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ARTS
CALENDAR
 FALL
2011
 NOVEMBER
16–
NOVEMBER
25



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Table
of
Contents DANCE
 FILM
 LITERARY
 MUSIC
 THEATER
 VISUAL
ARTS
 INFO
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


3
 3
 8
 3
 13
 13
 17



Follow
Us
on
Twitter!
@BabsonArts
 DANCE
 BABSON
COLLEGE
 December
2nd.
7pm.
 Babson
Dance
Ensemble:
iDance.



MUSIC



BABSON
COLLEGE
 December
4.
3pm.
 Piano
Recital.
Carling­Sorenson
Theater.
RSVP.
 
 WELLESLEY
COLLEGE
 November
16th.
8pm.
 Collegium
Musicum.
Houghton
Chapel.
RSVP.


An
ensemble
of
singers
and
instrumentalists,
 Collegium
specializes
in
the
performance
of
Western
 music
from
the
Middle
Ages
to
the
early
19th
 century.
Members
of
the
Collegium
enjoy
the
use
of
 the
Music
Department’s
unusually
fine
collection
of
 historical
instruments.
Directed
by
Tom
Zajac.
 
 November
20th.
8pm.



Brandeis­Wellesley
Orchestra.
Houghton
Chapel.
 RSVP.


The
Brandeis‐Wellesley
 Orchestra
is
composed
of
 students,
faculty,
staff,
and
 associates
of
Wellesley
 College
and
Brandeis
 University.
Uniting
the
standards
of
excellence
 associated
with
Wellesley
and
Brandeis,
the
 orchestra
brings
inspiring
performances
of
the
great
 orchestral
literature—past
and
present—to
a
new
 generation
of
musicians
and
audiences.
Its
fall
 program
will
include
Elgar’s
Enigma
Variations,
The
 Roman
Carnival
Overture
by
Berlioz,
and
the
Boston
 premier
of
the
Fauré
Violin
Concerto.
Directed
by
 Neal
Hampton.
 
 November
30th.
12:30pm
 Triple
Helix
Piano
Trio:
Lecture­Recital.
Jewett
 Auditorium.
RSVP.

 In
this
informal
lecture
and
 recital,
Triple
Helix
takes
a
look
 at
the
cool
and
urbane
world
of
 jazz.
As
they
perform
the
works
 of
Ravel,
Piazzolla
and
Reid
with
 Wellesley
College
Performance
 Faculty
member
Greg
Hopkins,



they
examine
the
music's
role
in
promoting
cross‐cultural
 exchange.
 
 The
Wellesley
College
Club,
situated
on
the
shores
of
Lake
 Waban,
is
delighted
to
open
its
doors
to
the
public
for
High
 Tea,
October
12
at
2:00
pm,
following
the
concert
in
 Jewwett
Auditorium
beginning
at
12:30
pm.
Reservations
 are
required;
please
call
781.283.2700
for
reservations
and
 membership
inquiries.



 December
1st.
7pm.
 Chamber
Music
Society
Concert.

Pendleton
West
 220.
RSVP.


The
Wellesley
College
 Chamber
Music
Society
 offers
students
the
 opportunity
to
explore
and
 perform
the
classical
repertoire
for
small
 ensembles—including
strings,
winds,
guitar,
harp,
 piano,
harpsichord,
and
voice—and
to
be
coached
 weekly
by
members
of
the
Music
Department
 faculty.
Each
semester
culminates
in
a
series
of
 concerts
given
by
participants.
Directed
by
David
 Russell
and
Jenny
Tang.



ecember
4Piano
Recital.
Carling­Sorenson
Theater.



FILM



WELLESLEY
COLLEGE
 November
30th.
7pm.
 Anomaly.
Multifaith
Center.
RSVP.
 Anomaly
takes
a
thought‐ provoking
insider's
look
at
 multiracial
identity
by
combining
 personal
narratives
with
the
 larger
drama
of
mixed
race
in
 American
culture.
Featured
interviewees
use
spoken
 word
and
music
to
tell
their
stories.
Community
 leaders
and
academic
experts,
including
Jen
Chau
’99,
 provide
context
and
analysis.
As
it
unfolds,
Anomaly
 tells
a
story
that
is
deeply
personal
yet
broadly
 American.
Anomaly
won
the
Langston
Hughes
 African
American
Film
Festival’s
Local
Filmmaker
 Award
in
Seattle
in
April
2010,
and
was
featured
in
 the
Best
of
the
African
Diaspora
Film
Festival
in
 Brooklyn
in
February
2010.
Click
to
watch
the
 Anomaly
trailer.
 
 Chau
is
founder
and
executive
director
of
Swirl,
Inc.,
 a
national
community
organization
founded
in
2000
 that
serves
the
mixed‐race
community.
As
a
student
 at
Wellesley,
Chau
served
College
Government
as
the
 multicultural
affairs
coordinator.



LITERARY
 BABSON
COLLEGE
 November
30.
7pm.
 The
Empower
Series:
Emmanuel
Jal.
 Knight
Auditorium.
RSVP.
 All
events
in
our
“Empower”
 series
this
fall
are
designed
 to
bring
as
much
energy
and
 commitment
to
the
ethics
of
 difference
and
inclusion
on
 our
campus
as
is
generated
 around,
say,
social
 entrepreneurship
or
sustainability.

 Emmanuel
Jal,
former
child
soldier,
hip‐hop
artist,
 peace
activist
will
perform
and
speak
as
part
of
 this
series,
but
also
as
the
featured
speaker
for
all
 Arts
and
Humanities
Foundation
sections
this
fall.
 Most
of
those
courses
will
use
the
documentary
 WAR
CHILD,
about
his
life,
as
well.
Watch
his
TED
 talk
here:
 http://www.ted.com/talks/emmanuel_jal_the_mu sic_of_a_war_child.html
 http://www.myspace.com/emmanueljal



cosponsored
by
Arts
and
Humanities
Division
as
 AHF
performer,
required
for
all
students
 Emmanuel
Jal
was
born
in
war‐torn
Sudan,
and
 while
he
doesn’t
know
exactly
when,
he
believes
it
 was
in
the
early
1980s.
He
was
taken
from
his
 family
home
in
1987
when
he
was
six
or
seven
 years
old,
and
sent
to
fight
with
the
rebel
army
in
 Sudan’s
bloody
civil
war.
For
nearly
five
years,
he
 was
a
“child
warrior,”
put
into
battle
carrying
an
 AK‐47
that
was
taller
than
he
was.
 By
the
time
he
was
13,
he
was
a
veteran
of
two
 civil
wars
and
had
seen
hundreds
of
his
fellow
 child
soldiers
reduced
to
taking
unspeakable
 measures
as
they
struggled
to
survive
on
the
 killing
fields
of
Southern
Sudan.
After
a
series
of
 harrowing
events,
he
was
rescued
by
a
British
aid
 worker
(Emma
McCune)
who
smuggled
him
into
 Nairobi
to
raise
him
as
her
own.”

 Jal
is
also
the
subject
of
a
documentary
film
 http://www.warchildmovie.com/
and
a
memoir
 http://www.amazon.com/War‐Child‐Soldiers‐ Story/dp/0312383223/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=b ooks&qid=1306510822&sr=8‐2
 
 



WELLESLEY
COLLEGE
 November
17.
6:30pm.
 In
the
Mecca.
Collins
Cinema.
RSVP.
 A
conversation
with
Sarifa
Rhodes‐Pitts
and
Sarah
 Broom
about
Harlem
and
New
Orleans
 
 In
1968,
the
poet
Gwendolyn
Brooks
published
a
 book
length
work
called
"In
the
Mecca."
In
it,
an
 inner
city
mother
searches
for
her
child
in
an
 urban
housing
project.
In
this
program,
the
 writers
Sharifa
Rhodes‐Pitts
and
Sarah
Broom
 discuss
their
interest
in
two
communities
that
are
 closely
identified
with
people
of
color:
Harlem
and
 the
city
of
New
Orleans.
As
a
New
Orleans
native,
 Broom
will
discuss
the
after
effects
of
Hurricane
 Katrina
on
the
city's
current
status
and
the
 dispossessed;
Rhodes‐Pitts,
who
currently
resides
 in
New
Orleans,
will
read
from,
and
comment
on,
 her
book,
Harlem
in
Nowhere,
a
meditative
 account
of
her
life
in
New
York's
"black
mecca."
 Their
conversation
will
be
moderated
by
Noah
 Chasin,
an
art
historian
from
Bard
College,
whose
 research
focuses
on
the
intersection
of
human
 rights
and
urban
contexts.
 



Sharifa
Rhodes‐Pitts
is
a
writer
whose
work
has
 appeared
in
Transition,
The
New
York
Times,
and
 The
Boston
Globe.
She
has
received
awards
from
 the
Rona
Jaffe
Foundation,
the
Lannan
 Foundation,
and
the
New
York
Foundation
for
the
 Arts.
Originally
from
Houston,
Texas,
she
 graduated
in
2000
from
Harvard
University
and
 was
a
Fulbright
Scholar
in
the
United
Kingdom.
 Sharifa
is
writing
a
trilogy
on
African‐Americans
 and
utopia;
her
first
book,
Harlem
is
Nowhere,
 was
published
in
2011
by
Little,
Brown
&
 Company.
 
 Sarah
M.
Broom
is
a
New
Orleans
native
whose
 essays
have
appeared
in
The
New
York
Times
 Magazine,
The
Oxford
American,
O,
The
Oprah
 Magazine
and
elsewhere.
She
has
worked
as
 Senior
Writer
for
Mayor
C.
Ray
Nagin
after
 Hurricane
Katrina
and
most
recently
served
as
 Executive
Director
of
Village
Health
Works,
a
New
 York‐based
international
non‐profit
that
provides
 health
care
to
Burundi's
poorest.
Ms.
Broom
is
 currently
at
work
on
The
Yellow
House
which
will
 be
published
by
Grove
in
2013.
Broom
lives
in
 Harlem.
 



Noah
Chasin
is
Assistant
Professor
of
Art
History
 at
Bard
College
where
he
also
teaches
in
the
 Human
Rights
and
the
Environmental
and
Urban
 Studies
Programs.
He
has
written
criticism
in
 many
venues
including
Artforum,
Art
Journal,
and
 the
Journal
of
the
Society
of
Architectural
 Historians.
His
research
focuses
on
the
 intersection
of
human
rights
and
urban
contexts,
 as
well
as
the
history
of
self‐organization
in
urban
 communities.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



THEATER
 


VISUAL
ARTS
 BABSON
COLLEGE



 Loops
and
Strips:
New
Paintings
by
 Nataliya
Bregel.

Hollister
Gallery.
RSVP.
 Opening
Reception:
Thursday
November
3,
5‐7p.m.
 Artist’s
Talk:
Wednesday
November
9,
1‐1:30
p.m.
 
 For
more
information,
contact
Danielle
Krcmar
at
 dkrcmar@babson.edu




Exhibit
Hours:
9
a.m.‐7
p.m.
Monday–Friday,
by
 appointment
 
 Babson
College
presents
“Loops
and
Strips,”
New
 Paintings
by
Nataliya
Bregel,
based
on
video
footage
 from
her
travels.
She
shoots
footage
in
both
public
 and
domestic
environments,
observing
unfolding
 interactions
between
friends
and
family
or
groups
of
 strangers.

 
 Bregel
selects
a
group
of
still
shots
from
the
video,
 which
she
then
paints
onto
thin
horizontal
panels
 and
more
recently,
the
interiors
of
hoops,
shown
 here
for
the
first
time.
The
interior
surfaces
of
the
 large
wooden
hoops
allow
the
viewer
to
become
 immersed
in
these
painting
spaces.

 
 In
their
scale,
palette,
and
touch,
these
serial
 paintings
create
an
intimate
viewing
environment
 with
interesting
parallels
and
contrasts
to
our
 increasingly
screen
derived
experiences
whether
 they
arrive
through
laptop,
tablet,
or
smart‐phone.

 
 The
paintings’
filmic
qualities
move
the
viewer
 through
their
narratives,
while
the
artist’s
painterly



strokes
move
between
deep
explorations
and
light
 drawing.
While
life
at
the
screen
compels
 multitasking,
these
near
miniatures
ask
the
viewer
to
 slow
down
and
contemplate
the
selected
moments
 unfolding
in
the
paintings.



 Global
Flora:
Botanical
imagery
and
 Exploration.
RSVP.
 An
exhibition
celebrating
the
 aesthetic
qualities
as
well
as
 the
scientific
importance
of
 botanical
imagery,
Global
Flora
 features
prints
and
illustrated
 books
that
have
resulted
from
 exploratory
missions
around
 the
world.
Curated
by
Elaine
 Mehalakes,
Kemper
Curator
of
 Academic
Programs.

 Pictured
above:
Robert
John
Thornton,
The
Night‐ Blowing
Cereus
from
The
Temple
of
Flora,
1807.
 Double
Solitaire:
The
Surreal
Worlds
of
Kay
Sage
 and
Yves
Tanguy.
RSVP.
 Double
Solitaire
brings
the
work
of
husband
and
wife
 painters
Yves
Tanguy
and
Kay
Sage
together
for
the
first



time.
As
the
exhibit
explores
the
Surrealist
work
of
the
 two
artists,
the
paintings
provide
a
window
into
the
 couple’s
personal
lives. Pictured above: Kay Sage, Small Portrait, 1950, oil on canvas.
 


Five
Watercolors
by
Madame
 Chiang
Kai­shek.
RSVP.
 Soong
May‐ling,
Wellesley
College
 class
of
1917,
began
to
paint
in
 her
middle
age,
and
quickly
 distinguished
herself
as
a
gifted
 pupil.
A
1952
feature
on
her
 watercolors
in
Life
magazine
 proclaimed
her
“aptitude
far
 greater
than
that
of
most
 amateurs.”
Madame
Chiang
 donated
the
paintings
to
 Wellesley
College,
allowing
 future
generations
of
students
 and
Davis
visitors
to
enjoy
and
be
 inspired
by
her
artistic
work. 
 Pictured
above:
Madame
Chiang
Kai‐shek,
Chinese
 Orchid
for
Spring



INFO



 Have
an
event
tip
or
an
open
call?
Email
 lowolabi1@babson.edu
with
details.
View
the
Arts
Calendar
online
 at
the
Sorenson
Center
on
facebook
and
forward
this
info
to
 any
interested
people.

 


the
arts
at
babson.
the
arts
at
wellesley.
the
arts
at
 olin.
 [art
clubs]


BFAA
–Babson
Fine
Arts
Association

 Contact
cbao1@babson.edu
 Pottery
Club
 Contact
molly.gutcher@students.olin.edu

 
 Studio
Art
facilities
at
Babson
 
 Babson
Ceramics
studio
–
Open
to
experienced
potters/sculptors
 $80/$200
fee
for
8
weeks
 Babson
Wet
Photography
Lab
–
Open
to
experienced
photographers
 with
a
Babson
OneCard
with
the
permission
of
the
manager.
$80/$200
 fee
for
semester.
 Drawing/Painting
Studio
–
Available
to
use
with
the
permission
of
staff.
 Contact
dakiba@babson.edu

or
dkrcamar@babson.edu

 


[music
clubs]
 Ask
Michèle
Oshima
moshima@babson.edu
how
you
can
take
 private
music
lessons
at
Wellesley.
 
 Babson
College
Radio
 Contact
epadial1@babson.edu
 Babson
Entertainment
Initiative
 Contact
epadial1@babson.edu

 Babson
Musicians
Union
 Contact
nloukellis11@babson.edu



Babson/Olin
Jazz
Ensemble
 Contact
jbroganjazz@gmail.com
 Brandeis­Wellesley
Orchestra
 Anyone
wishing
to
audition
for
the
Brandeis‐Wellesley
Orchestra
should
 contact
Neal
Hampton,
the
director,
at
hampton@brandeis.edu.
 Shared
Voices,
Multifaith
Chorus
(open
to
students,
staff,
and
 faculty)
 Contact
pshain@babson.edu

 Rocket
Pitches
 Contact
ilee3@babson.edu

 Conductorless
Orchestra
 Contact
Diana.dabby@olin.edu
 Powerchords
 Contact
Jessica.rucker@students.olin.edu

 
 Wellesley
College:

 Choir,
Chamber
Singers,
Collegium
Musicum,
Chamber
Music
 Society,
Wellesley
BlueJazz,
and
Yanvalou.
 
 Performing
Arts
Facilities
at
Babson
 
 Carling‐Sorenson
Theater
–
State
of
the
art
441
seat
proscenium
 theater.
 Park
Manor
Central
Band
Room
–
Open
to
all
musicians
with
a
OneCard
 Equipped
with
bass,
guitar
amps,
drum
set,
electric
piano,
and
 instrument
lockers.
 Sorenson
Piano
Practice
Rooms
–
Open
to
the
Babson
community
‐
first
 come
first
serve.
 Contact
Sorenson@babson.edu

 
 Roger’s
Pub
–
Available
for
student
shows
and
equipped
with
a
small
 stage,
lights,
and
sound
reinforcement.
 Contact
pbaptiste@babson.edu


[dance
clubs]
 AMAN
 Contact
tbutani@babson.edu




Babson
Dance
Ensemble
(BDE)
 Contact
ewang2@babson.edu
 BAPSA
 Contact
ilee3@babson.edu
 Butterfingers
 Contact
Zachary.brass@students.olin.edu

 Olin
Firethrowers
 Contact
Kevin.simon@students.olin.edu

 Performing
Arts
Facilities
at
Babson
 Sorenson
Dance
Studio
–
Studio
with
wood
floor,
two
mirrored
walls,
 and
dance
bar
 Contact
Sorenson@babson.edu

 


[theater
clubs]

 Babson
Players
 Contact
agreenslet1@babson.edu

 Vagina
Monologues
 Contact
agreenslet1@babson.edu

 FWOP
 Contact
harold.jaffe@students.olin.edu

 The
Empty
Space
Theater
 Contact
bwynstra@babson.edu
 


[film
clubs]
 FILM.
Tuesdays.
9pm.
Olin
Auditorium.

 contact
Eli.Sheldon@students.olin.edu
 CINE.

 Contact
irahvar1@babson.edu

 


[literary
clubs]
 Babson
Literary
Magazine
 Contact
litmag@babson.edu

 Poetry
Slam
Team
 Contact
bthrash1@babson.edu

 
 




Arts Calendar - November 16