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ANTIQUE SILVER MODERN TIMES

KOOPMAN RARE ART 53-64 CHANCERY LANE LONDON WC2A 1QS TEL: +44 207 242 7624 info@koopmanrareart.com www.koopmanrareart.com


Introduction

Global events in 2016 have amazed the world, but “A thing of beauty is a joy forever� John Keats and in these changing times we have enjoyed putting together and cataloguing a collection of rare and beautiful silver that is one of our very best. Our recent exhibition on the work and genius of Paul Storr gave us an opportunity to showcase some rare and exceptional pieces and with the help and patience of Christopher Hartop, we learnt so much. In the current catalogue we have endeavoured to show that we have built on this and that we are committed to maintaining the theme of excellence and the pursuit of knowledge in the field of fine silver. Many new clients found us last year and along with our existing valued customers and friends, began or continued their love of collecting, and we are sure that our recent purchases, some of which we have waited years to acquire, will prove just as interesting to all. The silver on display was produced to complement the style and architecture of the period, but Works of Art placed in a modern setting can be, and often are, even more striking and compelling. My colleagues Timo and Oliver have done much of the research for this catalogue, and everyone of us at Koopman Rare Art has contributed to the presentation. We all look forward to welcoming you to our gallery situated above The London Silver Vaults, or at one of the upcoming fairs at which we exhibit, details of which can be found on the back page of this catalogue or online at our recently re-launched website. Some of our pieces were present to witness global events in past centuries. We hope you will enjoy seeing them in 2017. Lewis Smith www.koopmanrareart.com

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THOMAS GILPIN A Set of Four George II Candlesticks London 1755 Height: 9.5in (24.5 cm) Total weight: 104.8oz (3,260g)

This set of four candlesticks by Thomas Gilpin, whose wonderful rococo pieces are well represented at Althorp, is a famous model that was used by Paul de Lamerie from the mid-1730s to the end of the 1740s. According to Ellenor Alcorn in ‘Beyond the Maker’s Mark, Paul de Lamerie Silver in the Cahn Collection’, examples made by goldsmiths other than de Lamerie point to interaction within the trade. One pair bearing the sponsor’s mark for silversmith, John White was among the silver supplied to Chancellor King. Christopher Hartop has suggested that White was a retailer who bought finished pieces from de Lamerie. This is also likely to be the case with these candlesticks as the gauge and quality is similar to that of de Lamerie. There is a further set of four candlesticks

by Paul de Lamerie illustrated in ‘The Glory of The Goldsmith, Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al Tajir Collection, p.114115’ and the weight of this set is the same, almost to the penny weight, as the Thomas Gilpin set – another indication that Gilpin may actually have purchased the finished pieces from de Lamerie. Thomas Gilpin entered his first mark in September 1730. He is recorded as being a silversmith of Serle Street, Lincolns Inn which is only a stone’s throw away from us at Koopman Rare Art.

AUGUSTINE COURTAULD George I Salver London, 1723 Britannia standard Diameter: 11.25in (28cm) Weight: 35 oz. (1,097g)

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This rare salver is fifteen-sided, on three pad feet, with a moulded rim. It is engraved with a coat-of-arms within rococo cartouche flanked by lions, birds and snakes.The same arms in an identical cartouche appear on a cup and cover of the following year, also by Courtauld, illustrated in E. Alfred Jones, Some Silver Wrought by the Courtauld Family, 1940, p. 42, plate XXII.

PROVENANCE: Sir John Noble, Bt. The Rt. Hon. Michael Noble Esq., PC, MP Christie’s, London, 13th December 1967, lot. 25 The AH Whiteley Trust Collection of Alan & Simone Hartman

According to Christopher Hartop, by the end of the 17 th century many books on geometry had been published, which provided assistance in drawing the most intricate shapes. For salvers, the guidelines could be scribed directly onto the silver. Polygons could be drawn using a compass and a straight edge and this method was used to make five-, six-, eight-, ten-, twelve- and even fifteen-sided objects. The fifteen-sided salver was the most complicated and this example is believed to be the only known surviving example from this period.

EXHIBITED: Royal Academy, London, The Four Georges, 1931, no.185 LITERATURE: Christie’s Review of the Season, 1986, illustrated p. 320. The arms are those of Wilmot of Stodham and Chiselhampton, Oxford, impaling those of Mann, of Broadoak, Essex.

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PAUL DE LAMERIE A George II Set of Three Tea Caddies Circa 1732 Two caddies with maker’s mark Height: 4in (10cm) & 4 ¿in (10.5cm) Weight: 1508.8g (48oz. 10dwt.)

This exquisite set of three tea caddies has been intricately engraved with shells within strapwork and diaperwork. The crest and coat-of-arms are below an earl’s coronet for those of Spencer 5th Earl of Sunderland (1706-1758) who was married on 23rd May 1732 to Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Trevor, 2nd Baron Trevor.  Lord Sunderland, as 3rd Duke, succeeded to the honours of his grandfather, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, upon the death on 24 th October 1733 of his aunt, Henrietta, Duchess of Marlborough. He had a distinguished career in the army and was briefly Lord Privy Seal in 1755. These caddies almost certainly date from about the time of Lord and Lady Sunderland’s marriage in May 1732. The male and female profiles engraved on one of the sliding covers would appear to be a reference to the newly-wed couple. On the other covers one is initialled B, for black tea and the other initialled G, for green tea. The remarkable de Lamerie silvergilt rococo inkstand, London, 1738, which is in the possession of the present Duke of Marlborough, was probably also made for the 3 rd Duke (Paul de Lamerie, The Work of England’s Master Silversmith, exhibition catalogue, Goldsmiths’ Hall, London, 1990, p.145, no. 94). PROVENANCE: Sotheby’s Park Bernet Los Angeles, 21st October 1973, lot 36 Sotheby’s New York, 22ndApril 1998, lot 40

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PAUL DE LAMERIE A Set of Four George II Candlesticks London, 1733/34 Length over handles: 19.6cm (7.75in) Weight: 2,597.5g (83oz. 5dwt)

In typical Regence style, the circular bases chased with a border of shells and foliage, the baluster panelled columns chased with husks and profile busts, each rising from a guilloche chased girdle, the sconces partly chased with a stiff leaf rising from gadrooned octagonal discs, engraved with arms and crests. The arms are of John Carmichael, 3rd Earl of Hyndford, K.T. (17071767), envoy to the King of Prussia during the invasion of Silesia in 1742 and greatly instrumental in effecting the Treaty of Breslau, 11th June 1742. He was invested K.T. by the King of Prussia in 1742 with the addition to his paternal coat-of-arms of the eagle of Silesia. His first wife, whom he married in 1732, was Elizabeth, widow of Robert, 1st Lord Romney, and daughter and co-heir of Admiral Sir Cloudesley Shovell (1650-1707). She was a Lady of the Bedchamber to the Princess of Orange until 1750 and died at The Hague later that year. The crests (within the insignia of the Order of the Thistle, conferred 1742) engraved on the undersides of these candlesticks are those of Sir John Carmichael-Gibson, Bt. of Skirling, co. Peebles, the 3rd Earl of Hyndford’s collateral descendant.

PROVENANCE: Montague G. Thorold, Christie’s London, 5th March 1919, lot 111 Sotheby’s, London, 4thDecember 1969, lot 246 Francis E. Fowler III, Sotheby’s, New York, 21st October 1998, lot 91 Literature: Vanessa Brett, The Sotheby’s Dictionary of Silver, London, 1986, p. 174, no. 704

Portrait of John Carmichael, 3rd Earl of Hyndford (1701-1767) – Attributed to Cosmo Alexander

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PAUL DE LAMERIE A George II Soup Tureen London, 1740 Length over handles: 18.5in (45.8cm) Weight: 150oz (4,665g)

This is an exceptional example of a soup tureen by Paul de Lamerie. The shape of the body and the cast decoration has been expertly crafted. The same finial and handles can be seen on the 7th Earl of Thanet Tureens also by de Lamerie dated 1743. Other pieces from the service can be seen on the following pages.

Exhibited: Portland Museum 21st August 1999 – 30th June 2000

BENJAMIN GODFREY A Pair of George II Two-Light Rococo Candelabra London, 1739 Height: 16.25in (41.2cm) Weight: 148oz (4,603g)

These candelabra are a fine example of high rococo design – richly cast and chased and each with a cast figure of a Blackamoor supporting the branches. Examples of Blackamoor candlesticks are exceedingly rare from the late 17th and early 18th century. Indeed most, with rare exception such as with this pair, are without branches. For comparison, The Virginia Museum of Fine art have a pair of candlesticks by Isaac Duke circa, 1695.

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THE THANET DINNER SERVICE Sackville Tufton, 7 th Earl of Thanet (11 th May 1688 – 4 thDecember 1753), known as Sackville Tufton until 1729, was a British nobleman and politician. Tufton was the son of Colonel the Honourable Sackville Tufton, fifth son of John Tufton, 2 nd Earl of Thanet. His mother was Elizabeth, daughter of Ralph Wilbraham. He sat as  Member of Parliament  for  Appleby  from 1722 to 1729, when he succeeded his uncle Thomas Tufton, 6th Earl of Thanet in the earldom of Thanet and entered the House of Lords. He was hereditary High Sheriff of Westmorland from 1729 to 1753.

PAUL DE LAMERIE 1) An Important Pair of George II Serving Dishes London, 1743 Diameter: 16.75in (42.5cm) Weight: 142oz (4,416g)

Each of shaped circular form, engraved with the coat-ofarms of Tufton quartering Sackville, Clifford and Vipont with Saville in pretence as borne by the Earls of Thanet, within a gadrooned and leaf decorated border.

Lord Thanet married Lady Mary, daughter of William Savile, 2ndMarquess of Halifax, in 1722. She died in July 1751. Thanet survived her by two years and died in December 1753, aged 65. He was succeeded in his titles by his eldest surviving son, Sackville. Sackville Tufton commissioned Paul De Lamerie to produce a magnificent and extensive dinner service when he inherited his title in 1729. The new Earl immediately put his new-found fortune to effect by purchasing 19 Grosvenor Square, at that time the most expensive property on the newly developed square. Over the next few pages are several pieces from this important service.

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PAUL DE LAMERIE 2) A Suite of Four George II Second Course Dishes

PAUL DE LAMERIE 4) A George II Serving Dish & Cover

London, 1743 Diameter: 11in (28cm) Weight: 88oz 14dwt (2,760g)

London, 1745 Length across handles: 11.4in (29cm) Weight: 42oz (1,306.2g)

Each of shaped circular form, engraved with the coat-of-arms of Tufton quartering Sackville, Clifford and Vipont with Saville in pretence as borne by the Earls of Thanet, within a gadrooned and leaf decorated border.

The dish has gadrooned border and cast handles. The cover has strap work decoration.

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PAUL DE LAMERIE 3) A Pair of George II Meat Dishes

PAUL DE LAMERIE 5) A George II Meat Dish & Mazarine

London, 1742 Length: 14.7in (37.5cm) Weight: 63oz (1,959g)

London, 1743 Length: 17.5in (44.5cm) Weight: 80oz (2,488g)

Each of shaped rectangular form, engraved with the coat-of-arms of Tufton quartering Sackville, Clifford and Vipont with Saville in pretence as borne by the Earls of Thanet, within a gadrooned border.

Of shaped oval form, engraved with arms of Tufton quartering Sackville, Clifford and Vipont with Saville in pretence as borne by the Earls of Thanet, within a gadrooned and leaf decorated border, the mazarine pierced and centring an engraved medallion.

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PETER ARCHAMBO & PETER MEURE Set of Four Graduated George II Meat Dishes The smaller pair 1752 by Peter Archambo. The larger pair 1753 by Archambo & Meure Weight: 97.1oz (3,040g)

Each bearing the coat-of-arms of Henry 1st Earl Conyngham, 1 st Baron Conyngham, Vice Admiral of Ulster, Governor of Donegal. Henry (1705-1781) was a member of both the Irish House of Commons and the British House of Commons and served as Vice-Admiral of Ulster and as Governor of the counties of Donegal and Londonderry. In 1753 he was raised to the Peerage of Ireland as Baron Conyngham, of Mount Charles in the County of Donegal, and in 1756 he was created Viscount Conyngham in Ireland, also in the Peerage of Ireland. In 1781

he was made Baron Conyngham, of Mount Charles in the County of Donegal, with remainder to his nephew Francis Burton, and Earl Conyngham, of Mount Charles in the County of Donegal, which like the creations of 1753 and 1756 was created with normal remainder to the heirs male of his body. The latter titles were also in the Peerage of Ireland. Lord Conyngham was childless and on his death in 1781 the barony of 1753, the viscountcy and earldom became extinct.

THE EPERGNE The epergne became a prominent part of the dining table from the mid-18th century in England and can trace its origins from the Surtout which was a centre tray holding items such as casters, salts and oil bottles. The word epergne comes from the French word ‘epargne’ which means economy. At the time, the fashion for entertaining was to the fill the table with many dishes with the epergne saving space by elevating dishes above the table. Additionally it would greatly reduce the wastage of rare nuts and fruits from far around the globe because unlike the other dishes on the table, once the guests had served themselves from the epergne, the great delicacies that were not eaten would be left in place on the centrepiece rather than being thrown away when the plates were cleared. The first description of an epergne in England appeared in the Inventory of the Royal Plate of 1721 where it does make reference to the branches of an ‘Aparn’. From the mid-18th century, the epergne became an essential and elaborate part of the English dining table. Traditionally starting as a dessert centrepiece, it would be brought to the table after the main course. The tablecloth would be taken away leaving the epergne to be placed directly onto the table.

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THOMAS GILPIN A George II Epergne London, 1757 Height: 16in (40.5cm) Weighable silver: 221oz 17dwt (6,900g)

By 1757 the epergne was developing into the higher, more traditional shape. This particular piece was made by one of the great rococo silversmiths, Thomas Gilpin. The base is intricately cast and embellished with grapes and flowers, which would have complemented the rare delicacies placed in the dishes. This piece bears the crest of the Earl of Shrewsbury, applied in the early 19th century.

BENJAMIN GIGNAC A George II Rococo Five-Basket Epergne London, 1751 Width: 23in (58.5cm) Weight: 145oz 8dwt (4,523g)

This epergne has a central bowl and four smaller bowls all chased with flowers, foliage and fish-scales. This epergne also has French import marks meaning that it has been in France at some time in its history. The gilding was almost certainly applied during the early 19th century and the epergne has remained in the most wonderful condition, as is the case with many gilded pieces. In the 1750s, the design of the epergne was already becoming much more elaborate and created an extravagant display on a dining table. As the second half of the 18th century epergnes became more of a focal point for the dining table. Examples of their extravagant designs can be seen on the following pages.

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THOMAS PITTS A Magnificent Neo-Classical Nine-Basket Epergne Centrepiece London, 1788 Height: 22.5in (57.1cm) Width: 28in (71.1cm) Depth: 20.5in (52cm) Total weight: 230oz 14 dwt (7,174.7g)

In the latter part of the 18th century, neo-classical designs took over from the rococo. However the epergne continued to be a central part of the dining table and became increasingly elaborate. At the forefront of this phenomenon was Thomas Pitts, who was one of the most celebrated neo classical silversmiths, famous for his epergnes. This particular example is extremely elegant. There is a cast pineapple in the centre, which was an important symbol of wealth and hospitality. Pineapples were such a rarity that they could cost thousands of pounds and it is believed that people even rented them for dinner parties.

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The arms are those of Sir Peter Pole 2nd Baronet of Wolverton. The Pole, later Van Notten-Pole Baronetcy, of Wolverton in the County of Southampton, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 28th July 1791 for Charles Pole, a London merchant. Born Charles Van Notten, he was the son of Charles Van Notten, a merchant, of Amsterdam and London. He married in 1769, Millicent, daughter of Charles Pole, of Holcroft, a scion of an ancient family of Radbourne Hall, Derbyshire and in 1787 changed his surname to Pole. The baronetcy was created with remainder to the heirs male of his body, failing which to the heirs male of his daughter Susannah, wife of Isaac Minet (however, her male line is understood to have become extinct on the death of her son). His son Sir Peter Pole, the second Baronet, sat as Tory Member of Parliament for Yarmouth and sold Wolverton House to the Duke of Wellington in 1837. 

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JOHN CARTER A Set of Four George III Neo-Classical Silver Candlesticks London, 1774 Height: 10.75in (27.2cm) Weight: 91oz. 10dwt (2,842g)

These elegant candlesticks are cast, the square bases chased with flutes above acanthus and bead borders. Theses candlesticks were of a design by the great architect Robert Adam whose designs are lucky enough to survive at the Sir John Soane Museum, just around the corner from Koopman Rare Art in Lincolns Inn Fields. Adam spent four years in Italy absorbing the ideas of neo-classicism, returning to London in 1758. These ideas together with his direct experience of ancient ruins themselves, gave him the confidence and direct approach to classical vocabulary which was in stark contrast to others like Chambers or indeed Wyatt who had much lighter and flimsier designs. Horace Walpole’s jibe about Wyatt’s ‘sippets of embroidery’ is hard to apply to Adam’s silver designs which have a solidity and crispness of detail. This is also true of these candlesticks executed by John Carter, who produced many designs of Robert Adam.

The crest is that of Bacon of Raveningham Hall, Norfolk, most likely for Sir Edmund Bacon, 8th Bt. (1749-1820), whose ancestor was Sir Nicholas Bacon (1509-1579), Lord Keeper of the Great Seal during the reign of Elizabeth I. The initials AB are probably those of Sir Edmund’s second wife, Anne (17491813), daughter of Sir William Beauchamp-Proctor, 1st Bt., whom he married at St. Marylebone on 29th January 1778. The Raveningham Estate is a traditional rural estate of some 5,500 acres situated south of Norwich in South Norfolk. It has been home to the Bacon family since 1735. Raveningham Hall was built around 1750 by an unknown architect for Sir Edmund Bacon the 8th and 9th Baronet. The Hall is Grade II listed and home to Sir Nicholas Bacon the 14th and 15th Baronet and his family.

Adam Vol. XXV, no. 98 by courtesy of the Trustees of Sir John Soane’s Museum 22

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JOHN SCHOFIELD The Duke of Cambridge Candlesticks London, 1791 Height: 7.4in (19cm) Weight: 36oz 18dwt (1,150g)

Bearing the monogram and ducal coronet for Adolphus, the Duke of Cambridge. Each candlestick bears the Royal Ducal crest for the Duke of Cambridge. The candlesticks were made in London in 1791, by John Schofield and based on a design by Robert Adam. Suites of similar candlesticks can be found in the collection of William Beckford at Brodick Castle, where Beckford enlarged existing suites by adding reproductions of earlier designs to produce his spectacular lighting schemes. This pair of candlesticks are the original 18th century form and the Duke of Cambridge added to his collection of candlesticks in this style with purchases from Charles Fox in 1829.

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Adam Vol. XXV, no. 97 by courtesy of the Trustees of Sir John Soane's Museum

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PAUL STORR The Thomas Hope Dessert Plates London, 1798 Diameter: 8.5in (21.6cm) Weight: 275oz 4dwt (8,560g)

The arms are those of Hope, for the aesthete and patron Thomas Hope (1769-1831). Several members of the Hope Dutch banking family established themselves in London in the 1790s. Thomas Hope was one of the great collectors of the late 18th and early 19th century. Through his extensive travels he was able to amass a great collection of objects, which he then went on to display in his new house on Duchess Street. He designed each room based on a different country he had visited. The best example of Hope’s 1798 acquisitions from Storr was a set of four gilt dessert baskets with arms matching these plates (see Thomas Hope: Regency Designer, Bard Graduate Center, 2008, no. 101, pp. 438-39). That form was significant enough for Hope to include it twice in his Household Furniture and Interior Decoration of 1807, suggesting that Storr was making the items to Hope›s design.

Hope in oriental dress; colour print after the portrait of 1798 by William Beechey

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PAUL STORR The Bank of The United States Soup Tureen London, 1799 Retailed by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell Length of stand: 20.5in (52.1cm) Weight: 225oz (6,998g)

The tureen and stand are both engraved with the seal of the Bank of the United States and the arms of Thomas Willing. The inscription reads: “At a Meeting of the STOCKHOLDERS of the BANK of the UNITED STATES, January the 8th: 1799. ON MOTION RESOLVED UNANIMOUSLY, That the Sum of FIVE HUNDRED DOLLARS be appropriated to be laid out subject to the Order of the DIRECTORS, for the Purchase of a Piece of Plate, to be presented to, THOS. Willing ESQR.: PRESIDENT of the BANK of the UNITED STATES, on Behalf of the STOCKHOLDERS, as a Testimony of their high Sense of his Services and Exertions for the Benefit of the Institution, during the Prevalence of the late EPEDEMIC in the CITY of PHILADELPHIA. H.G. Otis, Secretary. Jacob Read, Chairman.” This magnificent silver tureen was presented to Thomas Willing, President of the Bank of the United States, by the stockholders on 8thJanuary, 1799. As detailed by the engraving,

Willing’s service is recognised during the recurring yellow fever epidemics that plagued Philadelphia throughout the last decade of the 18thcentury. Thomas Willing (1731-1821) was born into the Philadelphia aristocracy, the eldest son of Charles Willing (1710-1754) and Anne Shippen. At age nine, Willing was sent to England for his formal education, returning home to Philadelphia only in 1749. Willing, in partnership with Robert Morris, founded the firm of Willing, Morris, and Company in 1754, the most powerful commercial credit, trade and transport enterprise of the American colonies. After serving the City in a variety of offices throughout the 1750s,Willing was elected mayor of Philadelphia in 1763 and in 1767 was appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania by Governor Thomas Penn. Like his father, Thomas also served as a trustee of the University of Pennsylvania, from 1760 until 1791.

Thomas Willing by John Wollaston (1706-1805)

Willing was chosen to act as a representative from Philadelphia at the Second Continental Congress in 1776. Though he was present when the vote of independence was passed, he voted against its resolution due to his reluctance to break irrevocably with Great Britain. On the basis of his esteem as a merchant and businessman, Willing was selected as the first president of the Bank of North America when it was charted in 1781. He worked alongside Alexander Hamilton to reduce national debt through the creation of a central bank, and was appointed President of the first Bank of the United States in 1791. Willing died in Philadelphia in 1821. Upon his death in 1821, Thomas Willing bequeathed to his son this silver tureen. Emphasizing the property’s personal significance, the tureen is the first item that Willing addresses in his will, directly following his decision of estates and land. Willing wrote: “I give to my son Thomas my silver Tureene with all its appurtenances made in London and given to me by the stockholders in the United States Bank as a testimony of their approbation of my conduct as President of that institution.” Willing had strong personal connections with the yellow fever epidemic, as it caused his father’s death in 1754. During Charles Willing’s second term as mayor, the yellow fever broke out in Philadelphia: “And Charles Willing, his strength undermined by his exertions in his official capacity to combat that dreaded disease, fell one of its victims.” The city of Philadelphia fell victim to the plague on numerous occasions

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through the late 18th century, upon its striking in 1793, 1797, 1798 and 1799. With an official death toll of 5,000, in addition to residents abandoning the city, Philadelphia’s population dwindled from 50,000 at the start of 1793 to 8,000 by the close of 1798. The role of the Philadelphia banks was crucial in combating the epidemic, as their credit support was needed to support the city’s citizens and build protective infrastructure. Commissions were formed voluntarily among individual citizens to superintend the poor, aimed at raising donations from the city’s government, banks and wealthy individuals. Commissioner records from 1797 indicate a $100 donation from Thomas M. Willing, $130 received from the Clerks of the Bank of the United States, and $300 from Willing’s son-in-law William Bingham. Furthermore, the Bank of the United States was closely affected by the crisis by August 1798, the porter had died and two clerks were missing.

PROVENANCE: Thomas Willing (1731-1821), to his son Thomas Willing (d. 1822), probably to his brother Richard Willing (d. 1858), to his son Edward Shippen Willing (d. 1906), to his daughter Susan Ridgway Willing, m. 1899 Francis C. Lawrence, Jr.,  to their daughter Frances Alice Willing Lawrence, m. 1919 Prince André Poniatowski Jr., and by descent.

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DIGBY SCOTT & BENJAMIN SMITH The Foley Wine Coolers London, 1805 The crest is that of Foley for Thomas Foley 3rd Baron Foley of Kidderminster (1780-1833). Height: 11.5in (29.2cm) Total weight: 431oz (13,404g)

This pair of wine coolers is a rare example in silver gilt of the Egyptian inspired style that was very popular in Europe at the beginning of the 19thcentury as a result of archaeological discoveries and territorial conquests in Italy and the Nile such as Napoleon’s Egyptian campaign, later popularised by publications such as Vivant Denon’s Voyages dans la Basse et la Haute Egypte of 1802 and its English translations, Travels in Egypt, 1803.

© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The design for these coolers can be attributed to French born Jean-Jacques Boileau, a mural painter, who came to England to assist the architect Henry Holland in the decoration of the Prince of Wales’s Carlton House. Boileau’s drawing for a wine cooler in the Egyptian manner, which features identical sphinx supports and similar serpent handles, now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is clearly the inspiration for this object. The design forms part of a portfolio of drawings used by Rundell Bridge & Rundell from which many of the firm’s designs were based, see T. Schroder, The Gilbert Collection of Gold and Silver, 1998, pp. 337-341, no 89-90. Thomas 3 rd Baron Foley (1780-1833), almost certainly commissioned these wine coolers as either part of John Nash’s major reconstruction of Witley Court, Worcestershire or to celebrate his marriage on 18 th August 1806, Celia Olivia (d.1863), daughter of Robert William Fitzgerald, 2nd Duke of Leinster. Then by descent to his son Thomas Henry, 4th Baron Foley, (1808-1869), who in 1837 sold Witley Court to William Ward, 11th Baron Ward and later 1st Earl of Dudley, and then by descent to their son Henry Thomas, 5th Baron Foley, (18501905) who acquired in 1872, Ruxley Lodge in Claygate, Surrey, and then by descent to his brother Fitzalan Charles John, 6th Baron Foley (1852-1918) and then by descent to Gerald Henry, 7th Baron Foley, (1898-1927)Gerald Henry, Baron Foley; Castiglione and Scott, Ruxley Lodge, Claygate Surrey 14th-20th October 1919, lots 1333-1336.

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Thomas, 3rd Baron Foley Thomas, 3rd Baron Foley, (1780-1833), was the son of Thomas 2nd Baron Foley and Henrietta Stanhope. He succeeded his father to become 3rd Baron in 1793, though he was only able to take his seat in the House of Lords on gaining his majority in 1801. He married Lady Cecelia Fitzgerald (d.1863), daughter of William Fitzgerald, 2nd Duke of Leinster in 1806. Around the same time he also served as Master of the Quorn Hunt and later, when the Whigs came to power under Lord Grey in 1830, was appointed Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms, a post he held until his death in 1833. Foley was also a member of the privy council from 1830 and Lord Lieutenant of Worcestershire between 1831 and 1833. On his death in 1833 he was succeeded by his son, Thomas Henry, who became 4th Baron Foley.

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The title of Baron Foley was first created in 1712 for Thomas Foley who represented Stafford in the House of Commons and who was the grandson of the prominent ironmaster Thomas Foley and the nephew of Paul Foley, speaker of the House of Commons. The title however was short lived in its first creation, becoming extinct on the death of Thomas’ first son in 1766. The title was created for a second time for another Thomas Foley who sat as a Member of Parliament for Droitwich and Herefordshire.

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THE EARL OF TALBOT & HIS SILVER Charles Chetwynd, 2nd Earl Talbot (1777-1814) by Thomas Thompson Charles, 2nd Earl Talbot of Hensol (1777-1849) was born and baptised in the parish of St. George’s in Hanover Square on 25th April 1777. He became Viscount Ingestre in 1784; he took the title of Count on the death of his father in May 1793 before entering Christ Church College Oxford the following year. In order to prevent a possible Napoleonic invasion, Talbot was involved in raising an army of volunteers in Staffordshire. Appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1817 until 1821 he was also Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire from 1812, and throughout his life was a huge supporter of agriculture. On 10th January 1849, he died at the age of 72 at Ingestre Hall where he is buried. Ingestre Hall was formally the official home of the Earls of Shrewsbury and Talbot and was built in 1613 for Sir Walter Chetwynd on the foundations of an ancient manor house. Located near Stafford in Staffordshire, its brick facade incorporates several Renaissance influences, including Jacobean. When the grandson of Walter, the first Viscount Chetwynd, inherited the estate towards the end of the 17th century, he made​​ some changes. It was not until the 19th century however that more work was undertaken by the architect John Nash at the request of the 2nd Earl of Talbot. Desiring more sumptuous interiors, the count employed the architect to the King and also his cabinetmaker and his goldsmiths, Paul Storr & Benjamin Smith.

DIGBY SCOTT & BENJAMIN SMITH The Talbot Tray London, 1805 Retailed by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell Length: 23.25in (59cm) Weight: 202oz (6,269 g)

Charles Chetwynd, 2nd Earl Talbot (1777-1814) by Thomas Thompson

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This is one of the finest examples of an English silver-gilt tray made in the early 19th century. It has four bacchanalian mask and goats-hoof feet. The magnificent border has been cast and applied with openwork grapevine border, ribbon and berried laurel leaf rim. The centre of the tray is engraved with a coat-of-arms below an earl’s coronet. The arms are those of Talbot quartering Chetwynd impaling Lambart for Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2 nd Earl Talbot of Hensol (1777-1849) and his wife Frances Thomasine, eldest daughter of Charles Lambert of Beau Parc in co. Meath. whom he married in 1800. Literature J.B. Hawkins, The Al Tajir Collection of Silver and Gold, London, 1983, p. 92. The Glory of the Goldsmith, Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection, London, 1989, p. 164.

Exhibited London, Christie’s, The Glory of the Goldsmith, Magnificent Gold and Silver from the Al-Tajir Collection, 1989, no. 126

PROVENANCE: Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot of Hensol (1777-1849). Henry Spencer and Sons, Retford, 1966 (one of a pair). Mrs. B.E. Llewelyn, Christie’s, London, 31st March 1971, lot 118. Anonymous sale; Christie’s, London, 28th November 1979, lot 29 E & CT Koopman& Sons LTD. H E Mahdi Al Tajir

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PAUL STORR The Talbot Suite London, 1817 Retailed by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell Height: The pair - 20.8in (53cm); The single - 31.4in (80cm) Weight: 376oz 8dwt (42,811g)

Bearing the coat-of-arms of Talbot for Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot of Hensol This is an important table garniture comprising three large centrepieces retailed by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell and made by Paul Storr. All with cast and applied coats-of-arms for Talbot. Each piece formed as a candelabra centrepiece, resting on scrolled shell feet supporting the base with applied and cast coat-of-arms for Talbot with Talbot dogs as supporters above the family motto ‘ Humani Nihil’. The branches issuing from scrolling acanthus flower’s. The main bowls decorated with garlands of ivy.

PROVENANCE: Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 2nd Earl Talbot of Hensol, KG, FRS, FSA (1777 to 1849) as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland in 1817 and then by descent to his second son, Admiral Henry Chetwynd-Talbot, 3rd Earl Talbot and 18th Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford CB, PC (1803-1869) and then by descent to his eldest son, Charles Chetwynd-Talbot, 4th Earl Talbot and 19th Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford PC (1830-1872) and by descent to his grandson, John Chetwynd-Talbot, 6th Earl Talbot and 21th Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford (1914-1980) Sale of the Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford, Sotheby’s London, 13th October 1960, lot 129 (1,650 pounds awarded to T. Lumley) Thomas Lumley Ltd  Literature: A. Andrews, A Short History in Ingestre, Stafford, 2015, p. 29. The Times, ‘The saleroom’, 14th October 1960, p. 7. Art in Industry: The Silver of Paul Storr, Cambridge, 2015, p.112

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PAUL STORR A Magnificent Pair of George III Four-Light Candelabra London, 1811 Height: 27.5in (69.8cm) Weight: 369oz 2dwt (11,480g)

These superb candelabra represent one of Paul Storr’s most successful and popular models. The earliest surviving pair of Storr candelabra with bases of this design was made for the 9th Duke of Bedford in 1807, the year that Storr became the director of the workshops of Rundell, Bridge & Rundell (illustrated in N.M. Penzer, Paul Storr, 1954, p. 126, and sold Christie’s, London, 14th June 1950, lot 117). Similar examples, both dating to 1808, are illustrated, respectively, in The Lillian and Morrie Moss Collection of Paul Storr Silver, 1972, p. 97; Sotheby’s, London, 11thFebruary 1971, lot 243; Koopman Rare Art, Silver from a Gilded Age, 2005, p. 35.

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THE WARWICK VASE The facts relating to the discovery, in 1771, of the fragments of the Warwick Vase by the Scottish artist Gavin Hamilton, at the ruins of Hadrian’s Villa near Tivoli, its restoration by order of Sir William Hamilton and its passing into the collection of his nephew, George Greville 2nd Earl of Warwick, are wellknown. Viewed as a survival from the classical world, the vase had a great influence on the evolution of English taste. Copies after it and derivations from it appeared throughout the nineteenth century in a variety of materials of which the finest are those in silver by Paul Storr. Two original size bronzes were also cast and may be seen at Cambridge and Windsor. If all of this is familiar, then what is less so maybe the manner in which the vase was displayed at Warwick Castle, its home for almost two centuries. In the years following his succession to the title in 1773, the 2nd Earl of Warwick began acquiring works of art for his family seat. Whether or not he received the vase as a gift from his uncle, or bought it from him, is uncertain. During the summer of 1776 Hamilton made desperate efforts to persuade the British Museum to purchase it but to no avail and, as he spent a fortnight at Warwick that September, his nephew may have agreed to buy it then. What is certain is that two years later the vase was standing in the courtyard of Warwick Castle. It is clear that Lord Warwick had no real idea what to do with the work he had acquired and therefore simply deposited it in the castle’s courtyard. The vase was to remain in this undignified position, displayed without its pedestal, for some ten years, and when necessary protected by a tent. After six years, however, the earl gave orders for the building of what he termed a ‘green house’ in which to display it. The Warwick Castle greenhouse was designed and built by a local mason, William Eboral, and by 1788 it was complete and the vase placed within. In 1858 Queen Victoria and Prince Albert made their only visit to the castle. She wrote in her journal of walking in the beautiful grounds and of having ‘looked in a sort of Green House at the celebrated Warwick Vase’. Over the next few pages we will highlight a selection of silver Warwick Vases and Warwick Vase inspired pieces.

PAUL STORR The Cowper Warwick Vase London, 1812 Height: 16.75in (42.5cm) Weight: 247oz 10dwt (7,694g)

The inscription reads “To Captain Wm. Cowper of the Engineers FROM MESSRS. FORBES & Co., BRUCE FAWCETT & Co., SHOTTON CALDER & Co., BRISCOE &BEAUFORT, JOHN LECKIE & DE SOUZA & Co. MERCHANTS AT BOMBAY In grateful Remembrance of the eminent & lasting Services rendered to that Port by the persevering Exception of his distinguished Talents in the Construction of TWO NEW DOCKS in that part of the British Empire / Thereby enabling THE PORT OF BOMBAY to add to and maintain the best Bulwarks of the Mother Country BY BUILDING OR REPAIRING SHIPS OF THE LINE OF THE LARGEST CLASS and at the same time to afford ample and extensive Accommodation TO THE COMMERCIAL SHIPPING of British India. Mense Septembris MDCCCX.” 40

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Captain William Cowper (1774-1825) was a military engineer who succeeded in building two dry docks in the port of Bombay despite numerous difficulties, including a lack of skilled workmen and problems with hard rock and tides. The first was completed in 1808 and the inaugural vessel built there was named Minden. It was quickly followed by a second dock called the Duncan Docks after Jonathan Duncan, Governor of Bombay, and both docks were in use for close to fifty years.

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General Sir Edward Kerrison, 1st Baronet, GCH  KCB  (30 July 1776 – 9 March 1853) was a British Army  officer and politician. Kerrison was a Lieutenant Colonel in the 7th Light Dragoons, saw service during the Peninsular War and commanded his regiment at the Battle of Waterloo. Along with Charles Wetherell, he petitioned Parliament over electoral malpractice in the parliamentary elections for Shaftesbury, Dorset.

PAUL STORR The Kerrison Warwick Vase Wine Cooler

Kerrison was the only son of Matthias Kerrison (1742–1827), who was a prosperous merchant and property investor, and his wife, Mary née Barnes. He was born at his father’s property, Hoxne Hall, near Bungay, Suffolk, on 30th July 1776. The Battle of Orthez (27 February 1814) saw the AngloPortuguese Army under Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, Marquess of Wellington, defeat a French  army led by Marshal Nicolas Soult in southern France towards the end of the Peninsular War.

London, 1814 Height: 17.75in (45cm) Weight: 206oz (6,406.6g) excluding pedestal

The foot engraved with arms in foliate surround, the base rim with presentation inscription, all on gilt-metal pedestal engraved with matching arms and applied with ribbon-tied oak wreaths, vase marked on body, liner and collar, stamped on base rim RUNDELL, BRIDGE ET RUNDELL AURIFICES REGIS ET PRINCIPIS WALLIAE REGENTIS BRITANIAS, the pedestal stamped on base rim STORR & MORTIMER

The inscription reading ‘Presented By The Officers of the 7th Queen’s Own Hussars to Edward Kerrison Excited by His Conduct at the Battle of Orthes 27th Feb 1814 & as a Mark Of The Regard & Esteem They Feel Towards Him’.

Sir Edward Kerrison, 1st Bt, by William Salter

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JOHN BRIDGE Marked Rundell, Bridge & Rundell

The Duchess of St. Albans Wine Coolers London, 1829 Height: 10in (25.5cm) Weight: 321oz 10dwt (10,000g)

The design for this pair of wine coolers was inspired by the Warwick vase. Harriot Beauclerk, Duchess of St Albans (née Mellon; 11th November 1777 – 6th August 1837) was a British actress who eventually starred on Drury Lane. She was successively the wife of banker Thomas Coutts and William Beauclerk, 9th Duke of St Albans. The Duchess developed a great love of silver and became one of the greatest collectors of the 19th century. She commissioned the very finest silversmiths such as Paul Storr and Rundell, Bridge & Rundell to create the most magnificent pieces often rivalling the quality of those commissioned by the King. Everything that bears her initials is of extraordinary quality and spares no expense. Mellon was the daughter of strolling players (members of a travelling theatre company) and became an actress. When she was young, she appeared at the Duke Street Theatre, where she attracted the attention of an elderly wealthy banker, Thomas Coutts of Coutts & Co, the royal bank. Following his wife’s death in 1815 they married. She was widely celebrated for her beauty, and was painted by both George Romney and Sir Thomas Lawrence. In 1822, after her husband’s death, she became very wealthy, having been bequeathed his entire fortune, including his interest in the family bank. She purchased the lease on a country property four miles away at the Holly Lodge in

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Highgate, holding parties there and at her town house at 78 Piccadilly. She also spent time at her house in Brighton, St Alban’s House, 131 Kings Road, on the corner of Regency Square. In 1827 she married William Beauclerk, 9th Duke of St Albans, who was 23 years her junior. Sir Walter Scott wrote to her to congratulate her on this second marriage. Her reply to Scott is quoted in full in his journal for 30th June1827. They were “old and true friends” and she wrote to him, “What a strange eventful life has mine been, from a poor little player child, with just food and clothes to cover me, dependent on a very precarious profession, without talent or a friend in the world - first the wife of the best, the most perfect being that ever breathed ...and now the wife of a Duke! You must write my life... my true history written by the author of Waverley” On her death in 1837, her property and fortune went to her step-grand daughter, selected as heir after careful scrutiny of the possible recipients and who as a condition of the inheritance adapted her name to Angela Burdett-Coutts.

PROVENANCE: Harriet, Duchess of St Albans (1777-1837), thence by descent; The Coutts Heirlooms, Christie’s London, 17th March 1920, lot 92 Christie’s London, 23rdJune 1999, lot 106

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JOHN BRIDGE Marked Rundell, Bridge & Rundell

A George IV Ewer London, 1828 Height: 10.5in (26.8cm) Weight: 46oz (1,430.6g)

This ewer of lobed circular bellied form, has been designed with acanthus and vine leaf decoration, a twisted vine scroll handle, the front applied with two Bacchus heads, a hinged cover with a bunch of grapes finial, and it has been inscribed ‘Lieutenant Blood from the Officers of the 16th Lancers’. Lieutenant Thomas Blood was one of the bravest and most renowned soldiers to fight at the Battle of Waterloo. A plaque commemorating his life was unveiled at his former home, in Tean, in 2003. Lt. Blood served with distinction with the 16th Light Dragoons/Lancers, forerunners of the Royal Lancers. He was born in Cheadle and joined the Army in 1793, aged 18. His life ran almost parallel to the fictional Peninsular War

hero Sharpe made famous in the books of Bernard Cornwall. The Duke of Wellington wanted to promote him early in his career for his service in Spain, but he refused a commission to stay in the ranks. Blood was eventually persuaded to take a commission at a time when most officers were aristocrats or at least from very wealthy families who bought their commissions. Lieutenant Blood fought at Waterloo and was mentioned in dispatches by both the Duke of Wellington and Duke of York. He later served in India and played a vital role in capturing Bhurtpore. After being invalided out of the Army aged 58, Blood built a row of cottages in Cheadle Road, Tean, where he lived in the end house, and which today are still known as Blood’s Cottages. He died in 1840 at the age of 65.

ROBERT HENNELL A Warwick Vase Tea & Coffee Set London, 1819 Height of coffee pot on stand: 10.5in (26.7cm) Weight: 146oz (4,540.6g)

Comprising a teapot, coffee pot on stand, cream jug and sugar bowl, each modelled after the Warwick Vase.

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PAUL STORR The Ogilvy Tea & Coffee Set London, 1812 Arms of Ogilvy Height of coffee pot on stand: 12in (30cm) Weight: 129oz. 5dwt (4,021.8g)

Comprising a teapot, coffee pot on stand, with burner, sugar bowl and cream jug, the pots with ivory handles, engraved with a coat-of-arms below a Baron’s coronet for Baron Ogilvy, 9th Earl of Airlie.

PAUL STORR A George III Soup Tureen London, 1812 Length: 17.5in (44cm) Weight: 161oz (5,007.1g)

The oval tureen with half fluting together with a shell and gadrooned border. The reeded and foliate handle surmounts the cover with conforming decoration. The tureen resting on four foliate scroll feet.

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PAUL STORR Set of Twelve George III Wine Coasters London, 1812-13 Diameter: 6.6in (17cm)

This is a wonderful set of twelve wine coasters engraved differently: eight with the coronet and crest of Baron Ogilvy, Earl of Airlie, and four with a Viscount’s coronet and crest of a Wheat Sheaf inside the Order of the Bath.

PAUL STORR The Howard Tray London, 1812 Weight: 157.6oz (4,900g) Length: 28in (71cm)

Engraved with the coat-of-arms of Howard for Bernard Edward Howard, later the 12th Duke of Norfolk.

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PAUL STORR A George III Honey Pot London, 1798 Height: 4.75in (12.1cm) Weight: 15oz 6dwt (485g)

The honey pot of bound reeded skep form. The pot with a detachable cover with ribboned wreath finial, the plain stand with reed and ribbon rim

PHILIP RUNDELL Marked Rundell, Bridge & Rundell

The Clive Wine Coolers London, 1820 Height: 8 ยกin (21cm) Weight: 153 oz. 18 dwt. (4,787g)

The arms are those of Clive quartering Styche and Herbert impaling Windsor, for the Hon. Robert Henry Clive (17801854), of Oakley Park, Shropshire and his wife Lady Mary (1797-1869), daughter of Other, 5th Earl of Plymouth (17511799) and sister and co-heir of Other, 6 th Earl of Plymouth (1789-1833), whom he married in 1819. On the death of her brother, Lady Mary the barony of Windsor fell into abeyance between her and her sister. The abeyance was terminated in favour of Lady Mary in 1855 and she became Baroness Windsor, assuming the additional name of Windsor the same year. Her grandson Robert George (1857-1923), succeeded her and was created 1st Earl of Plymouth of the second creation in 1905. 52

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PROVENANCE: Hon. Robert Henry Clive (1780-1854), of Oakley Park, Shropshire bequeathed to his wife Lady Mary Clive, later Baroness Windsor (1797-1869) Then by descent to Robert Henry Clive, 1st Earl of Plymouth (1857-1923) Then by descent to his son Other Robert Ivor, 3rd Earl of Plymouth (b.1923).

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PAUL STORR The Triton Salts London, 1827 Length: 5.5in (14cm) Weight: 36oz. 4dwt (1,126.8g)

Each cast has a kneeling triton grasping and pulling a shell, on a stylised coral encrusted lobed oval base, initialled with monogram AGBC, for Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts, 1st Baroness Burdett-Coutts (1814-1906). The attribution of this design to the sculptor and painter William Theed (1764-1817) is based on its close similarity to the artist’s bronze group, ‘Thetis returning from Vulcan with the Arms of Achilles,’ which was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1812 and is now in the Royal Collection. The earliest version of these salts is a set of twenty-four sold by Rundell, Bridge & Rundell to the Prince Regent in 1811.

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PAUL STORR A Magnificent Pair of William IV Rococo Sauceboats London, 1832 Length: 8.25in (21cm) Weight: 41oz (1,275.1g)

Each partially fluted and stylized shell-form oval body with a rim of applied foliate scrolls and leaf capped scroll handle, on three scroll feet. These wonderful, elaborately chased sauceboats are in total contrast to the studied classicism of Rundell and Storr silver during the Regency period. A growing interest in the rococo and its naturalistic decoration would flourish by the 1820s.

PAUL STORR A Regency Coburg Pattern Flatware Service London, 1817-18 143 pieces in total Weight: 182oz 18dwt (5,691g)

This rare pattern was designed for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell for the royal household at the beginning of the 19th century. This pattern was originally made by Paul Storr and original complete sets by him like this are exceptionally rare.

Comprising: 12 dinner forks, 12 table forks, 12 tea spoons, 12 dessert spoons, 12 table spoons, 2 fish servers, 2 basting spoons, 1 vegetable spoon with strainer, 2 sauce ladles, 2 mustard spoons (one by Eley & Fearn, London 1823), 1 ice cream scoop (Eley & Fearn, London, 1823), a pair of sugar tongs. Including twelve of each of the following: dinner knives, dessert knives, fish knives, fish forks, butter knives, carvers and the knife sharpener by CJ Vander, 1980

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JOHN BRIDGE Marked Rundell, Bridge & Rundell

The Neeld Pilgrim Flasks London, 1828 The arms are those of Neeld for Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) of Grittleton House, Wiltshire.  Height: 17 ¬in. (45.4cm)  Weight: 246 oz. 14 dwt. (7,673g)

Each slightly compressed lobed pear-shape and on spreading stepped foot, the lower body applied with foliage on a foliage chased and matted ground, the shoulder applied with female masks supporting later chains to the detachable foliage cast cover, engraved on each side with a coat-of-arms, marked on neck, cover bezel and some links, the foot further stamped ‘Rundell Bridge et Rundell Aurifices Regis Londini’. The pear-shaped form of the pilgrim flask has its roots in the leather water flask carried by the pilgrim or traveller of the Middle Ages. Particularly grand flasks with fine cutcard work were produced in the late 17 th and early 18 th century. Contemporary prints, such as Martin Engelbrecht’s representation of the great silver buffet in the Rittersaal at the Berliner Schloss, circa 1708, indicate that they were arranged on side buffets during formal banquets. This pair of pilgrim flasks was made for Joseph Neeld, great nephew and heir to the royal goldsmith, Philip Rundell. Upon Rundell’s death in 1827, some £900,000 was left to Neeld, who in taking care of his cantankerous relation had “quitted, for his uncle’s sake, a lucrative profession, in which his realizing a fortune was certain... and devoted himself wholly and absolutely to the care of Mr. Rundell for the last thirteen years of his life” (J. Culme, “A Devoted Attention to Business: An Obituary of Philip Rundell,” Silver Society Journal, Winter 1991, pp. 91-102). Following Rundell’s death, Neeld promptly purchased and enlarged an estate at Grittleton and indulged in his passion for sculpture. He commissioned numerous pieces from Edward Hodges Baily, who had served as a silver designer for his uncle’s firm. Neeld acquired a large quantity of plate, including a pair of soup tureens; one, now gilt, is in the Campbell Museum, Camden, New Jersey.

PROVENANCE: Joseph Neeld (1789-1856), great nephew of Philip Rundell, and by descent to Lionel William NeeldEsq., of Grittleton House, Wiltshire, who succeeded to the estates of Sir Audley Dallas Neeld, 3rd and last Baronet on 2nd April 1942.  L. W. Neeld, Jr., Grittleton, Wiltshire; Sotheby’s, London, 11th February 1943, lot 49 

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JOHN BRIDGE Marked Rundell, Bridge & Rundell

A Pair of William IV ‘Swan’ Candlesticks London, 1830 Height: 6.1in (15.5cm) Weight: 60oz 8dwt (1,800g)

These candlesticks were based on a design by the Duchess of Sutherland (1765-1839), these candlesticks amateur landscape painter and engraver. Rundell produced naturalism as a form of the picturesque, demonstrated by these candlesticks formed as three swans. The candlesticks have a cast shaped triangular bases with shell corners and three applied swans, central foliage stems and capitals and detachable petal sconces. They were first produced in 1825-6 in partially gilded silver and subsequently produced by the firm in bronze and ormolu. After the closure of the Rundell’s workshop at Dean Street, William Bateman continued to make candlesticks in this form for the firm; the bronze and ormolu versions are stamped with Rundell’s Latin signature and appear to date from the 1830s. After the firm closed, versions continued to be made by others in bronze and ormolu though not to the same standard.

During the 1790s, Lady Sutherland became a leading figure of the social season in London. Her dinner parties and balls were attended by royalty, nobility and prominent politicians, both foreign and domestic, and she and her husband became close friends with George Canning. Her interests included corresponding with Sir Walter Scott and, as a gifted artist, painting in watercolour and oil.

‘Elizabeth, Duchess o f Sutherland’ by George Romney

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PAUL STORR An Important William IV Silver-Gilt Ewer London, 1831 Height: 20.5in (52cm) Weight: 267 oz. 18 dwt (8,332 g)

This ewer was one of the star lots and fully illustrated in the auction of ‘The Palace Collections of Egypt: Catalogue of the valuable and extensive collection of silver and silver-gilt from Koubbeh, Tahra and Adbin palaces’, Lot 208. The decoration on the ewer includes mermaids, tritons, dolphins and seahorses, as well as a very impressive gryphon spout. It is a highly important example of the talent and ability of all who worked for the firm of Storr & Mortimer.

PROVENANCE: King Farouk I of Egypt and Sudan, The Tahra Palace, until 1952.

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AUGUSTINE COURTAULD The Dysart Beer Jugs THE EARL’S OF DYSART SILVER Over the next few pages are selection of silver from two centuries and six generations of the Earls of Dysart. The Tollemache family commissioned the finest silversmiths in both the 18th and 19th centuries to adorn Ham House in Richmond and Peckforton Castle in Cheshire.

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London, 1718 Height: 6.85in (17.5cm) Weight: 53.2oz (1,678g)

These exceptional beer jugs, each with scroll handle and unusual short spout, are engraved with a coat-of-arms within the motto of the Order of the Thistle all below an earl’s coronet. The arms are those of Tollemache impaling Carteret for Lionel, 4th Earl Dysart K.T. (1708-1770) and his wife Lady Grace Carteret (1713-1755), daughter of 1st Earl Granville, whom he married in 1729. He was made a Knight of the Thistle in 1743.

PROVENANCE: Lionel Tollemache, 4th Earl Dysart K.T. (1708-1770), then by descent to Bentley Lyonel John Tollemache, 3rd Baron Tollemache (1883-1955)  The Trustees of the Tollemache Estates; Christie’s, London, 13th May 1953, lot 78 (£920 to How). 

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PAUL STORR & JOHN SAMUEL HUNT The Dysart Centrepieces The figures by Paul Storr 1838; shells and bases by John Samuel Hunt 1849 Width: 14in (35.5cm)

Each engraved with the crest of Tollemache for John Jervis Tollemache, 1stBaron Tollemache. The shaped oval marine bases are cast and chased with shells and rockwork and each support a crested clam pulled by a conch-blowing triton.

PROVENANCE: The Tollemarch Estate, Peckforton Castle, Cheshire, Christie’s London, 13th May 1953, lot 45 Bulgari Rome Private Collection

PAUL STORR & JOHN SAMUEL HUNT A Pair of Figural Vases The figures by Paul Storr 1838, vases by John Samuel Hunt 1849 Height: 15.25in (38.8cm) Weight: 385.5oz (11,983g)

These vases do not bear any crest yet there is good evidence to suggest that they were also made for the Dysart family. As with the pair of centrepieces on the opposite page, not only are both centrepieces and vases of the same style and theme but they also both have this combination of the figures 66

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made by Paul Storr in 1838 and the rest by John Samuel Hunt in 1849. This is not a surprising combination as Hunt was Storr’s nephew and they worked together prior to Storr’s retirement in 1838 with Hunt continuing in the same premises for many years afterwards. Both pieces are a remarkable and rare combination of the skills of two of the great 19th century silversmiths.

© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

The design for this pair of vases can be attributed to Edward Hodges Bailey who was the chief designer for Hunt & Roskell. Bailey originally worked for Rundell, Bridge & Rundell under the supervision of the famous designer, John Flaxman, and took over his role after Flaxman’s death in 1826. Bailey would have also worked very closely with Paul Storr as he was in charge of manufacturing before he left Rundell, Bridge & Rundell in 1819.

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ROBERT GARRARD ‘The Queen’s Cup Ascot 1865’ London, 1864 Height of cup: 22.9in (58.4cm) Weight: 213oz 10dwt (6,640g)

This tankard is a magnificent example of a Victorian horse racing trophy. It is engraved “The Gift of Her Majesty The Queen, Ascot 1865”, and the finely detailed cast finial is formed as St Thomas of Aquitaine with his page attendants either side and his gauntlet thrown down. The tankard rests on an octagonal plinth applied with two openwork Royal ciphers, and two cartouches engraved “The Queen’s vase 1865”; and “Won by Eltham”, An illustration for this prize cup appears in the “The Illustrated London News” from June 1865, Vol XLVI. There were four runners, with Mr Robinson’s Eltham, the favourite, ridden by S.Adams. The Times reported on the race as follows, “Breeze, owned by Baron Rothschild, was first out: Eltham rushed past him and carried on running round the top turn, when Adams indulged him with a pull, and Breeze was, in consequence, left in the lead, which carried on into the Swinley Mile Bottom. On reaching the mile post, the pair closed and raced together to the road, where the Baron’s filly drew slightly away, and came into the straight half a length in advance of the favourite, the pair having the race to themselves at the distance... within a stride or two of the chair (Eltham) came with a rush, and finished a splendid race with a dead heat”.

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VICTORIAN NOVELTY SILVER The Victorians were fascinated by novelty wares, in keeping with the English love of whimsy. Silversmiths were hugely protective of their designs and the Patent Office Design Registry was set up in 1842. The law required that all articles should be marked with the letters Rd together with code letters and numerals corresponding with the date of registration. Manufacturers were divided into thirteen classes, with silver falling into class ‘O’. We have been fortunate to find a few choice examples from this period.

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ROBERT HENNELL A Novelty Pair of Victorian Harlequin Peppers London, 1869 Height: 5.3in (13.5cm) Weight: 9oz 18dwt (310g)

Robert Hennell was an interesting and entertaining man who laughed at the fashions of the trade through the pages of his diary. He travelled extensively in Europe, illustrating his journals with fine pen and ink drawings. He and his brother James Barclay Hennell produced some of the most delightful and gently humorous of all Victorian silver, much based on realistically modelled cast and chased animals, birds and flowers. These Harlequin or Jester pepperettes exemplify this.

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EDWARD & JOHN BARNARD A Set of Four Victorian Figural Salt Cellars London, 1866 Height: 7.5in (19cm) Weight: 64oz (1,990.4g)

Each engraved with a coat-of-arms to the base. One pair depicted in peasant dress, the other as 18th century gentlefolk. These salt cellars were first inspired by 18th century Meissen porcelain figures. The set of four shown here are each engraved with a coat-of-arms to the base, one pair depicting a man and woman in peasant dress; and the other as 18 th century gentlefolk. 18th century examples of these figures can be seen in a centrepiece in vermeil, made for the Duke of Aveiro, but now in the Portuguese Royal collection which comprises of statuettes in picturesque fancy costumes. It was made in 1757 by Ambroise-Nicolas Cousinet and would certainly have influenced the making of the Victorian novelty salt cellars.

JEAN VALENTINE MOREL The Donkey Salt London, 1851 Height: 9.06in (23cm) Weight: 30.4oz (940g)

After studying under his father, Morel transferred to the workshop of Adrian Vachette, the famous gold box maker, before establishing his own business around 1827, primarily for the manufacture of gold snuff boxes and other gold luxury objects. In 1842 Morel went into partnership with Charles-Edmond Duponchel. The business grew quickly, however after the partnership was dissolved in 1848 a lawsuit followed resulting in Morel being barred from working in the Department of the Seine. He therefore transferred his business to London and opened at 7 New Burlington Street,

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Old Bond Street. He produced pieces of very fine quality yet his business in London lasted just over one year and closed in 1852. Consequently this piece is a very rare example made during the short time that Morel was working in London. It is beautifully cast as a girl and donkey with two side-baskets acting as salts. This is a very early example of the figural style that became extremely fashionable in England in the second half of the 19th century.

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ITALIAN EWER Messina Circa 1695 Height: 8.3in (21cm) Weight: 24.1oz (750g)

Cast with a mask, scrolls and leaves, the handle cast with a leopard’s head, the hammered body on a spreading foot.

JAMES BARCLAY HENNELL An Amusing Victorian Novelty Table Lighter London, 1885 Height: 4.7in (12cm) Weight: 6oz 18dwt (214g)

This design may be based on a story relating to Paul du Chaillu (1837-1903), an 19th century American explorer, who, in 1856 spent three and a half years exploring a large section of the Gabon coast. On his return to New York he wrote the story of his discoveries, ‘Explorations and Adventures in Equatorial Africa; with accounts of the manners and customs of the people, and of the chase of the gorilla, crocodile, leopard, elephant, hippopotamus and other animals’, published by Harper Bros in 1861. He had been the first known white man to see and hunt a gorilla. One story told was of a hunting expedition and a ‘Killer Gorilla’. Du Chaillu was out with a group of local guides when they split into different directions and after a while he heard the “tremendous roar of the

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gorilla…. instinctively we made for the spot…. the poor brave fellow who had gone off alone was lying on the ground in a pool of his own blood…beside him lay his gun, the stock broken, and the barrel bent almost double. In one place it was flattened, and it bore plainly the marks of the gorilla’s teeth.....this huge gorilla thought the gun was his enemy, so he had seized it and dashed it on the ground...not satisfied, had taken it up again and given it a tremendous bite…” This gorilla table lighter was made with “the barrel bent almost double”!

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DIGBY SCOTT & BENJAMIN SMITH Marked Rundell, Bridge & Rundell

A Set of Four George III Wine Coasters London, 1804 Diameter: 5in (12.3cm) Height: 2.75in (6.9cm)

Engraved with an unusual variant of the shield, crest and motto of Ball, of Lincoln’s Inn, London. Each finely cast sides of trailing fruiting vines and laurel above swag bands, the bases engraved with a full achievement of arms, on turned wood bases, inscribed Rundell Bridge et Rundell Aurifices Regis et Principis Walliae Londini Fecerent

GORHAM An American 19th Century Two-Handled Vase Providence, Rhode Island 1893 Height: 8.8in (22.5cm)

Gorham, along with Tiffany & Co, made the finest American silver in the second half of the 19th and early 20th century. They were a highly influential firm at the turn of the last century and designed many striking pieces. They also made many very famous trophies including one for the America’s Cup.

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Printed by CA Design Photographs by Karen Bengall A special thank you to Stephen Stodel and Kimberley Smith for their help in editing this catalogue.

JEAN E PUIFORCAT A French Art Deco Four-Piece Tea And Coffee Set with Tray Paris, circa 1937 Height of teapot: 5.5in (14cm) Length of tray: 20.5in (52cm) Weight excluding tray: 63oz 10 dwt (1,978g)

The service comprising a teapot, coffeepot, cream jug and sugar bowl along with a two-handled rosewood & silver plated tray. The set is partially gilded and the tea and coffee pot has ‘THE’ and ‘CAFE’ applied in silver gilt to the handles. Each piece marked on base and engraved “Jean E. Puiforcat / Made in Paris”; the tray stamped on handle “Puiforcat France”.

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Koopman Rare Art: Antique Silver - Modern Times  

Koopman Rare Art: Antique Silver - Modern Times