Page 1

April 2018 SCULPTURE EDITION WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


08

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


CONTENTS April 2018

12 NOT A SINGLE STORY WINTER SCULPTURE EXHIBITION 20 GORDON FROUD: AN EVOLUTION OF FORM AND MEANING 30 IN CONVERSATION WITH DYLAN LEWIS 36 ABSA L’ATELIER WINNER DONALD WASSWA 40 JACO SIEBERHAGEN 44 THE IS SCULPTURE GARDEN AT TOKARA WINE ESTATE 56 QUARREL OVER SARAH BAARTMAN SCULPTURE AT UCT 58 BUSINESS ART 60 THE MARRIAGE OF ART AND BUSINESS 70 AUCTION ACTION 78 ARTGO & GALLERY LISTING 92 WORLD DISCLOSURE 106 THE NORVAL FOUNDATION 114 LA MOTTE BRINGS ART TO LIFE

APRIL COVER ARTWORK Stanislaw Trzebinski, Perpetual Silence

Contents Artwork: Gordon Froud, White Conevirus, Plastic Road Cones, 4.5 x4.5 meters W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

09


Editorial

I always look forward to the April edition of the Art Times, purely because it follows a sculpture theme and one can view a year’s progress and diversity of new trends and expressions in sculpture. Unlike any other medium, sculpture has a physical presence to it: it’s weighty, it’s in your physical space, you can walk around it and in some cases climb over it; it feels good and real. A great sculpture is when you can both see and touch the sculpture and feel the form and material that the sculptor tells their story with. To feel the same sculptor’s handprint pressure on the sculpture is like living a musical note from a musician; it’s pure magic. Our first feature is the collaboration between the Nirox Foundation and the Wanås Konst sculpture park, which features an exchange between Swedish and South African artists under the banner of “Not a Single Story”. One of their objectives is to validate and extend sculpture practice for the future, opening doors worldwide. Nirox intends to alternate these initiatives with exhibitions that showcase younger artists, such as the 2017 Winter Exhibition, which gave the park to 6 local universities and their appointed curators. 2018 marks a return to the international stage. We are also spoilt for choice by publishing an extract from Gordon Froud’s Mid Career Catalogue written by Tracy Murinik for his mouth-watering show coming up at the Standard Bank Gallery in Johannesburg. The magic behind Gordon is that you grow more and more to love his whimsical and humorous sculpture that in effect takes everyday things and makes them into magical objects – not massed-produced utensils, but like Marcel Duchamp, a fountain, not a toilet. The more I read the interview, the more I love Gordon’s mind and fascinating early years to his mid life – that makes for inspired reading. On the other side of the spectrum, Dylan Lewis’s larger-than-life sculptures are challenging and heroic, with both sculpture and settings pitching you into a dark passionate world of nature and confrontation, of man getting to grips with his human or natural soul. When I see Dylan Lewis’s sculpture, I see pure passion and energy. This month we cover Art Auction sales with Strauss & Co. clearly leading the market and Aspire, Sotherby’s and Bonhams on their heels. It’s impressive that there is so much belief and enjoyment in this market, despite the recession and political instability. We are pleased to be branching out in a new direction of Art Life. Our visit to La Motte was simply heaven with being surrounded by the best of everything, food, wine, art and wonderful people. A big thank you to the staff for putting us up. Lastly our ArtGo website is almost up, we are in the last stages of its development. You are welcome to look at it at www.artgo. co.za and please let us know what you think of both Artgo and our magazine. We would love to hear from you. Gabriel Clark-Brown

10

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

CONTACT ART TIMES Tel: 021 424 7733 P.O Box 428 Rondebosch 7701 EDITOR Gabriel Clark-Brown editor@arttimes.co.za ART DIRECTOR Brendan Body ADVERTISING & NEWSWIRE Eugene Fisher sales@arttimes.co.za DIGITAL MEDIA EVENT LISTINGS Jan Croft subs@arttimes.co.za SEND AD MATERIAL sales@arttimes.co.za LETTERS TO editor@arttimes.co.za RIGHTS: THE ART TIMES MAGAZINE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY MATERIAL THAT COULD BE FOUND OFFENSIVE BY ITS READERS. OPINIONS AND VIEWS EXPRESSED IN THE SA ART TIMES DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE OFFICIAL VIEWPOINT OF THE EDITOR, STAFF OR PUBLISHER, WHILE INCLUSION OF ADVERTISING FEATURES DOES NOT IMPLY THE NEWSPAPER’S ENDORSEMENT OF ANY BUSINESS, PRODUCT OR SERVICE. COPYRIGHT OF THE ENCLOSED MATERIAL IN THIS PUBLICATION IS RESERVED.

@ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Unearth the wilderness within.


NOT A SINGLE STORY WINTER SCULPTURE EXHIBITION 2018

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN NIROX FOUNDATION, SOUTH AFRICA AND WANÅS KONST, SWEDEN / 12 MAY – END OF JULY, 2018

Mary Sibande, Let slip the dogs of war, 2015, Wanas Konst, Photo Mattias Givell 12

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


An international sculpture exhibition in one of Gauteng’s most beautiful landscapes, complete with exquisite food and wine from the Franschhoek Valley. Artlogic’s renowned Winter Sculpture Fair returns for its 6th edition at the Nirox Foundation Sculpture Park near the Cradle of Humankind on the weekend of 12 and 13 May, 2018. In partnership with Franschhoek Tourism, the Fair will afford our visitors the opportunity to sample some of the country’s best food and wine from the famed Cape Valley. Top restaurants and wineries will set up shop alongside one another to offer audiences a feast of their choosing, from artisanal cheeses by Fromages de France to wine from Babylonstoren as well as the famed chocolate desserts by Huguenot Fine Chocolates. This Mother’s Day weekend promises to be a delight for the entire family to be enjoyed meandering through the beautiful grounds of Nirox and picnicking amongst the sculptures. The 2018 Winter Sculpture Fair will mark the opening of the NIROX Foundation annual winter sculpture exhibition to the public, in collaboration with the Swedish sculpture park, Wanås Konst/The Wanås Foundation. The exhibition is supported by the Swedish Postcode Foundation. ABOUT THE WINTER EXHIBITION: NOT A SINGLE STORY From 12 May until the end of July, NIROX will host its Winter 2018 sculpture exhibition, co-curated by the Swedish Wanås Konst sculpture park and the Wanås Foundation., and co-directed by Elisabeth Millqvist and Mattias Givell. The exhibition title, Not A Single Story, is inspired by the TED Talk given by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and is the starting point of the exhibition, positing

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

13


Photo Henry Engelbrecht

that diversity strengthens rather than divides us. The exhibition is an exchange between sculpture parks on two continents and the selected artists come from various backgrounds and represent a rich diversity of perspectives. The exhibition is interested in showcasing works by forerunners of the modern art world alongside the less established (emerging) artists, looking at individual practices as overlapping dialogues and bringing contemporary concerns to the fore. The exhibition and its comprehensive educational programme, which is aimed at children and the youth to expand their understanding of life and art, is supported by the Swedish Postcode Foundation. The exhibition, along with educational exchanges of talks, tours and workshops, is presented in the NIROX Winter Program context, with a wider range of programs such as concerts and pop-up restaurants to stimulate creative thought and promote good values, towards building a better world.

This will be the second NIROX exhibition in collaboration with a leading global sculpture park. In 2016 NIROX collaborated successfully with Yorkshire Sculpture Park, in similar fashion. As a result several African artists found their way to new opportunities through YSP. One of our objectives is to validate and extend this practise for the future, opening doors worldwide NIROX’s intention is to alternate these initiatives with exhibitions that showcase younger artists. Such as the 2017 Winter Exhibition which gave the park to 6 local universities and their appointed curators. 2018 is a return to the international stage. Wanås Konst and the NIROX Foundation are pleased to announce that the following artists will participate in NOT A SINGLE STORY: Lubaina Himid, Yoko Ono, Esther Mahlangu, Jane Alexander, Mary Sibande, Nandipha Mntambo, Mwangi Hutter, Lungiswa Gqunta, Sethembile Msezane, Frances Goodman, Nelisiwe Xaba, Sophia Van Wyk,

“The exhibition is interested in showcasing works by forerunners of the modern art world alongside the less established (emerging) artists” 14

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

15


Jürgen Dünhofen, Reacclimate

Photo Henry Engelbrecht

Caroline Mårtensson, Bronwyn Katz, Claudette Schreuders, Whitney McVeigh, Beth Diane Armstrong, Dineo Bopape, Gunilla Klingberg and Peter Geschwind, Marcia Kure, Marianne Lindberg De Geer, Latifa Echakhch, Lena Cronqvist, Ayana V Jackson, Zanele Muholi and Rachel Tess. The artists represent a diversity of perspectives as they range from forerunners and matriarchs, to emerging artists within contemporary art in South Africa, the African diaspora, Sweden and other regions. Japanese artist Yoko Ono, commonly seen as the grandmother of conceptual and performance art, will exhibit her ongoing installation series Wish Trees. This iteration of the installation is titled Wish Trees for Hope, a name Ono nominated especially for her first showcase in Africa. Now 82, iconic artist Esther Mahlangu is known for her colourful artworks that jump between contemporary disciplines such as pop art, abstraction and graphic design. Following the painting customs passed down from the generations of women in her family, her brightly coloured murals have captured the attention of audiences around the globe. Mahlangu will present a traditional Ndebele mural, showcasing the best of pattern, colour and geometry for NOT A SINGLE STORY.

16

The NIROX Sculpture Park and Wanås Konst are also incredibly proud to announce the participation of 2017 Turner Prize Winner, Lubaina Himid. Himid will be exhibiting in Africa, the continent of her birth, for the first time. She will show a selection of the painted cut-outs from Vernet’s Studio, a twenty-sixpiece installation featuring representations of artists such as Georgia O’Keefe, Frida Kahlo and Betye Saar. Established South African artist Jane Alexander will exhibit Security in NOT A SINGLE STORY. This is the second time Alexander will exhibit in the NIROX Sculpture Park after showing in 2010.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Yoko Ono, Wish Trees for Wanas, 1996 2011, Wanas Konst, Photo Mattias Givell

Security continues in Alexander’s language, which among other things is concerned with borders, security and displacement. We are also pleased to welcome back Nandipha Mntambo, Mary Sibande, Whitney McVeigh, Frances Goodman and Beth Diane Armstrong for NOT A SINGLE STORY. Dancer and performance artist Nelisiwe Xaba will present a second version of her performance lecture Bang Bang Wo, which was first presented at The Centre for the Less Good Idea. Directly translated from Mandarin, Bang Bang Wo means ‘help’ and the performance explores the politics of aid. As performance art develops momentum

and a growing presence in South Africa, Wanås Konst and the NIROX Foundation are pleased to include this discipline in a largely sculptural show. NOT A SINGLE STORY will hear voices from the African diaspora with the inclusion of Kenyan-German artists Mwangi Hutter, American artist Ayana V Jackson, U.Sbased Nigerian artist Marcia Kure and Moroccan-French artist Latifa Echakhch. These diaspora members explore various themes including their complex sense of identity and culture, personal and collective histories and post-colonial destabilisation.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

17


It is with immense excitement that we welcome Claudette Schreuders and Zanele Muholi who will be exhibiting at the NIROX Sculpture Park for the first time as a part of NOT A SINGLE STORY. Emerging talents Bronwyn Katz, Sophia van Wyk, Dineo Bopape, Sethembile Msezane & Lungiswa Gqunta will also exhibit for the first time, showcasing work that represents the forefront of contemporary art practise in South Africa and closes the loop on the generational dialogue between artists. Swedish artists Caroline Mårtensson, Gunilla Klingberg and Peter Geschwind, Rachel Tess, Marianne Lindberg De Geer and Lena Cronqvist represent the Swedish contingent of artists as introduced by the Wanås Foundation. Exhibiting Artists (by nationality) in are: SOUTH AFRICA Jane Alexander (SA) Beth Armstrong (SA) Frances Goodman (SA) Lungiswa Gqunta (SA) Bronwyn Katz (SA) Esther Mahlungu (SA) Nandipha Mntambo (Swaziland/SA) Sethembile Msezane (SA) Claudette Schreuders (SA) Mary Sibande (SA) Sophia van Wyk (SA) Nelisiwe Xaba (SA)

18

SWEDISH Lena Cronqvist (SE) Gunilla Klingberg Peter Geschwind (SE) Marianne Lindberg De Geer (SE) Caroline Mårtensson (SE) Rachel Tess (SE) INTERNATIONAL AND DIASPORA Latifa Echakhch (MA/FR) Lubaina Himid (ZAN/UK) Turner Prize winner 2017 Mwangi Hutter (KE/GER) Ayana V Jackson (US) Marcia Kure (NIG/US) Whitney McVeigh (UK) Yoko Ono (Japan/US) NIROX APP Powered with the help of Grotech, visitors will be able to download the NIROX App to provide live mapping of their location in the park, the exhibition catalogue and related information. OPENING TIMES: The 2018 Winter Sculpture Fair is open from 10h00 – 17h00 daily on both 12 and 13 May, 2018. Tickets are available online only prior to the event at www.tixsa.co.za for R220- R240. Children 12 years and under enter for free. For more information, visit www wintersculpturefair.co.za or email info@artlogic.co.za or like the Winter Sculpture Fair on Facebook.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

19


AN EVOLUTION OF FORM AND MEANING GORDON FROUD IN CONVERSATION WITH TRACY MURINIK For the full length conversation please see Gordon’s profile on www.arttimes.co.za

One could not simply call Gordon Froud’s working space a studio, because, while it is that, it is also a treasure trove of collections — artworks, books, music, films, paraphernalia of all sorts: a gallery space; an occasional living space; an artists’ residency, and it is likely the most accurate representation of many aspects of who Gordon Froud is. Exploring these spaces is a rich sensory and cerebral adventure — a space into which Froud readily invites people to explore with him — generous in its visual opulence and eclecticism; charming in its quirkiness and occasional iconoclasm; defiant in the utterly flamboyant showiness of its vast accumulation. TM: I’d like start our discussion, which is consistent with just having walked through your very extraordinary (working/living/being) spaces, with the issue of self-definition. You wear very many hats, even for those who slip between simultaneously being artists and curators and sometimes writers. But you wear more hats than most. GF: I have a big head… TM: And one of the perks of having a big head is that you can fit many more hats on! Artist, teacher, avid art collector, gatherer and curator of many collections of things; passionate supporter of young artists, sometime gallerist … How do you define yourself? And is there any particular role or space that supersedes the other? Or is this ultimately an entirely irrelevant question, because I have a sense that all of these things interplay all the time, consistently?

GF: It depends on the circumstance. Currently I see myself as a maker, and a 21st century person — that’s currently how I’d describe myself. When I was running gordart Gallery, for example, just on a technical basis, it was a good way to locate oneself by saying gallerist, curator, artist and educator. And then, as the gallery became less and the artistic and creative side became more again — because it’s always a balancing act of which should come first — I now call myself an artist, educator and curator. TM: And the collector is an entirely separate persona, which is a far more private persona, but shares himself with those invited in? GF: Everybody is invited in, and that’s the nice thing about it. It’s very much a public space. It’s a private collection in a public space, and I’m very happy for everyone to share and enjoy it. TM: There is an interesting tension you embody, between the public and the private, where the slippage between intimacy and sharing is a very generous one. And if we come back to a self-definition, one thing that occurs to me is that sense of generosity, not only of you as an individual person, but of your position in relation to other artists, students, young emerging artists; to the space of the art world more broadly, regularly creating additional spaces where people can access. For me, that stands out, because the nature of access, especially in the South African art world context, is so opaque. But you open small windows where people can look in at things they might not otherwise get to see — at a less hierarchical level — and also step into a space where they can experience and explore.

“Artist, teacher, avid art collector, gatherer and curator of many collections of things; passionate supporter of young artists, sometime gallerist” 20

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

21


GF: For me that’s a very important thing. I see myself as a generous person, but I don’t do it to be recognised as such. It’s my nature — I’m not a harmful person in any way, and I’ve always shared. I came from a very poor background, and we didn’t grow up with very much. I don’t see myself as a materialist, despite having all this stuff. To me I possess it so I can share it. With my movie collection, for example, the idea is that we have movie nights, and twenty people get together and watch movies, because I have the type of movies that other people don’t necessarily have. It’s part of who I am. TM: Picking up on your experience of growing up, what was your exposure to creativity and art during that time? GF: It happened in a very odd way, because I grew up basically as a poor white in Hillbrow. My dad could never keep a job and he moved around — I went to seventeen different schools, and I was never intended to go to university. Although my parents always hoped I might become a lawyer or an actor or broadcaster — I’d always shown a lot of interest in the spoken word from a young age — but there was never any money to consider something like that. So at school I did accountancy and science, and absolutely hated it, and by the end of standard nine I’d actually failed both, so for matric I changed to do art and history instead. TM: Had you considered art before that? GF: My mother had been a genre painter; still-life, landscape and the like. She kept us alive from time to time making paintings on tiles and selling them door to door. So there was always a sense of creativity. But I always knew I wanted to do something creative, whether it was acting, or music, or visual art. During that time there was a shortage of art teachers at TED [Transvaal Education Department] schools, and one of my teachers at school suggested that one of the ways of getting into university was to apply for a teaching loan. So I got in basically though the back door by going to study art teaching, and getting a loan to pay for it. I

22

had five jobs through university to pay my way and I had to teach in a TED school to pay the loan back. I was an appalling student — I worked hard, I’ve always been Calvinist in my way of working — but I didn’t have a clue of what art was. Prof. Alan Crump, in our first year, looked at my sculpture and said, “Mr. Froud, you make furniture shop art”, and I took that as a compliment! I always saw myself becoming an abstract painter or a welder of stuff. And now I look at it and realise I had no idea what that was actually about — I couldn’t paint at all. I can do just about everything else, but I still don’t paint. It’s not something that I understand at all. TM: And yet you have an amazing painting collection. GF: That’s probably why. There are less sculptures in my collection because I can conceive and make them myself. But I’m more intrigued by other people’s painting abilities. TM: There are always resonances when you start to look into people’s lives — an echo of the generosity you offer now by the particular generosity of your school teacher giving you a means to go further, for example … GF: The same school teacher who, when I was supposed to go into the detention barracks and be in jail for six years for refusing to carry arms and go to the army, suggested that I go to university first, so that at least I’d have a degree, and would not be just another nameless/faceless person if conscripted later, but a somebody. Coming back to what you asked about my exposure to art earlier on, we always had books in the home, even though we were as poor as church mice, and we listened to Springbok Radio — ‘theatre of the mind’. And my mom used to sketch and make copies of artworks and drawings. There was an article I remember in 1975 all about Picasso’s line drawings, and my mom made the most beautiful copies of these and they were up on the wall. I was influenced by that.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Flower of Life, Laser engraving on Supawood, graphite and gold dust. 2.7x2.7m

TM: Did you ever try to emulate what she was doing? GF: Yes, right from primary school I always drew. I had my first exhibition when I was in standard five — I had a few little ceramic works, school art things — but I was interested enough and always drew right throughout my school career, even when I wasn’t doing art. (I still have my artist sketchbooks in which I copied cartoons, landscapes and objects — very juvenile but I guess at least I did something). My other big influence was in the city. I went to school in Germiston, and by the time we’d moved back and finally settled again in Hillbrow, I made the conscious decision that I wouldn’t uproot and move again from school, and so I travelled backwards and forwards to school in Germiston, which meant walking from Hillbrow, through Joubert Park, catching the bus to Germiston and back. So, for the final three years of my school life, I walked

through Joubert Park nearly every day on the way home, and I got to go into the JAG (Johannesburg Art Gallery) three or four times a week. I’d go in and see the work, and look at my favourites, and go and explore things. And then, of course, the Artists in the Park [Artists Under the Sun] would also be there — from a Friday through to Sunday, so on my way home from school on a Friday I could spend an hour wandering through and looking at all the kitsch landscapes and things, and I’d think, “Ah, I’d love to be able to do that”. So I always had the interest, but the influence came from these experiences. I remember seeing Judith Mason’s work for the first time at the JAG, for example, and being blown away. TM: It’s an interesting point you make about Artists Under the Sun, and their influence on you at such an early age, because as well as many of those artists going on to become wellknown, highly regarded artists, the history of Artists Under the Sun is that it was mainly

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

23


Geometric solid, Mixed media on brown paper, 1580 x 850mm

created by black artists who, by separatist legislation, were not allowed to show in the JAG, and the formation of the grouping was essentially an act of insurgency against that conservative and bigoted establishment of the JAG at the time. GF: Yes, it was definitely an influence to see some of those early painters. I didn’t know who they were at the time, but when I was able to see their works again much later on, I’d be able to say, “Yes, I actually remember seeing their work there”. TM: You mentioned your first exhibition being at school in Standard Five, where you showed a few works and was awarded a gold or silver certificate for them. It is significant to me because it would have planted a seed not only of making, but then showing your

24

work. And many years later, in 2013-14, you come to present A retrospective of exhibitions I never had, which David Paton, in his essay in this publication, amends to A retrospective of [all] exhibitions I never had… GF: I always find retrospectives interesting, because they require such a careful review and editing process. At the same time they can be extremely challenging processes because they require one to assess your life’s work to that point, which can be an existential adventure — ‘adventure’, of course, possibly being a euphemism for what it actually entails! TM: You’ve described vividly the feeling of showing some works on that first Standard Five exhibition at school as having felt both powerful and empowered for you in that

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


TM: Right on the cusp of political shift in the country. GF: In fact those were the last two years of compulsory military service. So I had my trial in the morning, and was posted straight out of Oudtshoorn to Pretoria to go and work in their printing unit; coming into a creative industry within the military. TM: What was the nature of that printing unit? GF: It involved printing everything from manuals to invitations to banquets and events for the military. TM: And how much propaganda material was there? GF: Probably quite a lot. It wasn’t a big military printing works, and material was more about how to conduct yourself with etiquette, give a salute, and how to make your bed properly … But it gave me an opportunity to learn the printing industry — I learnt how to do colour separations, for example, and how to do offset lithography — a lot of the things that have fed back into my work in some ways over the years. TM: Were you reading the materials?

moment. What happened to the exhibitions that you feel should have been shown beyond that, along the way, as a working artist? GF: Well, one of the great difficulties of trying to make one’s way through the art world is that unless you are supremely talented like [Froud’s partner] Diane Victor, for example — Diane got her first show within a week of us leaving university, which sold well and she was soon snapped up by Goodman Gallery who still shows her work to this day — then for others like me, there was no way in. I wasn’t a supremely talented artist — although I worked harder than most people — so I had to find other ways of getting into the art world. When I finished university I was still compelled by the regime to go to the army, so I registered as a conscientious objector, had a trial and was granted objector status. So while I still had to be in the military, I didn’t have to do combatant duty. That was in 1988-9. I was 25.

GF: Yes. I had to do a lot of the proof reading, and obviously I was still conflicted to some extent, because even the idea of being employed to paint a tank in pretty patterns doesn’t make the tank any less deadly. I was quite aware of those kinds of conflicts. Anyway, the printing unit was a way of me having some contact with creativity and design. TM: David Paton, again in his essay published in de Arte speaks of your “cynical eye”, which is always, of course, melded in with an astute sense of humour. Paton suggests also that your work, over the years, has been misinterpreted... GF: ...yes, and perhaps glossed over… TM: ...and assumed to be quite simple and easy to read at a surface level. He describes your work as having been “too easily and comfortably categorised”, rather than considering the complexity of the humour,

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

25


the social critique and its content. The history you’ve just described here, though, begins to make sense of these layers, especially in your earlier work. GF: I’ve always been someone who thinks very deeply about things, everything from politics through to religion — I’m a questioning an inquisitive kind of person in whatever I do. I take on things in a very personal way — I analyse the world around me. But unlike Diane or Ayanda Mabula, for example, who go for the jugular and point out all the horrors explicitly, I find more subtle ways of intervening. I always look at it as a way of changing people’s view of the world around them. My coat hanger works are an example — I always love it when kids come into a gallery and see this big shape and then they realise that it’s an assemblage of coat hangers; and there’s almost this Gestalt moment where they physically move and realise that, ‘oh, it’s only coat hangers’. And then I say to them, well now I’ve changed your perception of the world forever, because you’ll never see a coat hanger being sold on the side of the road again and not think of my work. You can’t erase or unthink the thought, which is why I don’t make work that is of a high social commentary — I leave that up to the more narrative artists. My intention is to work in a slightly different way, often with a slightly cynical and humorous eye. TM: The coat hanger works that you’ve just referred to start to infer your interest in modular forms, into the possibilities of reading forms. Interesting to me also is that you moved from hating science and maths at school into the arts, and then, much later, realising that, in fact, the sciences can be immensely creative. And considering your work over the past twelve plus years, or perhaps longer, there seems to be a type of aesthetic schism that presents itself. Aesthetically, especially since your Masters in Fine Art in 2009, there has been a shift in how you take your expressions of social critique into another visual and aesthetic realm. I’m interested in the way your still subtly politicised content has shifted. GF: Yes, shifted through the subtlety of language — the titles are always very important to me — they’re almost a material.

26

TM: And one has to read subtly. As much as they could be humorous one-liners, they’re also keys into reading the work? GF: The perfect example, again, is the simple plastic coat hanger, which for me represents the people selling coat hangers on the side of the road; the migrants who come in every day, buy a bunch of coat hangers and then flog them on the side of the road. So it has that secondary layer of meaning around economic migrancy, about the dispossessed; about taking a little bit of something, selling that and going and buying more; as well as the consumerism of it. But to me the coat hanger symbolised the people themselves. It came about quite simply as I was driving home one day to unpack my studio after living in London, and I couldn’t find the box with the coat hangers in it, and I saw one of the guys selling them and bought a hundred coat hangers from him. And when I got home, the memory of buying those coat hangers stuck with me, and when I opened them up and chucked them out on the floor, I started seeing all the patterns; so I spent the whole evening playing with coat hangers, cable tying them together rather than hanging my clothing up. And that’s where that link came in. When I started making work like the taxi works made of coat hangers, it was about relating to the empowerment of the people who use the taxis, the kids and that strata of migrants who come into the city into that socio-economic environment. TM: Your work has never been explicitly political, even though it might be read as such — an example that comes to mind is your Alice in Wonderland series, and its engagements with issues of gender and social class, all of those things legible within the works as social critiques, but always as implicit references. With that as an example, then, and coming back to the aesthetic shift into the hangers and more modular works, they present as a quite dramatic shift from your previous work — notably paring down, even though they’re still cumulative in their making. GF: And that’s also what is happening with

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Figure with Geometry, 1205 x 900mm W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

27


Circular Table Top, Digital print on archival paper, 1205 x 900mm

the current exhibition. They’re becoming even more minimal, coming down to a single shape or form. TM: A maturation? GF: Well, I couldn’t get to the [minimal form] unless I had been going through that process to get there. TM: This different, pared down mode of working then embeds meaning through the work in a different way. Just in the title of your Masters dissertation, Modularity, Repetition and Material Choices as Strategies in the Work of Selected South African Sculptors (2009) and in the exhibitions that emerged from it, you are very deliberate in terms of recognising a capacity to shift into a different aesthetic mode, but where meaning is maintained and foregrounded.

GF: The overriding theme of that exhibition was the circular form, either as globe or as circle. In the current show I extend the geometry into other forms. TM: But then, in 2013-14, with Retrospective of [all] the exhibitions I never had, you seemed to go back into reviewing and representing the type of early aesthetic which takes you through a process of recording your own maturation and development. And yet, the works there — and again I think that it is significant that it was a cumulative showing of works in different space, — revealed a previous focus on showing singular works, or small bodies of work that were embedded in a space, whereas, here, you have installations that start to speak to one another; that also of course start to speak to your curatorial role.

“I’ve always been someone who thinks very deeply about things, everything from politics through to religion — I’m a questioning an inquisitive kind of person in whatever I do.” 28

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Register now at lateliercompetition.com. Entries close on the 27 April 2018 Authorised Financial Services Provider Registered Credit Provider Reg No NCRCP7 CULLINAN/Lat/003


IN CONVERSATION WITH DYLAN LEWIS BY DR. JOHAN THOM (UNIVERSITY OF PRETORIA) www.dylanlewis.co.za

and even of sexuality in the symbolism of the big cat was a vehicle through which I could explore that underlying part of myself without having any straightforward attachment to it. Today I am ready to be more open. This is why I have turned to exploring the human form and mythology. JT: So with the human figures you are more interested in their darker, mythological possibilities - as archaic signs and symbols? How and why did this shift come about? Dylan Lewis working in his studio. Photo Elsa Young

Dylan Lewis is an established South African artist well-known for his monumental bronze sculptures of African wildlife. More recently his work has become darker, showing traces of a highly personal journey into the human psyche and its primal drives. These works explore human myth through the hybridisation and fragmentation of sculptural form. Coupled with this development in his recent work is the realisation of a beautiful large-scale sculpture garden just outside Stellenbosch. JT: Dylan first I want to talk about your themes and recent formal developments in your work. Then I would like to briefly discuss the development, form and function of the sculpture garden. I think as an artist you are mostly known for the big cat series. Did you make these works purely out of a formal fascination or were there other forces at play? DL: I love the big cats both as living beings and as forms. On a psychological level the cats always represent something raw, even free to me. The possibility of violence, aggression

DL: My primary passion and source of inspiration is always the wilderness - the wild places where I grew up and still spend much of my time. My initial youthful response to that attraction was to draw and sculpt the animals I saw there, because they were the things that I loved and connected with most. As my own ideas about the world and my place therein became more complex, I became more interested in exploring the ‘wilderness’ as a symbol of personal freedom, the animal, and all that is hidden in my unconscious. That is why I have turned to the human form and abstraction such as the monumental animal fragments. JT: Let us talk a bit about the human figures that you have begun to sculpt lately. They are quite a departure from your previous works.   DL: I am interested in the human body as a surface on which to explore emotion, tension and concept, rather than narrowly focusing on the face (which for me is too easy). In some of the new works I integrated aspect of animal into the human form to defamiliarise it, to make something else momentarily appear through - or as part of - the human form. For me the human body is an expression of our animal-like state in the world, of our givingness as a species if you like.

“These works explore human myth through the hybridisation and fragmentation of sculptural form.” 30

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

Black wildebeest skull masked male figure. [Male Trans-Figure II], bronze with a red patina.

31


Monumental human and animal fragmented torsos exploring dissolution,fragmentation and the sometimes transformative power of brokenness in an individual life; fibre reinforced acrylic plaster with black oxide,12 x 5 meters. 32

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

33


Crouching male figure wearing waterbuck skull mask [Male Trans-Figure IX] in the foreground and monumental lion skull masked male figure [Male Trans-figure I] in the background , Bronze . The skull masks are symbolic of a ritualistic integration of the “animal� or authentic life within as well as the necessary death associated with following an intuitive path which may be at odds with the society or family we find ourselves in. 34

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Monumental fragmented female torso at the edge of the lake; fibre reinforced acrylic plaster with iron oxide 5 x 3 meters.

JT: You hide the faces of the figures behind animals mask often or avoid them completely. What is the reason for this? DL: For me the human face represents the spoken and written word, intellect and control. The body is older and it is more visceral - a constant reminder of our past as a species that is part of and ultimately belongs in the world. The animal skull-mask represents my ritualistic engagement with the story of the ‘wildness’ and what it might symbolise today. JT: There seems to be a specific narrative at stake in the placement of the different forms throughout the sculpture park? DL: With the sculpture garden I want to establish something like a timeline in my sculpture to date. I divided the garden into distinct spaces featuring early bird imagery, the African animal imagery, the cat imagery, the early human form, the human torso, fragmented animal forms, monumental fragments and the recent work respectively. These distinct forms are all stories associated with different thinking processes, artistic interests and experiences in my life thus far. For example, the section containing most of the female figures is associated to a personal moment of self-reflection and development

regarding the human form and its place in my art, spirituality and life. JT: How does the landscape frame the work? DL: The system of pathways that run through the garden allow the visitor to either enter the garden randomly, or experience it as a specific narrative journey. On an obvious level the placement of the sculptures in the garden relates to the viewer’s physical approach to the sculpture and its context. For example, in one area I placed an upright vertical angel-like figure, to create a moment of quiet and stability in the landscape. There is nature, and then there is what I have made to resemble nature - the sculpture garden. Together this now forms a single continuum, one with its own problems and possibilities, freedoms, pleasures and constraints. Dr Johan Thom (b1976, Johannesburg) is an academic, artist and curator who lectures Fine Art at the University of Pretoria. This interview is an edited transcript of a longer interview with Dylan Lewis conducted in late 2017. Visits to the Dylan Lewis Sculpture Garden are by appointment Tuesdays to Saturdays. To make a booking contact reservations@dylanart.co.za.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

35


ABSA L’ATELIER WINNER: DONALD WASSWA

DEGENERATIVE EVOLUTION / SOLO EXHIBITION www.lateliercompetition.com

Creative expression meets future science in Degenerative Evolution of the Living – the mindblowing new solo exhibition from Absa L’Atelier 2016 Merit Award winner, Ugandan Donald Wasswa. Intriguing and provocative, the exhibition promises to change the way audiences look at animals, man and the evolution of both in our scientifically advanced modern society. Dr Paul Bayliss, Absa Art and Museum Curator, says the Absa Gallery is thrilled to welcome Wasswa in this fascinating new exhibition. “Donald is renowned for pushing the boundaries in his art, and we’re incredibly privileged to host his first solo exhibition since his L’Atelier win and his

first-ever solo exhibition in South Africa. Exhibitions like this are just another way in which Absa L’Atelier aims to help further the careers of our continent’s emerging artists, and audiences to this showcase will not be disappointed,” says Dr Bayliss. Degenerative Evolution of the Living explores the concept of animals and their progressive development through a wide range of artworks, rendered in Wasswa’s highly engaging trademark style. It draws on themes such as Charles Darwin’s natural selection theory; living species’ desire to propagate better offspring than themselves to ensure their long-term survival; cloning and the amplification of human intelligence with artificial intelligence.

MNA Station (Life Support System), Series of 12 drawings Ink on paper, 70 x 50cm (2018) 36

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Through The Heart Of Every Man, Albizia and Ebony wood, 60 x 36 x 46cm (2018)

“The exhibition was inspired by the process of transformation, with a focus on humans versus a given environment, and the influence and effects of science and technology on both humans and their surroundings today. It’s an idea I developed after a discussion with fellow artists Genza Peter and Nakitende Sheila, where I imagined our current era as being the past, and humans living in a future existence – with these futuristic humans and animals presented in a museum-like space,” explains 33-year-old Wasswa, who has long drawn inspiration from animals and animalistic forms. Much of the appeal of Wasswa’s work – often described as unconventional and even experimental – lies in its abstract realism combined with his diverse use of media; he

enjoys painting, sculpture and multimedia, with wood and mixed media being his current favourites. This is evident in the exhibition, which features 22 ink on paper drawings; nine sculptures carved from the indigenous Ugandan hard woods, teak, albizia and ebony; two wall sculptures and a set of three free-standing sculptures; and two installations. Three of the drawings featured were conceptualised while Wasswa was in residency at the Sylt Foundation on the island of Sylt, Germany, which he won as part of his L’Atelier Merit Award. “I had the best time of my life during my residency. I used the time to reflect on what I

“Degenerative Evolution of the Living explores the concept of animals and their progressive development” W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

37


Ntonzi, Leather off cuts and Goss thread, 100 x 76 x 96cm (2018)

wanted to do with my life, what made sense in life, what was life etc. It was refreshing; the perfect break. I made a few drawings related to how I was feeling at the time, even though I had not planned to make any works. Later, when I began to organise my works for this show, I realised three of the drawings I did during my residency were directly in line with the key themes I was exploring,” adds Wasswa. Those themes, he hopes, will inform public discussion and debate on the effects of the environment, time, and science and technology on human development.

Wasswa grew up in Nakivubo Flats in downtown Kampala, but today lives and works in Buziga, a suburb in Kampala, where he runs Artpunch Studio. Degenerative Evolution of the Living runs from 26 March until 20 April 2018 at the Absa Gallery in Johannesburg. The Gallery will also produce a virtual walkthru of the exhibition, which will allow Wasswa’s many fans across Africa, including in his home country of Uganda, to enjoy the exhibition. www.lateliercompetition.com

“I had the best time of my life during my residency. I used the time to reflect on what I wanted to do with my life, what made sense in life, what was life etc.” 38

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


An E x hi bi ti on of Abstrac t Ar t Artwork by: Klara Christen

Featuring ar tists: Leandri Erlank; Dirk Meerkotter; Ben Eagle; Paul Marais; Klara Christen & Strijdom Van Der Mer we

13 April - 12 May Info@absolutar t.co.za www.absolutar t.co.za 19 Ryneveld street Stellenbosch 021 882 9296


JACO SIEBERHAGEN ECLECTICA CONTEMPORARY www.eclecticacontemporary.co.za By Dr Danny Shorkend

The Locomotive, 10 000 x 3800 x 1000 mm

Jaco Sieberhagen’s work constitutes a consistent working method and iconographic output. He uses a special laser cut steel material with deft technical facility, often also incorporating Perspex and then paints over the steel, usually in black, but sometimes in blue. The effect is powerful: The forms are outlined in silhouette-like clarity almost existing as a kind of shadow world oscillating between sculpture and drawing. Moreover, his oeuvre reveals strong thematic holism exploring over the years political sentiment; the construction of a so-called South African identity; the superficiality of popular culture and the metaphor of the staircase. What is most tantalising is what he calls his “poetic language”. This is indeed an apt metaphor. For his constructions and assemblages, these quasi-sculptural

40

creations – flat and yet not flat – are what one might call surreal. Images within images, signs and symbols within figures that imply movement; the spectre of death always lurking as various subjects take the stage. His works at Eclectica Contemporary will be memorable. Sieberhagen’s use of imagery and their interesting juxtapositions are well thought through. Each element is not only well constructed but forms an energised unity. He uses images that range from an hour glass to trees, buildings and various archetypal subjects to convey a narrative. The stories that run through his works are told with an articulation that recalls a poetic sense of the weight, sound and imagery that only poetry can conjure. The excellence of the artist’s work is that he finds a visual analogue to their conceptual underpinning, which is testimony to decades of work and technical ingenuity.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Forest selfie, 700 x 712 x 100 mm

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

41


Peace, 720 x 1007 x 321 mm each

The artist questions whether there is a notion of a South African identity and confronts history and popular culture in the process. Most pleasurable is what I can describe as his iterative design skill where images play within, between and above other forms so that his expertise with the medium is such that he is able to, in Paul Klee words “take a line for a walk.” He creates mental landscapes where it is unclear if his subjects are placed, misplaced or simply enter a dreamscape of sorts. This reflects the constant ebb and flow of culture and its discontents. Sieberhagen’s work can be described as highly imaginative aligned with strong craft and formal understanding. It engages the viewer to free and liberate the mind from literal associations and soar into another world – his work has the effect of transporting the art lover to other dimensions. Having said that, the artist confronts everyday realities. In navigating these apparent opposites, there is the possibility that pain and joy exist at the same time. There is a sense in his work that it is brittle and vulnerable and yet at the same time it is strong and solid. Such dichotomies

42

Table Mountain selfie, 755 x 482 x 100 mm

speak to the resilience of himself as an artist as well as the strength of his work to evoke beauty and mystery. Jaco Sieberhagen has an impressive exhibition history which is a credit to his unique language and dedication to tell stories. His figures and imagery at once occupy space and yet at the same time are mere outlines or spaces in themselves, neither quite here nor there. They recall the history of reliefs, only set within a modern context and methods. Eclectica Contemporary at 69 Burg Street, CT info@eclecticacontemporary.co.za Tel +27 21 422 4145

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


AndrĂŠ Stead, Paper Planes, installation, 180 x 180 x 30 cm

Christopher Moller Gallery 7 Kloofnek Road, Cape Town, +2721 422 1599, www.christophermollerart.co.za


THE IS SCULPTURE GARDEN AT TOKARA WINE ESTATE

12TH EXHIBITION OF SCULPTURE BY CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICAN ARTISTS

Karen Lijnes, Bird Language, Ceramic

The IS Sculpture Garden at Tokara Wine Estate, situated on the Helshoogte Pass between Stellenbosch and Franschhoek, is currently hosting its 12th exhibition of sculpture by contemporary South African artists.  The current exhibition, ‘The other side of winter’ by Jaco Sieberhagen features 10 works presented in-and-around the delicatessen, each with an accompanying poem.  The Tokara sculpture garden has been a particularly fruitful collaboration with owners Anne-Marie and GT Ferreira. 

This project includes a scenic sculpture walk between the farm’s cellar and the delicatessen. Along the way, dotted between olive trees and vineyards, visitors will find works by South Africa’s leading sculptors -  Wilma Cruise, Guy du Toit, Angus Taylor to name a few. With every exhibition, a beautiful catalogue is produced by IS Art and Tokara which is available at the delicatessen or at IS Art Gallery in Franschhoek.  The IS Art gallery situated in the main road of Franschhoek has been a feature of the town for the past 14 years.  This is an ever-changing and evolving space with

“This project includes a scenic sculpture walk between the farm’s cellar and the delicatessen.” 44

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Wilma Cruise, Poor Horrance, Bronze W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

45


Gallery IS ART Franschhoek Paintings by Jacqueline Crewe Brown and sculpture by Angus Taylor

Guy du Toit, Thinker, Bronze

Jacqueline Crewe Brown, Mixed media on Canvas

Wilma Cruise, Dolly Sheep, Bronze

exhibitions of established and upcoming artists in a variety of mediums opening every 4 to 6 weeks. Ilse Schermers, the curator of the gallery,  prides herself in her efforts to identify and show young and upcoming talent.  The current exhibition, ‘Visual Diaries’, features the work of  local Franschhoek artist, Jacqueline CreweBrown. The gallery always has an interesting collection of sculpture, painting, ceramic

and jewellery on exhibition. Notably, the gallery shares its space with Foliage, one of the country’s leading restaurants, operated by pre-eminent chef Chris Erasmus.  Foliage serves as an extension to the gallery and is filled with art. The gallery and sculpture garden at Tokara are both open seven days a week. More information can be obtained from the gallery at gallery@isart.co.za  or 021 876 071.

46

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


DIETMAR WIENING Dietmar Wiening’s work is very distinctive. He has perfected the art of form simplification in his work by reducing his subject matter to essentials while retaining its intrinsic character. These are not the dull repetitions so often seen but vibrant statements with a life of their own. Some are pensive, some cheeky, others arrogant or combined in collective compositions and all having an intrinsic sculptural value that surpasses the mere illustrative solution. Dietmar built his own foundry and is proud to cast all his work himself. He uses high quality bronze and casts in the lost wax procedure. He also uses the new, highly effective, ceramic shell technology. Dietmar’s bronzes can easily be identified by his eye-catching mounting techniques and enhancing patinas which imbue his works with life and colour. His sculptures range from a cute little long-nosed butterfly fish, a mean mako shark, a prehistoric coelacanth and a bizarre lionfish to a life-size sailfish. Being a keen scuba diver and having dived at the Great Barrier Reef, Dietmar finds it of benefit for his work to study, film and photograph his subjects above and below the water. 48

A dedicated conservationist, Dietmar made the following statement: “I am very concerned about the conservation of all wildlife, especially my beloved birds and marine life. It is so devastating to see the world’s rivers and dams becoming more and more polluted. The whole world is using the oceans and lakes as a dumping ground for toxic waste and plastic. It is hard to believe that man is slowly but surely wiping out all of the beautiful creatures on this planet. Soon our children will not have the chance to see many wildlife species alive at all. As an artist, I have an urge to capture the beauty of all our endangered animals so that they may ‘live’ forever in my sculptures”. From his balcony, with a telescope and binoculars, Dietmar is able to study almost all the birds he chooses to sculpt. These range from wild geese, herons, spoonbills and kingfishers to hornbills and even an occasional fish eagle. Dietmar Wiening Gallery a is a treat not to be missed, hanging on a cliff along the Crocodile River situated in the “Cradle of Humankind” as well as the “Magaliesberg Biosphere” www.dietmarwiening.com Mobile: 082 891 9987

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Limb Ben Coutouvidis Opening: 05 April 2018

69 Burg Street, Cape Town info@eclecticacontemporary.co.za www.eclecticacontemporary.co.za +27214224145

the presence of absence |

Christa Myburgh

Opening: 05 April 2018 6 9 B u r g S t r e e t , C a p e To w n | w w w. e c l e c t i c a c o l l e c t i o n . c o . z a | + 2 7 2 1 4 2 2 4 1 4 5


Antonio da Silva, Honey badger

PALETTE FINE ART GALLERY Palette Fine Art gallery was founded in July 2013 in the beautiful and historic town of Stellenbosch. In April 2017, a second gallery opened its doors in Waterkant Street, Cape Town. October 2017 saw a third gallery come to life (Palette Art in the Piazza) in the eclectic Cape Quarter Lifestyle Village. Each gallery has its own ambience and art suited to the environment. Palette in the Piazza has a sleek look with silver bronzes and monochrome paintings. Personalized service is the gallery s strong point. Gallery at 41 Church Street Stellenbosch Gallery at 68 Waterkant Str, Cape Quarter Piazza, Cape Town Gallery at Cape Quarter Piazza 27 Somerset Road Cape Town www.palettesculpturegallery.co.za 5 90 2

Antonio da Silva, Peregrine W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Dane Stops, Sphume spraypaint, pastel and charcoal on canvas

Sanlam Portrait Award 2017 Exhibition

KwaZulu-Natal Society of Arts Gallery 166 Bulwer Road, Glenwood, Durban Tel: 031 277 1705 email: gallery@kznsagallery.co.za

11 April – 29 April 2019 Viewing Times: Tuesday – Friday 09:00 – 17:00 Saturday 09:00 – 16:00 Sunday & Public Holidays 10:00 – 15:00 Closed Mondays www.kznsagallery.co.za www.rust-en-vrede.com www.sanlamportraitaward.co.za

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

93


Fig. 188. Spirited Ride 1993, 92 x 62 cm, Oil on board, Jack Lugg Art Gallery CC Fig. 188. Spirited Ride 1993, 92 x 62 cm, Oil on board, Jack Lugg Art Gallery CC Fig. 188. Spirited Ride 1993, 92 x 62 cm, Oil on board, Jack Lugg Art Gallery CC


The Curator and staff of the Ann Bryant Art Gallery have pleasure in inviting you to the opening of the

JACK LUGG RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION AND BOOK LAUNCH The exhibition will be opened by Marlene Neumann, South African Master Fine Art Photographer Date: Friday, 20 April 2018 Time: 6pm for 6:30pm Venue: 9 St Marks Road, Southernwood, East London RSVP: 083 501 3392 Email: dupreezleon234@gmail.com The exhibition closes on 18 May 2018 All artwork and the book, The House that Jack Built will be available for purchase.

www.jackluggartgallery.co.za


SCULPTURE A MONUMENT TO THE PAST Editors Choice: First published by www.southernmail.co.za By Tamlynne Thompson - February 28, 2018

Artist Michele Mathison with his sculpture, Angular Mass.

The V&A Waterfront’s trendy Silo District became home to a new sculpture, named Angular Mass, last Thursday. The sculpture, made by Michele Mathison, comprises of five flywheels that were once part of machinery in the original grain silo building which now houses the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Arts Africa (MOCAA). When the building was repurposed, the flywheels were given to Mathison to recycle into a sculpture. The sculpture forms part of the V&A Waterfront’s Art in Public Places programme, an ongoing initiative that takes art into public spaces on the precinct, making it accessible to all. Angular Mass is the latest in a number of other sculptures installed across the V&A Waterfront by African artists such as Noria Mabasa, Mohau Modisakeng, Kyle Morland, Cameron Platter, Carl Frederik Reutersward, Claudette Schreuders and Gavin Younge.

54

Mr Mathison, who is from Johannesburg, said he first met Mark Coetzee, the Director of the Zeitz MOCAA, and founding partner of the museum, Jochen Zeitz, at the Venice Biennale, one of the biggest art exhibitions in the world. “Jochen Zeitz bought a lot of my work at the Venice Biennale. Soon after, they built their relationship with the V&A Waterfront, and when the Waterfront Arts Programme was initiated, they approached me and asked if I wanted to make a sculpture using the machinery of the old granary.” In his work, Mathison uses a lot of found objects. “I like to use objects that have a history and symbolism to them. I like deconstructing them, making them nonfunctional, but then understanding the way they worked in my art. I use lots of tools in my work, so it’s sort of behind the scenes.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


“It’s like a monument to the workers.” He said they had lots of old machinery from the granary left after the construction of the Zeitz MOCAA. “I saw the wheels in the basement and I was immediately attracted to them.” He then proceeded to turn the five flywheels, made in the 1920s, into a sculpture. “When I made the sculpture, I wanted to keep it simple because the wheels were already beautiful. They were made in the 1920s in England and were used in the grain silos. There were belts on the wheels and they lifted all kinds of things. “So I thought I would change the axis, but also keep the heritage feel.” Coetzee, who also serves as chairman of the Waterfront’s Art in Public Places programme, said when the Zeitz MOCAA was constructed, there was a commitment to access for all. “We wanted everyone to feel like they belong here, and didn’t want to turn anyone away. “Even at the Zeitz MOCAA – 50 percent of the people visiting enter for free, and the 50 percent who pay compensate for that.” He said while the precinct had public art in the past, the plan was to manage it better and space it nicely once the Zeitz MOCAA was built. “We commissioned artists to make the public art available 24/7. “As we do this we are aware that Cape Town is still divided, but we still share public space. By bringing public art out into a mixed space and for it to cost nothing for people to look at it and engage with it, adds to the commitment we made to (making it) free for all.” He said when they saw the bits of machinery and material left from the old granary, the obvious thing to do was to get artists to use them and scatter these pieces around the precinct. He said they asked Mathison as he already had an exhibition at the Zeitz MOCAA, and he agreed immediately. “With his use of metal and the detriment to labour, he turns things that are practical into something spectacular. Can you imagine the weight of these things? When I look at these flywheels, I will never look at the coin flip the same way again.”

The Waterfront’s spokesperson, Donald Kau, said since 2014, a number of sizeable outdoor artworks and sculptures have been installed in public plazas and open spaces around the property. “These artworks all formed part of the Waterfront’s Art in Public Places Programme.” He said during the construction of the Zeitz MOCAA, the Waterfront made a commitment to showcase South African art to the public, both inside and outside the museum. “The concept behind Art in Public Places is that works of those exhibiting inside the museum should not be totally confined within the museum’s walls. “Instead, the museum’s artistry should spill out to the rest of the property, with the outdoor areas becoming something of an open-air art gallery the public could appreciate at any time.” He said the statues of South Africa’s four Nobel Laureates in Nobel Square are indicative of the popularity of outdoor art, and the public frequently posed for photographs alongside them. “The Art in Public Places committee aims to install one major work each year. “Exciting plans are in place for 2018 and these will be announced when each work is ready to be unveiled.” The Waterfront CEO, David Green, said the idea behind the Art in Public Places initiative is to showcase Africa’s creativity, and to stimulate cultural awareness and public dialogue by making it accessible. “We believe it is important to put these inspiring and imaginative sculptures into the public domain for all to visit and see.” Mathison said the Silo District was a space he was proud to be involved in. “The Waterfront has the ability to bring people together and the Silo District is a fantastic exhibition of that. “To have this sculpture placed at the entrance of the Silo District as a value to physical labour… it’s an interesting site because even though the Waterfront is a tourist destination, it remains a working destination with the shipyards and retail, etc. “I am so honoured to have my sculpture here in this melting pot of work and play.”

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

55


ENOUGH IS ENOUGH BRAVE LIBRARIAN SINGLE HANDEDLY TAKES CONTROL OVER UCT’S CENSORSHIP POLICY

LIBRARIAN REMOVES COVERING THAT MISCHIEVOUS STUDENTS HAD PLACED OVER THE STATUE Editors Choice: First published by/www.groundup.org.zas By Natalie Pertsovsky and GroundUp Staff - 2 March 2018

The decision by a Senior UCT librarian to uncover the sculpture of Sarah Baartman at the university’s main library at the end of last year has sparked a row. The sculpture, by Willie Bester, had been covered up since March 2016, when student protesters wrapped it in cloth. William Daniels, then a senior UCT librarian, has taken responsibility for uncovering the sculpture. Academics inside and outside UCT, and artists, including Bester himself, have praised the uncovering. But some members of the UCT community have publicly denounced Daniels. Bester wrote to Daniels, thanking him, after finding out his sculpture had been uncovered. Bester has previously spoken to GroundUp about art censorship, and about the censorship

of his Sarah Baartman sculpture, in particular. “Head to toe, as though a shameful object, it was hidden under cloth,” David Goldblatt, celebrated anti-apartheid photographer, wrote to GroundUp. Goldblatt chose to move his collection from UCT to Yale University after UCT appointed a committee to remove or cover artworks in its collection. “For nearly three years, the sculpture stood at the centre of the main library of the University of Cape Town, grotesquely demonstrating the university’s trashing of freedom of expression” wrote Goldblatt. “All who passed bore witness to the violation of Willie Bester’s art, yet few said anything and no-one lifted a finger. Until an American, William Daniels, for whose guts and regard for our precarious democracy let us all give thanks.”

Left: Willie Bester’s Saartjie Baartman sculpture on UCT. Right: Same sculpture after it was covered up. (Left photo by Flickr user Alan Cordle - CC BY-NC-SA 2.0; Right photo by GroundUp 56

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


In opposition, UCT professor Elelwani Ramugondo tweeted: “Why would a white man see the need to derobe a sculpture in order to expose a naked Sarah Baartman yet again?” Ramugondo spent time as Vice Chancellor Max Price’s special advisor on transformation during the height of the Fallist Movement. Ramagundo’s husband and UCT PhD candidate, Frank Kronenberg, said on Facebook that the removal of the robe “can rightfully be regarded as provocation”. He said he had asked librarians why this had been done. Following the uncovering of the sculpture, Gwenda Thomas, Executive Director of UCT libraries, said in an email to library staff that she had informed the university executive. Daniels responded: “Censorship is anathema to the library profession and a grave violation of South African and international codes of professional ethics for librarians, not to mention a scandal to academic freedom and to the constitution of South Africa.” “Works of art may well be a ‘university-level matter,’ but the ethical obligations entailed in this case are not: they are ours,” he said. “I therefore implore you to raise your own voice … to articulate the fundamental principles of our profession and to defend freedom of expression, artistic freedom, and academic freedom.” Associate Professor Jay Pather, the Head of the Works of Art Committee (WOAC) at UCT, told GroundUp that the covering of the sculpture had taken place in the “context of numerous artworks that foregrounded naked black bodies”. He said that from the students perspective they had “robed the sculpture not covered it.” Daniels on the other hand has argued that using the term “disrobe” fell “victim to the pathetic fallacy”. He wrote: “The word ‘disrobed’

implies that a person was deprived of clothing. But the sculpture is not a person, and it was not clothed, but covered up with cloth.” Pather said a public meeting had been planned to discuss the matter including discussions on the right to freedom of expression and the right to dignity. Bester as well as students who support covering the sculpture would participate in the meeting. Bester has agreed to present the “history and the context of the sculpture” at the meeting. However the uncovering of the sculpture had “changed the dynamic” of the situation, said Pather. Nevertheless WOAC still intends for a public meeting to take place, and Bester has agreed to participate. Daniels told GroundUp that he had been called to a meeting on 22 January with Thomas where she read a letter from the vice-chancellor instructing that the sculpture be covered. But, following this meeting, Thomas wrote to Daniels: “I will not support the vice-chancellor’s decision to place the coverings back on the Sarah Baartman sculpture.” Other academics voiced their support for Daniels. Elisa Galgut, professor of philosophy at UCT, said that Daniels’s actions were “very brave in [defending] freedom of expression and academic freedom.” However, it is “also sad that the prevailing climate necessitated that this be done in secret.” “I also thought that the way the university handled the issue [of removing artworks] was undemocratic and not well thought through,” Galgut said. Imraan Coovadia, a novelist and professor of English at UCT, also praised Daniels. “I got to read your correspondence about the statue,” he wrote. “It’s wonderful!” “I’ve been watching this dreary march of censorship and hatred with such dismay,” Coovadia wrote.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

57


BUSINESS ART INVESTMENT ART, NEWS & AUCTIONS APRIL 2018

Gordon Froud, Black Conevirus, Plastic roadcones. 4500 x 4500mm 58

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Willem Boshoff, Clast Mar (from Children of the Stars series), 2009, granite, 103 x 326 x 190 cm Sold for R672 000 (Record for the artist)

Inviting entries for our

AUTUMN AUCTION IN JOHANNESBURG | 17 JUNE 2018

Historic, Modern & Contemporary Art Entries close 4 May 2018 FOR ART VALUATIONS CONTACT 011 243 5243 | enquiries@aspireart.net ww www.aspireart.net


PETER WILSON: THE MAN WHO INVENTED MODERN AUCTIONEERING

BUCCANEERING, BRILLIANT, ART-LOVING—HE CREATED THE POWER OF SOTHEBY’S (AND CHRISTIE’S LEARNED BY IMITATION) First Published on www.theartnewspaper.com Written by Anna Somers Cocks, March 2018

Above all, he understood art and had a keen eye for its saleability. Richard Day, of the prints and drawings department from 1957 to 1990, remembers asking him whether prints were worth selling. Wilson replied that people tend to sell their less important possessions first, which are often prints, and so you gain access to their main collection of drawings and paintings.

“Picasso was the most famous painter in the art world, but Peter Wilson (1913-1984) was its most influential figure,” says Peregrine Pollen, a senior figure at Sotheby’s in London and New York from the late 1950s to the 80s. If that sounds like hyperbole, consider this. Wilson, the chairman of Sotheby’s from 1958 until 1980, introduced currency converter boards and satellite links during auctions, public presale estimates, telephone bidding, glitzy evening sales, guarantees, art sales statistics and ruthless business-getting that included buying works outright. He also pioneered the PR stunt: In New York, when selling the treasure from Spanish ships sunk off Florida in 1715, Wilson mounted an exhibition with a live macaw in a reconstruction of the captain’s cabin, and only children were allowed to bid, addressed as “sir” and “madam” by Wilson, who took the auction himself.

60

His style of management was, at the very least, unorthodox. Marc Blondeau, on the staff from 1969 to 1987, remembers one meeting at Wilson’s house in the south of France with “Sotheby’s European representatives standing in the large, irregularshaped pool with water up to our necks. Wilson dominated everyone with his height and the water only came up to his waist. There we were discussing the future of Sotheby’s Europe.” This fragment comes from recollections by people who knew him well, compiled in a book, Sotheby’s Maestro, published by the auction house late last year. They are not the whole truth, but the mosaic they make up is more vivid than many footnoted histories, and the admiration with which he is (mostly) remembered shines through. This is how the sculpture dealer Cyril Humphries describes him: “As General de Gaulle would say, ‘He rowed towards his objective with muffled oars…’ [Wilson] was practically always in a plain blue suit, very dapper and very unusual… It was not just his height and physical presence but also demeanour; he moved easily on his feet.” Wilson was an intelligence officer in Washington during the Second World War, which helped his relations in the US after Sotheby’s bought ParkeBernet in 1964—Christie’s did not open in New York until 1977. But it was probably also the origin of the myth (and it seems that it really was just a myth) that he was a hypothetical Fifth Man, one of the group of upper-class British double agents that included the art historian Anthony Blunt. For Wilson was polyglot: cosmopolitan, ambiguous in his sexuality, calculating, secretive and had absolute mastery of himself, which squared nicely with the romantic idea of the fiendishly intelligent anti-hero. He took Sotheby’s from being a quiet auction house known for its expertise in rare books to a world leader, and was instrumental in London’s succeeding Paris as the hub of the art market in the late 1950s after

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


BUSINESS ART France shot itself in the foot by imposing a 7% tax on auction sales. Christie’s, which traditionally had the advantage through its better links with historic collections, was left standing. Clifford Henderson, at Sotheby’s in the 1950s, says: “It should have been a level playing field… this was not the case, however. Joe Floyd [a former chairman of Christie’s] told me many years later that in 1959, Christie’s had to sell their own books to pay the staff and he felt it was all over for them. It took some 20 years for Christie’s to catch up.” The turning point was the 1958 Jakob Goldschmidt sale of seven Impressionist works, which totalled £781,000. The New York investment banker had offered them to Christie’s, which failed to see their value, while Wilson turned the sale into a PR and financial triumph with a black-tie evening auction— the first of its kind. To fill it out, he shared the reception with Partridge, the furniture dealers then on the other side of Bond Street. It was at this sale that guarantees were first considered, when Wilson thought of getting the shipping millionaire, Sir John Ellerman, lined up to buy the pictures if the reserves were not met. By 1972, Peregrine Pollen was proposing greater use of guarantees to gain business, with a rising scale of  rewards for Sotheby’s depending how much above the guaranteed sum the bidding went. Wilson’s other huge public triumph was to secure the sale of the contents of Mentmore, the Rothschild house belonging to the Earls of Rosebery, in 1977. This not only established Sotheby’s as a credible alternative to Christie’s for sales of historic collections but also persuaded the great and the good that better systems needed to be in place to protect the heritage. As the government havered interminably over whether to buy the house, its furnishings and works of art for £2m, Wilson persuaded the owners that Sotheby’s, which had done the valuation, would serve their interests much better by selling the contents. As usual, he made it into a huge international event, and it totalled £6m. Wilson believed that people find art more fascinating if they know how much it is worth. He was the first to suggest an index of market values, which was created by the journalist Geraldine Norman for Sotheby’s and published in The Times newspaper. She started with the Impressionists, she says, and on the instructions of the head of the department, Michel Strauss, “laid out all the Monets and Renoirs in order of quality. He would then classify the new ones when they were sold, judging which matched which in order of quality. Then I got out my adding machine and totted up how much it had moved. Twelve different indices, each covering a different section of the market were established, and one was published per month round the year, measuring annual performance.” This was then compared with

the stock market and cost of living index. Popular as it was, the index lasted only from 1969 to 1971, for reasons that are revealing. The silver market was going down, and Wilson only liked graphs that were going up. Then Norman wrote an article in The Times saying that unsold lots should be revealed, which outraged him so much that he pulled the plug. Wilson was a good talent-spotter and hired a lot of clever, often handsome, young men, the most famous of whom was Bruce Chatwin, who went on to a travel writing career. David Nash, at Sotheby’s from 1961 to 1969 and now of Mitchell-Innes and Nash Gallery, remembers his interview: “When I told Wilson that I had worked as a gravedigger at the Wimbledon cemetery and as an electrician’s assistant in a lunatic asylum, his face lit up and he pronounced that this would be a very useful experience in the auction world.” Wilson knew how to give these young men enough autonomy to be creative and trusted them to share his own disregard for the rules. James Mayor, of the eponymous gallery and at Sotheby’s from 1969 to 1972, says: “In 1969 I asked him whether I might go and see museums in Switzerland. He said yes and ‘there’s just a little thing you could do for me’. He gave me a whole lot of gold boxes that belonged to the king of the Belgians and that really should have been reimported officially.” What Wilson was incapable of doing, though, was sharing serious power himself. He ran the company with a tiny cabal and took major decisions without consulting the board. In 1969, after the crash in silver prices, the company was up against its overdraft limit and had to ring round clients to settle their bills, according to Howard Ricketts, in Sotheby’s works of art department from 1959 to 1972. With Michel Strauss, Wilson started buying Impressionist paintings secretly through a dealer based in France called Stephen Higgins and then entered them for sale in London. This was discovered only when a substantial number remained unsold. There was an internal enquiry and Wilson got through it, but it made the board mistrustful of him. In any case, by the late 1970s, he had grown the company to the point where it could no longer be run informally. In 1980 he resigned as chairman and it is a sad fact that, although he continued to have Sotheby’s interests close at heart and worked to get it more business, some former colleagues considered this interference. After a confused interregnum, Sotheby’s ended up in the hands of mostly American investors and it has been run by businessmen ever since. James Mayor has the last word. “Two great British institutions were created and destroyed by their founders: the Conservative Party with Maggie Thatcher and Sotheby’s with Peter Wilson. Neither of them had really thought of a successor.”

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

61


STRAUSS & CO.

AN UNSEEN AND THRILLING PRELLER TO GO ON SALE www.straussart.co.za

An extraordinary portrait by soughtafter painter Alexis Preller depicting Poseidon, the Greek god of the sea, will go on sale at Strauss & Co’s June auction in Johannesburg. The undated painting, executed in Preller’s signature intaglio style and acquired directly from the artist, carries a competitive pre-sale estimate of three to five million rand. Alastair Meredith, who heads up Strauss & Co’s art department in Johannesburg, is unambiguous about the importance of Preller’s stylised interpretation. “With his plaited hair, tousled beard and sleek almond eye executed in Preller’s thrilling electric blue, Poseidon comes from the artist’s most important, late-career series of symbolically charged, disembodied heads,” said Dr. Meredith Held in the same private collection for decades, Poseidon, like Adam from the November 16 sale missed being documented in Esmé Berman and Karel Nel’s definitive 2009 book on Preller – adding extra excitement to its offering. The unusual choice of subject stems from a research trip to Greece and Turkey that Preller undertook in 1968. On his return home Preller worked on an extended cycle of paintings engaged with Grecian motifs and themes. Preller initially worked on flat surfaces, producing lavishly painted icons, but in 1969 began to experiment with a novel method that first involved modelling a scene in clay. He then created a fibreglass cast onto which he applied his paint treatment. Preller named the process “intaglio” and described the resulting three-dimensional works as “part sculpture and part painting”. Preller’s intaglio works are highly prized among collectors.

62

Cecily Sash, Chalice, 1985, R60 000 - 80 000

In 2015, Stephan Welz, Strauss & Co’s charismatic Managing Director, sold Preller’s intaglio study of an unclothed male figure Apollo Kouros II (1971) for R5.5 million. And in 2016, Strauss & Co sold a life-size rendition of the biblical first man, Adam (1969), for R6.8 Million. Vigorous bidding among collectors for Preller at Strauss & Co. auctions has consolidated this Pretoria-born painter’s reputation as one of South Africa’s leading post-war artists. After South African masters Irma Stern and JH Pierneef, Strauss & Co’s best performing artist in 2017 was Preller. Strauss & Co achieved combined sales of R33.5 Million from just 24 Preller lots sold in 2017. The top Preller lot in 2017 was a transformative study of a wounded soldier, Fleurs du Mal (1944), which sold for R8.2 Million.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


BUSINESS ART

Alexis Preller, Poseidon, R3 000 000 – 5 000 000

“Strauss & Co. has played a pivotal role in building the market for Preller and achieved many records for the artist,” said Dr. Meredith. Strauss & Co’s June sale will feature other works by Preller. It will also include a special section focusing on abstraction. Strauss & Co. is currently inviting consignments of Important South African and International Art for its upcoming June auction. Enquiries: 011 728 8246 | 021 683 6560 | www.straussart.co.za

“Poseidon comes from the artist’s most important, late-career series of symbolically charged, disembodied heads”

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

63


STRAUSS & CO.

SETS NEW WORLD RECORD FOR STILL LIFE BY ERIK LAUBSCHER www.straussart.co.za

Lot 605, Erik Laubscher, Still Life with coffee Pot and Fruit, Sold R2 273 600

A bold and colourful Still Life with Coffee Pot and Fruit by Erik Laubscher set a new world record at Strauss & Co’s live sale in Cape Town, selling for R 2.273 Million. “Erik Laubscher is asserting himself as a force to be reckoned with,” said Strauss & Co’s chairman Frank Kilbourn. “We sold three works spanning a period of 46 years, from a sought after School of Paris still life from 1952 to a magnificent Winter Afternoon, Overberg landscape from 1998. Two of the three works sold for way above their top estimates, which

64

is an indication of the robust appetite for Laubscher, a quintessential Cape artist.” A late-career Reclining Nude by Irma Stern from 1962 was the first work to surpass the million rand mark, selling for R1.136 million. Other important works sold in the evening sale included Gerard Sekoto’s The Donkey Water Carrier (circa 1939), from the artist’s formative Sophiatown period which sold for R1.079 million, and Alexis Preller’s The Herald (1955), an intriguing collage of Egyptian and Beninese motifs laid down on a panel which fetched R1.023 million.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


BUSINESS ART

Another Cape artist to perform well was Peter Clarke, whose gouache, Tree, Eroded Bank and Birds, Teslaarsdal (1959), sold for R909 440. The headline result is consistent with the uptick in value of Clarke’s work registered in 2017. On a sale that generally favoured buyers interested in mid-range works, marquee lots by Walter Battiss, Gregoire Boonzaier, Adolph Jentsch, William Kentridge, Maggie Laubser, Dylan Lewis, Robert Hodgins, Hugo Naudé, George Pemba, JH Pierneef, Gerard Sekoto, Cecil Skotnes and Jean Welz all came within or just above their median estimates. Said Frank Kilbourn: “Following on last year’s exceptional performance, the R37.7 million we achieved on our current sale is a solid result. With the R13.5 million generated at our exciting contemporary auction two weeks ago, Strauss & Co has sold over R51 million this year. This is a very satisfactory result given the uncertain economic and social climate.” Strauss & Co’s sale at the Vineyard Hotel began with two sessions devoted to the decorative arts, a broad category of work that includes jewellery, silverware, glassware, furniture and objects of vertu. The sale commenced with enthusiastic bidding for 20 lots composed of Georgian and Victorian gold rings from the Estate of the Late Vyvyan Myerson, one of South Africa’s top valuers and a noted collector. A Georgian rock crystal, black enamel and gold Memento Mori ring from 1739 sold for R62 524, more than double its high estimate. Nineteen of the twenty lots offered sold, a superlative result. Quality jewellery proved its worth throughout, with pieces from the 1970s also proving especially popular. A lady’s gold, diamond and sapphire Piaget wristwatch sold for R88 670.

Lot 584, Gerard Sekoto. The Donkey Water Carrier, Sold R1 079 960

The top selling jewellery pieces were a 19th century diamond necklace, tiara and aigrette designed by Falize, Paris, which sold for R227 360, and gold necklace with three rows of rope-twist link chains designed by artist Salvador Dali for Piaget in 1966, which fetched R193 256. The best performing lot in the decorative arts was a Japanese blue and white VOC Arita dish which sold for R511 560, doubling the high estimate. A 19th century mahogany breakfront bookcase achieved a surprise R272 832, a ten-fold improvement over the high estimate. “Everything to do with the library, including a set of mahogany and leather metamorphic library steps, a George III mahogany cabinet bookcase and complementary mahogany partners’ desk performed well,” said Vanessa Phillips, Strauss & Co’s joint managing director and a specialist in furniture, decorative arts and jewellery. There was notable interest in a Chinese jade carving depicting a recumbent mythical beast surmounted by a hawk. The jade carving, drawn from one of two collections offered for sale, eventually sold for R193 256, nearly ten times its high estimate.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

35 6


BUSINESS ART

Lot 549, Irma Stern, Reclining Nude, Sold R1 136 800

“Single-owner collections, like the 28 lots of wonderful jade carvings and 30 lots of 19th and 20th century snuff bottles, always attract considerable interest, both locally and from buyers abroad. It was a white-glove sale for both the jade pieces and snuff bottles,” said Phillips.

all selling for well above their high estimates. The earliest work, Leda (1947), achieved R227 360, while Village with Woman (1963) and Kettle with Dry Branches (1973) sold for R136 416 and R147 784 respectively – all to the same bidder in the room.

Every auction yields results that, while unlikely to capture the headlines, speak of collector enthusiasm and rivalry for unique lots. Works by Neville Lewis, Johannes Meintjes, Gladys Mgudlandlu and Maud Sumner all attracted enthusiastic bidding in the evening premier sale session, handled by Strauss & Co’s joint Managing Director Bina Genovese.

Four telephone bidders vied for Lewis’s charming Jazz Age beach scene, On the Beach (1924), which sold for R125 048, five times its estimate. The cult Cape expressionist Gladys Mgudlandlu registered a pleasing result when her vivid gouache on paper, Cattle (1970), sold for R181 888, a two-fold improvement over the high estimate.

Meintjes, another Cape artist to benefit from local support, performed exceptionally well, with paintings made between 1947 and 1973

The late-summer sale achieved R37.7 million in sales with a value sell-through rate of 80% for painting and sculpture.

66

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


TH

TM

1

9

6

8

-

2

0

1

8

A N N I V E R S A RY AU C T I O N

8 MAY 2018 w w w. s t e p h a n we l z a n d c o . c o . z a

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

69


BUSINESS ART

ASPIRE ART AUCTIONS

THE CONTEMPORARY AND THE MILLENNIAL www.aspireart.net

But these established cornerstones of the collectible art market are often out of reach for newer and younger collectors. In addition, the amount of works by these high-end artists that are available in today’s auction market is becoming less and less. In the global market too this phenomenon can be seen in the increasing paucity of Old Masters available at auction – symbolised by the sale to a private collector last year of the so-called Last Leonardo for over USD $450m. Perhaps in response to these market constraints for collectors, interest in the contemporary art market is growing. The ArtPrice Index for contemporary art reports that the market grew 14% globally through the first half of 2017, relative to the previous year. This represents a growth in global auction turnover for the year to June 2017 to $1.6bn, equating to an increase in the average price per work to USD $27 500

Dumile Feni, Feni Children Under Apartheid

In terms of the market share of the segment, in the year 2000, contemporary art accounted for 3% of global Fine Art auction turnover; 18 years later it now generates 15%. But despite the gains in collecting importance contemporary art is making, it remains a somewhat skewed and concentrated market. Just three countries – the USA, China and the UK – have 89.4% of the market.

The market for contemporary art globally is growing. The traditional strength of the art market in South Africa has been in historic and modern painting and sculpture, roughly from the late nineteenth century through the first half of the 20th century. Established markets for collectors have grown up around artists like Irma Stern, Maggie Laubser and J.H. Pierneef, whose works trade reliably on both the local auction market and internationally.

By contrast SA has a market share of only 0.3%, but many of the top-selling contemporary artists from Africa are South African. In fact, the local market is demonstrating the same appetite for growth as the global one, if recent results on contemporary auctions are any guide. Aspire’s recent sales have seen world record and South African record prices fetched for work by artists as diverse as Louis Maqhubela, Dumile Feni, William Kentridge, Angus Taylor and Willem Boshoff. A newer market is also

68

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


BUSINESS ART

Angus Taylor, Sit en Staan, 2008

Athi-Patra Ruga, The Night of the Long Knives lll, 2013, Pigmented inkjet print

Kentridge, Mine

opening up for cutting edge contemporary work by younger artists such as AthiPatra Ruga and Mohau Modisakeng. Their presence and performance on Aspire’s recent Cape Town sale bears out the perception of a bullish market for contemporary work.

with the gradual whittling away of this forum from daily and weekend newspapers, exposure to opinions and research about art has become more and more specialised and rareified. Other institutions have stepped into the breach. Most of South Africa’s larger public and private art institutions run media, publicity and outreach programmes designed to educate and expose their collections to the public. The primary and secondary markets, in the form of art galleries, dealers and auction houses, have also expanded their educational and information marketing services to fill the gap. This includes in depth marketing catalogues of work – for which Aspire has become justly respected – and information-rich advertising and marketing campaigns. While much contemporary art continues to be neglected by mainstream cultural outlets, it is still finding a way to thrive in a constrained climate, and to grow its investment and collector base.

While the contemporary sphere continues to expand globally, the expansion of a collector base also requires infrastructural support from other areas than just the primary and secondary art markets themselves. Two of the most important factors in opening up new audiences to a passion for collecting art are education and exposure. While younger and newer collectors know what they like, the relative lack of reviews and analysis of trends and individual artists and exhibitions in the South African market makes things more difficult for artist and collector alike. Art criticism in the mainstream was usually conducted by the established press, but

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

69


BUSINESS ART

AUCTION ACTION

RESULTS, HIGHLIGHTS AND LOTS TO WATCH

STRAUSS & CO Important South African and International Art, Decorative Arts & Jewellery Cape Town / 5 March 2018 / Sale Highlights www.straussart.co.za

Gerard Sekoto SOUTH AFRICAN 1913-1993 The Donkey Water Carrier Sold R 1 079 960 Peter Clarke SOUTH AFRICAN 1929-2014 Tree, Eroded Bank and Birds, Teslaarsdal (sic) R 400 000 - 600 000 Sold R 909 440

Jacob Hendrik Pierneef SOUTH AFRICAN 1886-1957, Landscape R 400 000 - 600 000 Sold R 704 816

70

Alex is Preller SOUTH AFRICAN 1911-1975 The Herald Sold R 1 023 120

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Wanted for upcoming auctions art, antiques, furniture and jewellery next auction on Mon 2nd of April 2018

Tinus De Jongh, oil on canvas SOLD R90 000 View previous auction results at www.rkauctioneers.co.za

011 789 7422 • 083 675 8468 • 12 Allan Road, Bordeaux, Johannesburg

5th Avenue Fine Art Auctioneers

F ebruAry 2018, P rices Achieved :

Claerhout, Bronze Sold For r 260 000

Stephen pan, oil Sold For r30 000

Kentridge, CharCoal Sold For r 300 000

Let us do the same for you! Entries Invited for our April 15th Auction Enquire: stuart@5aa.co.za ~ 011 781 2040 W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

71


BUSINESS ART

AUCTION ACTION

RESULTS, HIGHLIGHTS AND LOTS TO WATCH

5TH AVENUE FINE ART AUCTIONEERS Upcoming Auction Highlights / 15 April 2018 www.5thaveauctions.co.za

72

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

73


BUSINESS ART

AUCTION ACTION

RESULTS, HIGHLIGHTS AND LOTS TO WATCH

ASHBEY’S GALLERIES Ashbey’s Galleries / Fine Arts, Antiques & Collectables Auction 15 March 2018 Sale Highlights www.ashbeysgalleries.co.za

Lot 70 A Set Of Aynsley Bone China, Painted By Ja Bailey, Circa 1930, Estimate: R10 000/15 000, Sold For: R108 468

Lot 25 A Victorian Silver Mounted And Cutglass Claret Jug, London 1887, Estimate: R2000/3000, Sold For: R9368 Lot 109 A Copper Christening Fond, Estimate R2000/3000, Sold For: R12 070

74

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Muratie Wine Estate Stellenbosch Presents

“A Few days in the Languedoc� An exhibition by

Pippa Lea Pennington

 

 Sunday 6 May 11h00 -16 June 2018 Muratie Wine Estate Stellenbosch.Cecile Blevi 0725535547 www.mokgallery.com. Facebook and Instagram. Gallery hours Monday-Sunday 10.00-16.30 A selection of works in oil and watercolour France. W W W. Areferencing R T T I M E S . C O .a Z Astay in the Languedoc region of5 7


BUSINESS ART

AUCTION ACTION

RESULTS, HIGHLIGHTS AND LOTS TO WATCH

RUSSELL KAPLAN AUCTIONEERS Upcoming Auction highlights Next Art and Antiques Auction 02 April 2017. www.rkauctioneers.co.za

Boonzaier, Gregoire Johannes (SS 1909 - 2005) Street Scene In District Six Mixed Media, Signed, 1973, 36.5 X 54cm R12 000.00 - R18 000.00

Battiss Walter Whall ( SA 1906 - 1982 ) Limpopo Lithograph, Signed, 51 X 67cm R6 000.00 - R9 000.00

76

Botes, Conrad (SA 1969 - ) Young Haddock Screen Print, Signed, 2018, 76 X 56cm R8 000.00 - R12 000.00

Van Der Westhuizen, Pieter (SA 1931 - 2008) Landscape With Trees Pastel, Signed, 1999, 55 X 77cm R25 000.00 - R35 000.00

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


H E R M A N U S

A Celebration of South African Arts

8 - 17 June 2018 a bumper line-up of

artists - musicians - singers - presenters

exhibitions and performances talks and presentations workshops and demonstrations tutored wine tastings and dinners films and a youth programme

hermanusfynarts.co.za for the full programme, to subscribe to the FynArts newsletter, for updates and to become a Friend of FynArts Tickets at webtickets.co.za and Hermanus Tourism W W W.060 A R T T957 I M E S .5371 CO.ZA Tel:

77


APRIL 2018: EXHIBITIONS, GALLERY GUIDE • ONGOING SHOWS: APRIL 2018 • OPENING EXHIBITIONS: APRIL 18 • UPCOMING SHOWS: MAY 2018 ONWARDS

Edoardo Villa, Figure, Bronze. 78

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


NiCOLAAS MARiTZ STUDiO & GALLERY

5 Nemesia Street, Darling, South Africa by appointment 078 419 7093 https://sites.google.com/site/nicolaasmaritzgallery/

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

79


ARTGO: ONGOING SHOWS APRIL 2018

STEVENSON JHB DEBORAH POYNTON THE HUMAN ABSTRACT 24/03/2018 UNTIL 04/05/2018

NELSON MANDELA METROPOLITAN ART MUSEUM JACK LUGG RETROSPECTIVE UNTIL 06/04/2018

WWW.STEVENSON.INFO

WWW.ARTMUSEUM.CO.ZA

UNTIL 04/05/2018

UNTIL 06/04/2018

UNTIL 15/04/2018

EVERARD READ FRANSCHHOEK WITHOUT WORDS BY ARABELLA CACCIA 24/03/2018 UNTIL 16/04/2018 WWW.EVERARD-READ-FRANSCHHOEK.CO.ZA

CAPE PALETTE AUTUMN EXHIBITION UNTIL 18/04/2018 WWW.CAPEPALETTE.CO.ZA

IZIKO SOUTH AFRICAN NATIONAL GALLERY MEYINA SOLO EXHIBITION BY EL ANATSUI UNTIL 29/04/2018 WWW.IZIKO.ORG.ZA

UNTIL 18/04/2018

UNTIL 29/04/2018

UNTIL 16/04/2018

ART@DURBANVILLEHILLS GALLERY AND SCULPTURE ESTATE THE LOOP COLLECTION 25/03/2018 UNTIL 25/04/2018

KALK BAY MODERN GALLERY ART ON PAPER IX UNTIL 28/04/2018

WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

WWW.KALKBAYMODERN.CO.ZA

UNTIL 25/04/2018 80

UNTIL 28/04/2018 W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

AN EXHIBITION BY:

Muratie Wine Estate Stellenbosch. Cecile Blevi 0725535547 www.mokgallery.com. Facebook and Instagram. Exhibition extended until 15 April 2018 Gallery hours Tuesday-Sunday 10.00-16.30

UNTIL 30/04/2018


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

81


ARTGO: ONGOING SHOWS APRIL 2018

STELLENBOSCH ART GALLERY HEINZ MODLER,JOHANN VAN VUUREN,HILKE DAVIES AND GAIL CATLIN UNTIL 30/04/2018

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY ANINA DEETLEFS - SKIN 20/03/2018 UNTIL 02/05/2018

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY BASTIAAN VAN STENIS NIGHT TIME IS THE RIGHT TIME 20/03/2018 UNTIL 02/05/2018

WWW.STELLENBOSCHARTGALLERY.COM

WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

UNTIL 30/04/2018

UNTIL 02/05/2018

UNTIL 02/05/2018

STEVENSON JHB DEBORAH POYNTON THE HUMAN ABSTRACT UNTIL 04/05/2018

STEVENSON CAPE TOWN ZANDER BLOM PAINTINGS AND POSTERS UNTIL 05/05/2018

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY JUDY WOODBORNE SOLO EXHIBITION 08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018

WWW.STEVENSON.INFO

WWW.STEVENSON.INFO

WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

UNTIL 04/05/2018

UNTIL 05/05/2018

UNTIL 13/06/2018

IS ART GALLERY THE OTHER SIDE OF WINTER. AN EXHIBITION OF SCULPTURE BY JACO SIEBERHAGEN AT IS SCULPTURE TOKARA STELLENBOSCH UNTIL 03/06/2018

LA MOTTE MUSEUM

FLEURS DE LA MOTTE, WORK BY PAULA VAN COLLER-LOUW AND TOBY MEGAW. UNTIL 17/06/2018

UNTIL 03/06/2018

UNTIL 17/06/2018

UNTIL 25/5/2018 82

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

WWW.LA-MOTTE.COM


EXHIBITION | 4-25 APRIL 2018 UJ Art Gallery, Kingsway Campus, corner Kingsway Ave and University Rd, Auckland Park GALLERY HOURS MON-FRI 09:00 - 16:00 CLOSED ON WEEKENDS + PUBLIC HOLIDAYS AEDEMPSEY@UJ.AC.ZA :: T 011 559 2556

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

83


ALICEARTGALLERY FOR THE ULTIMATE EXPERIENCE IN ART

SINCE 1990

EMOTION MOVES ART... For me lasting artists are those artists that produce work, not only with paint but allowing their souls to “speak”.

“Your mind runs faster than your body can follow.” Anyone that knows me will agree.

During the past 28 years I have had the opportunity, or rather, privilege to meet many South African artists that inspire me. What make some artists stand out above others? I would like to think an artist must have something to say; whether it’s a political statement, hurt, pain, joy or laughter, a journey…..

A gentle deep loving soul, Father Frans Martin Claerhout , has definitely influenced the collectors interest and outlook, especially mine.

It’s impossible to mention all the artists that inspire me, or had an impact on my life in this limited space, so I thought of highlighting some artists who move art through emotion. Father Claerhout had the ability to look at a person and then painted his or her character. His works definitely grow on you. It’s this emotion that attracts buyers. I fondly remember his description of me:

Looking at the market, we are definitely experiencing a greater increase in popularity for his sculptures. While Alice Art Gallery has recently sold more than 30 of his bronze works, Strauss and Company and 5th Avenue Auctioneers has also experienced a renewed interest. Amos Langdown is probably one of the best storytellers I have ever met. The story and the struggle of his community are clearly captured in his works: The woman foraging ahead against the “Noord-ooster”. Fishermen fixing their

DIE MAN WAT ‘n HUIS STEEL THE MAN WHO STEALS A HOUSE “Ek het niks, ek moet trek. ‘n Huis, ‘n rusplek, hier blijf ek” “I have nothing, I have to move. A house, a place of rest, I live here.” FARTHER FRANS CLAERHOUT (15 Feb 1919 – 4 Jul 2006)

CLAERHOUT. WOMAN WITH PINK FLOWERS 600x350mm, R105,000

www.aliceart.co.za | 54 dryf road, ruimsig, roodepoort

CLAERHOUT. THE MAN THAT STEALS A HOUSE R275,000


“To me there is no past or future in art. If a work of art cannot live always in the present it must not be considered.” - Pablo Picasso

AMOS LANGDOWN, MIXED MEDIA 290x210mm, R15,000

AMOS LANGDOWN, SKETCH, 290x300mm, R15,000

nets after a hard days work. On the lighter side two women gossiping in the wind. Amos had a heart for his people, his spirit lives on through his works. Works by Amos are currently appreciating. He has something strong to say about his community - the immense effort and struggle required in performing their daily tasks. One of the artists, I believe, is contributing greatly to the market with exceptional impressions, is Michael Heyns. I have committed to what he has to say through his strong emotional link between words and pictures by dedicating the Michael Heyns Gallery at Alice Art to him.

AMOS LANGDOWN, OIL WASH ON CANVAS, 400x300mm, R37,500

actual work there is a conversation that, to me, is important and I’m also listening to what the work is telling me... Some works tell a story of a person with scars, who is damaged, who cannot defend himself.” He is one of the most intriguing souls I’ve ever met and I cherish him dearly. Connection with art keeps us grounded, it shows us a little about ourselves. We tend to search for pieces that speak. Sometimes even about things we did not expect. How we are moved by art, often depicts how we move art.

“The work starts with a feeling, or a title in Afrikaans and when I start with the MICHAEL HEYNS. OIL, WINDBLOMME, 700x280mm, R18,000

AliceArtGallery | 011 958 1392 | 083 377 1470 | info@aliceart.co.za


OPENING EXHIBITIONS: APRIL 2018

WEEKS 1 - 4

Luigi di Sarro, Untitled, 1969, iron rod, plywood, foam rubber 86

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

87


ARTGO: OPENING EXHIBITIONS APRIL WEEK 1 EXHIBITIONS, GALLERY GUIDE

CROUSE ART GALLERY MIND SHANA 01/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WWW.CROUSEART.CO.ZA

PRETORIA KUNSKAMER ART GALLERY OLD MASTERS, CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS AND ESTABLISHING ARTISTS. WORKS BY LYNETTE TEN KROODEN, STEFAN ROSSOUW. 01/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WWW.PRETORIAKUNSKAMER.CO.ZA

01/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

01/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

THE CHRIS TUGWELL GALLERY SHOP 309, LEVEL 3, BROOKLYN MALL, PRETORIA 02/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018

TERESA DECINTI FINE ART GALLERY

WWW.CHRISTUGWELL.CO.ZA 02/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

01/04/2018 UNTIL 31/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

WWW.TERESADECINTI.COM 02/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

02/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

02/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 FLORAL AND LANDSCAPE IN WATERCOLOURS AND PALETTE KNIFE OILS

WWW.ECLECTICACOLLECTION.CO.ZA

05/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

04/04/2018 UNTIL 05/05/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

88

WWW.CARMELART.CO.ZA

THE WHITE HOUSE GALLERY A SELECTION OF ARTWORKS BY INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED ARTISTS 02/04/2018 UNTIL 30/04/2018 WWW.WHG.CO.ZA

SMITH IN MY ROOM WITH MAZZY STAR’ A SOLO SHOW BY ROSIE MUDGE 04/04/2018 UNTIL 05/05/2018 WWW.SMITHSTUDIO.CO.ZA

ECLECTICA COLLECTION THE PRESENCE OF ABSENCE: CHRISTA MYBURGH OPENS 05/04/2018

CARMEL ART GALLERY NICHOLAS PRINSLOO 01/04/2018 UNTIL 31/04/2018

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

05/04/18 UNTIL 02/06/18 WEEK 1 APRIL


Cromwell Ngobeni - ku pfumala mavoko ahiku pfumala nomo - 2018(detail)

IT WEB BRAINSTORM CALENDAR WINNER Cromwell Ngobeni

www.artistproofstudio.co.za

+27 11 492 1278

admin@artistproofstudio.co.za

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

89


ARTGO: OPENING EXHIBITIONS APRIL WEEK 1

ECLECTICA CONTEMPORARY LIMB: BEN COUTOUVIDIS OPENS 05/04/2018

WWW.ECLECTICACONTEMPORARY.CO.ZA OPENS 05/04/2018

WEEK 1 APRIL

OLIEWENHUIS ART MUSEUM 10TH SOUTH AFRICAN QUILTERS GUILD TRAVELLING QUILT EXHIBITION 05/04/2018 UNTIL 22/04/2018 WWW.NASMUS.CO.ZA

PRIEST VEX & SILENCE 05/04/2018 UNTIL 28/04/2018

05/04/2018 UNTIL 22/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

05/04/2018 UNTIL 28/04/2018

WWW.PRIEST.CO.ZA

WEEK 1 APRIL

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

STATEOFTHEART GALLERY ABSENCE AND PRESENCE: IN SEARCH OF MEMORY AND THE IMAGO | A SOLO EXHIBITION BY SARAH WALMSLEY 05/04/2018 UNTIL 21/04/2018

ALICE ART GALLERY MONICA CSEREI 07/04/2018 UNTIL 08/04/2018

WWW.STATEOFTHEART-GALLERY.COM

WWW.ALICEART.CO.ZA

March 2018 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

05/04/2018 UNTIL 21/04/2018

07/04/2018 UNTIL 08/04/2018 WEEK 1 APRIL

LIST YOUR EXHIBITION INFO@ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

WEEK 1 APRIL

SUBSCRIBE

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

SANLAM PORTRAIT AWARDS 17

February 2018 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

SEPTEMBER | 2017 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

90

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


IS Art Tokara Art Times quarter page ad copy.pdf

Renowned for its ever changing Sculpture Exhibitions by contemporary South African artists, curated by Ilse Schermers of IS Art Gallery in Franschhoek.

Helshoogte Road, Banhoek, Stellenbosch

"Warm Feelings"

Paul Stein Sculpture

021 876 2071 gallery@isart.co.za

083 253 3968

paulstein@cybersmart.co.za

www.paulstein.co.za

DK<ŐĂůůĞƌLJ WƌĞƐĞŶƚƐ͗

ŝĂŶĞsŝĐƚŽƌĚƌĂǁŝŶŐĐŽƵƌƐĞƐϮϬϭϴ ĞŐŝŶŶĞƌƐ͗ϮͲϲ:ƵůLJϮϬϭϴDƵƌĂƚŝĞtŝŶĞƐƚĂƚĞ^ƚĞůůĞŶďŽƐĐŚ͘ džĐůƵĚŝŶŐŵĞĂůƐ͕ĂĐĐŽŵŵŽĚĂƚŝŽŶĂŶĚĂƌƚŵĂƚĞƌŝĂů͘ZϰϯϬϬ͘

ĚǀĂŶĐĞĚ͗ϵͲϭϯ:ƵůLJϮϬϭϴDƵƌĂƚŝĞtŝŶĞƐƚĂƚĞ^ƚĞůůĞŶďŽƐĐŚ͘ džĐůƵĚŝŶŐŵĞĂůƐ͕ĂĐĐŽŵŵŽĚĂƚŝŽŶĂŶĚĂƌƚŵĂƚĞƌŝĂů͘ZϰϯϬϬ͘ ;ŶŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚLJŶŽƚƚŽďĞŵŝƐƐĞĚͿ

‘en plein air ’

A solo exhibition by Christopher Reid opening First Thursday 5th April at 6pm on view 26th March - 21st April

 ŽŶƚĂĐƚĞĐŝůĞнϮϳ;ϬͿϳϮϱϱϯϱϱϰϳŽƌĐĞĐŝůĞΛŵŽŬŐĂůůĞƌLJ͘ĐŽŵ͘KŶůLJϭϬƐƚƵĚĞŶƚƐƉĞƌĐŽƵƌƐĞ͘

THE CAPE GALLERY



W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

Open Mon - fri: 9h30 - 17h00 Sat: 10h00 - 14h00 27 21 423 5309 cgallery@mweb.co.za www.capegallery.co.za

91

1


WORLD DISCLOSURE

DANIEL RANKADI MOSAKO, CURATOR, SCULPTURE COLLECTION, UP ARTS MUSEUMS

Edoardo Villa, Figure with drapery, 1953, Bronze, 16400mm

Luigi Di Sarro

World disclosure as an exhibition honours two distinct and internationally renowned artists who were both born in Italy under different revolutionary periods. These are Edoardo Daniela Villa (1915 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2011) and Luigi di Sarro (1941 - 1979). In the visual art world artists use a wide range of materials for the various disciplines. Edoardo Daniele Villa was one such artist. He was a prolific naturalised South African artist who was selected to represent South Africa at the 1956 Venice Biennale and at the 1959 Sao Paolo Biennale. Villa specifically chose sculpture as a phenomenal and fundamental discipline to share and disseminate his artistic insights and

92

vision. He used commercial materials such as bronze, marble, steel, polystyrene and plasterof-Paris creatively in his sculpture techniques. Published literature shares evidence that artists such as Villa contributed extensively to art production and practice in South Africa. It is exciting to note that Villaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s diverse approach to art expanded and refined the African geometric art style. This geometric art form was affirmed by cubism and constructivism art practitioners, with artists such as Picasso and Villa taking the lead after being exposed to North African art identity that is based on mask and totem productions. This approach further introduced a unique geometric abstract art style to South Africa. This South African approach to art

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ARTGO: OPENING EXHIBITIONS APRIL WEEK 1

Edoardo Villa, Figure, 1963, Bronze, 725mm

Edoardo Villa, Figure, 1963, Bronze, 665mm

production and practice was made popular by the Polly Street Art Centre network. The centre was used as an art education support base for many contemporary abstract artists, to incubate a modern art educational philosophy which Villa was part of. Villa’s new approach, abstract public art, advanced one of the fundamental art practices in South Africa during the 20th century. The ‘World Disclosure’ exhibition makes a significant and extensive connection between European and African stylistic art developments. The exhibition also makes reference to various human and mechanistic forms. It is, however, the human form that influenced major part of

Edoardo Villa, Figure in space, 1956, Bronze, 1250mm

Villa’s art, a subject matter that Villa explored in an objective manner by portraying stylized abstract human figurative postures. This is emphasised by the depiction of human elements that characterise his artworks, such as stylized limbs , torsos, and head features. The human figure is a significant aspect in Villa’s world. This is evident in the naming and interpretation of his artworks, which is predominantly attributed to free single standing, sitting, and reclining figures. His sculptural art pieces are inclined to initiate a self-conscious dialogue on interpretations of human beings’ abstract and conceptual relations. Such interpretations are evident in his both his completed monumental public commissions and smaller sculptural visions.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

93


ARTGO: OPENING EXHIBITIONS APRIL WEEK 1

Untitled, 1970, fiberglass, iron, plywood, foam rubber

On the other hand, Villa’s works show skilful balance between aesthetic textured / smooth finishes and emotion encapsulated in his 3-dimmesional works of art. The current exhibition is testimony to his balanced visual composition. Luigi di Sarro contributed extensively to the vocation of experimental art that was made popular in the sixties and the seventies throughout the world. This ultimately make Di Sarro a true experimenter using iron, fiberglass, iron and wood, amongst other materials to produce art works. Both Villa and Di Sarro’s works of art make concrete reference to the human body and reflect on interpretations based on human life. Di Sarros’ work focusses more on the human soul and its aspirations to be filled with the good part that the world can offer. His abstract

94

Edoardo Villa, Reclining figure, 1970, Bronze, 430mm

linear sculptural forms are a metaphoric representation of life travel that human beings are challenged with in the world. Di Sarro skilfully uses the technique of minimalism to emphasis the superficial emptiness and non-recognition of people’s grievances in life. This being the epitome of many revolutionary protest acts. Whilst villa’s stylized sculptural works make solid reference on the visible presence of human beings in the world, whose decision making can solve problems or lead to wars.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

95


ARTGO: OPENING EXHIBITIONS APRIL 2018 WEEKS 2-4 EXHIBITIONS, GALLERY GUIDE

SALON91 WARMBLOODED A SOLO EXHIBITION BY KATRIN COETZER 11/04/2018 UNTIL 19/05/2018 WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA

THE AVA GALLERY GREATEST HITS: WORKS FROM MICHAELIS, RUTH PROWSE AND STELLENBOSCH ART SCHOOLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 2017 GRADUATES 12/04/2018 UNTIL 10/05/2018 WWW.AVA.CO.ZA

11/04/2018 UNTIL 19/05/2018 WEEK 2 APRIL

12/04/2018 UNTIL 10/05/2018 WEEK 2 APRIL

THE MELROSE GALLERY THE DIN OF DAILY LIFE ARLENE AMALER-RAVIV. WE ARE EXCITED TO BE HOSTING THIS CAPTIVATING SOLO EXHIBITION. 13/04/2018 UNTIL 13/05/2018 WWW.THEMELROSEGALLERY.COM

WWW.ABSOLUTART.CO.ZA 13/04/2018 UNTIL 12/05/2018 WEEK 2 APRIL

CAPE PALETTE AUTUMN EXHIBITION UNTIL 30/04/18

OLIEWENHUIS ART MUSEUM BEST BEFORE BY MARGARET NEL 19/04/2018 UNTIL 27/05/2018

WWW.CAPEPALETTE.CO.ZA

WWW.NASMUS.CO.ZA

UNTIL 30/04/18 WEEK 3-4 APRIL

19/04/2018 UNTIL 27/05/2018 WEEK 3 APRIL

ALICE ART GALLERY PETRO NEAL 21/04/2018 UNTIL 22/04/2018

BARNARD MJ LOURENS: VIEWS ON ENTROPY 24/04/2018 UNTIL 29/05/2018

RK CONTEMPORARY RE-WORKED K9 - THEO PAUL VORSTER & HENNIE MEYER 27/04/2018 UNTIL 23/05/2018

WWW.ALICEART.CO.ZA

WWW.BARNARDGALLERY

WWW.RKCONTEMPORARY.COM

21/04/2018 UNTIL 22/04/2018 WEEK 3 APRIL

27/04/2018 24/04/2018 UNTIL UNTIL 23/05/2018 29/05/2018 WEEK 4 WEEK 3 APRIL APRIL

27/04/2018 UNTIL 23/05/2018 WEEK 4 APRIL

13/04/2018 UNTIL 13/05/2018 WEEK 2 APRIL

96

ABSOLUT ART GALLERY SEQUENCE & FORMATION AN EXHIBITION OF ABSTRACT ART 13/04/2018 UNTIL 12/05/2018

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ALICE ART GALLERY KARIEN BOONZAAIER 28/04/2018 UNTIL 29/04/2018

RUST-EN-VREDE GALLERY RONNIE WATT, CHRISTO GILES & DAVID WALTERS COLLABORATIVE EXHIBITION 08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

WWW.ALICEART.CO.ZA 25/03/2018 UNTIL 25/04/2018 WEEK 4 APRIL

06/05/18 UNTIL 16/06/2018 WEEK 1MAY

08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018 WEEK 2 MAY

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

RUST-EN-VREDE CLAY MUSEUM FAMOUS BRANDS - CERAMIC GROUP EXHIBITION 08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

RUST EN VREDE GALLERY ENDLESS HORIZON GROUP EXHIBITION 08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018 WWW.RUST-EN-VREDE.COM

08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018 WEEK 2 MAY

08/05/2018 UNTIL 13/06/2018 WEEK 2 MAY

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

March 2018 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

LIST YOUR GALLERY, AUCTION OR ART SHOP IN PRINT AND ONLINE WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

Dietmar Wiening, Evolution W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

97


7

STEPHAN CO. (CT) STRAUSSWELZ & CO&(JHB) 65-June 7 June 2017 2017 Viewings:22––44June June2017 2017 Viewings: www.stephanwelzandco.co.za www.straussart.co.za

5th Avenue Auctioneers STEPHAN WELZ & CO. (CT) 6 -117 June 2017 Viewings: 29 –& 410June June2017 2017 www.5thaveauctions.co.za www.stephanwelzandco.co.za

PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTING

RUSSELL 5thKAPLAN Avenue AUCTIONEERS Auctioneers (JHB) 24June June2017 2017 11 Viewings: 921& -1024June June2017 2017 Viewings: rkauctioneers.co.za EC JHB WC KZN PTA www.5thaveauctions.co.za

Vie NWP

Cape Eastern AND Cape AUCTIONEERS SOUTH AFRICANEastern ART GALLERIES, SUPPLIERS

East London Alexandria

Port Elizabeth

East ART London TIMES GALLERY LISTINGS

RUSSELL

Port Elizab

Johannesburg

QUIN SCULPTURE GARDEN & GALLERY PERMANENT EXHIBITION OF MAUREEN Ann Bryant GalleryQUIN No 9 St Marks MON TO FRIDAY 9AM - 4 30PM Road, SATURDAY Southernwood, East London, www. 9 AM - 1 PM

annbryant.co.za

WWW.QUIN-ART.CO.ZA

Free State

EC - ALEXANDRIA Bloemfontein

ALICE ART GALLERY 54 DRYF AVE, ROODEPOORT

Oliewenhuis 011 Art 958 Museum is a satellite 1392 of the National Museum, Bloemfontein, National Arts Festival an agency of the Department of Arts and Culture. Opening 29 June 2017 WWW.ALICEART.CO.ZA

JHB

30

Vincent Art Gallery The home of Contemporary Fine Art and the Masters. We also offer professional framing, Ann Gallery Nopewter, 9 St Marks decor,Bryant ceramics, semiCrouseSouthernwood, Artstones Gallery and Beautiful gallery with a Road, Eastsilver London, www. precious jewellery, coffee shop. JHB. A gem of a gallery with annbryant.co.za www.vincentartgallery.co.za a big variety of art in the Eden Meander Mall, George, Florida, www.facebook.com/ Gauteng crouse.art/timeline EC Free - EASTState LONDON

Johannesburg Bloemfontein

Artist Proof Studio One of the largest and most vibrant community and exhibition professional Swelco Studio A revolving of printmaking facilities in Southern Africa, paintings, prints, sculpture and photography accommodating up to 50 students per featuring a range of artists such as Ndabuko Oliewenhuis Museumandis collaborative a satellite year. Hosting,Art publishing Ntuli, Patrick de Mervelec, Daniel Novela and ofprojects the National with manyMuseum, artists andBloemfontein, organisations Allen year. Hallett, amongstwww.artistproofstudio. others. Shop L38, each Newtown, an agency of the Department of Arts and Nelson Mandela Square, Sandton, www. co.za/home-3 Culture. stephanwelzandco.co.za

ArtEC - EPSAC Community Art Centre artEC is a non profit organisation Vincent Art Gallery Theset home of and Community ArtART Centre, up for the VINCENT GALLERY Contemporary Fine ArtVisual and the advancement of the Arts Masters. and Art 8 DAWSON RD, SELBORNE We also offerWorking professional Craftsmanship. to uplift framing, the arts decor, ceramics, pewter, semiin the Eastern Cape, South Africa, helping Fifth Avenue Fine Art Auctioneers The precious and a silver jewellery, artists andstones encouraging public interest in June Auction, 11/06/2017, 404 www.vincentartgallery.co.za the arts, www.facebook.com/ArtECPE WWW.VINCENTARTGALLERY.CO.ZA Jan Smuts Avenue, Craighall Park, www.5thaveauctions.co.za Gauteng EC - EAST LONDON

ArtEC Centre ar and Comm advancem Craftsman in the Eas artists and Graham’ the arts, w significan African an Bryanston

Artist Proof Studio One of the largest and most vibrant community and professional printmaking facilities in Southern Africa, BERMAN CONTEMPORARY accommodating up to 50 students per 11 ALICE year. Hosting, publishingLANE, and collaborative SANDTON Cherie with de Villiers Gallery in fine projects many artists andDealers organisations The year. Bag and Factory Artists’ StudiosSouth Call paintings sculptures by leading each Newtown, www.artistproofstudio. for Applications - Artist www.gallery.co.za Career Bootcamp, African artists. Sandton, co.za/home-3 29/05/2017 till 01/09/2017 WWW.BERMANCONTEMPORARY.COM

Cherie de Touch o paintings Exhibition African art Randburg

Johannesburg

SA ARTJHB TIMES | JUNE 2017

JHB

S

2017/05/23 6:24 PM

AT June 2017.indd 30

CANDICE BERMAN GALLERY RIVERSIDE SHOPPING CENTRE, BRYANSTON, JOHANNESBURG WWW.CANDICEBERMANGALLERY.COM

Centurion Art Gallery The ‘Centurion Art Gallery’ is a commercial satellite of the Pretoria Art Museum, Lyttelton Manor, www.tshwane.gov.za/sites/tourism/ArtsCulture-and-Heritage/Pages/Centurion-ArtGallery.aspx

JHB

JHB

98

Durban

Chris Tugwell Art Gallery The Chris Tugwell Galleries, in existence for over fifty years, showcaseREAD work from some of South EVERARD AND CIRCA Africa’s most exciting and /talented EVERARD READ CIRCAartists. This includes paintings,AVENUE ceramics, glass and JELLICOE limited edition bronzes and sculptures by well-known South African masters, Brooklyn, Pretoria, www.christugwell.co.za WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA

Mpumalanga

White W River W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

So

JHB

Cape Tow


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

99


eers The , 404 ll Park,

dios Call ootcamp,

ART TIMES GALLERY LISTINGS

PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTINGS Johannesburg ART TIMES GALLERY LISTINGS

Johannesburg

5TH AVENUE FINE ART Crouse Art AUCTIONEERS Gallery Beautiful gallery with a coffee shop. JHB. A gem of a gallery with a big variety of art in the Eden Meander Mall, TEL George, Florida, : 011 781 www.facebook.com/ 2040/41/39 crouse.art/timeline WWW.5THAVEAUCTIONS.CO.ZA

GOODMAN GALLERY Fifth163 Avenue Art Auctioneers JAN Fine SMUTS AVENUE, The June Auction, 11/06/2017, 404 PARKWOOD Jan Smuts011 Avenue, Craighall Park, 788 1113 www.5thaveauctions.co.za

JHB

JHB

Swelco Studio A revolving exhibition of paintings, prints, sculpture and photography featuring a range of artists such as Ndabuko Ntuli, Patrick de Mervelec, Daniel Novela and Allen Hallett, amongst others. Shop L38, Nelson Mandela Square, Sandton, www. JOHANNESBURG stephanwelzandco.co.za ART GALLERY KING GEORGE STREET, JOUBERT PARK JOHANNESBURG, GAUTENG Graham’s Fine Art Gallery Exhibits a WWW.FRIENDSOFJAG.ORG significant collection of important South African and international JHB contemporary art, Bryanston, www.grahamsgallery.co.za

WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM

The Bag Factory Artists’ Studios Call RUSSELL KAPLAN for Applications - Artist Career Bootcamp, 29/05/2017AUCTIONEERS till 01/09/2017 Sanlam Art Lounge Showcases works TEL : +27artists, 11 789commemorates 7422 from emerging WWW.RKAUCTIONEERS.CO.ZA iconic pieces from the renowned Sanlam Art collection and on occasion, hosts exhibitions compiled in collaboration with other JHB institutions, Sandton, www.sanlam.co.za

Chris Tugwell Art Gallery The Chris Tugwell Galleries, in existence for over fifty Centurion Art Gallery The ‘Centurion years, showcase work from some of South Art Gallery’ is a commercial satellite of Africa’s most exciting and talented artists. the Pretoria Art Museum, Lyttelton Manor, This includes paintings, ceramics, glass and www.tshwane.gov.za/sites/tourism/Artslimited edition bronzes and sculptures by Culture-and-Heritage/Pages/Centurion-Artwell-known South African masters, Brooklyn, UJ ART GALLERY Gallery.aspx Pretoria, www.christugwell.co.za EXHIBITIONS, CONCERTS UNISA Art Gallery Showcases AND A RANGE OF CULTURAL Contemporary South African and AND CREATIVE ACTIVITIES. International Art, New Muckleneuk, Touch of Genius Gallery New Artists Mpumalanga 011 559 2099 Pretoria, www.facebook.com/ Exhibition, 01/06/2017 till 30/06/2017, White RiverWWW.UJ.AC.ZA groups/222848047188 Randburg, www.togg.co.za

Durban 100

JHB

KZ Natal

JHB W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

Sanlam from em iconic piec collection compiled institutions Fifth Ave June A Jan Smu www.5tha

Graham’s Fine Art Gallery Exhibits a significant collection of important South African and international contemporary art, Bryanston, Crouse Art www.grahamsgallery.co.za Gallery Beautiful gallery with a coffee shop. JHB. A gem of a gallery with a big variety of art in the Eden Meander JHB Mall, George, Florida, www.facebook.com/ crouse.art/timeline

Touch of Genius Gallery exhibition New Artists Swelco Studio A revolving of Exhibition,prints, 01/06/2017 paintings, sculpture till and 30/06/2017, photography Randburg, www.togg.co.za featuring a range of artists such as Ndabuko Ntuli, Patrick de Mervelec, Daniel Novela and Allen Hallett, amongst others. Shop L38, KZ Nelson Mandela Square, Sandton, www. Durban stephanwelzandco.co.za

UNISA Contempo Internation Pretoria, groups/22

The Bag Natal for Applica

29/05/201

JHB

Artspace Durban Centurion Art Gallery The King ‘Centurion Solo exhibition by Terence YIULL ARTISTS’ www.artspace-durban.com Art Gallery’ isDAMASO a commercial satellite of STUDIO & GALLERY the Pretoria Art Museum, Lyttelton Manor, CONTACT 0832340870 www.tshwane.gov.za/sites/tourism/ArtsWestern Culture-and-Heritage/Pages/Centurion-ArtGallery.aspx Cape Town WWW.YIULL.COM

White River

JHB

Durban Collection Chris Tu permanen Tugwell G Services, years, sho Codesa to Africa’s m This includ limited ed Cape well-know Pretoria, w

Mpumalanga


PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTINGS

THE VIEWING ROOM GALLERY AT ST.LORIENT FASHION & ART GALLERY

THE CAPE GALLERY SOUTH AFRICAN PAINTINGS SCULPTURES & CERAMICS

WWW.STLORIENT.CO.ZA

WWW.CAPEGALLERY.CO.ZA

JHB

PTA

WC - CAPE TOWN

ART@BREE - AVANT GARDE GALLERY AND VENUE 103A BREE STREET

ART@DURBANVILLEHILLS SCULPTURE ESTATE TYGERBERG VALLEY ROAD7945

WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

ART@CLOCKTOWER GALLERY V&A WATERFRONT SHOP G5, CLOCK TOWER SHOPPING CENTRE WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

ARTSAUCE

Carmel Art Dealers in fine art and distributors of Pieter van der Westhuizen etchings. Green Point, www.carmelart.co.za

DONALD GREIG GALLERY & BRONZE FOUNDRY 1 COODE CRESCENT, V&A WATERFRONT 021 418 0003 GALLERY@DGART.CO.ZA

ABSA GALLERY MONTHLY CONTEMPORARY ART EXHIBITIONS AND THE PROMINENT Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ATELIER AWARD. ABSA TOWERS NORTH BUILDING 161 MAIN STREET TEL: 011 350 5139

ART TIMES GALLERY LISTINGS

62 Roland Street, Cape Town 021 461 0885

SHOWCASING EMERGING AS WELL AS ESTABLISHED ARTISTS.

Christopher Moller Gallery

WC - CAPE TOWN

WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

www.christophermollerart.co.za

WWW.DONALDGREIG.COM

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

DF Co 03/06/201 dfcontemp

101


n

hed in SA Art, wn. www.

eclectic artworks sters and ernational n, www.

rge's St

DF Contemporary Winter 03/06/2017 till 04/07/2017, dfcontemporary.co.za

Carmel Art Dealers in fine art and distributors of Pieter van der Westhuizen etchings. Green Point, www.carmelart.co.za

PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTINGS

Show, www.

Wildlife Bronze Sculptures 1 Coode Cresc; Port of Cape Town www.donaldgreig.com 021 418 0003 The foundry can be visited to view the casting process and a bronze pouring.

ECLECTICA PRINT GALLERY 69Eatwell BURGGallery STREET 021 4224185

Open Studio The working studio of Lynne-Marie Eatwell, also exhibiting the work of WWW.ECLECTICAPRINTGALLERY.CO.ZA Eric Oswald Eatwell and Mags Eatwell www.eatwellgallery.com

EVERARD READ CPT IMAGE: BLESSING NGOBENI HOUSE GOAT Eclectica Art & Antiques Purveyors of antiques, furniture, bespoke pieces of objet WWW.EVERARD-READ-CAPETOWN.CO.ZA dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;arts & fineart, incl. SA Masters. Wynberg, www.eclecticaartandantiques.co.za/

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

Framing Place Conservation framing, framing of art, Block mounting and Block frames. Observatory, www.framingplace.co.za

GALLERY F SPECIALIZING IN BLACK AND G2 Art Offering a diverse range of WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY sculpture, contemporary painting and mixed 021 423 4423 media by South African artists, Cape Town, www.g2art.co.za/contact-us/a WWW.PAPA-SA.COM

IN-FIN-ART 9 WOLFE ST, CHELSEA, WYNBERG, CAPE TOWN, 7800 021 761 2816 Gallery F Specializing in Black and White photography, Cape Town, www.galleryf.co.za WWW.INFINART.CO.ZA

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

In-Fin-Art-Picture Framers & Art Gallery Expert advice | Extensive range GOODMAN GALLERY of moulding profiles | Custom made handSIR |LOWRY RD, framing finished 176 frames Conservation WOODSTOCK with museum glass | Original art by local 4627573 contemporary021 artists, Cape Town

Iziko SA National Gallery Our Lady, 11/11/2016 till June 2017, Cape Town Central, www.iziko.org.za

Conrad Botes, The Big Other, Lithograph, 570x764mm www.kalkbaymodern.co.za

ECLECTICA ANTIQUES AND ART 11 A WOLF STREET WYNBERG 021 7627983 WWW.ECLECTICAARTANDANTIQUES.CO.ZA

Kalk Bay Modern Gallery

WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM

WC - CAPE TOWN 102

SA ART TIMES | JUNE 2017 WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A 2017/05/23 6:28 PM


PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTINGS

RED! THE GALLERY ART GALLERY & CAFE. STEENBERG VILLAGE , TOKAI AND 4 BREE STREET, PORTSIDE BUILDING, FORESHORE, CAPE TOWN WWW.REDTHEGALLERY.CO.ZA

WC - CAPE TOWN

WC - CAPE TOWN

NICOLAAS MARITZ STUDIO AND GALLERY 5 NEMESIA STREET DARLING BY APPOINTMENT 0784197093 SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/ NICOLAASMARITZGALLERY/

Creative Moments by appointment SCULPTURE ESTATE cell: 0825796403 VILJOENSHOOP ROAD 50, www.johannesduplessis.co.za

WC - DARLING

WC - ELGIN

WC - CAPE TOWN

IS Art T. 021 www.fac 1470315

Atelier at 1 unie ART@ALMENKERK GALLERY AND

GRABOUW, 7160 WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

Makiwa Gallery Franschhoek 1 WINTER WONDER - Exhibiting Renowned

Artists including Makiwa Mutomba EVERARD READ Happy Greens 20x20 IMAGE: PAOLO BINI www.makiwagalleries.com/artists-franschhoek

MONOCHROME WHITE III, 2015

Gordonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay

WWW.EVERARD-READ-FRANSCHHOEK.CO.ZA

WC - FRANSCHHOEK

Wall Art of works the pain Cecil Sko Sydney K bronzes and Syd V&A Wat

THE SOUTH AFRICAN PRINT GALLERY 0214626851 The Cape Gallery Cape Town, T. 021 4235309, web@capegallery.co.za, www. capegallery.co.za WWW.PRINTGALLERY.CO.ZA

WC - FRANSCHHOEK W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

WC - FRANSCHHOEK

Makiwa Gallery Franschhoek 2 WINTER WONDER - Exhibiting Renowned Artists including Makiwa Mutomba

KIM DONALDSON Rhino 79x79GALLERY 38 HUGUENOT RD, www.makiwagalleries.com/artists-franschhoek FRANSCHHOEK

Grabouw WWW.KIMDONALDSONGALLERY.COM WC - FRANSCHHOEK 103

Latent p

Great Bra


angebaan, Jordaan, o, Antonia angebaan,

PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTINGS

Knysna

MANZART 30 HUGUENOT STREET FRANSCHHOEK WWW.MANZART.COM Rossouw Modern Art Gallery Leading Artists and Sculptors WC - FRANSCHHOEK www.rossoumodern.com

Paarl

GALLERY 103 THE MANDALA SYMBOL IS THE COLLECTIVE THREAD THAT RUNS THROUGH SMALL, INTIMATE The ART THIS SQUARE studio/gallery GALLERY / 044 620 3144 WWW.SPIRITUALMANDALAS. Solo exhibitions every last Thursday ofCO.ZA the month

www.facebook.com/ThePumpkinHouse

WC - GREAT BRAK RIVER

Riebeek Kasteel

works of a ecialising in

st, Oil on

NDIZA GALLERY GORDON’S BAY AFRICAN DREAMS WalkerONGOING Bay Art EXHIBITION Gallery A Selection of South African Contemporary Artists including Solly Smook, Jimmy Law, Louis WWW.NDIZAGALLERY.COM Chanu, Claire Denarie,Tay Dall and many more, WC Hermanus, www.walkerbayartgallery. - GORDONS BAY co.za

WWW.39LONG.GALLERY

Knysna Art www.finearts.co.za WC Fine - GREAT BRAK RIVER

Plettenberg Bay

THE ART SQUARE STUDIO

54 PARK DRIVE Hout Street Gallery Specialising in 7357 LANGEBAAN, WESTERN CAPE, paintings and fine art by more than thirty SOUTH AFRICA SA artists. Open Monday to Friday from 8.30am to 5.30pm; Saturday 8.30am to 1pm and Sunday by appointment, Paarl, www.houtstreetgallery.co.za WC - LANGEBAAN

Robertson

Riebeek Kasteel - The Gallery Featuring contemporary paintings and sculptures by mostly local artists. Only an hour’s drive from Cape Town, Riebeek Kasteel, www. galleryriebeek.co.za

Robertson Art Gallery Should you find yourself in the Robertson Wine Valley on Route 62, pay a visit to this gallery, where you’ll find a carefully curated selection of art by top SA artists, as well as a large range of sterling silver jewellery, Robertson, www. robertsonartgallery.co.za

WC - STELLENBOSCH

WC - STELLENBOSCH

104

ART@39LONG

BOUTIQUE GALLERY ON THE GARDEN ROUTE.WORK BY MOSTLY SOUTHERN CAPE ARTISTS.EXQUISITE CERAMICS FOR COLLECTORS

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

ROBERTSON ART GALLERY 3 VOORTREKKER ROAD

Old Nick ROBERTSON, Village A sensory shopping 6705 TEL: 023 626 5364 / FAX: 626and 5363 the experience presenting fine023art CELL: 082 921 2697 creative work of many of the best artists, INFO@ROBERTSONART.CO.ZA crafters and creative manufacturers of South Africa, Plettenberg Bay, www. WWW.ROBERTSONARTGALLERY.CO.ZA oldnickvillage.co.za/about/ WC - ROBERTSON

Somerset West

VINCENT DA SILVA GALLERY 38 CHURCH ST, STELLENBOSCH CENTRAL 074172 4359

Vincent da Silva Studio Somerset West, www.vincentdasilva.co.za WWW.VINCENTDASILVA.COM WC - STELLENBOSCH


Bootcamp,

he Chris over fifty of South ed artists. glass and ptures by Brooklyn,

Sculpture ork for the well as a hite River,

Exhibition, 01/06/2017 till 30/06/2017, Randburg, www.togg.co.za

Pretoria, www.facebook.com/ groups/222848047188

PROVINCIAL GALLERY LISTINGS

KZ Natal Durban

SARONSBERG CELLAR PERMANENT COLLECTION WAVEREN ROAD, TULBAGH Artspace Durban Solo exhibition by Terence King www.artspace-durban.com

WWWSARONSBERG.COM WC - TULBACH

Durban Art Gallery KwaZulu-Natal Collections - an exhibition of works from the permanent collection of the KZN Museum Services, 30 Anton Lembede St. From Codesa to present, www.durban.gov.za

Western Cape

Cape Town

DIETMAR WIENING ART GALLERY

PERMANENT EXHIBITION OF BIRDS AND MARINE LIVE IN BRONZE WWW.DIETMARWIENING.COM

NWP - BROEDERSTROOM

KZN

Art @ Durbanville Hills Sculpture Estate and Gallery Tygerberg Valley Rd, Cape Farms Cape Town, 7550 082 774 1078 www.art-at-durbanvillehills.com Soon to be the home of Norman O’Flynns Astronauts

ArtB Gallery, Bellville AGM and Members Exhibition, ends 05/05/2017, Bellville, www.artb.co.za

SA ART TIMES | JUNE 2017

2017/05/23 6:27 PM

SOUTH AFRICA’S DAILY ART EVENTS GUIDE WWW.ARTGO.CO.ZA

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

105


ART LIFE

THE NORVAL FOUNDATION OPENS IN CAPE TOWN APRIL 2018 www.norvalfoundation.org

The long-anticipated opening of the Norval Foundation in Steenberg, Cape Town, is set for 28 April 2018. The new centre for art will be a research and exhibition space for 20th and 21stcentury artworks, as well as a platform for music and cultural expression. Adjacent to Table Mountain National Park, the Norval Foundation will offer visitors a multisensory experience that combines the exhibition of art with an appreciation for nature. Housed in world-class facilities, the foundation includes a sculpture garden, outdoor amphitheatre, purpose-built exhibition spaces, a research library, a restaurant and bar, a shop and a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playground. The Skotnes Restaurant is the culinary arm of the Norval Foundation. Named after legendary South African artist and teacher Cecil Skotnes, the restaurant is naturally at home in the world of art. Overlooking the

106

Cecil Skotnes, Head Study, 1989. Image Skotnes Family

foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s serene wetland and innovative sculpture garden, the Skotnes seamlessly integrates nature and architecture. The menu pays homage to classical South African cuisine, whilst updating its flavours and distilling its ingredients to their simplest

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Serge Alain Nitegeka, Structural Response II, 2014. W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

107


ART LIFE

108

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Sydney Kumalo, St. Francis of Assisi, 1962. Image the Kumalo Family

possible presentation. All ingredients are sourced from local, small-batch suppliers, with the intention of supporting and uplifting local communities. At the helm of the Skotnes is Executive Chef, Phil de Villiers. De Villiers previously led the Primal Eatery, which was named Eat Outâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Steakhouse of 2017. Guided by Director Elana Brundyn and her team of museum professionals, the Norval Foundation aims to create high quality exhibitions and public programming.

Ezrom Legae, Pensive Woman, 1969. Image the Legae Family

The Norval Foundation is the custodian of the Gerard Sekoto Foundation, Edoardo Villa Estate Collection and the Alexis Preller Archive. The Norval family are the founders and initial funders of the Norval Foundation. Their aim is to make art widely accessible to local and international visitors, by creating a selfsustainable centre for art. The proceeds from capital donations will be used to secure the foundation for future generations.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

109


ART LIFE

GALLERY BUZZ: THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT JACK LUGG BOOK LAUNCH AND EXHIBITION

The House that Jack Built - print

The book launch was held at the prestigious Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum, Port Elizabeth.

110

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


The Jack Lugg extended family.

A great opening was had by all.

Dirk, Emma & Pippa.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

111


ART LIFE

GALLERY BUZZ: ASHRAF JAMAL IN THE WORLD BOOK LAUNCH

ESSAYS ON CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICAN ART

‘Ashraf Jamal’s wide-ranging, passionately engaged and sometimes startling essays focus on twenty-four South African artists. Some are well-known figures, others – argues this persuasive critic and visual theorist – deserve wider notice. While drawn to things particular artists do and say, what Jamal presents here exceeds mere journalism. His writing proposes an argument with the genteel notion of a stable South African art canon. The precariousness of the South African idea, a malleable idea subject to widespread negotiation in the present tense, demands a highly mobile form of critical activism. Jamal is exactly the right man for the task.’ - Sean O’Toole Ashraf Jamal and Andile Magengelele

L-R Lungile Hlatshwayo Photographer with Ashraf Jamal

112

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


L-R Andrew Tshabangu in a robust conversation with Ashraf Jamal, far behind David Andrew, Dept Fine Arts-Wits

From Back l-r Zen Marie Wits Fine Arts Dept, Ashraf Jamal, Andrew Tshabangu, Thuli Mlambo James,Thembinkosi Goniwe, Front l-r David Koloane, Pat Mautloa,Thabo and Dumi

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

113


ART LIFE

LA MOTTE BRINGS ART TO LIFE

AN ENTIRELY DIFFERENT ORDER OF TRANQUILITY, LUXURY AND PLEASURE www.la-motte.com

The Franschhoek Valley never fails to beguile and delight. Simply driving along beneath the spectacular mountain slopes, past woods and vineyards, initiates a process of enchantment transporting you into another world – only 60km from Cape Town, but of an entirely different order of tranquility, luxury and pleasure. Nowhere is this harmony better represented than the La Motte Wine Estate, where the culinary, oenological and visual arts combine to form a synesthetic palette that is nothing short of ravishing. The scene is already set on the approach to La Motte, by imposing sculpture of a woman, four metres high, holding an overflowing cup. The Wine Bearer was commissioned by the late Dr Anton Rupert’s daughter, mezzo soprano Hanneli-Rupert-Koegelenberg, to celebrate La Motte’s tradition of sharing. The sculpture is one of eight strong, silent female forms that you will encounter at La Motte, all created by South African artists Toby Megaw and his father Theo. Take the Sculpture Walk if you want to find out more about these fascinating works. The Wine Bearer’s overflowing vessel is also a prompt to head for the tasting facility. An experience in itself, this completely redesigned and refurbished space creates a truly inviting and friendly ambiance. The large fireplace looks particularly convenient for winter. There’s no stiff formality to wine tasting here – just take a seat at the tasting counter or one of the hand-made tasting tables and let the knowledgeable and very friendly staff talk you through the nuances of La Motte’s award-winning vintages, including the Pierneef Collection premium wine range.

114

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


The book launch was held at the prestigious Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Museum, Port Elizabeth. W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

115


Inspired by the master at Pierneef Ă La Motte Restaurant 116

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

117


The perfect atmosphere for wine-tasting. 118

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ART LIFE

Pierneef, Bushveld Trees, 1955, oil on canvas, 46x62cm Pierneef’s linocuts on the labels and the walls.

Why Pierneef? After the old master’s death, ten sets of a collection of 128 linocuts were printed, after which the originals were destroyed. Dr Anton Rupert bought each of his children a set; Hanneli Rupert-Koegelenberg’s one now adorns the walls of the tasting room and the restaurant. In addition, each bottle of Pierneef Syrah Viognier or Pierneef Sauvignon Blanc has its own linocut on the front label. The linocuts offer a fascinating glimpse into Pierneef’s concerns as an artist – historic buildings, lonely farmsteads, wine cellars, landscapes, his beloved indigenous trees, and the eruption of towering cloud formations behind mountains or over plains. What comes through is the independence of his approach – he was never a slave to any European school or theory. Perhaps this unique quality is reflected in the Syrah Viognier, with the red and white varietals playing a subtle game of light and shade, like the combination of white and

“La Motte Wine Estate, where the culinary, oenological and visual arts combine to form a synesthetic palette that is nothing short of ravishing.” W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

119


120

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ART LIFE

Tony Megaw at work.

Wines of distinction. W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

121


A feast for the senses: the Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant.

black in Pierneef’s linocuts. From the tasting room it’s a short walk over an enchanting suspension bridge above a pond filled with lilies and fish to the Pierneef à La Motte Restaurant, where the culinary team rises to the challenge of echoing Pierneef’s artistry in their modern interpretations of old-time Cape Winelands cuisine. The á la carte lunch is a triumph of creativity, with astonishing twists on traditional ingredients. For example, it’s no exaggeration to say that every ingredient of the

Cape bokkom salad, with the pungent flavour of the salted and dried fish set against semidried tomatoes, dried apricots, quail eggs, and toasted almonds with garlic dressing, acts like a note in a piece of music, so that your taste buds are stimulated to investigate the principle at play. Yes, the diner is a cocreator in this experience … In a different way, the Boerbok with braised and picked carrots and hazelnuts and heirloom carrot chutney transforms the humble farmer’s goat

“60km from Cape Town, but of an entirely different order of tranquility, luxury and pleasure” 122

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ART LIFE

Wine-tasting in comfort.

Impeccable pairing.

into something rich and strange. However, the pièce de résistance was the dessert, simply entitled “Jam”. This multi-layered, swirling confectionary of watermelon, jelly, white chocolate and pecan nut mousse, shades of pink cake, and watermelon sorbet (styled “a playful interpretation of South African’s love for all kinds of jams and conserves”) is like a Jean-Paul Gaultier creation in a glass. Clearly, one is in the presence of a formidable culinary artist. The temptation to return and sample the rest of the menu is strong. To round off the experience, the La Motte Museum offers a stimulating excursion through the history of the estate, together with that of the influential Rupert family, and the

perennially absorbing permanent collection of Pierneefs, which are well served in this setting. Also not to be missed is the new exhibition Fleurs de La Motte featuring Paula van Coller-Louw’s coruscating paintings of La Motte’s various flora, from mountain fynbos to lavender and roses. Also to be seen is Toby Megaw’s The Blushing Bride, a sculpture in progress that will be completed in May. Fleurs de la Motte runs until 17 June. On Tuesday mornings, the Fleurs de La Motte Experience offers a guided exhibition tour of the exhibition; on alternate weeks, there is a sculpting demonstration by Toby Megaw or a walk-about with Paula van Coller-Louw or Museum Curator Eliz-Marié Schoonbee, followed by tea in the Pierneef à La Motte gardens. Bookings 021 876 8850 museum@lamotte.co.za

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

123


wallcandies.com Pink Lady by Lempricka


SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

February 2018 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

March 2018 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

SUBSCRIBE, IT’S ONLY R360 FOR 11 ISSUES HERE’S HOW TO DO IT:

Email us your name, address and proof of payment to: Jan, Email proof of payment with your full name as reference to subs@arttimes.co.za or 021 424 7733 to confirm your subscription. Pay: SA Art Times Bank: FNB 62171029856 Branch Code: 201709

WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


BOOK REVIEW

IN THE WORLD BY ASHRAF JAMAL ESSAYS ON CONTEMPORARY SOUTH AFRICAN ART

‘Over the last few years, art has found its way “back” into the most sensitive discussions that affect society. In offering In the World, Ashraf Jamal, at his critical best, does the manual labour of walking us through a select number of visual artists and their creative worlds. Stitching the connections between the art world and other worlds, this book helps us to properly navigate the complex dynamics of our contemporary situations. To ignore it would be an egregious error.’ - Athi Mongezeleli Joja, art critic ‘In the World is a collection of persuasive insights, reflections, and consolations. As always, Ashraf Jamal’s essays are not just wonderful expositions, but theoretical flights

compelling readers to inhabit their world of ideas and passions; an intellectual universe in which artists and artworks are engaged with profound imagination and scholarly elucidation.’ - Thembinkosi Goniwe, artist and art historian Ashraf Jamal is a Research Associate in the Visual Identities in Art and Design Research Centre, University of Johannesburg. He is the co-author of Art in South Africa: The Future Present and co-editor of Indian Ocean Studies: Social, Cultural, and Political Perspectives. Ashraf Jamal is also the author of Predicaments of culture in South Africa, Love themes for the wilderness, and the award-winning short fiction, The Shades.

“His writing proposes an argument with the genteel notion of a stable South African art canon.” 126

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

127


Thompson, Isabel Pata Pata I and 2 Linocut 685 x 950

the south african print gallery 100 Beautiful Years of SA Fine Art Printmaking www.printgallery.co.za


GET YOUR COPY OF THE ART TIMES ON ROVOS RAIL


SOUTH AFRICAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

ONTRACK WITH THE MOST ADVENTUROUS ROVOS RAIL READERS WHO LOVE A WORLD OF ART AND BEAUTY.


R3 000 000 - 5 000 000 Alexis Preller, Poseidon (detail)

Important South African and International Art Johannesburg, 4 June 2018 011 728 8246 | jhb@straussart.co.za | 021 683 6560 | ct@straussart.co.za | www.straussart.co.za

Art Times April Edition 2018  
Art Times April Edition 2018