 2003,

Arlene Amaler-Raviv & Dale Yudelman

Yudelman then ventured into uncharted territory drawing on his photojournalism background and a growing interest in digital technology. The resulting series ‘Reality Bytes’ are works that reclaim and freeze the emotional content of daily experience rather than merely regurgitating actual events. A number of projects followed - including ‘ I am…’ , a portrayal of the ongoing plight of refugees in South Africa. For his series ‘Life under Democracy’ he won the inaugural Ernest Cole Award in 2012 - the country’s most prestigious prize for social documentary photography. Yudelman’s work is a consequence of a studied eye, brokered over forty years of incessant image making. Enthralled with the many aspects, nuances and dimensions of reality – his images are a manifestation of how modern photography is able to escape the bounds of the ‘record’ - creating an authentic and evocative account of recent times

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Livestock - South Africa, Amaler Raviv Yudelman


ART BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA

Nurturing emerging South African artists www.artbanksa.org

(from left) Johnny Harmse, Thato Motana (artist), Nonto Sheryl Msomi and Nathi Gumede of ArtbankSA, Optix Photography

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he COVID-19 pandemic has changed society. Crowded exhibition openings are now a distant memory. Galleries and museums, the world over, were temporarily closed and international fairs were postponed or cancelled. It has been a huge shock for a sector that is mostly freelance in nature. Necessity has once again forced the arts to adapt to these times and to operate with limited face-to-face interactions. True to form, the cultural and creative industries have responded in innovative ways to meet these new challenges. Some business aspects have migrated to online sources and has had the positive result of increasing access to previously inaccessible art content from prestigious collections. What will be critical for the health and sustainability of the sector is finding sustainable solutions, using what can be learned during the time of crisis to design appropriate responses and policies. While strategies are being formulated, artists, particularly emerging artists, are struggling to survive in a world where opportunities to generate an income have disappeared. The Art Bank of South Africa (ArtbankSA) is a programme of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture (under the Mzansi Golden Economy Strategy) and is hosted by the National Museum, Bloemfontein.

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Vangatava: The Limpopo Launch of the Art Bank of South Africa Exhibition Opening, Optix Photography


Tswela Pele: KZN Launch of the Art Bank of South Africa Exhibition at Durban Art Gallery, Photo Paulo Menezes

It is tasked with purchasing artworks from South African artists, particularly that of emerging artists to lease and sell the artworks to South African government departments, private companies and private individuals. Artists can submit up to five artworks for consideration by the nine member acquisitions committee of the ArtbankSA. In making their assessments they are guided by the collections policy of the ArtbankSA and their own judgement of good work. All submissions being reviewed are treated equally. When the submission window is open, application guidelines are made available on the ArtbankSA website. In 2020 the national lockdown had little impact on the selection process as the systems could very easily be adapted for virtual coordination. The ArtbankSA received over 340 entries and the committee selected over 120 artworks, the most it has selected in one year. In addition to the annual acquisitions, and in response to the clarion call by President Ramaphosa for job creation with a focus on youth, women, and people with disability, the ArtbankSA with the support of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture

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Tswela Pele: KZN Launch of the Art Bank of South Africa Exhibition at Durban Art Gallery, Photo Paulo Menezes


Vangatava: Limpopo Launch of the Art Bank of South Africa Exhibition at Polokwane Art Museum, Photo Optix Photography

launched a four-month employment stimulus programme. The programme has created over 150 employment opportunities through art commissioning and work placements. The created artworks will be considered for inclusion into the ArtbankSA’s Contemporary Visual Art Collection. The artworks featured in the collection explore a variety of themes since the ArtbankSA does not outline any themes for artists to respond to. They prefer to see what artists find interesting, are contemplating and discussing in their communities. What brings these works together is that they reflect us. They force us to face our identity as South Africans. Forcing us to interrogate what matters most to us, diverse as we are. This strategy has resulted in visitors to ArtbankSA exhibitions always finding something that speaks to them, which is in line with the programme’s mission to foster

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an appreciation for contemporary art, by making art accessible to the broader public. The public has an opportunity to view a selection of the works acquired in 2020 by visiting the Tiro ya diatla: New Acquisitions of the Art Bank of South Africa Exhibition opening at the Oliewenhuis Art Museum on 11 March 2021. The exhibition will run until 18 April 2021. To lease or buy artwork or for more information about the ArtbankSA, visit the official website www.artbanksa.org or email info@artbanksa.org. Facebook Page: Art Bank of South Africa Instagram Profile: @artbankSA Twitter Profile: @artbankS

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Art, antiques, objets d’art, furniture and jewellery wanted for forthcoming auctions

Walter Whall Battiss, oil on board SOLD R 150,000

Caryn Scrimgeour, oil on canvas SOLD R 38,000 View previous auction results at www.rkauctioneers.co.za

011 789 7422 • 011 326 3515 • 083 675 8468 • 95 Bram Fischer Drive Cnr George Street, Randburg, Johannesburg


DIVE DEEP & FLYING HIGH

A solo exhibition by Helen van Stolk 20 March - 14 April 2021 www.artintheyard.co.za

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s the world around us changes at an ever increasingly rapid pace we look to the comforts of leisure, culture and the arts to provide us with a sense of escapism. We can look to these pursuits as a tool to achieve endurance in these tough times. Many artists and audience comment on the ability to be taken on inner journeys whilst contemplating a particular work. A moment of recognition of former times or feelings. A journey is started and can offer great upliftment, and this phenomena is not found more powerfully than in the work of Helen van Stolk. The body of work encapsulates inspiration by some what opposing sources and expressed in uniquely opposite forms. Great masters like Renoir and Gauguin speak volumes in the work using references of colour and emotion juxtaposed with beautiful and delicate gestures that are motivated by tiny whispers of beauty discovered in life and nature. A pattern, an intention or a moment is expressed in van Stolk’s work with effortless easy and equilibrium. Her mark making is constantly changing to express time, space and speed. Her ability to build up the canvas in a variety of mediums is astonishing it almost feels as if she is sculpting the painting where thick stokes are in perfect balance with fine smooth contours. The artist states “In this new series of abstract work, I escape into stories, I lean into curiosity and let intuitive nudges and signs lead to treasure. Gauguin’s Garden, 100 x 100cm, Ink pencils, acrylic, oil & oil sticks on canvas

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Above: Helen’s inspiration board in her studio. Left: A Beautiful Friendship, 200 x 165cm, Ink pencils, acrylic, oil & oil sticks on canvas

Artist voices from the past influence me, floating in and out, adding their commentary on my choice of colours and shapes. Then, the flutter of birds shows up, humouring me with their daring ingenious designs. “How can we not be featured?”, they say.   Diving into the luxuriousness capture the generous and flamboyant inspirations nature setting me free to explore new this body of work. 

of it all, I abundantly offers me, horizons in

Each painting has its own vibration, its own energy that elevates the human spirit. It is in diving deep, into my thoughts and emotions, that I am able to take my work to new heights. Stepping back from large works that capture a distant, almost aerial view, you are able to see the bigger picture before diving down deeper to view the layered nuances in each piece. Reaching new depths of exploration to reach new heights, I work with an accepting knowledge that both polarities and everything in between are exactly where I am meant to be.”


Here and Now, 200 x 165cm, Ink pencils, acrylic, oil & oil sticks on canvas

van Stolk’s ability to conduct all these threads of life to produce harmonious compositions of great splendour is extraordinary and makes the work versatile, exciting and consuming. Her past success’s no doubt will be repeated, and we are so honoured to be hosting such talented work. This will be her fourth solo exhibition, her third with AITY Gallery. The show is called Dive Deep & Fly High and opens on 20th March 2021, a special day for the artist as she will also be celebrating an important birthday. We welcome all to the opening although we will be monitoring numbers closely and adhering to strict Covid protocols. Our new space with the high ceilings and vast natural light will lend itself as a excellent stage for this work. We relocated the

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gallery to the top end of the village at the end of last year. We find ourselves in good keeping with notable other contemporary galleries and also superb new restaurants. We loved our old location in the heart of the village but are confident this change brings fresh positive energy and a new exciting chapter for the gallery. We aim to bring you more fascinating solo and group exhibitions and to start attending art fairs both locally, nationally and internationally once the impediments of the pandemic subside. We look forward to welcoming you soon but if this is not possible we always make a digital catalogue available for all our shows.


DIVING DEEP &

A solo exhibition by

HELEN VAN STOLK 20.03.2021 | 14.04.2021 Heritage Sq, 9 Huguenot st. Franschhoek WWW.ARTINTHEYARD.CO.ZA


IN BARDO

Solo exhibition by Leanne Olivier 7 – 28 March 2021 RK CONTEMPORARY

Ophelian Sanctum ii, 2019, Hematite, Bone Meal, Ash & Oil on canvas. 130x100cm

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he Tibetan term “Bardo” refers to an intermediate state; it is the space between the cyclical nature of life / death / life. Whether it is experiencing the loss of a loved one or contemplating our own mortality, ultimately it is about the loss of the illusion of control. In the moments when we are at our most vulnerable and exposed and cannot negotiate ourselves out of a situation or an experience; there is an interruption in the continuity of things and our compulsive manufacturing of existence stops (hopefully… if we allow it). There exists great potentiality if we can allow things to come undone: The roles we ascribe to ourselves and others are discarded, and the inessential recedes to reveal what is truly essential. The liminal space allows us to move from dualistic living and transfixed

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She Returns, 2020. Hematite & Oil on canvas, 200x130cm Right: (Detail) Behold, I Make All Things New, 2020, Hematite & oil on canvas. 100x100cm

by primordial anxiety towards a state of presence where the “swinging pendulum” can be observed more acutely… not dispassionately and without emotion but with a deeper sense of Knowing and clarity about the cyclical nature of things. Leanne Olivier uses ash, clay, bones and hematite (bloodstone) as a vehicle and metaphor – physical matter pointing towards the essential (what truly matters) in our collective human experience. It points to the ultimate truth that we all return from whence we came and that it is because of death, that life has meaning www.rkcontemporary.com art@rkcontemporary.com

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BUSINESS ART

MARCH 2021 LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL ART NEWS Banksy, Napoleon


Auctions

BONHAMS AFRICAN ART SALE

Stunning Portrait From Irma Stern’s Zanzibar Epiphany At Bonhams African Art Sale New Bond Street, 17 March

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n the summer of 1939, on the eve of the outbreak of World War II, the South African painter Irma Stern, wearied by the sameness of her life in Cape Town, made a trip to Zanzibar. She returned to the island in 1945 – coincidentally as the Second World War was drawing to a close. These two visits proved pivotal to her career and inspired a body of work which has come to be seen as definitive. As Stern herself wrote, she was “conquering new ground for my work and my development.” A painting from that time, Arab with Dagger, leads Bonhams’ Modern and Contemporary African Art sale in London on Wednesday 17 March. It has an estimate of £700,000-1,000,000. Arab with Dagger, painted in 1945, is one of several key works that Stern executed of members of Zanzibar’s Arab community. She was particularly fascinated by the older men in whose faces she saw, in her own words, “depths of suffering, profound wisdom and full understanding of all the pleasures of life – faces alive with life’s experiences.” As with many works from Stern’s Zanzibar trips, the painting is perfectly framed in wood cut from Arab doors. In their complete state, the highly distinctive doors were subject to an export ban, but there was nothing to prevent Stern’s Arab carpenter from converting them into picture frames.

Bonhams Director of African Art, Giles Peppiatt said: “Arab with Dagger is a remarkable work and shows Irma Stern at her best. Like many of her portraits from this period, it conveys not only an individual likeness, but also the fatalism and the deep spiritually that the artist found among the Arab people, and which she so much admired.” Writing in the spring edition of Bonhams Magazine, Claire Wrathall shows how Stern’s Zanzibar works represent a perfect blend of the inspiration she took from her new environment with the influence of her artistic training in Germany after the First World War, and especially that of her mentor, the great German Expressionist painter and sculptor, Max Pechstein. Of Arab with Dagger, Wrathall writes: “It’s an uneasy portrait, a suspicious rather than a sympathetic one, but that air of unease gives it the emotional truth that defines Stern as South Africa’s first true Expressionist.” Bonhams has sold many works from Irma Stern’s Zanzibar period including Arab Priest (1945), which achieved £3 million in 2011, making this the world auction record for a painting by Stern and the most valuable South African painting ever sold at auction. It was bought by the Qatar Museums Authority and is part of the collection for the forthcoming Orientalist Museum in Doha.

“depths of suffering, profound wisdom and full understanding of all the pleasures of life – faces alive with life’s experiences.”

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Arab with Dagger by Irma Stern. Estimate: £700,000-1,000,000


LIVE VIRTUAL AUCTION

Strauss & Co: Modern, Post-war and Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Jewellery and Wine Cape Town 11-13 April 2021 www.straussart.co.za

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Jacob Hendrik Pierneef, Fishing Boats, Hout Bay, oil on canvasboard, 44,5 by 59cm, R 2 000 000 - 3 000 000

Above: Gerard Sekoto, The Gossips, watercolour on paper 32,5 by 36,5cm, R 700 000 - 800 000. Left: Maggie Laubser, Shepherd and Sheep, oil on canvas laid down on board 38,5 by 49cm, R 1 200 000 - 1 500 000

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Athi-Patra Ruga, Future White Women of Azania I, archival inkjet print, 119 by 79cm, R 150 000 - 200 000

Cyrus Kabiru, Macho Nne 08 (Nyatiti), pigment ink on HP premium satin photographic paper, 150 x 120cm, R 70 000 - 90 000

Simphiwe Ndzube, Inevitable Journey to Mars II, acrylic and mixed media on perspex print 120 by 240 by 3cm, R 150 000 - 200 000. Opposite Page: Mustafa Maluka, They have got to Hate what they Fear, oil on canvas, 184 by 133 by 4,5cm, R 200 000 - 300 000

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ART THEFT IN LOCKDOWN By Gail Bosch

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t has been a common misperception historically that only electronics and jewellery are stolen in South Africa, but art theft, even though not as common, is happening. We have no intention of downplaying the risk of theft of high valued jewellery, and the increased levels of theft in this category. As levels of desperation among the population increase with the impact of the COVID-19 virus and resultant lockdown on the income of so many, so too do the levels of crime. We have been in lockdown for about a year now, that sounds incredible to put in writing, but it’s been a year in which high numbers of people no longer earn a living. Putting bread on the tables has become a much more difficult task. The reasons are many, they may be justified, but the fact remains that many people are hungry. This is perhaps, not the ideal time to wear your best jewellery to the grocery store. Not only because you need to go through the process of claiming from your insurance, but also because it is dangerous. No insurer wants to tell their clients that they should rather not take the risk, but we live in extraordinary times. Quite frankly, insurance will earn higher premiums for Jewellery and watches that are worn regularly when compared to cover whilst in a bank vault or home safe only. It will protect your financial investment in your collection, but nothing can replace the irreplaceable when it comes to sentimental value. Even more important, there is nothing that is worth the safety of you and your family.

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Jeffrey Jason, Karootoneel, Oil On Canvas, 900 x 1200mm

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“Nothing can replace the irreplaceable when it comes to sentimental value. “


Adriaan Boshoff, My Gypsy Dream, Oil On Canvas, 810 x 1225mm

Marie Vermeulen-BreedtMymering – Toneel In ‘N Klassieke Interieur, Oil On Canvas, 900 x 1200mm

Danie Smith, Restauranttoneel, Oil On Canvas, 900 x 1200mm

Danie Smith, Verposing, Oil On Canvas, 810 x 1000mm

Art Theft a growing trend: The privacy of every one of our clients is sacrosanct. We do not divulge personal information, nor the details pertaining to individual claims. We can however, comment on the trends that we are seeing.

Of course, expert insurance of your precious collections will allow you to rest easy, knowing that your financial investment is protected.

Since the start of Lockdown in March 2020, iTOO Artinsure has paid out approximately R6 million in claims for the theft of Art and Collectables - and these are only our own claims. Examples include jewellery stolen from safes, Chinese ceramics, Oil paintings and sculptures. Owners should take extra measures to secure their collections by reviewing their existing security measures to ensure that all systems are functioning properly and perhaps consider moving vulnerable collections to specialist fine art storage facilities or bank vaults. 64

In our ongoing efforts to recover stolen artworks, we maintain an Art Theft Register, which is freely available to everyone, at no cost, to notify authorities and commercial art dealers of items that may not be legally sold. The faster we are notified, the better the chances of recovery. Items of this nature and value are moved quickly and rather frighteningly professionally. We are not just talking about an opportunist snatching an unattended cell phone. Those items can be replaced. Art cannot.

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Auctions

STEPHAN WELZ & CO.

Premier Online Auction 2021 www.swelco.co.za

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ollowing the success of the Stephan Welz & Co. Cape Town Premier sale, our staff and specialists are hard at work preparing for the upcoming Premier Online Auction, taking place on the 23rd and 24th March. The March sale features pieces from soughtafter artists which our collectors have come to expect from Stephan Welz & Co., while remaining accessible to the average auctiongoer and appealing to a more diverse collector base. Whether you are looking for a contemporary piece, or a work by an old master, we are proud to be presenting works by artists from Norman Catherine to Helen Sebidi and J.H. Pierneef. We are looking forward to providing clients with an auction experience which combines a long-standing reputation with forward-thinking online bidding solutions. Stephan Welz & Co. has seen an unprecedented increase in sales of contemporary works on our auctions, with many hammer prices surging above their high estimates. This represents a shift in the current market, not only towards a more contemporary aesthetic, but also indicates the diversification of buying pools, with younger collectors starting to make their mark on the auction world.

Jacob Hendrik Pierneef, Rehoboth, SWA, watercolour over pencil on paper, R25 000—R35 000

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Helen Sebidi, Women Carrying Washing, oil on board, R15 000—R20 000

We are looking forward to working closely with contemporary collectors, artists and exhibitors to take this art category from strength to strength, particularly as participation in online transactions increases and matures. Despite the continued challenges associated with Covid-19, Stephan Welz & Co. has embraced our new circumstances, continuing with hybrid auction models and ensuring that consignment, valuation and buying on auction is convenient, safe and accessible from the comfort of your home. With over fifty years of experience, Stephan Welz & Co. maintains our commitment to knowledge, transparency and discretion.

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Norman Clive Catherine, DS 3-02, from the Performance Set, giclee print, R18 000—R24 000

Our expertise spans multiple categories, and our specialists are excited to find new ways to interact with loyal and prospective clients throughout the year, starting with the launch of our cross-country valuation sweeps, where we will be hosting various valuation days in major cities across South Africa. Whether you have a collection of old masters, a portfolio of contemporary works, would like expert advice on procuring or selling investment pieces, or if you are

simply curious about the value of your items, contact us on support@swelco.co.za to find out when we will be nearest to you. In addition to our valuation sweeps, both our Johannesburg and Cape Town branches are actively consigning for upcoming auctions. Contact us on ct@swelco.co.za or info@ swelco.co.za or phone +27 11 880 3125/ +27 21 794 6461 if you are interested in consulting with our specialists.


ART MARKET NEWS

As Dealers Look to Reinvent Their Businesses, German Gallerist Johann König Is Hiring an Auctions Expert to Steer His In-House Fair Model First published on news.artnet.com by Kate Brown, February 12, 2021

space (hence the pun). The dates overlap with Gallery Weekend Berlin, which takes place as a two-part even this year, with its first chapter running from April 29 to May 2 this year (the second event will take place in September focused on more emerging and underrepresented positions). “In auction houses, prices are more transparent and so there is less anxiety around for new clients entering the art market,” Winter told Artnet News. “We want to take this approach, and have transparency be one of the main aspects of the fair in St. Agnes. We want things to be democratic.”

In a sign of further hybridization of the art market, Galerie König in Berlin has announced a revamped 2021 edition of the in-house art fair that it piloted last year. To oversee the weeklong sale of primary and secondary market works, the gallery has appointed an auctions expert to the helm. Lena Winter has now joined the gallery as the director of the event, dubbed Messe in St. Agnes (“messe” is both the word for fair and church service in German). Her expertise flows from the German auction world, where she served as head of the contemporary art department at Ketterer Kunst in Munich, one of Germany’s leading auction houses. She previously worked at Lempertz and Grisebach auction houses. The 2021 fair will run May 2 through 9 this spring at a converted brutalist church that the gallery operates as an exhibition

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This year’s edition of the fair will be a tidied up version of the salon-style concept that it debuted last year, in May and September. This time around, works will be curated into different thematic sections: abstract expressionism, figuration, and “young contemporary” are a few placeholder ideas that are in the making. Winter said the gallery is creating a specialized architecture to better accommodate the viewing experience. When Messe St. Agnes was first launched last spring, it was met was a mix of both gratitude by some and friction with other dealers in the city. “It’s always difficult for people to adapt to new formats and the mix of primary and secondary markets,” said König. “But we need to all find new niches in our own regions.” Both Winter and König share the conviction that the art market needs to hybridize its various sectors, the gallery and auction worlds, and continue to innovate. “You have to open the borders between the primary and secondary market, because they need each other,” said Winter. “The one market is not anything without the other.”

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2020 Messe in St. Agnes. by Roman Maerz.

“It is not possible for a gallery to simply grow by only having their 20 or so artists anymore.” She adds that the relationship between the primary and secondary markets was marked by “misunderstanding” for a long time, as well as a fear of that primary dealers had of auctions due to the transparency of sales.

South. And auction houses, for their part, have been leaning more on private sales, while also trying out new concepts, such as Christie’s primary market sale “Say It Out Loud,” which was organized by dynamo curator Destinee Ross-Sutton.

The gallery may be the first in Germany to fully embrace such a path. Still, this blurring of categories is also occurring online this month with VEZA, an online selling event organized by Goodman Gallery that focuses on highlighting selected works by dealers in the Global

“The pandemic sped up a process that was already necessarily transforming,” said Winter. “It is not possible for a gallery to simply grow by only having their 20 or so artists anymore.”


INTERNATIONAL ART NEWS

Keep problematic monuments and ‘explain them’, UK government to tell cultural leaders First published on www.theartnewspaper.com By Gareth Harris 15th February 2021

Last month, the UK government announced new laws aimed at safeguarding historic monuments across England. The legislation, if approved by Parliament, will require individuals to have listed building consent or planning permission before removing any historic statue. The law would come into effect from March and apply to England’s 12,000 statues. “Our view will be set out in law, that such monuments are almost always best explained and contextualised,” said Robert Jenrick, the communities secretary. But the government’s strategy has drawn criticism from some artists. “The government does not understand how monuments function as visual cues; they are not inert but uphold and reinforce incredibly objectionable ideas: racism, chauvinism, sexism, homophobia,” says the sculptor Nick Hornby.

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he UK culture secretary Oliver Dowden will stoke the debate raging over controversial historic monuments by telling museum and heritage leaders later this month that they “must defend our culture and history from the noisy minority of activists constantly trying to do Britain down”. According to the Daily Telegraph, Dowden is due to tell the leaders of the National Trust, Historic England, the National Lottery Heritage Fund, Arts Council England, the British Museum and the Imperial War Museum at a roundtable meeting how to put into practice the government’s “retain and explain” approach towards heritage. A source close to the Department for Digital, Media, Culture and Sport (DCMS) confirmed that the meeting is scheduled to take place on 23 February.

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“It is simply a matter of understanding visual literacy—the public ‘read’ the landscape they inhabit—and a statue is no different to a zebra crossing. We know what it means and we respond. Conserving public monuments is to conserve their values,” Hornby argues. So is recontextualising contentious monuments the answer? “In terms of recontextualising a statue, a simple small-scale label won’t suffice. How can a tiny plaque compete with a monument?” he says. “The point I want to raise about scale and proportion of interpretation is that the viewing distances for public monuments are typically from quite far away, and that a small plaque isn’t noticeable. Walking past the Albert memorial [in London] on the other side of the road, you typically don’t read that small text label. An explanatory panel, a QR code—this is not how public

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spaces and streets are used. People are busy, people walk fast— they see these things every day in their periphery—and these sculptures unconsciously reinforce ideas that are problematic.” The artist Bob and Roberta Smith, a Royal Academician, also tells The Art Newspaper: “The British establishment is obsessed with continuity in order to maintain the power of UK institutions. They don’t realise that keeping faith with lots of awful men who committed numerous atrocities during Britain’s empire, in the face of inevitable growing new awareness of different histories, undermines all of us.” The Public Statues and Sculpture Association (PSSA) believes the government’s action is justified though. “If such statues are removed this will leave an historic vacuum of ignorance. We will have manipulated history in the same way these statues have been accused of doing by misrepresenting it. There will be nothing for later generations to learn from. If on the other hand, statues are retained and given full, inclusive and honest didactic labels this can help mitigate some of the cruel, barbaric acts of the past,” say the association cochairs Joanna Barnes and Holly Trusted. The PSSA believes there should be national and local consultation about contested works, with newly established committees comprising art historians able to comment on the historic significance of disputed works. “The monument to William Beckford in the Guildhall Great Hall is an excellent example of the need for this sort of expertise when these works are reviewed,” say Barnes and Trusted, referring to the City of London Corporation’s decision to remove statues of William Beckford and John Cass.

“It is a rare example of an 18th-century monument still in the civic setting for which it was designed; this highly important historical fact only featured in arguments to retain the work once the PSSA had pointed this out,” they say. Jenrick waded into the debate again last week by sending a letter to the City of London Corporation which warned that removing the statues of Beckford and Cass puts the city’s “rich history” at risk. A City of London Corporation spokesman tells The Art Newspaper that a working group has been set up that will now consider the next steps regarding the two statues which currently stand in Guildhall. He says: “As Guildhall is a Grade I-listed building, we will need to seek planning permissions and we will of course comply with any new legislation that might be brought in.” Last year, Dowden implied in a letter to cultural institutions sent on 22 September that they could lose government funding if they fail to toe the government line on contested heritage. “The significant support that you receive from the taxpayer is an acknowledgement of the important cultural role you play for the entire country. It is imperative that you continue to act impartially, in line with your publicly funded status, and not in a way that brings this into question,” Dowden wrote. The move prompted Sharon Heal, the director of the advocacy body Museums Association, to respond: “We feel that this contravenes the long-established principle that national museums and other bodies operate at arm’s length from government and are responsible primarily to their trustees.” DCMS declined to comment.


BUSINESS ART

Christie’s Auction House Will Now Accept Cryptocurrency First published on www.bloomberg.com By James Tarmy, February 18, 2021

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ast October, the digital artist Mike Winkelmann, who goes by Beeple, put a digital artwork in an edition of 100 up for sale. Each work cost $1, and the entire set sold out in less than one second. Today the non-fungible tokens (NFTs) representing the digital artworks are trading on Nifty Gateway, an NFT marketplace run by the Winklevoss twins, for “well over $50,000,” Winkelmann says. (The site lists the average resale price as $6,559, but the artist says that number is misleading, as it includes early, low-priced sales.) In December, Beeple held an auction, in which he offered an open edition of three works, priced at $969 apiece. In five minutes 601 sold, totaling $582,369. The same auction included 20 unique digital artworks, which made a total of $2.2 million. The final lot in the sale was a single artwork containing all 20 images, which sold, after protracted bidding, for $777,778. All told, $3.5 million of Beeple’s art sold in just a few days. “It’s been a lot to take in,” says Winkelmann, who has 1.8 million Instagram followers and until a few months ago had a day job making visuals for brands including Apple and Louis Vuitton, and artists such as Justin Bieber and Ariana Grande. “The rabbit hole of possibilities that this is going to bring to the art world—I don’t think people are fully recognizing that this is going to be a massive, massive shift,” he says. Fueling this shift is the network called Ethereum, which supports cryptocurrency Ether, currently trading at about $1,800 per token. Everyone collecting Beeple’s artwork— almost all of the people who’ve bought, sold, and even fractionalized ownership of

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his images—were using Ether to pay for it, effortlessly shifting dollars and cents into the cryptocurrency via Coinbase, Gemini, and other platforms. “Ethereum is like Bitcoin, but you can program rules on top of it that govern how these things work. ‘Smart money’ is the easiest sort of analogy for people,” Winkelmann says. “There’s a bunch of advantages that [cryptocurrency] affords. It’s super interesting and adds a ton of value.” These advantages are not lost on the more traditional branches of the art market. On Tuesday, Christie’s announced it would auction a work by Beeple, Everydays: The First 5000 Days, in a standalone sale, which runs from Feb. 25 to March 11. Now the auction house has revealed to Bloomberg that it will accept Ether as payment for the artwork’s principal price. The premium, which is a polite word for saying the fee an auction house tacks on to the price, will have to be paid in dollars.

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Everydays: The First 5000 Days by Beeple, which was minted on Feb. 16, 2021. Source: Christie’s

“We’re at this precipice where crypto is going to be such a more established and mainstream mode of conducting business,” says Noah Davis, the Christie’s specialist who’s organized the auction. “With this [sale], I think it’s the perfect way to dip our toes in and give this a shot.” That Christie’s is willing to accept cryptocurrency for the first time, Davis continues, says more about the auction house’s attempt to break into new audiences than it does about a shift in the traditional art market. Ideally, Davis says, a heretofore uninterested demographic of people could also realize

that the auction market is, well, fun. “I’m thinking of Reddit, and GameStop, and the low bar for entry on platforms like Robinhood,” he says. “This artwork is the perfect way into the Christie’s universe.” “There are 1.8 million people who follow this guy on Instagram and for whom a $100 starting bid, up to a few thousand dollars, is accessible,” Davis says. “We want people to play the game and see that bidding is not this impossible-to-do, sort of velvet rope way to engage in popular culture.” Davis first heard about Beeple from a junior colleague who told him about the wildly successful sales on Nifty Gateway.


He contacted Winkelmann and had an initial discussion that Davis describes as “abstract.” Winkelmann, in turn, offered a work for Christie’s to sell that Davis describes as “a complete nonstarter for us.” It was, he says, after searching for the right word, “challenging.” The work in question, which anyone can view on the Beeple Instagram account, features several figures including a nude, lactating Buzz Lightyear; a pregnant, cyborg Michael Jackson; and what appears to be a bloody, muscle-bound Mickey Mouse. Donald Trump lurks in the background. “Honestly,” Winkelmann says, “I’m super thankful Christie’s said no to it.” His second idea was to create a massive mosaic of all 5,000 of his works, which he calls Everydays because he’s made a new artwork every day for the past 13 years. “It becomes this more complete gesamtkunstwerk,” Davis says. “It really illustrates how epic his project is.” (Not to worry—the work that Christie’s initially turned down is included in the larger piece.)

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The opening bid is set at $100, in an attempt, Davis says, to demonstrate that “a Christie’s auction can be accessible.” Should this auction prove a success, and should the successful buyer pay in Ether, it will represent a milestone in the secondary art market. To date, there’s been a series of efforts to introduce blockchain to the art world; none have quite stuck, though the most successful efforts, such as the company Artory, have been primarily for cataloging purposes. By creating a permanent, unalterable line of provenance for an artwork, blockchain can render questions of authenticity moot. “We want to have it both ways,” Davis says. “We want to [use cryptocurrency] when it makes sense, but this is not necessarily the new rule of thumb, where every auction we’ll be taking crypto.”

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BUSINESS ART

Museums Are Selling Virtual Classes and Tours to Boost Revenue During the Pandemic. Here’s What They’ve Learned About What Works First published on news.artnet.com by Naomi Rea, February 17, 2021

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ince the pandemic first forced museums into lockdown last spring, a growing number of institutions have been trying to supplement lost income by selling tickets to experience their exhibitions online. If successful, the business model could provide a new source of revenue in the future and support further digital investment.

Nevertheless, the exceptional circumstances have forced museums to plumb the depths of their revenue-generating capacity. With millions of people bored and stuck indoors—last March, visitors to the Louvre’s website increased more than tenfold, while visitors to the British Museum’s website were up 137 percent—many have looked to capitalize on the increased online traffic.

But, let’s face it—it’s a hard sell. To audiences used to experiencing museum objects in full IRL splendor, a wander around the Google Street View version of the Temple of Dendur is unlikely to measure up. And it’s equally tough to imagine an audience that isn’t your typical museum-going public ponying up $10 to watch a video of a curator walking through an exhibition when there are more sophisticated offers competing for their attention (and their dollars) online.

In the UK, where most museums rely on at least some degree of government support, institutions have had an extra incentive to experiment with new business models. In a leaked letter from the culture secretary to museums last August, Oliver Dowden warned that if institutions did not show that they were “pursuing every opportunity to maximize alternative sources of income,” the government would perhaps reconsider further financial support to the sector.

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So far, the experiments have had mixed results. London’s Design Museum has managed to sell more than 5,000 tickets for its online programs since the first lockdown in March. Today, online visitors can access a virtual walkthrough of its electronic music exhibition for £7, and for £5 can immerse themselves in a 360-degree digital version of the museum and “walk around” its “Designs of the Year” exhibit. The museum is also offering tickets (usually priced around £5) to its program of talks and other live events. The strategy has generated “much needed income to support the museum during closure,” a spokesperson for the museum tells Artnet News. Meanwhile, the Metropolitan Museum in New York has found some success with a program of paid virtual tours it launched in June. The 60-minute group tours include live discussions around a collection-based topic or special exhibition, and cost $300 per group of up to 40 people ($200 for students). Between July and December, the museum served some 116 groups with this option, generating between $23,000 and $34,000. In the same time period, it ran 156 of its 45-minute tours for younger school groups, which cost $200 per class (and was free for New York public schools). It’s unclear whether other museums’ virtual tours are getting the same traction. Despite saying it was “popular” and “doing well,” a spokesman for London’s National Gallery declined to share numbers for the uptake on its £8 online tour of its Artemisia Gentileschi exhibition that launched in December. And it’s hard to see these virtual tours holding the same allure once people return to museums in person.

Cashing in on Expertise As the pandemic wears on and virtual learning becomes a growing part of everyday life, museums are also seeing potential in monetizing their educational expertise through their online offerings. The Met saw an additional boost in income last year by offering paid online classes for children and adults, and its latest round of studio workshop and art history courses sold out in days. Elsewhere, the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia rushed to move its in-person adult education classes in art and art history online at the onset of the pandemic. The live online classes proved incredibly popular, and have raised more than $600,000 since their launch last March—more than double the revenue that in-person classes generated in 2019. The institution’s chief of business strategy and analytics, Will Cary, tells Artnet News that the Barnes was “surprised” at the interest in online classes, which, aside from making up for lost revenue from admissions and events, helped it connect with more students than ever. Between April and


December, more than 2,600 students from 39 states and six countries took classes, and 60 percent of that enrollment was from students who had never taken a Barnes class before. Encouraged by these results, the Barnes will continue to offer online classes even once the in-person classes resume. Cary does not expect enrollment to decline significantly. “We expect there will be many students who will continue taking online classes—perhaps they live in a different state or country and wouldn’t have been able to attend in person,” he says, adding that the online classes can accommodate more numbers than the in-person classes. Get With the Gamers The forced online migration last year was an opportunity for institutions and audiences to test out the digital waters, and their experiments have shown some potential. But if they want to cement their digital content as a source of income in future, they need to be thinking strategically about how to keep their visitors coming back (and attracting new audiences).

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While the phrase “virtual museum tours” was among the most Google searched of 2020, the interest peaked sharply in March, perhaps as the novelty of clicking around a virtual gallery wore off. It’s worth noting, however, that search interest in “virtual learning” did not see as sharp of a drop off, indicating that there is more potential for sustained interest in online learning. But museums need to be thinking outside the box if they hope to continue engaging consumers to invest in their online content. “There certainly is potential for digital experiences as alternative revenue streams for museums, but they need to get better,” Erinrose Sullivan, head of museums and cultural heritage at SO REAL, a tech company that offers 3D scanning and conversion services, tells Artnet News. Museums might do well to take cues from other industries. “Gaming is a prime example,” Sullivan says, pointing out that three of the most popular video game franchises–Assassin’s Creed, Tomb Raider, and Uncharted—have core history-driven storylines that engage and excite consumers enough to keep playing.

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“There certainly is potential for digital experiences as alternative revenue streams for museums, but they need to get better,” Assassin’s Creed even offers something close to what museums are trying to do now in its “Discovery Tours,” which allow the user to travel the game’s virtual world and experience culturally important sites. Museums could also create digital experiences that go beyond imitating the inperson museum experience online. Some have already been experimenting with this idea, including the Uffizi Galleries, which unveiled a murder-mystery video game set at the Pitti Palace Museum in 2019. Sullivan cites the game Avakin Life, a type of Second Life virtual universe where you can pick out clothes and furnishings for your space, including artwork. “I own two Paul Klee pieces in there, something simply not possible in the real world,” Sullivan says. “Artwork could be incorporated into a game that can enrich a player’s online life and

even play an integral role in the experience itself, an incredibly exciting way to bring in a new generation of art lovers.” And if museums are thinking about the digital as a way to generate additional revenue, they could also be looking beyond the pockets of their visitors for returns. Sullivan’s company uses technology to create “digital twins” of the items in museum collections, which could then be licensed to third parties such as the gaming or movie industries. That approach could “harness a whole new set of funding, while at the same time raising awareness of collections to new audiences,” Sullivan says. “As the world becomes more digital, there are lots of financial opportunities. Museums just need to look at how they harness that in new ways.”


ARTGO MARCH 2021 ONGOING SHOWS AND OPENING EXHIBITIONS JoGreen Street. 55 x 72 cm.Oil on Canvas, John-Michael Metelerkamp, Deepest Darkest Gallery


ARTGO: MARCH 2021

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ART@AFRICA FRANSCHHOEK FOUR SEASONS 2 HUGUENOT ROAD, FRANSCHHOEK 01/03/2021 UNTIL 30/04/2021 WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

ART@AFRICA HERMANUS SO MUCH TALENT IN OUR COUNTRY THE COURTYARD-HARBOUR SQUARE, 2 HARBOUR ROAD, HERMANUS 01/03/2021 UNTIL 30/04/2021 WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

CAPE PALETTE ART GALLERY GROUP EXHIBITION OF GALLERY ARTISTS SOLITUDE IN TIMES OF A PANDEMIC 01/03/2021 UNTIL 28/03/2021 WWW.CAPEPALETTE.CO.ZA

THE CAPE GALLERY FREDERIKE STOKHUYZEN 01/03/2021 UNTIL 26/03/2021 WWW.CAPEGALLERY.CO.ZA

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ARTGO: MARCH 2021

OPENING EXHIBITIONS

UPSTAIRS @ BAMBOO ANTIQUE CAPE AND TRANSVAAL FURNITURE, SA ART & CERAMICS 53 RUSTENBURG MELVILLE 06/03/2021 UNTIL 14/03/2021 TEL: 083 698 7146 EMAIL: RIAAN@RIAANBOLT.CO.ZA

ART@AFRICA MUTE WISDOM ANDRIES VISSER AND GUEST ARTIST GORDON FROUD UNTIL 04/03/2021 WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

ECLECTICA CONTEMPORARY MOHAMMAD RABIE NATUREÍS KEEPERS 04 MARCH 2021 WWW.ECLECTICACONTEMPORARY.CO.ZA

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RUPERT MUSEUM OUTSIDE IN - SOLO EXHIBITION BY MICHÈLE NIGRINI 05/03/2021 UNTIL 15/05/2021 IMIBALA GALLERY WWW.MICHELENIGRINI.COM

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NASIONALE MUSEUM • MUSIAMO WA SETJHABA

Department of Sport, Arts and Culture


ARTGO: MARCH 2021

OPENING EXHIBITIONS

RK CONTEMPORARY SOLO EXHIBITION BY LEANNE OLIVIER IN BARDO 07/03/2021 UNTIL 28/03/2021 WWW.RKCONTEMPORARY.COM

EBONY CURATED CAPE TOWN RENTIA RETIEF AND LARITA ENGELBRECHT THE LONG VIEW 10/03/2021 - 30/04/2021 WWW.EBONYCURATED.COM

OLIEWENHUIS ART MUSEUM TIRO YA DIATLA: NEW ACQUISITIONS OF THE ART BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA EXHIBITION 11/03/2021 UNTIL 18/04/2021

GALLERY 2 SOLO EXHIBITION BY NEIL BADENHORST IN COMPLETION OF HIS MASTERS IN ILLUSTRATION. between worlds 13/03/2021 – 03/04/2021 WWW.GALLERY2.CO.ZA

WWW.NASMUS.CO.ZA/OLIEWENHUIS-TEMPORARY-EXHIBITIONS

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RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY ANN MARAIS, WILMA CRUISE AND HELEN DOHERTY COLLABORATIVE EXHIBITION 16/03/2021 - 14/04/2021 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY ILSE NIEMAN BLACK / WHITE MY CITY 16/03/2021 - 14/04/2021 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY GROUP EXHIBITION OF LITHOGRAPHS PRINTED AT LE ATELIER LE GRANDE VILLAGE, FRANCE 16/03/2021 - 14/04/2021 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

AITY GALLERY SOLO EXHIBITION BY HELEN VAN STOLK DIVING DEEP & FLYING HIGH 20/03/2021 UNTIL 14/04/2021 WWW.ARTINTHEYARD.CO.ZA


ARTGO: MARCH 2021

OPENING EXHIBITIONS

GALLERY AT GLEN CARLOU A SOLO EXHIBITION BY JEAN DREYER BURNT WHITE 21/03/2021 UNTIL 22/04/2021 WWW.GLENCARLOU.COM/ART-GALLERY

PRINCE ALBERT GALLERY DIANE JOHNSON-ACKERMAN SOLO EXHIBITION NOSTALGIA 31/03/2021 UNTIL 02/05/2021 WWW.PRINCEALBERTGALLERY.CO.ZA

SALON NINETY ONE DREAM WINDOW - JEANNE HOFFMAN SOLO EXHIBITION 31/03/2021 UNTIL 01/05/2021 WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA

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ARTGO: MARCH- DECEMBER 2021

ONGOING SHOWS

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RUPERT MUSEUM MY GRUNDIG LOUNGE INSTALLATION SAM NHLENGETHWA UNTIL 07/03/2021 WWW.RUPERTMUSEUM.ORG

GOODMAN GALLERY CPT DID YOU EVER THINK THERE WOULD COME A TIME? GROUP SHOW UNTIL 12/03/2021 WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM

STEVENSON JHB LOST AND FOUND SERGE ALAIN NITEGEKA UNTIL 12/03/2021 WWW.STEVENSON.INFO

131//A//GALLERY ADELE VAN HEERDEN SOLO EXHIBITION INSIDE / OUTSIDE UNTIL 15 MARCH 2021 WWW.131AGALLERY.COM

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ARTGO: MARCH 2021

ONGOING SHOWS

GALLERY GLEN CARLOU PAPER – A DIGITAL GROUP EXHIBITION UNTIL 18/03/2021 WWW.GLENCARLOU.COM/ART-GALLERY

GOODMAN GALLERY JHB SOUTH SOUTH | EVERYTHING FITS TO OUR DAILY NEEDS GROUP SHOW UNTIL 24/03/2021 WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM

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EVERARD READ CPT BRETT CHARLES SEILER TIMBER UNTIL 20/03/2021 WWW.EVERARD-READ-CAPETOWN.CO.ZA

EDG2020

INAUGURAL LAUNCH EXHIBITION - THE ARTISTS’ WORK PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF OUR VISION FOR EDG2020 GALLERY - TO SHOWCASE GOOD QUALITY CONTEMPORARY ART THAT ENGAGES WITH THE DIVERSE WORLD OF SOUTH AFRICANS UNTIL 25/03/2021 WWW.EDG2020.COM

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EVERARD READ JHB BRETT MURRAY HIDE UNTIL 27/03/2021 WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA

SALON NINETY ONE ONLY IF YOU LOOK CLOSELY SARAH PRATT SOLO EXHIBITION 27/03/2021 WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA

MELROSE GALLERY ARLENE AMALER-RAVIV & DALE YUDELMAN LIVESTOCK UNTIL 28/03/2021 WWW.THEMELROSEGALLERY.COM

NWU GALLERY UNTIL 28/03/2021 IKHAYA LIKA MOYA SETHEMBISO ZULU WWW.SERVICES.NWU.AC.ZA/NWU-GALLERY


ARTGO: MARCH - MAY 2021

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IS SCULPTURE BIRDS EXHIBITION GROUP EXHIBITION UNTIL 31/03/2021 VENUE: TOKARA WINE ESTATE, HELSHOOGTE ROAD WWW.IS-ART-GALLERY.COM

DEEPEST DARKEST JOHN-MICHAEL METELERKAMP NOCTURNES UNTIL 10/04/2021 WWW.DEEPESTDARKESTART.COM

ECLECTICA CONTEMPORARY GROUP EXHIBITION 11:11 UNITL 29/04/2021 WWW.ECLECTICACONTEMPORARY.CO.ZA

ARTS TOWN RIEBEEK VALLEY AMPHITHEATRE SUMMER THEATRE SEASON UNTIL APRIL 2021 WWW.ARTSTOWN.CO.ZA

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LA MOTTE MUSEUM CELEBRATING THE LOVE OF ART -A PERSONAL SELECTION BY HANNELI RUPERT-KOEGELENBERG UNTIL WINTER 2021 WWW.LA-MOTTE.COM/PAGES/MUSEUM

ZEITZ MOCCA WAITING FOR GEBANE SENZENI MTHWAKAZI MARASELA UNTIL 02/05/2021 WWW.ZEITZMOCAA.MUSEUM


ARTGO: MAY - DECEMBER 2021

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NORVAL ART FOUNDATION THE REUNION GEORGINA GRATRIX UNTIL 31/05/2021 WWW.NORVALFOUNDATION.ORG

NORVAL ART FOUNDATION IINYANGA ZONYAKA ATHI-PATRA RUGA UNTIL 26/07/2021 WWW.NORVALFOUNDATION.ORG

THE RUPERT MUSEUM NATURE MORTE THE STILL FROM LIFE UNTIL 29/08/2021 WWW.RUPERTMUSEUM.ORG

EVERARD READ LEEU ESTATE FRANSCHHOEK ART AND SCULPTURE GALLERY UNTIL 31/12/2021

WWW.EVERARD-READ-FRANSCHHOEK.CO.ZA

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ARTFLIX S O U T H A F R I C A’ S D A I LY A R T M O V I E G U I D E ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


Zululand: Natal Where Art School Is Nov 2020 R 43 244 Jul 2018 R 18 760 Sep 2016 R 12 881 Apr 2015 R 7 261

The Love is Approaching But too much of anything is very dangerous Feb 2021 R 40 000 Mar 2019 R 16 415

They are Shaking Their Hands Because They are Longing each other Feb 2021 R 35 000 Oct 2020 R 9 380 Feb 2017 R 9 368


The SA Print Gallery introduces a new Blue Chip Printmaker on the block Now its more than just Kentridge, Pierneef, Hodgins, Clarke and Victor. Follow The Print Gallery Sales index and see how Muafangejo are doubling if not quadrupling sales in less than 5 years. All auction prices quoted here are from past Struass and Co sales. 109 Sir Lowry Road, Woodstock,Cape Town, Tel 021 300 0461 gabriel@printgallery.co.za www.printgallery.co.za


LIVE VIRTUAL AUCTION Cape Town | 11-13 April 2021 021 683 6560 | ct@straussart.co.za www.straussart.co.za

Jacob Hendrik Pierneef Baobabs (detail), R 2 500 000 - 3 000 0000

Modern, Post-War and Contemporary Art, Decorative Arts, Jewellery and Wine

Profile for SA ART TIMES

THE ART TIMES MARCH EDITION 2021