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THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES

01/02 S U P P O R T I N G C R E AT I V I T Y


A L E G A C Y TO Y E A R O F T H E A R T I S T W A L E S

The Year of the Artist was a nationwide event running from June 2000 to May 2001 that aimed to “celebrate living artists and promote greater awareness of their role and status in society”. As the year drew to a close, the Arts Council of Wales took the decision to create a legacy project to mark the event. To this end Ffotogallery, the national development agency for photography in Wales, was appointed to manage and co-ordinate a touring photographic exhibition that would capture the creative energy generated by artists and arts organisations across Wales. Following an open submission process, a young Caernarfon-based artist, Bedwyr Williams was offered the commission. Williams applied himself to the task by assuming the guise of a roving private detective. In this role, he travelled the length and breadth of the country, observing, documenting and gathering evidence about some of the arts activities and individuals who benefited from ACW’s Year of the Artist Wales initiative. The resulting exhibition, Operation Ferrule, is a multi-media exhibition combining sound, video excerpts, photographs, maps and objects and text. To coincide with the exhibition,Williams has also published an artists’ bookwork which vividly recalls the detective’s experiences at each location on his journey. The photographs reproduced throughout this Annual Report are all taken from Operation Ferrule. The exhibition is to tour venues across Wales during the Autumn of 2002 and throughout 2003.

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Sybil Crouch, ACW Chairman (right) with Bedwyr Williams at the launch of Operation Ferrule at the National Eisteddfod in St David's in August 2002. Photo: Rob Stratton

“Operation Ferrule, as I later named it, was the kind of case I’d usually leave to an outa-town type artist. It had community written all over it. But I thought what the hell, there’s more to these kind of things than meets the eye. So I sent off some slides and sure enough I get summoned. I knew one thing: it wasn’t going to be no sculpture walk in the park. A few weeks later I find myself in Cardiff ’s Chapter after a long drive down from the north. It was simmering with a posse of ladies in their mid-thirties, packing babies. I withdrew into the smoky annexe and drank my coffee a bit too quick. I was in town to speak to Ffotogallery; they were the outfit in charge of the operation.That’s all I needed to know.”


CHAIRMAN’S FOREWORD

The restructure of ACW has resulted in the introduction of clearly visible new systems and staffing structures. This was not simply a case of change for change’s sake, but a process propelled forward by the National Assembly for Wales in response to the Richard Wallace report. The path has not always been smooth and as in any journey there have been stumbling blocks along the way. However the impetus has taken us firmly forward. ACW has emerged as an invigorated organisation that looks ahead with enthusiasm to working with individuals, arts organisations and the Welsh Assembly Government to deliver its newly developed Five-Year Arts Development Strategy, Supporting Creativity. In October of last year we welcomed Peter Tyndall to the post of Chief Executive. Peter’s previous post as Head of Education and Cultural Affairs at the Welsh Local Government Association meant he was no stranger to ACW and his

considerable experience in managing change has proved a valuable asset in the implementation of the new structure. The change has brought with it new faces in the course of the year. New Council members include Meg Elis, Janet Roberts and Dewi Walters, who has also taken up the appointment of Deputy Chairman. All three bring a wealth of knowledge and experience particularly in their special areas of interest literature, drama and education and access respectively. If 2001/02 was a year of change and upheaval then I look forward to 2002/03 as a time for consolidation and evaluation. There has been a major shift towards open dialogue with artists and arts organisations and I am sure that this increased emphasis on consultation will pay many dividends and provide ACW with a sure footing to take forward its vision for the future.

Sybil Crouch Chairman

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The word ‘change’ comes to mind as I look over the past year at the Arts Council of Wales – changes in structure, in Council members, in personnel and perhaps most importantly of all, in approach.


CHIEF EXECUTIVE’S REPORT

I would like at this point to pay particular tribute to Fran, both for her stalwart work in steering Council through some very difficult times, and also for her tremendous efforts in her new capacity as Deputy Chief Executive. Fran was the first appointment of Council’s new Senior Management Team, and took the lead in the extensive consultation exercise that led to the production of Council’s Five-Year Arts Development Strategy, Supporting Creativity. The consultation exercise was a very important part in rebuilding links with our partners, including individual artists and arts organisations, local authorities, other public bodies and the private sector. Ensuring that the Arts Council is a trusted and effective partner is a key part of our vision for the future. February 2002 saw the introduction of ACW’s new staffing structure, that brought about increased devolution to our local offices, a move critical to maintaining local partnerships. Preparation was well in hand for the introduction of the new streamlined grant schemes integrating lottery and grant in aid funding from the Welsh Assembly Government. Mention of the Welsh Assembly Government is of special significance. The appointment of a Minister for Culture demonstrated a renewed commitment to the arts and before the year ended, the Minister had announced a 23% increase for the Arts Council.This was a ringing endorsement for the new organisation and tangible evidence of the Assembly’s commitment to investing in the arts in Wales. The Assembly Government also worked on the production of their own Culture Strategy in the year, which ultimately led to the publication of Creative Future: Cymru Greadigol.This provides the framework for the Arts Council of Wales’ strategy and includes many challenging targets for ACW. I also want to pay particular tribute to the staff in our sponsor division at the Assembly, both for the quality of the partnership, but also for their good humour and patience.

The year ended with ACW setting out its first growth budget for many years.This enabled us to plan for a more secure future for many of our revenue clients as they are in turn, able to augment their output and lay plans for new developments. Major future projects include a national Welsh language theatre company and the first major Welsh presence at the Venice Biennale in 2003. These have been challenging and exciting times and ACW and the arts in Wales are moving confidently forward into a more secure future. In reflecting on the year, I would like to pay tribute to the staff, whose commitment never wavered throughout times of change and uncertainty.Their determination and ability ensured that the very demanding schedule for change was adhered to, and major benefits delivered. My thanks are also due to the Chairman and Council for their huge contribution and for the tremendous support given to myself and staff throughout the year. In closing, I want to emphasise ACW’s vision for the future. This vision has two key elements; a commitment to excellence in the arts, and a determination to maximise the contribution the arts make to the communities and people of Wales.

Our vision of excellence is not just centred on flagship companies such as Clwyd Theatr Cymru,Welsh National Opera, BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Diversions. It is our mission to continue to develop excellence across the arts in Wales, in community arts, in participation, in access and in diversity.We want Wales to be

recognised as a great place in which to participate or experience all art forms.

inequalities, in contributing to regeneration and creating and sustaining jobs.

I believe the arts are central to the development of a Wales for the new millennium – one that has a strong, self-confident, forward-looking national identity.They also have a role to play in helping to tackle

2001/02 was the year in which these foundations were put in place.The next year and onwards will be a time for delivery. Peter Tyndall Chief Executive

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The year 2001/02 was a momentous one for the Arts Council of Wales, which saw detailed plans being laid for the major changes which came into being from April 2002. I joined the Council in October 2001, and set about implementing the proposals for change, which had been developed by the Chair and Council, with support from consultants and from the acting Chief Executive, Frances Medley.


BUILDING THE FRAMEWORK FOR A NEW ACW

The results of the review, published as the Wallace Report, recommended that ACW should undertake a restructure that would enable it to strengthen its regional structures, improve internal and external lines of communication and develop its business function to increase the efficiency of its services. In addition, a new framework for the organisation would enable ACW to increase its planning and research capacity to ensure a clear vision of ACW’s objectives, namely to meet the needs of the arts sector and the demands of the National Assembly for Wales. Following the publication of the report, ACW commissioned two independent consultants, Professor Anthony Everitt and Anne Twine. Together they undertook an internal review of ACW’s management structure and also consulted with other relevant bodies. In February 2002 the recommendations made in their Action Plan were implemented and the new structure came into being.

Underpinning the new structure is the devolution of more decision-making powers to the regional offices so that they may prove more responsive to local priorities. A new South Wales office (initially based at the Cardiff office in Museum Place) has been created to complement the existing offices covering North Wales and Mid and West Wales. Each regional office now has responsibility not only for the local authorities within its catchment area but also the ACW revenue clients based in its geographical area. The new offices will also take responsibility for the majority of funding applications made by individuals and organisations within its region. The development of nationwide policies for each artform is to be undertaken by Senior Artform Officers working from the regional offices. The officers responsible for Dance and Music are based in the South Wales Office, the officers responsible for Visual Arts and Craft in the Mid and West Wales Office and the officer responsible for Drama is based in North Wales. A review of the provision of support to the Literature sector has been undertaken and pending its implementation the Literature team continues to be based in Cardiff. The newly formed Strategic Unit, based in Museum Place, is headed by the Deputy Chief Executive, responsible for leading on strategic planning

across ACW. The Strategic Unit incorporates the Wales Arts International Team, Capital Team (responsible for assessment and approval of large-scale capital funding applications), Film Officer, Community Touring Unit (responsible for the ‘Night Out’ scheme) and Research Team. The Unit also includes a team of four responsible for the development of national policies and initiatives in the areas of young people, education, equal opportunities, cultural diversity, training, creative industries and European policy and funding. Such a major restructuring process is unlikely to proceed without encountering a few challenges along the way. To this end, ACW will put into place an Evaluation Plan, identifying areas that need to be monitored over the first year and will consult other organisations to act as external monitors so that any necessary adjustments may be made to improve the structure and services that ACW provides.

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The year 2001/02 saw the Arts Council of Wales take a long hard view of itself, its structure and its methods of operation. This period of self-examination came about in the light of the publication of an independent management review commissioned by the National Assembly for Wales in January 2000 and undertaken by Richard Wallace.


T H E A R T S – A N I N T E G R A L PA R T O F L I F E

Jenny Randerson, Minister for Culture, Sport and the Welsh Language The philosophy that imbues all of the Arts Council of Wales’ activities is the belief that the arts can and should be for everyone, playing an integral part in our day-to-day life. To some, the arts can be a source of relaxation, to others a physical or intellectual challenge or, indeed, a mixture of the two. Irrespective of how they are approached, they should be available for everyone to enjoy, whether as a reader of a book, a member of an audience, a visitor to a gallery or as a creator, a participant, be it professional or amateur. During 2001/02,ACW made available 1,065 grants to a diverse cross section of individuals and organisations. Underpinning all these projects was a vision of quality, diversity and opportunity for artists, participants and audiences alike. The thumbnail sketches below offer a brief insight of how ACW funding has contributed to the cultural and artistic life of Wales.

LO O K I N G TO T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N

“One of the most brilliantly accomplished new operas I have heard for many a year” is how The Times’ critic hailed Lynne Plowman’s Gwyneth and the Green Knight when Music Theatre Wales premiered the work at Theatr Brycheiniog, Brecon. With the help of lottery funding, Plowman’s opera, specially written for young people, went on tour throughout Wales, delighting audiences of all ages and gaining critical plaudits along the way – “a smash hit” (The Independent), “a blueprint for accessible opera” (The Guardian). A programme of educational workshops accompanied the tour, involving over 750 pupils across Wales. Together with the production, these workshops did much to prove to those taking part that opera can be fun, stimulating and relevant in today’s society. Music Theatre Wales’ educational outreach programme is just one of many ACW projects that are designed to encourage young people to take an active part in arts activity of all kinds. In Flintshire, ACW is funding a three-year project by Flintshire Youth Theatre to provide performing arts workshops in schools and youth clubs across the county, particularly in rural areas where there was no previous provision. These and other initiatives are tangible evidence of how ACW is responding to the high priority

given to young people in the National Assembly for Wales’ Culture Strategy. SAFEGUARDING LONG E S TA B L I S H E D O R G A N I S AT I O N S

In contrast to the recently formed Flintshire Youth Theatre, the Llangollen International Eisteddfod is one of Wales’ longest established festivals. From its beginnings in 1946, it has become an impressive beacon to the world, attracting performers and visitors from across the globe. However the Eisteddfod has not been immune to 21st century market forces, and so lottery money has been made available to appoint two new full time members of staff and to develop a cohesive marketing strategy that will increase visitor levels and attract both new audiences and participants. Like Llangollen,Welsh National Opera can trace its origins to the 1940s. It too has established a worldwide reputation for excellence and plays a vital ambassadorial role for the arts in Wales. In February 2002, ACW, together with the Arts Council of England agreed a plan that will provide lottery funding over a three year period to reestablish WNO’s financial stability. ACW’s contribution of £1.7m (40% of the total) will ensure WNO’s future is more secure and will enable the company to raise its current levels of activity and so increase

box office and sponsorship income. OFFERING NEW SKILLS TO T H E U N E M P LOY E D

A short walk from WNO’s headquarters in Cardiff will take you to an unassuming factory unit in Butetown, home of an organisation offering a musical experience of a very different kind. A two-year programme run by Beats Ltd offers unemployed people access to ‘drop in’ training sessions in technology based skills such as midi techniques, multi media, DJ, radio and broadcast skills. In its first year alone, Beats ran over 1800 training sessions with about half of the participants either going on to take up employment or undertaking further training. Simultaneously, there has been a marked reduction in crime in the locality (one of the most run down areas of Cardiff) and this has, in part, been attributed to the scheme – a palpable indication of the positive social contribution the arts can make to a community. G I V I N G V O I C E TO DISABLED ARTISTS

Another role for the arts is to act as a voice for a particular sector of the population. This was the thinking behind cADWyn, a new competition set up by Arts Disability Wales (ADW) to raise awareness of disabled artists in Wales. Following the submission of

over 125 different pieces, the work of 12 visual artists and craftspeople was selected and reproduced on a series of postcards. These were distributed to the public free of charge through 100 venues across Wales. As a result of the competition, a touring exhibition is planned featuring the work of the successful artists. PROVIDING A FORUM FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

In April 2001, Creu Cymru a new national Touring Agency for Wales came into being. Beginning with 31 members (rising to 40 by the end of the year) Creu Cymru presented a total of 74 performances by a mix of 30 companies to a range of small and middle scale venues across Wales. In addition to providing a much-needed source of information regarding touring opportunities, Creu Cymru is developing a number of audience-building projects and acts as an invaluable advocate on behalf of its membership offering both venues and companies a regular chance to debate key issues. S U C C E S S AT N AT I O N A L A N D I N T E R N AT I O N A L LEVEL

Offering opportunities of a different nature is Honno, the Welsh Women’s Press. In December 2001 the Women in Publishing Society presented

Honno with the Pandora Award, describing the company as a “source of inspiration” and paying tribute to Honno’s “great success in giving an opportunity to many Welsh women writers to publish their work”. Accolades, too, have been lined up for Steve Sullivan’s short film Heap of Trouble. This distinctly quirky film, partly funded by ACW, won a string of awards at festivals across Europe over the past year. It has been screened in 26 countries worldwide, one of the most prestigious showings being at the official press launch of the Cannes Film Festival. National and international recognition of the quality of work emerging from Wales is cause for celebration. Equally important, are the many grassroots projects that make such an important contribution to the quality of life of the people of Wales. ACW welcomes the publication of the National Assembly for Wales’ Culture Strategy and the Assembly’s commitment to a future increase in funding for the arts.These resources will provide a further impetus to build on the existing arts infrastructure and continue to work towards a society where the arts are a part of everyday life.

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“Our cultural life cannot be parcelled up separately from the rest of living. Rather it infuses everything.”


C A P I TA L I N V E S T M E N T S

During 2001/02, ACW announced capital funding towards the building of two new venues in North Wales. As a result of a £3.9m lottery grant a 400-seat theatre will be built in Wrexham, one of the few Welsh towns without a performing arts facility. In Caernarfon, a grant of just over £2m will enable Cwmni Tref Caernarfon to construct a cultural centre on a waterfront site at Victoria Dock. The centre will include a performance space, rehearsal rooms, studio spaces for artists and makers, gallery, cinema facilities and bar and café. In South Wales two large-scale building projects that have received significant funding from ACW got underway. Work on a

major new arts centre in Newport began and just a few miles down the M4, the National Assembly for Wales gave the go ahead for work to begin on the Wales Millennium Centre. This project, the recipient of the largest lottery capital grant made by ACW will accommodate a number of Wales’ leading cultural organisations, Diversions Dance Company, Hijinx Theatre, Urdd Gobaith Cymru,Yr Academi Gymreig,Tyˆ Cerdd and Welsh National Opera. Only days before the construction of the Wales Millennium Centre began, Butetown Artists opened Bay Arts,Wales’ largest artists’ studio and gallery space, to the public. This project, housed in a large building overlooking Cardiff Bay, is just a stone’s throw from another ACW funded project that was nearing completion, a new gallery space for Craft in the Bay. Together these projects will provide a valuable showcase for both young and established visual artists and craftspeople working in Cardiff. In addition, venues across Wales have received ACW funding that has made possible major refurbishment work to be undertaken. Over £300,000 was awarded to Theatr Ardudwy in Harlech to install the necessary facilities to make it fully accessible to disabled people and in

Newtown, the Montgomery County Recreation Association and Oriel 31 were granted the necessary monies to refurbish the Davies Memorial Gallery. In Cardigan, work began on a major development programme that will provide an extension to Theatr Mwldan along with the conversion of outbuildings into a media centre and at Wyeside Arts Centre in Builth Wells, essential building work to improve the facilities was completed. Of equal importance to these major building projects were the grants made to many smaller organisations for the provision of up-to-date equipment. Take, for example, Cymdeithas Tyˆ Tawe in Swansea, created to promote greater awareness of the Welsh language and heritage. New video and sound facilities have made it possible for the organisation to extend its range of activities. Cymdeithas Turnwyr Gwynedd Association of Woodturners has also benefited from the purchase of video equipment so it can capture on film the age-old art of woodturning in Wales and share this expertise with a wider audience. A new PA system for Dawnswyr Penybont has enabled the Bridgend-based Welsh folk dancing group to increase greatly the number of venues at which it can perform. Cumulatively, projects such as these form an important building block in the growth of the creative industries across Wales.

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A well-equipped, accessible venue is, quite literally, one of the key foundations upon which a flourishing creative community can be built. ACW recognises the importance of investing in both the creation of new buildings and the refurbishment of existing venues. Resources such as these not only provide a catalyst for greater participation in the arts but have a significant impact on the development of the local economy. They provide employment opportunities and make an important contribution towards encouraging new businesses to set up in an area.


P R O D U C T I V E PA R T N E R S H I P S

A N E W P L AT F O R M F O R CRAFTSPEOPLE

The craft sector was one such beneficiary during 2001/02. A service agreement drawn up between ACW and the Crafts Council of England means that makers and presenters of craft in Wales are

now eligible for a far wider range of projects and sources of funding than was previously available. Both individuals and organisations stand to benefit from Crafts Council provision, which offers a significant promotional platform for craft within the UK and internationally. KEEPING THE PUBLIC INFORMED

The launch of the Joint Welsh Lottery Information Service illustrates how ACW has built upon its existing relationship with other lottery funding

bodies. ACW joined forces with the Community Fund, Heritage Lottery Fund, New Opportunities Fund and Sports Council for Wales to launch the service in July 2001. With the aid of an information pamphlet and website, the service aims to reduce the confusion as to the type of projects each organisation funds and so make it easier for people to access lottery funding to bolster participation in communitybased activity.

LITERARY C O L L A B O R AT I O N S

In the field of literature, ACW has initiated two schemes to create opportunities for readers and writers alike. A grant of £300,000 to a consortium led by the Welsh Libraries Association is funding a threeyear scheme, Branching Out, designed to promote reading across all age ranges and sectors through public libraries the length and breadth of the country - particularly in areas of deprivation. For writers in Wales, ACW’s already well-established set of bursary schemes was expanded to include two 12-month bursaries based at institutes of Higher Education to support creative writing projects which have a significant research component.This was made possible through partnerships formed with the Arts & Humanities Research Board which provided the extra funding necessary and the University of Wales College Newport and University College Cardiff, the two institutes that offered to host the successful recipients of the award, Lloyd Robson and Owen Martell. L AY I N G N E W F O U N D AT I O N S F O R MUSICIANS

Yet another collaboration to take place was that between ACW and the Performing Rights Society Foundation which led

to the announcement of New Music Works, a jointly funded scheme that promises to provide fresh opportunities for musicians in Wales. The scheme aims to increase the number of commissions from Welsh composers and the number of performances of Welsh new music. Available from April 2002, the scheme will also provide increased funds that will allow composers and music creators working in Wales to match the fees earned by their counterparts working in the rest of the UK. CONNECTING WITH YOUNG PEOPLE

Ensuring that young people are better able to access the arts is a major priority for ACW. To this end the Arts and Young People Task Force (a multi-agency partnership formed by ACW in 1999) launched in October 2001 a series of youth arts pilot projects with the aim of increasing opportunities for young people to participate in the arts. In four Local Authority areas, Gwynedd, Merthyr, Newport and Ynys Môn, local strategies to co-ordinate the delivery of youth arts activities across all artforms will be developed. It is planned that young people should be actively involved in the process as their comments, along with other information gathered, will provide a valuable source of

feedback that can then be disseminated to other Local Authorities in Wales. The success of these initiatives encourages ACW to continue to foster partnerships that can produce such tangible results. By working closely with bodies such as Local Authorities, umbrella groups, arts organisations and other funding bodies, ACW can call upon a greater pool of expertise and resources and together with the relevant organisation, collectively achieve common goals in the most efficient way possible.

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No man, or indeed organisation, is an island. ACW is all too aware of the wisdom of this dictum and to this end is continually seeking to create effective partnerships with other organisations to improve opportunities and enhance services that will benefit both arts practitioners and members of the public.


W A L E S A R T S I N T E R N AT I O N A L

Diversions will themselves travel to Japan to perform. UKWITHNY

Wales Arts International also participated in the UKwithNY festival that took place in New York from 14 – 28 October 2001. The celebration, originally planned as UKinNY was redesigned in the light of events of September 11th, with an increased emphasis on the arts component which was regarded as more relevant than ever.

J A PA N 2 0 0 1

One such initiative was Japan 2001, a UK-wide year long festival devoted to building stronger cultural and social ties with Japan and introducing Japanese culture to a wider UK audience. Wales Arts International worked in partnership with the Welsh Development Agency and with venues and promoters to coordinate a programme of around 100 events across Wales between May 2001 and March 2002. One of the hosts during the festival was Diversions Dance Company who invited choreographer Shigehiro Ide to work with the company in creating a new piece that subsequently formed part of Diversions’ main body of work. Such was the success of this visit, Ide was invited to return to Wales with his company Idevian Crew, to undertake a major tour and in November 2002,

Of the Welsh representation at the Festival,Wales Arts International funded seven projects that took part in the festival: Gerald Tyler’s theatrical presentation Bed of Roses, the Sherman Theatre Company’s production of Saturday Night Forever, Eddie Ladd and her show Scarface, an installation piece by Sean O’Reilly, Bodilicious, an exhibition of bodices by Betsan Rees, Different Lights, John Metcalf’s work featuring paintings by Brendan Burns and Poetry’s Young Lions, a group of young writers from Wales. As a result of these appearances, many valuable contacts were made. Betsan Rees was invited back to stage her exhibition at the New York Academy of Art, Lloyd Robson, one of the ‘Young Lions,’ has since returned to read more of his poetry and the hosts of the John Metcalf’s Different Lights event are planning to bring a visual art exhibition

back to Wales. The Sherman Theatre continues to maintain its links with the Tisch Theatre School where its workshop activity made such an impact on the students. Given the prevailing atmosphere in New York at the time, with fewer people venturing out, audiences were inevitably reduced. However those who did attend the events of the Festival deeply appreciated the effort the UK had made to be present so soon after the tragedy of the World Trade Centre attacks. Venue Directors, in particular, were grateful that their audiences were being given the opportunity to get back to normal. New York was in a state of shock, but the presence of Welsh artists in the city was part of a very real healing process which Wales and Welsh arts can be proud to have been involved in.

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Wales Arts International is a unique partnership between ACW and the British Council in Wales that aims to promote an understanding of modern Wales abroad through its art. Wales Arts International not only creates opportunities for Welsh artists to travel and work abroad but also offers support to initiatives such as festivals that bring international artists and organisations to Wales.


CENTRE FOR VISUAL ARTS

Following the Centre’s closure in 2000, the Auditor General, Sir John Bourne of the National Audit Office undertook an extensive investigation into ACW’s handling of the project which received three Lottery Capital grants totaling £3.2m between 1995 – 1998. This report was forwarded to the Audit Committee of the National Assembly for Wales, which subsequently prepared its own report containing a total of eleven recommendations based on the findings of the National Audit Office. A response to each of the recommendations has been submitted by ACW and these have been accepted by the Welsh Assembly Government. The Minister for Culture, Sport and the Welsh Language summarized the contents of the Audit Committee’s Report in her official response during an Assembly plenary session. In the introduction to her paper, she emphasised that ACW had already addressed many of the issues raised and revised all of its procedures relating to the assessment and monitoring of large, complex capital projects such as the CVA. “We are pleased to note that the Audit Committee acknowledged that lessons had already been learnt by

ACW and would want to add that the Council already had, before the Auditor General’s report on the CVA, put measures in place to prevent problems similar to those experienced in respect of the CVA, happening with its future lottery projects. These changes to assessment and monitoring procedures were introduced in 1999.” Following the closure of the CVA, the issue arose as to whether ACW should pursue lottery grant claw-back against the Cardiff Old Library Trust, recipient of the original funding. The three grants were awarded by ACW to: • Adapt and renovate the Old Library building • Construct and install the Fantasmic exhibition • Purchase various assets Since the closure of the CVA, the Old Library has been transferred to the City and County of Cardiff. It continues to be used for cultural purposes and is currently headquarters of Cardiff County Council’s ‘Cardiff Capital of Culture 2008’ bid. Ownership of the Fantasmic exhibition has been transferred to ACW and is available for re-use. Much time and effort has gone into finding a permanent Welsh home for the exhibition but as yet, to no avail. Efforts will continue, but in the meantime ACW has secured a long-term loan agreement with the Manchester Museum of Sciences and Industry which will house part of the exhibition.

The remaining equipment has been transferred to other arts organisations in Wales. In the light of these circumstances, ACW has taken the decision that it would not be appropriate to seek a claw-back of grant. Important lessons have been learnt from the failure of the CVA. ACW continues to rigorously implement the recommendations made by the National Audit Committee and is confident that it now has the appropriate systems in place to manage effectively the risks that are inherent to large-scale capital projects.

The Arts Council’s commitment to increasing the accessibility of the arts to as wide an audience as possible is exemplified in its ‘Night Out’ Community Touring Scheme which has been in existence since 1980. Working in partnership with Local Authorities across Wales, the scheme offers community organisations outside the mainstream arts infrastructure, the opportunity to promote professional performing arts events of their choice in local community buildings. The scheme enables local organizations to use a wide range of spaces to act as venues for events. These include village and church halls, chapels, churches, community centres, hotels and sports and youth clubs. The range of organisations involved in hosting events is vast, ranging as it does from village hall management committees to youth clubs and taking in (for example) rugby clubs, steam railway preservation societies, Merched y Wawr branches and small folk clubs on the way.

Evidence of the scheme’s popularity is to be found in the continued demand of both community organisations and performers making use of its services. During 2001/02, 165 organisations promoted 298 performances, with audiences totalling 23, 981, exceeding by 3,981 the set target. The majority of the performers and performing groups that took part were based in Wales although a quarter visited from other areas of the UK and 5% originated from overseas. These individuals and groups covered a broad spectrum of different performing artforms – drama, popular music, including folk, rock, jazz and world music, storytelling and poetry readings, classical music, puppetry and dance. A quarter of the performances were in the Welsh language, a further 16% were specially targetted at children and young people and 5% were specially devised for people with learning difficulties. Over £130,000 was paid in fees to 119 different performing ensembles of which almost half was ACW subsidy and an estimated 14% subsidy from Local Authorities.

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The final chapters concerning the Centre for Visual Arts (CVA) in Cardiff came to a close during the course of 2001/02.

O P E N I N G D O O R S TO T H E P E R F O R M I N G ARTS


MEASURING THE VALUE

A C W P E R F O R M A N C E A G A I N S T M I L E S TO N E TA R G E T S F O R 2 0 0 1 / 0 2

T H E F O L L O W I N G TA B L E D I S P L AY S R E C E N T T R E N D S A N D A C W TA R G E T S W H E N M E A S U R I N G A S P E C T S O F T H E I R I M P A C T.

Turnover of arts organisations funded with ACW revenue grants1 Arts attendances & sales at events promoted by arts organisations receiving ACW revenue grants Percentage of Wales’ population attending arts events Source:

99-2000

ACHIEVE MENT 99-2000

2001-02

ACHIEVE MENT 2001-02

FUTURE TA R G E T 2002-03

FUTURE TA R G E T 2003-04

FUTURE TA R G E T 2004-05

£45.1m

£47.5m

£47.3m

See 2 below

£48.5m

£49.5m

£50.0m

2.62m

N/A

2.69m

3.45

2.75m

2.8m

2.85

39.4%

40%

41.2%

41%

43%

42%

42%

43%

300,000

618,000

300,000

878,000

300,000

883,000

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

100,000

467,000

100,000

651,000

100,000

410,000

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

200,000

397,000

200,000

468,000

200,000

697,000

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

250,000

252,000

250,000

75,000

250,000

127,000

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

50,000

79,000

50,000

38,000

50,000

272,000

See below

See below See below

6

8

6

6

6

11

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

2000-01

ACHIEVE MENT 2000-01

£45.1m

£46.2m

3.56m

46%

2.56m

4

3

TA R G E T

TA R G E T

Beaufort Research Omnibus Survey

New attendances at ACW Lottery funded arts projects Attendances at ACW lottery funded new and refurbished venues Participation in arts events by organisations receiving ACW Lottery grants Participation in events in ACW Lottery funded new and refurbished venues Participation by young people in events funded through ACW Lottery grants Arts projects, funded by ACW lottery grants, within targeted schemes to regenerate communities in Wales Arts projects, supported by ACW’s funds from the National Assembly for Wales, within targeted schemes to regenerate communities in Wales ACW’s performance for average time taken to process Lottery applications ACW’s performance for Lottery applications left outstanding

1 2 3 4

6

5

0

5

8

5

See 5 below

5

5

See 5 below See 5 below

70 days

67days

70 days

70 days

70 days

61 Days

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

29%

22%

29%

20%

29%

10%

See 5 below

See 5 below See 5 below

All these figures include Arts for All Lottery grants and BBC National Orchestra of Wales broadcast income At the time of going to print, these figures had not been finalised. They will be presented in the 2002/03 Annual Report This figure was based on estimates made on returns received by December 2000 The 1999/00 target relates to the 1998/99 achievement of 45.3%. This appears to be an artificial peak in the research data and future targets are based on the long-term trend in increase in attendances 5 ACW is currently setting new targets for 2002/03 and ahead that take into account the introduction of the new grant schemes in April 2002, integrating grant in aid and lottery funding 6 The implementation of this three-year Target Community Development scheme was rolled forward to 2001/02

TO L A U N C H A C W ’ S C U LT U R A L D I V E R S I T Y S T R AT E G Y

ACW launched the first part of its Cultural Diversity Strategy in May 2001. The Strategy recognises ACW’s responsibility to support a range of arts activities that reflect all the black and ethnic minority communities. Following the launch, a series of public seminars was organised across Wales to further develop the strategy and a programme of race equality and cultural diversity training for artists and arts organisations was put in place. TO IMPLEMENT THE ACTION PLAN FOR RESTRUCTURING, PREPARED BY INDEPENDENT CONSULTANT, PROFESSOR ANTHONY EVERITT

In March 2001, Anthony Everitt’s plan was accepted by Council. Following a robust round of planning, in February 2002, the recommendations made in Professor Everitt’s Action Plan were implemented and ACW’s new structure came into being. Further details on the restructure can be found on page 7. TO DEVELOP A FIVE YEAR ARTS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

In the autumn of 2001, ACW held twenty consultation meetings across Wales between November and January. The consultation meetings discussed proposed developments in individual areas of the arts and feedback was used to draft a

Five Year Arts Development Strategy and Action Plans. Feedback from these meetings was incorporated into a draft Strategy that was again discussed at a series of consultation meetings during March and April 2002. The final strategy was published in September 2002. TO I N T E G R AT E T H E E X I S T I N G LOT T E RY A N D GRANT IN AID FUNDING P R OV I S I O N A N D E S TA B L I S H A N E W S E T O F SCHEMES

Following consultation with the sector, a new set of schemes integrating grant in aid and lottery funding was established ready for introduction on 1 April 2002. The new schemes replace most of the existing schemes and are designed to be more inclusive, easier to understand and easier to access. TO CONTINUE PARTNERSHIP WITH THE WELSH DEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO SET IN PLACE A CREATIVE INDUSTRIES TASKFORCE

ACW and the Welsh Development Agency joined forces to organise a day-long conference to assess the potential of setting up a Creative Industries Taskforce in September 2001. The conference examined the role the arts can play in the future economic development of Wales. TO COMPLETE AND SIGN A POLICY AGREEMENT WITH THE WELSH LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION

Preliminary discussions were held to consider ways in which the two organizations could more closely work together, including ensuring respresentatives from the Local Authorities played a key role in ACW’s new devolved structure. TO UNDERTAKE A REVIEW OF FESTIVALS, GALLERIES AND UMBRELLA BODIES

Three reviews were commissioned: festivals – undertaken by Terry Stephens; galleries – undertaken by David Pratley Associates; strategic and umbrella bodies – undertaken by Lynne Williams and Judith Ackrill. The recommendations will be developed into Action Plans to be taken forward in 2002/03. TO COME TO AN AGREEMENT ON THE WAY FORWARD FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A WELSH LANGUAGE THEATRE COMPANY

ACW has established a steering committee charged with formulating the vision statement of the new company, registering the new company and recruiting the Chair and Board. The vision statement has been agreed and the draft memorandum and articles drawn up for the new company. The recruitment of Chair and Board will proceed during Autumn 2002 with the aim to establish the new company,Theatr Genedlaethol Cymru, at the beginning of the 2002/03 financial year.

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 21

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 20

TA R G E T


K E Y TA R G E T S F O R 2 0 0 2 / 0 3

• Work with Sgrîn Cymru Wales on the delegation of the Lottery Film Fund with the aim of putting in place a fully delegated arrangement in 2003/04. • Transfer responsibilities for film to Sgrîn Cymru Wales. • Evaluate the new structure of ACW, including the efficacy of the new funding schemes introduced by ACW. • Develop and implement the Action Plans for festivals, galleries and strategic/umbrella bodies. • Implement the outcome of the Literature Review to transfer activity to the Welsh Book Council and Yr Academi Gymreig. • Ensure a strong Welsh presence at the 2003 Venice Biennale. • Re-launch ACW’s website, incorporating an online database of Welsh artists and arts organisations. • Strengthen the work of Wales Arts International through the joint establishment with the British Council Wales of a newly created director post.

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 23

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 22

• Finalise the way forward for Theatre for Young People with the Theatre for Young People Working Group.


SENIOR MANAGEMENT

Peter Tyndall Chief Executive (from Oct 2001) Frances Medley Acting Chief Executive (to Oct 2001) Deputy Chief Executive (from Oct 2001) Michael Baker (to Dec 2001) Director of Artform Development Kath Davies Joint Lottery Director Rhys Parry Director of Finance and Resources Richard Turner Joint Lottery Director Sandra Wynne Director of Access Development In February 2002, ACW’s new management structure came into being. The newly formed Senior Management Team consists of the following: Peter Tyndall Chief Executive Originally from Dublin, Peter Tyndall has been living in Wales for over 20 years. He came to ACW from the Welsh Local Government Association, where he was Head of Education

and Cultural Affairs. Prior to that he worked at Cardiff County Council. He is committed to opening and increasing access to the arts in Wales. Frances Medley Deputy Chief Executive Frances Medley joined ACW from the National Assembly for Wales as Director of Planning in 1999. Since her appointment, she has led on the strategic, operational and corporate planning for ACW. David Newland Director of SouthWales David Newland began working in the arts in Wales when he was appointed Director of Valleys Arts Marketing in 1996. He has many years of experience working in arts marketing and has served on the Theatrical Management Association’s Marketing Committee and the Arts Marketing Association’s board. David took up his post in March 2002. Clare Thomas Director of Mid andWestWales A native of Aberaeron, Clare Thomas spent over 20 years working in the field of dance before taking up the post of Assistant Director at the Open University in Cardiff. From there she joined ACW, no stranger to the organisation as she had chaired both the Dance

and Artform Development Committees and acted as a member of Council. She took up her post in April 2002. Siân Tomos Director of NorthWales Siân has been with ACW since 1996 in a variety of posts, all based in North Wales. A graduate of Coventry School of Art and Design, she pursued a career in advertising and journalism before returning to Wales. Prior to joining ACW, she worked for the National Trust and National Museum and Galleries of Wales. Hywel Tudor Director of Finance & Central Services Hywel Tudor joined ACW in January 2002. A Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Management Accountants, he has held a number of financial and management positions in manufacturing and television. He joined ACW from the Environment Agency.

The register of Members of the Council and of its Committees and Advisory Panels and the register of interests of Council employees are available for public inspection, by appointment, at each of the Council’s offices during normal working hours.

COUNCIL

Sybil Crouch Chairman Dewi Walters Vice-chairman Dai Davies Roger Davies Meg Elis Edmond Fivet Steve Garrett Ellen ap Gwynn Harry James Daniel Jones Geraint Lewis Alan Lloyd Janet Roberts Penny Ryan OBE Clare Thomas (to Feb 2002) Hazel Walford Davies COMMITTEES A N D PA N E L S

ACW’s Council is advised by over 150 volunteers, who, along with ACW staff, make up the membership of various committees and panels. The voluntary members are arts practitioners, specialists and members of local authorities. Ellen ap Gwynn Pwyll ap Sion Nick Banwell Lydia Bassett Beverley Bell-Hughes Elinor Bennett John Bevan Simon Blackburn Alun Bond Sarah Bower Steve Brake Robert Brierley

Edmund Burke James Campbell Caroline Clark Rahel Clark Sara Clutton Ann Cluysenaar Derek Cobley Pauline Crossley Sybil Crouch David Crystal Cherry Davidson Ann Davies Carolyn Davies Dai Davies Huw Davies Julian Davies Roger Davies Sara Davis Meg Elis Peter Ellis Marilyn Enfield Anthony Ernest Simon Evans Susan Meryl Evans Janet Fieldsend Edmond Fivet Alan Fox Robert Francis-Davies Lesley Gannon Steve Garrett Peter Gibson David Gillam Marie Gillespie Peter Gomer Ann Gosse Richard Gough John Greatrex Gillian Green Jill Greenhalgh Gareth Griffith Margaret Griffiths Siân Griffiths Alan Hewson Alison Hindell Brian Hubble M B Hughes Rhiannon Hughes

Siân Eirian Hughes Jonathan Huish Marilyn Hunt Geraldine Hurl Harry James Siân James Glyn Jarvis J Geraint Jenkins Margaret Jervis David Johnson Sue Johnson Bernard Jones Christine Jones Daniel Jones Elen Jones Larraine Jones Lewis Jones Lyn Jones Alan Kilday Dipak Kundu David Lermon Geraint Lewis Alan Lloyd Wynne Lloyd Siôn Llwyd Hughes Vicky Macdonald Phillip Mackenzie David Matthews Clifford Meredith Christopher Michaelides Richard Morgan Richard Huw Morgan Robin Morrison Clive Myer John Neilson David Newland Gregory Owens Jackie Palit Huw Penallt Jones Shirley Pengelly Peter Phillips David Phoenix Gwerfyl Pierce Jones David J Potter Anne Price-Owen Geoff Pritchard Pamela Rawnsley

Lawrence Rawsthorne John Rees Thomas Elsie Reynolds Manon Rhys Aled Rhys Jones Dylan Rhys Jones Judi Richards Janet Roberts Aled Roberts Eileen Roberts John Roberts Alf Ropeke Ian Rowlands John Rowlands Frank Rozelaar-Green Dwynwen RuggartLloyd Penny Ryan Cherry Short Alicia Stubbersfield Ingrid Surgenor Robert Swain Ruth Taylor Davies Reg Teale Adrian Thomas Clare Thomas Siân Thomas Jeremy Turner Julie Turner Arvind Varsani Hazel Walford Davies Audrey Walker Judith Walker Dewi Walters Alan Watkin Betty R Watkins Christine Watkins S Watkins Hamish Weir Meri Wells Steve West Brian Williams Gareth Haulfryn Williams Iwan Bryn Williams Roger Williams

ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 25

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 24

Members of the Senior Management Team between April 2001 – January 2002 were as follows:

ADVICE AND MANAGEMENT


THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES

THE ARTS COUNCIL OF WALES :: ANNUAL REPORT 01/02 :: 26

W H AT …

WHERE …

The Arts Council of Wales (ACW) was set up in 1994, by Royal Charter, to:

ACW can be contacted at:

• develop and improve the knowledge, understanding and practice of the arts • increase the accessibility of the arts to the public • advise and co-operate with other public bodies • work through the medium of Welsh and English ACW is an Assembly Sponsored Public Body (ASPB). This means that the National Assembly for Wales provides ACW with money to fund the arts in Wales. ACW is responsible to the Assembly for the way this money is spent. ACW is also the distributor of Lottery money for the arts in Wales. This money is allocated to ACW by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS), based in London.

36 Prince’s Drive, Colwyn Bay LL29 8LA (open 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday) Tel: 01492 533440 Minicom: 01492 532288 Fax: 01492 533677 6 Gardd Llydaw, Jackson’s Lane, Carmarthen SA31 1QD (open 9am to 5pm, Monday to Friday) Tel: 01267 234248 Minicom: 01267 223469 Fax: 01267 233084 9 Museum Place, Cardiff CF10 3NX (open 9am to 5.30pm, Monday to Friday) Tel: 029 2037 6500 Minicom: 029 2039 0027 Fax: 029 2022 1447

WHO …

Alternatively, you may: ACW is managed by a group of members who are collectively called ‘Council’. Council members are appointed by the Welsh Assembly Government to manage the decision-making and financial procedures undertaken by ACW. They are selected for the breadth and depth of their knowledge of the arts in Wales. Council meets at least six times a year at various arts venues in Wales and these meetings are open to members of the public. ACW’s Council and staff are advised by a wide range of arts practitioners, specialists and members of local authorities who offer their services in a voluntary capacity.

e-mail ACW: info@artswales.org.uk or e-mail a member of staff: firstname.surname@artswales.org.uk write to ACW: Communications Team, 9 Museum Place, Cardiff CF10 3NX visit ACW’s website at: www.artswales.org.uk ACW operates an equal opportunities policy. ACW is committed to making information available in large print, Braille and on audiotape and will endeavour to provide information in languages other than Welsh or English on request.

Annual Report 2001-2002  

S U P P O R T I N G C R E A T I V I T Y T H E A R T S C O U N C I L O F W A L E S

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