Page 1

Arts in Health and Wellbeing An Action Plan for Wales

March 2009


Audience: NHS Trusts Local Authorities National Public Health Service Co-ordinators of Healthy School schemes Artists and Arts Organisations Community artists Arts Therapists Statutory and voluntary agencies working with community groups

Overview: This Action Plan describes collaborative action between the Welsh Assembly Government and Arts Council of Wales to benefit and enhance the health and wellbeing of the population of Wales through arts and creativity. The Plan is intended as the basis for future development of arts and health initiatives in Wales.

Enquiries: Arts Council of Wales Planning and Development Team Bute Place Cardiff CF10 5AL Tel: 029 2044 1380 Welsh Assembly Government Department of Public Health & Health Professions Health Improvement Division Young and Older People Branch Government Buildings Cathays Park, Cardiff CF10 3NQ Welsh Assembly Government Culture & Welsh Language & Sports Division Arts Policy Branch Government Buildings Cathays Park Cardiff CF10 3NQ Email Artsbranchmailbox@Wales.GSI.Gov.uk Further copies: can be downloaded from http://www.artswales.org.uk Key to organisations and abbreviations: ACC Age Concern Cymru ACW Arts Council of Wales Safle An Independent Public Arts Consultancy WACA Welsh Association of Community Artists WAG Welsh Assembly Government WCfH Wales Centre for Health WHE Welsh Health Estates

Front cover photo: Ysbyty Bronglais, Mick Dunwell (photo: Keith Morris)

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


Foreword

We are pleased to introduce this Arts in Health and Wellbeing Action Plan for Wales. It has long been recognised that there is a connection between the arts and health, and that people gain benefits from being in a conducive environment enhanced by good design and art, as well as from active engagement in creative pursuits. These benefits relate mainly to emotional health and wellbeing: for example through the power of music, literature and the visual arts to provide deep relaxation and emotional release, or the opportunities provided by the arts for self expression and enjoyable social contact. The Plan is intended to increase understanding of the role of the arts in health and wellbeing, and support the development of arts and health initiatives through information and guidance. It describes action in five main areas:

The Arts and Public Health and Wellbeing The Arts in Healthcare Settings Community Arts and Health and Wellbeing Arts Therapies Professions Art in Humanities and Healthcare These span the continuum of arts and health initiatives, from those for people who are fit and well, through those for people who are vulnerable to illness from stress, social isolation or difficult family circumstances, to those for patients in hospital and other healthcare settings.

In Wales we have many examples of successful arts and health projects. The Welsh Assembly Government is already supporting Healthy Sounds; a scheme to bring live music into hospitals and Gwanwyn; a festival to promote and celebrate creativity in older age. Our Welsh Network of Healthy School Schemes involves over fifteen hundred schools in Wales, and many local schemes have used the arts to promote health. In Swansea, the University School of Health Science offers a course on medical sciences and humanities, which was the first of its kind in the UK. Many hospitals have engaged artists to improve the healthcare environment, and several NHS Trusts have established arts and health strategies. Wales is fortunate to have a thriving community of visual artists and arts therapists, musicians, dancers, film makers, writers, poets and dramatists. Their willingness to use their creative vision and skills for the benefit of others is the foundation for arts and health work and we are grateful to them. We hope that the examples included in this plan will serve to inspire others to explore the opportunities to promote and protect health and wellbeing through the arts.

Edwina Hart AM

Alun Ffred Jones AM

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


Contents

Background

5

Evidence for the impact of the arts on health and wellbeing

6

What does the Plan aim to do?

9

The Arts and Public Health and Wellbeing

10

Arts in Healthcare Settings

14

Community Arts and Health and Wellbeing.

18

Arts Therapies Professions

20

Art in Humanities and Healthcare

22

Arts Council of Wales is committed to making information available in large print, Braille and on audiotape. We will endeavour to provide information in languages other than Welsh or English on request. Arts Council of Wales operates an equal opportunities policy.

photo: Royal Glamorgan Hospital - ‘Wish you were here’, painting session with Heather Parnell and Nigel Talbot

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


4

Remains To Be Seen - Gwanwyn Choreography by Caroline Lamb (photo: Anne Keeling)

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


Background

The Arts have a vibrant and valuable role to play in health and wellbeing at all levels, and we are fortunate in Wales to have a rich resource of creativity, experience and commitment in this field. Wales has a wealth of organisations and agencies which are delivering excellent work in a variety of health settings across the country. The Arts Council of Wales ‘Review of Arts and Health Activities in Wales’1 highlights some of the many successful projects and programmes that have been delivered. In December 2006 Arts Council of Wales held a ground breaking conference which focused on arts and health in a Wales wide context. The conference, supported by the then Welsh Assembly Government Ministers for Health and Social Services, and Culture, the Welsh Language and Sport, was the first major step towards partnership working between the Welsh Assembly Government, the Arts Council of Wales and other key strategic bodies on this issue.

5

Following on from the conference, Arts Council of Wales established a formal Arts and Health Steering Group to oversee the development of a strategy for arts in health and wellbeing in Wales. The Steering Group produced a draft strategic framework which was the subject of a public consultation exercise in autumn 2007, the outcome of which was presented to the Arts Strategy Board in early 2008. The draft framework has been used by the Arts Strategy Board and the Welsh Assembly Government Department of Public Health and Health Professions to inform the development of this shared action plan. This involved engagement with arts therapists from across Wales. The plan, which is jointly owned by Arts Council of Wales and Departments of Heritage, and Public Health and Health Professions, is intended as the basis for the future development of arts and health in Wales.

1 Tillcock A. (2005) Review of Arts and Health Activities in Wales. Arts Council of Wales

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


6

Evidence for the impact of the arts on health and wellbeing There is an increasing amount of evidence both from the UK and internationally that demonstrates the beneficial impact of the arts and creativity on health and wellbeing. Although the evidence varies in strength, there is a considerable evidence base, with hundreds of research studies and evaluated projects that clearly show the benefits of using the arts to promote health. For example: Dr Rosalia Staricoff’s review of the medical literature in 2004 cites nearly 400 papers showing the beneficial impact of the arts on a wide range of health outcomes.2 A study by Professors Ulrich and Craig Zimring3 found some 700 peer-reviewed robust research studies demonstrating the beneficial impact of the built environment on health outcomes. Many have also demonstrated economic savings as well as higher patient and service user satisfaction levels. Some arts and health initiatives derive their benefits partly from increased physical activity, for example in dance or choral singing. However, the main benefits in all arts and health initiatives are to emotional health and wellbeing, relating to the development of self expression and self-esteem, reduction of symptoms of anxiety and depression, and provision of opportunities for supportive social contact. These benefits can be

described as the therapeutic effects of engagement with the arts, but it is important to be clear that they are not art therapy, which is a specialist skill where art is intentionally used as therapy/treatment for people with various problems. The therapeutic effects of the arts are applicable to all groups of the population, from active involvement in the arts for people in their local community; to the acceleration of recovery of patients on hospital wards where the environment has been enhanced with art or music. The transformative effects of the arts are not, and should not be limited to those who are classified as ‘patients’ or ‘vulnerable groups’. For example staff in health settings or other workplaces can benefit from the relaxing and stress relieving effects of working in a conducive environment. This in turn has longer term impacts on job satisfaction, retention and recruitment. In relation to health behaviour, evaluation of the ‘Invest to Save’ programme suggests that benefits may lie in the fact that engagement with arts activity enhances the individual, building their capacity for change by stimulating personal growth, self-determination, and contributing towards self- awareness and transformation of identity.4 This would in turn affect all aspects of behaviour, including lifestyle choices.

2 www.artscouncil.org.uk/documents/publications/php7FMawE.doc 3 Ulrich R. & Zimring C. (2004) The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century The Center for Health Design 4 Towards Transformation: Exploring the impact of culture, creativity and the arts on health and wellbeing Arts for Health, Manchester Metropolitan University 2007

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


Canteen Gallery, Ysbyty Bronglais (photo: Keith Morris)


8

‘Shooting Star’ Women’s Cancer Unit, Maelor, Wrexham Tree of Life, Craig and Mary Matthews

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


What does the Plan aim to do?

9

A vision shared Partnerships between arts providers, the health sector, occupational and arts therapists, arts and health educators and local authorities are key to moving this agenda forward.

The Plan describes action in five main areas of: The Arts and Public Health and Wellbeing The Arts in Healthcare Settings

The aims of the Plan are to: 1. Raise the profile and increase understanding of the role of the arts in health and wellbeing. 2. Support the development and implementation of arts and health initiatives through information and guidance. 3. Encourage strategic and co-ordinated partnership approaches to engagement with the arts to enhance health and wellbeing.

Community Arts and Health and Wellbeing Arts Therapies Professions Art in Humanities and Healthcare each of which is described in more detail at the beginning of the section. However, it should be noted that in practice, many initiatives fit into several different categories.

4. Provide a foundation for future development of the arts and health in Wales.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


10

The Arts and Public Health and Wellbeing

Public health may be defined as ‘the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organised efforts and informed choices of society, organisations, public and private, communities and individuals’. Involvement with the arts has a central role to play in tackling inactivity, raising aspiration, confidence, a sense of community and cohesion, and individual and community wellbeing. With 1 in 4 of the population likely to experience mental distress at some point in their lives, the impact of the arts on mood and thoughts can be a powerful force in the development of improved emotional health and wellbeing. Moreover, the arts can be used effectively to raise debate and deliver health promotion messages on matters of major importance such as teenage pregnancy, drug and substance abuse, obesity, heart disease and cancer.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing

For example, in West Wales, Arts Care Gofal Celf offers a diverse range of arts initiatives including on-going programmes with probation services for offenders with drug misuse problems, and with social services for clients with drug and alcohol problems. In partnership with Carmarthenshire Community Safety Partnership, Arts Care has also worked with 10-16 year old children at risk from substance misuse problems in the Llanelli area.


11

Arts Care Gofal Celf

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


12

The Arts and Public Health and Wellbeing

Action

Lead

Timing

Raise awareness of the beneficial effects of arts on health and wellbeing, and advocate for arts and health schemes through:

WAG/WCfH/ACW

Point 1 by March 2009. Points 2, 3 & 4 by March 2010.

1. Arts Council of Wales membership of the All Wales Mental Health Promotion Network, run by the Wales Centre for Health. 2. Publication of relevant arts and health articles and research studies on the Mental Health Promotion Network website. 3. An arts and health seminar/conference covering all aspects of arts and health activity to be hosted by the Mental Health Promotion Network. 4. Inclusion of this Action Plan within the forthcoming ‘Our Healthy Future’ Strategy (setting the strategic direction for public health in Wales).

Publish a compendium on the arts and health. This will comprise An overview of the research evidence to support arts and health initiatives. Examples of schemes that illustrate activity in the 5 areas of the arts and public health, arts in healthcare settings; community arts and health; arts therapies professions; and the arts in humanities and healthcare.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing

ACW/WAG

Compendium to be published in 2010.


13

Action

Lead

Timing

Healthy Schools Co-ordinators and PSE Co-ordinators to encourage schools to utilise theatre including singing in education methodology, and singing, to support the Personal and Social Education curriculum.

WAG/local authorities/local Healthy School Schemes/NPHS

Ongoing

Recognise business and organisations’ investment in the arts and health as a contributing factor towards achievement of the Corporate Health Standard

WAG/NPHS

Ongoing

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


14

Arts in Healthcare Settings

Arts in health initiatives take place in all types of healthcare settings: primary, secondary and tertiary care; acute and mental health care. The arts can have an impact on anyone who enters the facility, whether patient, visitor, or staff and can be found in clinics, treatment rooms, recovery rooms, consultant offices, as well as the wards and public areas of the building. Arts interactions may be participatory, engaging actively with patients, visitors and staff. They often include but are not limited to: public performances of dance, music or drama; artists in residence working in public areas such as waiting rooms; site-specific commissioned artwork; and all artwork displayed, hung or exhibited in any public area from lobbies and foyers to restaurants and book stores.

The use of arts within healthcare settings has a beneficial role, not only for all those who have reason to visit healthcare premises but also for people working within them. Health environments that incorporate the arts are proven to have a positive influence on recovery rates for patients and to generally contribute to better sense of wellbeing. The arts are therefore an important consideration in the design of the built environment. Many hospitals and healthcare settings in Wales have employed artists in residence, and several NHS Trusts have established Arts in Health Strategies. In North West Wales the programme includes an artist in residence working with older people in a hospital setting, a music and art therapy service within the Trust’s Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Directorate, and the commissioning of 5 pieces of public art for a new Community Hospital. The North Wales NHS Trust in Conwy and Denbighshire employs two artists in residence whose role is to seek to engage patients in creative projects as part of a holistic approach to recovery and wellbeing.

“In clinical settings, encouraging patients to engage with the arts can help them to manage pain and the side effects of some treatments, to alleviate stress and anxiety and to come to terms with what can be major and distressing episodes in their lives. Incorporating the arts into the design of healthcare facilities has positive benefits for staff, patients and carers.� Dr. Rosalia Staricoff, (2004)

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


15

In Wrexham Maelor Hospital, the Cancer and Women’s Unit (the Shooting Star Unit) is enhanced by four commissioned art works: the Tree of Life Sculpture, the Ruabon Brick Wall, a feature window in the café area and three textile works based on the three phases of the Gwenfro River. The themes for these commissions were based on local interest.

The Welsh Assembly Government supports a ‘Healthy Sounds’ scheme, through which amateur music groups provide live music performances in hospitals and care settings. Relaxing music has been shown to have a beneficial effect on anxiety, heart rate, blood pressure, immune response and pain perception5 – all of which are especially relevant to patients.

‘Healthy Sounds’, Congress Youth Theatre (photo: Wayne Beecham)

“Little as we know about the way in which we are affected by form, by colour and light, we do know this; they have an actual physical effect.” Florence Nightingale (1860)

5 www.artscouncil.org.uk/documents/publications/php7FMawE.doc

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


16

Arts in Healthcare Settings

Action

Lead

Timing

Publish an ‘Art of Good Health’ handbook for NHS organisations on setting up an arts programme in a healthcare setting.

ACW/WHE/WAG

Document to be published by Arts Council of Wales by March 2009.

The principles outlined will apply equally to the visual arts and working with musicians, writers, storytellers, dancers and other art forms. The guidance document will: Demonstrate how the arts might be used to improve healthcare environments and build links with communities. Provide advice on setting up and running an ongoing arts programme in both new buildings and areas for refurbishment in existing buildings. Outline the role and responsibilities of an Arts Co-ordinator. Offer guidelines for working with artists, including appropriate induction and supervision/governance processes. Provide advice on purchasing and borrowing works of art, setting up changing exhibitions and commissioning artists. Provide guidance on assessing the impact of arts projects, from a health impact assessment before the project begins, to a final evaluation after completion.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


17

Action

Lead

Timing

Make available an electronic database of UK and International examples of promising practice in arts in healthcare settings.

ACW/WHE/Safle

An electronic database to be made available by March 2010.

Provide an electronic directory of arts co-ordinators and artists available to engage with public organizations.

ACW/Safle

An electronic database to be made available by March 2010.

Expand the role of NHS Design Champions to include art in the healthcare environment.

WHE

This will be implemented following NHS restructuring and the nomination of design champions for the 7 new healthcare organisations, provisionally in the latter half of 2009.

Further develop and deliver a Healthy Sounds scheme of live music performances in hospitals and care settings, provided by Welsh amateur music groups.

^ Cerdd/ WAG/Ty Welsh Amateur Music Federation

Maintain links with the Kings Fund ‘Enhancing the Healing Environment’ programme with a view to introducing the programme in Wales when funding permits.

WAG/WHE

Ongoing

Ongoing

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


18

Community Arts and Health and Wellbeing

Community arts and health projects seek to provide meaningful activity, influence motivation and encourage behaviour change. Local authority partnerships, the voluntary sector, neighbourhood renewal and community regeneration schemes all share agendas that involve tackling economic inactivity, encouraging citizenship and community involvement. The artist engages in a creative participatory process with community groups in order to create work that has a sense of meaning and value for those who participate. This involvement develops a sense of personal achievement and self-esteem and can generate confidence within individuals and the communities involved. Celf o Gwmpas is a community arts organisation working with people with learning disabilities in Powys. Their aims include the provision of inclusive opportunities for creative expression; to provide a showcase for artistic work; and to develop self expression and self advocacy through art. An added benefit of the programme is improved physical health for participants, as many people with learning disabilities have long periods of immobility. During workshops that required participants to walk around town, it was noticed how unused to walking any distance many people were. As a result, workshops were planned to encourage movement and mobility, and included activities such as forest craft days, photography workshops, circle dancing and drumming, all of which involve a degree of physical activity.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing

The Welsh Assembly Government works in partnership with Age Concern Cymru and Arts Council of Wales to support Gwanwyn, a national festival to celebrate creativity in older age. Gwanwyn aims to challenge negative stereotypes of ageing, and reduce social isolation for older people through enjoyable creative activity. Launched in 2007, the festival has been well received with over 6,000 older people taking part in 182 events or sessions in the 2008 festival month of May. The longer term aim of Gwanwyn is to increase opportunities for older people to be involved in creative pursuits in their local community all year round.


19

Action

Lead

Timing

Establish an electronic network for community artists who work in health. This will provide a forum for networking and facilitate the development of working partnerships.

ACW/Safle/WACA

Network to be established by the end of March 2010.

Publicise the availability of arts and health training courses for community artists.

ACW/WACA

Information on courses to be made available on the WACA website by March 2010.

Support the further development and delivery of Gwanwyn; a festival to celebrate creativity in older age.

WAG/ACW/ACC

Gwanwyn is currently funded until March 2011.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


20

Arts Therapies Professions

The Arts Therapies Professions comprise four separate professions: art therapy/ psychotherapy, dance movement therapy, drama therapy and music therapy. All are HPC (Health Professions Council) registered, except for dance which is in the process of being registered. In recognition of the powerful and profound nature of non-verbal communication, the arts therapies have established professional training and principles of practice. These ensure safe and effective methods of working in partnership with clients to creatively explore, express and challenge distress. The aim is to offer opportunities for expression, exploration and interaction that can enable positive change and greater wellbeing. Arts Therapies Professionals work with people of all ages in a variety of settings, including health and social services, education, prison services and the voluntary sector. Counselling and psychotherapy skills are a central part of training and practice.

The Ragamuffin project, based in Swansea, provides creative arts therapy for children and adults suffering from emotional distress and psychological damage. Ragamuffin works directly with such individuals and groups as well as providing training and supervision for arts therapists and staff working with vulnerable individuals damaged by abuse, family breakdown, war and trauma. Ragamuffin’s aim is to begin to undo the damage caused, to enable individuals to integrate fully into the community, and live full and productive lives. Recent work includes Incredible Journeys; weekly group and individual sessions with asylum seekers from many different ethnic backgrounds. Music, drama, movement, story telling and the visual arts are used in the project to enable expression of thoughts, feelings and events, providing a safe way to contain feelings which might otherwise be overwhelming. The creative arts are universal and translate across cultures regardless of skills or language.

Bodelwyddan Cancer Centre, Carved Wood Screen, Christine Kowal-Post

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


21

Action

Lead

Timing

Improve workforce planning for arts therapies through inclusion in the annual NHS workforce planning data collection.

WAG

From March 2009.

Explore opportunities for establishing arts therapy training in Wales.

WAG

By March 2010.

Involve arts therapists in arts and health initiatives where artists are working with patients, to:路

ACW/WHE/WAG

Guidance will be included in the Art of Good Health Handbook, to be published by March 2009.

Provide clinical awareness training Provide supervision/governance

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


22

Art in Humanities and Healthcare Humanities and Healthcare is a multidisciplinary field of study which challenges the tendency to reduce the experiences of patients and staff to what is easily measurable, by drawing on disciplines such as literature and history, philosophy and theology. For example, in nursing education, the introduction of a piece of art which had an elderly woman as its subject, resulted in an improved perception of ageing. This led to a more sensitive and humane approach to care. Similarly the study of literature in medical and nursing undergraduate courses can promote clarity of observation, expression and fluency in ordinary language – all of which are essential ingredients for developing communication skills and understanding in the doctor or nurse and patient relationship.

In Wales, the School of Health Science at Swansea University offers a degree course on medical sciences and humanities, which was the first of its kind in the UK. The course aims to develop an understanding of medicine and health care as a body of knowledge that is not limited to technical/scientific matters, but which also incorporates a wide range of social and cultural perspectives, and that recognises unique human individuals in diverse healthcare and medical contexts.

Staff Workshops, Glan Clwyd Hospital, Conwy and Denbighshire NHS Trust Artists in residence, Sian Hughes and Jenny Fell

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


24

Art in Humanities and Healthcare

Action

Lead

Timing

NHS Trusts to consider funding humanities and healthcare study days and courses from their central CPD (continuing professional development) budget allocation.

Relevant NHS Trusts/new ‘Health Communities’

From 2009/10.

Ensure that arts and health initiatives recognise and take account of the local culture, history and language of their setting.

ACW/WHE/WAG

Guidance on consultation and involvement of the local community to be included in the Art of Good Health handbook, to be published by March 2009.

Increase understanding of humanities and healthcare through publications and websites.

ACW/Safle/WCfH

By March 2010.

NHS Trusts with arts and health programmes to publicise their schemes to patients through NHS Trust information and websites.

Relevant NHS Trusts/new ‘Health Communities’

From 2009/10.

Arts in Health and Wellbeing


Arts in Health and Well-Being 2009  

An Action Plan for Wales March 2009 Key to organisations and abbreviations: ACC Age Concern Cymru ACW Arts Council of Wales Safle An Indepen...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you