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Issue 7 Also in this Issue: Gary Mark Smith pg. 14 Art Tougeau Coloring Page pg 12 Mona Lisa Crossword pg 13

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Simply put, Artstew’s goal is to help create new opportunities for art to flourish in Lawrence by bringing the artististic community together. Whether you consider yourself an artist, or just an art lover, we welcome you. For more information goto: www.artstew.org or contact us via email at: contact@artstew.org Artstew Magazine is published by Artstew Design and Creative Arts. Reproduction in whole or part without permission is prohibited. Printed by: OfďŹ ce Helpline P.O. Box 442398 Lawrence, KS 66044 (785) 843-8521 info@ohonline.biz www.ohonline.biz

Submit your art to Artstew at: www.artstew.org/?=contact or www.artstew.org/submitgallery/ nfpicturepro/

Artstew Magazine would like give special thanks to: Lee Shiney - leeshiney.com Gary Mark Smith - streetphoto.com Office Helpline - ohonline.biz The Rathaus (Tricia Rock and Brent Carter) - therathaus.com Sara Rock and everyone that has helped out in any way! Design and Stories by Scott Stewart. Photos by Scott Stewart, Sara Rock, and Brent Carter Artstew Design - www.artstew.org/?=design artstew.org - 3


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tronomicial Chemis

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••••• ••••••••••••••••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••••• ••••••••••••••••••• Artist Interview Revolving Aro und “Collioid” S at Pachamama how s Restaurant in Lawrence, KS April - June 20 09 •••••••••••• •••••••••••• • • •••••••••••• Lee Shiney com •••••••••••• es from a profes ••••••••••• sional backgrou screening, avion nd in graphic de ics fabrication, sign, sil and vid com

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kmon materials eo production. and the use of His artwork inc machines to ex orporates creative proces plore time as a s. Find videos, function of his a studio cam, an w w w.le es hi ne d more images y. co m at:

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Automatic 85, 44x44”, acrylic on canvas. 4 - artstew.org

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Throw 3, 30x30”, Automatic 79, 30x30”, both acrylic on canvas.

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How do you see your artwork representing time, both visually and through your process of its creation?

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Visual aspects of painting give us a sense of the time involved to complete it. Comparing a Pollock to something photorealistic might give us something of a visual time frame. Layering and overpainting also give viewers time-based clues. Viewing individual drops of paint can impart that sense of time passage. If dripping paint communicates a slowness of time passage, conversely, hand work with a sense of rapid execution is on the other end of that spectrum. If a viewer takes the time to observe the styles used to create the works, I hope they •••••••••••• come away with questions about the time involved to produce the pieces. ••••••

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•••••••••••• Now clearly, I see these differences of time passage in •••••••••••• •• the studio. My background in design and screen printing is rooted in time management, and I’m not afraid to let that inform my painting process.

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This was your first show in Lawrence, how does it compare to other places you have shown your work? Also, how do you think your work fits into Pachamama’s and the Lawrence, KS scene?

Lawrence is comparing very favorably, both in feedback and sales. But I just really like the vibe of Lawrence anyway. Pachamamas is new to me, but I think •• the abstract iconic pieces make for a good fit for a ••• • • restaurant. ••

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How has becoming a full-time artist changed the •• • • way you make art? •

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Automatic 86, 44x44”, acrylic on canvas.

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The single biggest difference in being a “full time artist” is I don’t have the stressful distractions that a day job can bring with it. Instead of being too tired, mentally or physically, at the end of the day, I feel a sense of energy to solve problems, daydream, and focus on the business of art.

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Can you explain your choices of color and shape or does it relate more to your process and experimentation?

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Usually I let a new work evolve organically tinkering along the way. Occasionally I start with a sketch or plan. It just depends.


Burn 7, 16x23”, encaustic on board.

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Automatic 80, 30x30”, acrylic on canvas.

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All of your pieces are similar in style, but many are different in construction (materials used, etc.), how do you see the difference in materials affecting the work and its impression on the viewer?

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• • matter • • • •kind I really don’t know. One thing I do know is that thing I try out, or if there is a piece that • •no • • of•• •oddball • • • • what • •connect • • • • • I personally feel is not one of my favorites, someone will invariably really with that piece. And I love hearing • • • • • • • • • reminds someone of something • • • •that I would never have thought about. If feedback because I hear about how a•piece • • • • like I would be missing out on opportunities to develop dialogs with viewers, I limited the exposure of my work, I’d feel because works resonate with viewers for serendipitous ways that I can’t predict. While I’m constantly trying to perfect my techniques, I am not afraid to toss new ideas out into the artstream. You have videos on your website that show some of your process, do you think that it is important that fans of your work know your process and how important it is toward the final product?

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While it’s not vital for viewers to know the process in order to connect with the work, I think it adds another dimension to how they interact with it. It’s like the difference between seeing photos of my work versus real life, where the sculptural aspects of a painting become more apparent, and changes in lighting affect how the colors appear. Getting that extra visual information is pretty important to the overall experience. And for me, process is everything. The finished work is almost secondary.

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left to right: Automatic 82, 14x30”, acrylic on canvas. / Automatic 78, 30x30”, acrylic on canvas. / Throw 2, 44x44”, acrylic on canvas. Automatic 83, 44x44”, acrylic on canvas. / Automatic 77, 30x30, acrylic on canvas. / Throw 5, 14x30”, acrylic on canvas. artstew.org - 9


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Process relates to pricing which relates to accessibility. I didn’t really set out to make inexpensive art, but I also realize that a thousand dollar price tag is a barrier to my friends. I think of what I’m able to do as something of a gift that needs to be shared. If my art is based on, say, a Santa Fe pricing model, most of it is going to accumulate in my basement. I mean, I can’t afford what my artist friends produce. It’s taken me a while, but I’ve come around to trying to achieve an element of affordability. If it’s accessible, it loosely translates into sharing.

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Automatic 72, 30x30, acrylic on canvas.

You have some very affordable paintings, how do you price your work?

You also make kinetic sculpture, where did your interest in sculpture come from and how is the creative process different than your 2-D work?

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I don’t know that the creative process is inherently different than 2-D. My paintings and encaustic pieces are pretty sculptural anyway, and using machines and technology is integral to the creative process. 3-D allows the machines to be on display, instead of the results of the machines. I’m really fascinated with the works of Arthur Ganson and Michael Kontopoulos; kinetic works that are just there, doing what they do.


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When and how did your interest in art begin?

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Grade school I guess, without getting into a philosophical discussion about the creativity each of us possesses. But you know, art is not a legitimate pursuit in the eyes of most people. It honestly took getting successfully treated for cancer in 2001 to light the fire under me, to get off my dead ass and take the risks. I say exhibiting art is like climbing up on a chair in public and taking off all your clothes. It’s a huge risk. But making art was ultimately something I simply had to do.

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Part of what’s next is refining and adding to the exhibit at the Wichita Art Museum, which was held over for another year. I’m working on an exhibit for Exploration Place in Wichita in July, paintings done as a series with a water theme. Beyond that, there are plenty of ideas and sketches. Inner consistency for me means refining and building on concepts I have already worked on, while exploring new ideas without the fear of diluting my body of work. I’m working and playing at the same time.

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Lee Shiney - a24@shiney.net, c.316-516-2948, h.316-744-0208 120 Kodiak, Kechi KS 67067-7600 Showing at the Wichita Art Museum through Spring 2010 www.wichitaartmuseum.org/livingRoom.html Studio webcam at www.leeshiney.com/cam

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Burn 10, 16x26”, encaustic on board.

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What’s next?

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Art Tougeau Parade Coloring Page www.arttougeau.org

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Mona Lisa Crossword

Answers (upside down) ... wait don’t look.

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Gary Mark Smith

Lots of people take snapshots on their local streets, but Gary Mark Smith takes it to a global and professional level, combining his Master of Photography skills and his never ending wanderlust for adventure and discovery. Whether waiting days in the same Amsterdam cafe for just the right “performer” to walk into a well composed backdrop or seeking access to some of the most dangerous streets on the planet, Gary goes full-force with a “dedication to that finer point of composition” and an overwelming resume of global street photography. Gary made a name for himself early on with “a keen eye for the moment” according to Black & White Online, and as Gary says he “use(s) every element available... advertising, fashion, architecture, iconic street lamps, etc, that speak visually somehow about the personality and reputation of that place.” Gary darts about “hunting, searching, and stalking” using “many established themes such as street sweeps and public telephones or vendors and police on the beat.” Read the full interview at: www.artstew.org See work by appointment at iGlobalNetwork - 10 East 9th St. Ste. B Lawrence, KS - hours: 8-4:30 M-F - (785) 856-8053 14 - artstew.org


Global Street Photographer

“Dreamscapes - 2008 World”

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1978-1981, Gary starts “The Streets of New York” series of photographs.

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1979, His studio is established, The Electric Bandana Ranch in Lawrence, Kansas.

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In 1978 while hitchhiking around the U.S., Gary Smith was struck by a headline in a newspaper at a Scottsbluff, Nebraska truckstop that read “International Airfares Accessible to Even the Most Modest of American Wage Earners.” This was all Gary needed to begin his adventure as a Global Street Photographer.

“Suchitoto Violin”, Suchitoto, El Salvador

Gary Mark Smith Global Street Ph 16 - artstew.org


“War Time”, Guazapa, El Salvador

1982, Gary begins “Streets of the Central American Wars of the 1980s” and travels to El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Hondouras. 1983, “The Streets of Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Northern England.”

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1984, Gary earns a Photojournalism and News-Editorial degree from the University of Kansas, and a Hearst Award nomination for his work in El Salvador wars from the KU School of Journalism.

See Gary’s photos and read stories at:

www.streetphoto.com

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1991, American Photo Magazine honored him in their National Photographer’s Career Competition.

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1992, Completes a new series titled “The Streets of Amsterdam.”

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19861990, Gary photographs “The Streets of New York, Toronto, Denver, and Las Vegas.” In 1990 Gary shoots on a three and a half month train trip through Eastern and Western Europe leading up to the German and European Reunification from the streets of Koln, Germany on Oct. 3rd, 1990.

Gary Mark Smith Global Street Ph 18 - artstew.org


“Russian Revolutionaries of 1991”, Moscow, Russia

1993-1996, “The Streets of Toronto.” Accepts and completes a teaching fellowship at Purdue University and is awarded a Master of Photographic Arts graduate degree from Purdue University. 1997-1999, “The Streets of Havana,” “ *Jamaica,” “ *New York,” “The Streets Under the Montserrat Volcano,” “ *the Eastern Caribbean,” “ *Paris,” “ *Amsterdam,” “ *San Francisco,” “ *Vancouver,” “ *Colorado,” and “ *Mexico.” Gary releases his first street photography journal “Molten Memoirs” about life at the bottom of a volcano.

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“Salem Ash Man”, Montserrat Volcano

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See Gary’s photos and read stories at:

www.streetphoto.com

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2001-2003, “The Streets of the Post 9-11 Terror War” in Amsterdam, Paris, Lawrence, New York-Ground Zero, Pakistan, Peshawar, and Afghanistan.

“Afghan Refugee Camp School #2”, Afghanistan-Pakistan Tribal Belt, Pakistan

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2000, Gary repeats as an Amercian Photo International winner.

20032005, Gary takes 3 - 3 week trips to Rio de Janeiro for the series “Springtime Streets of Rio de Janeiro.” 2005, Photographs the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina from a boat on Canal Street.

Gary Mark Smith Global Street Ph 20 - artstew.org


“Mississippi Ronald McDonald SurgeScape”, Highway 90, Mississippi Gulf Coast

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2006, 4-month exhibition at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, of which two were placed in its permanent collection. Gary takes a 6-week trip to South Africa, Botswana, and Swaziland. Shoots in Soweto on the twelfth anniversary of the end of Apartheid. 2007, releases his third book “White With Foam,” compiling his street photos related to 9-11. Gary shoots in Ecuador, the High Andes, and Toronto. 2008, Amsterdam, Lawrence/Hays - KS, Boston, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Uruguay. 2009, the New Orleans Museum of Art adds 8 of his photos into their permanent collection.

See Gary’s photos and read stories at:

www.streetphoto.com

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“Up Against The Wall”, Washinton D.C.

“Peshawar Live Chicken Salesman”, Peshawar, Pakistan

“Washington Monuments”, Washington D.C.

In a effort to extend his travels (and budget) Gary is still planning trips like a twenty year old, staying in hostels or camping out in his tent. He has slowed down a bit but “I’m pretty much sticking to my original mission developed during the first seven years of my career: To create a compelling global street photography portfolio during one artist’s lifetime revealing both the variety of culture and similarity of spirit, infrastructure and order one encounters out on the seemingly chaotic streets of a single planet during one generation at the turn of a millennium. Where predominantly urban people can be studied and photographed in the wild going about the task of living out the leisure and bustle and sometimes grind of their everyday public lives”.

Gary Mark Smith Global Street Ph 22 - artstew.org


hotographer

“Odd Man Out”, Toronto, Canada

When Gary is not traveling he is living and working in Lawrence, KS, enjoying the company of his wife, friends, and his two cats (The Secretary of Good and The Secretary of Evil), writing unusual books, and working as a educational mentor to several photographers.

See Gary’s photos and read stories at:

www.streetphoto.com

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Gary Mark Smith - pg 14 “Post-Crash Tax Day on Wall Street” Artstew.org Issue 7 Also in this Issue: Lee Shiney pg. 4 Art Tougeau Coloring Page pg 12 Mona Lisa Crossword pg 13

Artstew Magazine Issue #7  

Featuring art from: Lee Shiney, Gary Mark Smith, plus Crossword and Coloring Page.

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