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artists next door 4

bluegrass 10

calendar of events 12

expanding ‘space’ in hamden 18

a free publication of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven • newhavenarts.org

November 2013


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Artists Next Door Elison Jackson is a band

staff Cynthia Clair executive director Soonil Chun director of finance Julie Trachtenberg director of development & marketing Debbie Hesse director of artistic services & programs Bobbi Griffith director of membership & advertising Stephen Grant communications manager Winter Marshall executive administrative assistant David Brensilver editor, the arts paper Russell Shaddox, Quicksilver Communication design consultant

board of directors Robert B. Dannies, Jr. president James Alexander vice president Lois DeLise second vice president Kevin Tobias treasurer Mark Potocsny secretary directors Daisy Abreu Wojtek Borowski Susan Cahan Lindy Lee Gold Mandi Jackson Charles Kingsley Kenneth Lundgren Terry Maguire Jocelyn Maminta Josh Mamis Elizabeth Meyer-Gadon Frank Mitchell Mark Myrick Vivian Nabeta Eileen O’Donnell Bill Purcell David Silverstone Dexter Singleton Ken Spitzbard Richard S. Stahl, md honorary members Frances T. “Bitsie” Clark Cheever Tyler

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‘Acting Out’ Theatre 4 presents new works at The Institute Library

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Championing Bluegrass GuitartownCT Productions celebrates milestone

The Arts Council of Greater New Haven promotes, advocates, and fosters opportunities for artists, arts organizations, and audiences. Because the arts matter. The Arts Paper is published by the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, and is available by direct mail through membership with the Arts Council. For membership information call 203.772.2788. To advertise in The Arts Paper, call Bobbi Griffith at the Arts Council. Arts Council of Greater New Haven 70 Audubon Street, 2nd Floor New Haven, CT 06510 Phone: 203.772.2788 Fax: 203.772.2262 info@newhavenarts.org www.newhavenarts.org

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Space Empire Performance venues fill a void

The Arts Council is pleased to recognize the generous contributions of our business, corporate and institutional members. executive champions The United Illuminating Company/Southern Connecticut Gas Yale University senior patrons Knights of Columbus L. Suzio York Hill Companies Odonnell Company Webster Bank corporate partners AT&T Firehouse 12 Fusco Management Company The Lighting Quotient Yale-New Haven Hospital

In an effort to reduce its carbon footprint, the Arts Council now prints The Arts Paper on more environmentally friendly paper and using soy inks. Please read and recycle.

business patrons Albertus Magnus College Jewish Foundation of Greater New Haven Lenny & Joe’s Fish Tale Newman Architects, llc Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects People’s United Bank Quinnipiac University Wiggin and Dana

business members Bar Brenner, Saltzman & Wallman, llp Cheney & Company Duble & O’Hearn, Inc. Giampietro Gallery Griswold Home Care United Aluminum Corporation foundations and government agencies The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven Connecticut Arts Endowment Fund DECD/CT Office of the Arts Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation The Ethel & Abe Lapides Foundation First Niagara Foundation The George A. and Grace L. Long Foundation The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation NewAlliance Foundation Pfizer The Wells Fargo Foundation The Werth Family Foundation

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Letter from the editor This month’s edition of The Arts Paper includes a new feature called — aptly — “The Best Book I Read This Month.” In this first installment, Elizabeth Weinberg reviews Anthony Marra’s A Constellation of Vital Phenomena (Hogarth, 2013), writing, in part: “Without a hint of didacticism or soapboxing, Marra’s novel displays the horrors and traumas of the series of wars that have wracked Chechnya over the last century, all while bringing into sharp relief the human elements of political strife.” We’re looking forward to reading more of Elizabeth’s reviews and other literary columns, and we hope you will, too. Hank Hoffman’s contributions to this edition of The Arts Paper include an Artists Next Door profile of Sam Perduta — whose band, Elison Jackson, Hank describes as having “a strong command of the dynamics that makes performances exciting, able to deftly shift a song from a whisper to a roar” – and a story about Steve Rodgers’ successful Hamden music venues: The Space, The Outer Space, and the Spaceland Ballroom. I wrote this month about Theatre 4’s most recent site-specific “Acting Out” program, which takes place at The Institute Library and features new plays by M.J. Kaufman and Doron Ben-Atar. I also conducted a Q&A-style interview with Chris Wuerth, whose Hamden-based GuitartownCT

Productions has presented 40 bluegrass concert programs since its inception in 2008. Stephen Grant, the Arts Council’s communications manager, lets readers know about the organization’s newly created hashtag, #artNHV, explaining that “if organizations, artists, and musicians in the Greater New Haven area join the conversation, we can showcase the value art has in this city and the benefits it has for our communities.” Stephen also encourages folks who might be looking for something to do on Thanksgiving eve to see, hear, and dance to Deep Banana Blackout at the band’s Nov. 27 show at Toad’s Place. In this edition of The Arts Paper, we announce the winners of our 2013 Arts Awards: William Curran (C. Newton Schenck III Award for Lifetime Achievement in and Contribution to the Arts), Elizabeth Fisher, Dwight Pedersen, Joy Wulke, Lawrence Zukof, and the staff and volunteers of the Connecticut Hospice Arts Program. You’ll learn more about and see photographs of these folks in the December edition of The Arts Paper. As we remind you to do each and every month, please remember to recycle this publication when you’re finished reading it. Until then, enjoy the articles herein. ■ Sincerely,

David Brensilver, editor The Arts Paper

Yale University Art Gallery VISIT WITH FRIENDS

In the next issue … The December edition of The Arts Paper will feature detailed information about, and photographs of, the 2013 Arts Awards winners: William Curran, Elizabeth Fisher, Dwight Pedersen, Joy Wulke, Lawrence Zukof, and the staff and volunteers of the Connecticut Hospice Arts Program. Pictured is the C. Newton Schenck III Award for Lifetime Achievement in and Contribution to the Arts, which was given last year to Carol Ross.

Arts Paper deadlines The deadline for advertisements and calendar listings for the December 2013 and January-February 2014 editions of The Arts Paper are Monday, Oct. 28, at 5 p.m., and Monday, Nov. 25, at 5 p.m., respectively. Calendar listings are for Arts Council members only and should be submitted online at newhavenarts.org. Arts Council members can request a username and password by sending an e-mail to sgrant@newhavenarts.org. The Arts Council’s online calendar includes listings for programs and events taking place within 12 months of the current date. Listings submitted by the calendar deadline are included on a monthly basis in The Arts Paper.

Sculpture by

Nicola Hicks

November 14, 2013–March 9, 2014

ya l e center for british art 1080 Chapel Street New Haven, CT 06520 Tuesday–Saturday 10–5 Sunday noon–5 877 brit art britishart.yale.edu Admission is free

Expanded museum now open Yale University Art Gallery, view of the American paintings and sculpture galleries, 2012

• november 2013

Free and open to the public artgallery.yale.edu

Nicola Hicks, Who was I Kidding, 2011, straw and plaster, © Nicola Hicks, photo courtesy Flowers Collection

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artists next door

Elison Jackson bassist Greg Perault, guitarist Mike Kusek, keyboardist Dan Hollenbeck, Sam Perduta, and drummer Kevin Marrs. Photo submitted.

Elison Jackson is a band Sam Perduta leads “garage-folk” group hank hoffman

I

nspired by listening to 1960s folk records by the likes of Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, and Dave Van Ronk, Sam Perduta took up music his sophomore year of college. “I figured that's got to be easy — I could do that,” he recalls. He got an acoustic guitar, taught himself numerous folk nuggets, and began writing his own songs, which “were probably rip-offs at that point.” Over time, though, he found his own voice as a songwriter. Perduta leads and writes the songs for local rock band Elison Jackson. Over the past two years, the group has played about five shows a month, and more when they have done mini-tours. Their EP I Do Believe She Flew Out the Drainpipe, which came out last year, received a rave review on CT.com from Chip McCabe as “hands down one of the best things you'll hear out of the CT music scene this year.” The group just released their new LP, Do Not Fear to Kill a Dead Man, on the Telegraph Recording Company label and it deserves to garner similar acclaim. Perduta began playing live solo acoustic shows in 2009. The nucleus of the band formed the following year, when he started gigging with drummer Kevin Marrs and upright bass player Greg Perault. Lead guitarist Mike Kusek and key-

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board player Dan Hollenbeck joined up within the past year, not long after the recording of the group's Drainpipe EP. And the group's name? “In a moment of poor clarity, I called it Elison Jackson because I thought that was my grandfather's name,” admits Perduta. In fact, his grandfather's name was “Elson,” not “Elison.” “It was just a typo I had to keep,” Perduta says with a shrug. The group has a strong command of the dynamics that makes performances exciting, able to deftly shift a song from a whisper to a roar. Perduta says that Elison Jackson isn't “a polished band.” That's fine with him. Among his favorite recordings are live tapes of Bob Dylan from the mid1960s. “If they were a band today they would not be considered worthy of Bonnaroo. They were just a raw band and messed up a lot,” says Perduta. “I would rather have a band making mistakes but pushing buttons than doing the same thing all the time.” Early on, Perduta wrote lyrics and then tried to craft a melody to fit. Now he sees that approach as forced. “Now I don't worry about writing songs. They just gestate throughout the day,” says Perduta.

The gestation process is Perduta's method of quality control. While he also composes on acoustic guitar, often his songs take shape just through singing. Once the vocal melody becomes lodged in his memory — “If I don't remember it, it must not have been worth it” — he then finds the right chords on the guitar and records a demo. Although Perduta's lyrical approach has been described as “storytelling” in some reviews and blog posts, that's not really accurate. His songs strike me as aural cousins to modern figurative painting, hinting at narrative. Before he dove into music, Perduta was involved in filmmaking. He sees his lyrics more as setting scenes or creating vignettes. They evoke moods or a sense of place. “A painting or a still frame of a movie can tell a story,” says Perduta. In the opening song of the new record, “Tongue on Fire,” Perduta sings: “With your crooked smile and your parted lips/And your tongue on fire and your acid trips/I have slept in gutters and coughed in the sand/I have seen your lover in the frying pan.” When Perduta begins singing, his vocal is accompanied by a ghostly whistling wind sound from a “singing saw” played by guitarist Mike Kusek. With touches like that, the past feels present in the songs of Elison Jackson. Unusual for contemporary vocalists, Perduta sings in something of a baritone croon with just a hint of a quaver. The lyrics are haunted. Acoustic and electric guitars jostle for space with the wheezing sounds of vintage organs. But this isn't a conscious choice by Perduta

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‘The music I like could have been written at any point and could work in any form.’ —Sam Perduta

the arts council sounds off on …

#ArtNHV: join the conversation, start a movement stephen grant

to evoke some mythical past. Instead, it is the natural result of Perduta's influences coloring his own choices in the recording studio. “The music I like could have been written at any point and could work in any form,” Perduta says. It's a quality he strives for in his own songs, that “they could be played acoustic and sound as powerful as played with a band. Or they could be played on a banjo or a piano.” Folk music remains a touchstone. Along with the records made by big name folk revivalists in the 1960s like Bob Dylan, Perduta is fascinated with many of the songs archived by Harry Smith for his Anthology of American Folk Music and chronicled in Greil Marcus' book The Old, Weird America. But his recent recordings — made with producers Bill Readey and Matt Thomas of Fuzzy Rainbow Productions — also reflect Perduta's affection for 1960s recordings such as Forever Changes by the Los Angeles-based group Love — a psychedelic-era masterpiece in which acoustic and electric guitars are accompanied by strings and Tijuana Brass-ish trumpet solos — and the late career records of Phil Ochs, which featured more ornate arrangements than his earlier protest broadsides. “When we put out records, I try and make it something I would enjoy,” Perduta explains. “If I don't, then I feel like it's a failure.” ■

• november 2013

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oo often I hear people complaining about New Haven’s art scene. For some locals, living close to New York City is enough. Think about it, in just under two hours you can easily get lost in the Chelsea art galleries or watch a performance at one of the many concert venues the city has to offer. However, though New York is home to an eclectic arts collection, don’t discount the Elm City just yet. There are more than 15 galleries here in New Haven and even more in the surrounding Greater New Haven area towns. If you look in the right place you will find that performances, movie screenings, comedy shows, collective art events, and exciting workshops are happening every day. Throughout my undergraduate studies I became inspired by radical arts movements like the Beat Generation and Italian Futurism. There was something special about the unity between writers, artists, and musicians that awakened the generation to new ideas and changed history forever. I always wondered how we could recreate this in a world that has become so technological. According to Mashable.com, in 2012 social media had become one of the top news resources coming in

at 1% less than print news. The hashtag (#), which can now be used on all social media sites, has helped to categorize posts making them easily searchable to others interested in that topic, thus eliminating the social media headache of “selfies,” new puppy photos, and plagiarism. In basic terms, the hashtag directs you to the information you are looking for. In 2012, Seattle became a trending topic on Twitter’s homepage thanks to help of the city’s hashtag, #artSEA. When artists and organizations began sharing their events, artwork, and ideas, it created a voice so loud that all of Twitter’s 140 million users could take notice. As a result, the Seattle art scene was enhanced and the local residents who didn’t think art was alive in their city were in for quite a surprise. We, too, can create a new artistic movement using the hashtag #ArtNHV. If organizations, artists, and musicians in the Greater New Haven area join the conversation, we can showcase the value art has in this city and the benefits it has for our communities. It is possible to create an art movement in today’s world! ■ Stephen Grant is the Arts Council’s communications manager.

‘If you look in the right place you will find that performances, movie screenings, comedy shows, collective art events, and exciting workshops are happening every day.’ —Stephen Grant

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Connecticut at Work The Arts Council is pleased to partner with our friends at the New Haven Free Public Library to participate in Connecticut at Work, a yearlong exploration of the past, present, and future of work in the lives of Connecticut’s people. Connecticut at Work is a program of Connecticut Humanities. Beginning in November 2013, Connecticut at Work is traveling across the state to seven major regions, launching right here in New

Welcome, new members The Arts Council proudly welcomes new members David Chorney, George McTyre, Elizabeth Meyer-Gadon, Mark Myrick, Tom Stio, Marla Whalen, the Connecticut Storytelling Center, and the New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema. We thank you for supporting us in our mission to promote, advocate, and foster opportunities for artists, arts organizations, and audiences. Because the arts matter.

Haven. The main feature of the initiative is a Smithsonian touring exhibit, The Way We Worked, which will be on view at the main branch of the library Dec. 7-Jan. 19, 2014. From November through early February, community organizations will offer a range of programs including related exhibits, book and film discussions, author talks, and community conversations. This month:

Beyond the New Township: Wooster Square at the New Haven Museum On view through Feb. 28. This exhibit offers an in-depth and often personal view of this New Haven neighborhood's 18th century beginnings, the evolution of industry and the arrival of immigrants, the effect of urban renewal, and the impact of historic preservation. Museum hours: Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Saturday, 12-5 p.m. Admission: $4 adults, $3 seniors, $2 students (ages 12 and older), children admitted free. Visit newhavenmuseum.org.

The Domestic Workers of New Haven: The Invisible Wheels that Empower Our Economy: A Photo Project by Mario Quiroz at the New Haven Free Public Library Gallery On view Nov. 14-Dec. 3. Reception: Thursday, Nov. 14, 5-7 p.m. Domestic workers’ rights are often ignored, and workers exploited for the lack of proper legislation. Explore the invisible faces of the people who

help New England economy move forward.

Our Community at Winchester: An Elm City Story Thursday, Nov. 14-Friday, Jan. 31, 2014, at

Gateway Community College Art Gallery. This new Greater New Haven Labor History Association exhibit tells the story of New Haven’s workers at the Olin Winchester plant in the 20th century. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. GCC Gallery, 20 Church St., New Haven. laborhistory.org. For more information about the Connecticut at Work program, visit cthumanities.org. ■

best of …

Thanksgiving Eve entertainment stephen grant There are several places to catch up with friends on the eve of Thanksgiving, but nothing prepares you for a day of eating like a night of live music and dancing. For the 11th year, Toad's Place welcomes local band Deep Banana Blackout to provide a jam-

ming preholiday escape from the kitchen. Though they are based nearby in Bridgeport, Deep Banana Blackout reserves the day before Thanksgiving to present a highenergy performance for their New Haven fans. Folks from Fairfield and New Haven counties share the same dance floor, grooving to the jazzy funk sound that features vocals by Jen Durkin. I suggest purchasing your tickets early to reserve a spot for this sold out event at New Haven's legendary concert venue. ■

Orchestra New England 40 t h s eas on

20 1 3–1 4

november 30, 8 p.m.

Colonial Concert XXXIV february 8

Appalachian Spring

Stephen Grant is the Arts Council’s communications manager.

march 8

40th Birthday Bash may 3

Silent Movies Gala 2014

for ticket prices and subscription details please call (203) 777-4690 or go to our website www.orchestranewengland.org

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Somewhat Off the Wall a festive success At the new location in the lobby of 360 State St., guests of our annual Somewhat off the Wall art fundraiser mingled with old and new friends in a lively and festive atmosphere! It was a wonderful space to gather and the artwork looked amazing. Thank you to the 50 artists who each donated three original works of art. We truly rely on them to make this such a successful event. Thank you to our sponsors, without whose generous sponsorship this event would not be possible: Suzio York Hill, 360 State Street, Martha and Terry Maguire, J. Antonelle de Marcaida, MD, The Potocsny Financial Group of Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC, and Space-Craft Manufacturing. To our local restaurants, suppliers, and services, we are very grateful for your essential community support: CafÊ Romeo, Caseus, Elm City Market, Eubank Frame, Hull’s Art Supply and Framing, Katalina’s,

2013 Arts Awards The Arts Council of Greater New Haven is pleased to announce the winners of the 2013 Arts Awards, which applaud those who work “In the Wings,� behind the scenes and beyond the reach of the spotlight:

C. Newton Schenck III Award for Lifetime Achievement in and Contribution to the Arts

Kumo Japanese Hibachi Steakhouse, Odonnell Company, P&M Orange Street Market, Sitar, Stony Creek Brewery, Town Green Special Services District, Trader Joe’s, Whalley Glass, and The Wine Thief. Lastly, thank you to Larry Landsberg, The Shoreline Chef, the Beardsley Zoo, the Connecticut Science Center, the Essex Steam Train & Riverboat, Sweet Mary’s, Goodspeed, Hartford Stage, Ivoryton Playhouse, The Kate, Long Wharf Theatre, Palace Theater, Westport Country Playhouse, and the Yale Repertory Theatre for providing fabulous door prizes. ■

With his generous support of New Haven’s cultural institutions and an earnest personal interest in the remarkable work they present, William Curran has helped the city’s most iconic arts organizations further their missions to bring compelling arts experiences to the community. Over the course of 15 years as the International Festival of Arts & Ideas’ managing director, Elizabeth Fisher has played a critical role in establishing the annual event as one of the most dynamic and important of its kind, and one that sets New Haven apart as a cultural destination. Dwight Pedersen’s keen eye and thoughtful approach to framing and installing works for exhibition has long been recognized by artists and curators alike as paramount to viewers’ experiences. Through Projects for a New Millennium

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New Haven Living â–  Sep tember 2013

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and the groundbreaking artistic and scientific collaborations the organization has fostered for 20 years, and by way of her own provocative sculpture and steadfast advocacy of public art projects, Joy Wulke’s vision has inspired us to think more broadly about the natural environment and our place therein. As the dedicated executive director of Neighborhood Music School, Lawrence Zukof has enthusiastically worked to enrich our community by expanding the scope of the organization’s programs and championing its commitment to nurturing the talents of students of all ages. In circumstances that offer more sadness than hope, the extraordinary staff and volunteers of the Connecticut Hospice Arts Program work tirelessly to help patients and their families through physically and emotionally painful times, providing means of expression that celebrate life, create new memories, and bring beauty to those at the end of their journeys. The 2013 Arts Awards luncheon is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 6, at 11:45 a.m., at the New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave., in New Haven. For more information and to purchase tickets, call the Arts Council at (203) 772-2788. ■



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Doron Ben-Atar. Photo courtesy of the artist.

M.J. Kaufman. Photo by Kate Tarker.

From left: Jane Tamarkin, Rebecka Jones, Mariah Sage. Photos courtesy of Theatre 4.

History and place as inspiration Theatre 4 stages new plays at The Institute Library david brensilver The Institute Library this month will host the premieres of two new plays, each of which was inspired by the library’s rich history and/or its place in contemporary society. The productions are being presented as part of Theatre 4’s “Acting Out” series, which for five years has been a vehicle through which the company stages new, short site-specific works by playwrights with ties to the local community. This year, Theatre 4 is presenting works by M.J. Kaufman, who graduated in May from the Yale School of Drama, and Doron Ben-Atar, a New Haven resident who teaches history at Fordham University. Each has worked previously with Theatre 4: Kaufman wrote Your Living Room is Full of Ghosts for the company’s residency at IKEA earlier this year, and Ben-Atar created The Worst Man for Theatre 4’s 2011 “Acting Out” program, which was staged at The Study at Yale. About choosing The Institute Library for its latest “Acting Out” program, Mariah Sage, one of the company’s founders, said, “We’ve always been on the hunt for new venues that would intrigue people.” The Institute Library offers no shortage of that. In September, Sage, her Theatre 4 co-founders Rebecka Jones and Jane Tamarkin, Kaufman, and David Pilot and

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Josh Matteo — two actors who’ll be performing in the plays by Kaufman and Ben-Atar — gathered at the library to learn a bit about its history from the organization’s executive director, Will Baker. Founded in 1826 as the Young Apprentices’ Literary Association — “an educational society dedicated to the ‘mutual assistance in the attainment of useful knowledge,’” as described on the library’s website – the organization hosted such influential public figures as Frederick Douglass, Charles Dickens, Anna Dickinson, Henry Ward Beecher, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, before becoming less relevant over time. Since becoming its director in 2011, Baker has sought to revitalize the organization and re-establish its role as an important cultural resource in the City of New Haven. Baker, it’s worth mentioning, is himself tied to the organization’s history. He’s distantly related to William Borden, who served as the organization’s librarian in the late 19th century and created for the organization a unique cataloging system, and to William’s more famous cousin Lizzie. While in March 2012, the library hosted performances of Beckett’s Catastrophe, which was produced by the Young Mechanics Theatre Ensemble under the direction of James Leaf, Baker was reluctant at first to host theatrical performances at the library this fall. The pitch from Theatre 4,

though, was too good to turn down. The idea of site-specific work being created for performances at The Institute Library, he said, was “very appealing.” “Any time something new happens here that really involves imagination and is of quality … it of course brings new groups to the library,” Baker said. He’s also aware that such events engage the organization’s institutional memory. Sage, who’s been a member of the library for a few years, said that Baker “couldn’t have been more gracious and enthusiastic about the project” from the time it was pitched to him. The above-mentioned gathering was Kaufman’s first visit to The Institute Library. Of particular interest to him are the “fringe” groups the library welcomed in its early history and Borden’s cataloging system. Kaufman also talked about exploring the fact that technology has so dramatically changed the role and function of libraries in contemporary society. For Theatre 4’s “Acting Out” program at The Institute Library, Kaufman was commissioned to write two 20-minute plays, each of which is staged in a different part of the library’s second-floor space. And while he declined to talk about his work while it was being created, Kaufman did say that he’d set one of the plays in a specific historical moment. As a professor of American history, Ben-Atar is very familiar with the inception of organizations like The Institute

‘We’ve always been on the hunt for new venues that would intrigue people.’ —Mariah Sage november 2013 •


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Library, and with the struggles they face to adapt in modern times. “If done right,” Ben-Atar pointed out about Theatre 4’s “Acting Out” program, “it’s supposed to give the audience a sense that what’s happening in front of them is happening in front of them in that place.” Despite his historical expertise, Ben-Atar said in September that his 10-minute play at The Institute Library would take place in the present – “at the place, at the moment, with the audience, with the characters.” The brevity of the work, he said, puts a “premium on action – dramatic action – and movement in the piece.” He described the parameters of creating work for Theatre 4’s “Acting Out” series – the site-specific location, the work’s duration, and a predetermined cast – as a godsend. Ben-Atar said one of the virtues of Theatre 4’s approach to theatrical production is that “it’s very much handson … creating a dynamic of interaction. …That’s what theater has that nothing else has.” For detailed information about Theatre 4 and its “Acting Out” series, which is scheduled to take place Nov. 6-8 at The Institute Library, visit T4CT.org. ■

the best book i read this month

A Constellation of Vital Phenomena, by Anthony Marra elizabeth weinberg I have a soft spot for deeply-researched novels about places I have never been and subjects I have had little opportunity to consider, and Anthony Marra’s impressive first novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena (recently long-listed for the National Book Award), handily fits that bill. Without a hint of didacticism or soapboxing, Marra’s novel displays the horrors and traumas of the series of wars that have wracked Chechnya over the last century, all while bringing into sharp relief the human elements of political strife: the stories of those who are left behind, those who sacrifice, those who protect — and those who betray. A Constellation of Vital Phenomena (Hogarth, 2013) begins with a disappearance. When Akhmed, the sole, poorly trained doctor in a small Chechen village, discovers that his neighbor has been taken by the Feds and his neighbor’s daughter, Havaa, has escaped, he struggles to find a way to

harold shapiro Over 30 years of Fine Professional Photography

keep her safe. The anOne room of Sonja’s swer lies with Sonja, hospital serves as a the reluctant, overmemorial of sorts, conworked head of surgery taining a mural of the in a nearby hospital. city before it was Each character Marra bombed: “linden and introduces carries the poplar trees, rusted ghost of another — for streetlamps, drooping Sonja, it is her sister, for electrical lines, shinwhom she returned to gled roofs, a skyline of Chechnya from a promtelevision antennae, ising British medical clotheslines curved by career; for Havaa, it is wet laundry, smoke ribher father, presumed bons unwinding from dead; for Akhmed, his tailpipes, the sidewalks invalid wife and old and cigarette kiosks friends turned potential and everything [the enemies — and each artist] could rememghost falls into place ber,” all gone by the Image courtesy of Random House. like a puzzle piece, time Havaa arrives at each influencing the the hospital. In these other characters in unforeseen ways. quiet brushstrokes, Marra illuminates the Marra most effectively draws these beauty of the pre-war city and the destrucconnections by revisiting stories and detion wrought by decades of conflict. tails from numerous, surprising angles. In On occasion, Marra frustratingly stops the first chapter the reader learns that the narrative’s forward momentum for a “after forty-one of the villagers had disapglimpse into a minor character’s thoughts peared in a single day, Akhmed had drawn or to spend a page in endless questions: their forty-one portraits on forty-one ply“When had you last lived a day with the wood boards, weatherproofed them, and starting bell of your alarm clock? With hung them throughout the village.” As the breakfast djepelgesh? With news from novel progresses, these events are told and Moscow and New York and Beijing beamed retold through Sonja’s eyes and those of on the back of television waves? With the Akhmed’s neighbors, and the portraits are heat of that first cigarette in your throat reexamined and their subjects recalled by and the Route 7 bus turning the corner, unHavaa and by passing refugees. failingly three minutes behind schedule, Disappearances, and the stories told to just like you?” But each of these moments fill the resultant gaps, drive this novel forcompresses a multiplicity of lifetimes and ward. When Akhmed tries to explain to experiences into a single, lyrical expression, Havaa that once the woods and fields surand what’s more, they remind the reader rounding their village were full of wildlife that here, too, despite — or perhaps beand livestock, she asks, “Where did the Feds cause of — all this adversity, it is easy to take them?” Anything gone must, logically, get lost in the details. have been spirited away by the government. Marra implants these disappearances Also recommended this month: Mouninto the very setting of the novel, as well. tains of the Moon, by I. J. Kay. ■

Retirement living for those who value the arts.

portraits annual reports commercial Guilford, Connecticut 203 988-4954 email : haroldshapirophoto@gmail.com web site : www.haroldshapirophoto.com

Belief in the value of the arts to civilization is intrinsic to nourishing a complete life. At Whitney Center, as at the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, that belief is what sustains our culture. Whitney Center residents also believe that achievement never retires. This is demonstrated through their volunteerism and continued involvement in the community. It is the value and the security of LifeCare, the hospitality and service of Whitney Center that support our residents and make this lifestyle possible.

Call us today at 203-848-2641 for a FREE Retirement Information Kit, or to learn about Whitney Center.

A Heritage of Exceptional Senior Living

200 Leeder Hill Drive | Hamden, CT 06517 | www.WhitneyCenter.com WCTAP

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Bluegrass series marks milestone Q&A with GuitartownCT Productions’ Chris Wuerth

The Tony Rice Unit (Tony Rice, guitar; Wyatt Rice, guitar; and Rob Ickes, dobro) performs at the Unitarian Society Hall in Hamden in May 2011. Photo by Phil Rosenthal. Sierra Hull performs in October 2012. Photo by Marilyn Catasus.

GuitartownCT Productions presented a “Bill Monroe 100th birthday tribute concert” in November 2011 featuring Peter Rowan (far right, with Ronnie McCoury, on the left and Alan Bartram in the middle) and The Travelin’ McCourys. Photo by Marilyn Catasus.

hank hoffman In late October, the Hamden-based GuitartownCT Productions was poised to present its 40th concert. What follows is an interview (conducted via e-mail) with the series’ founder, Chris Wuerth. Q: How did GuitartownCT Productions come to be? A: I decided in early 2008 to try and present my bluegrass hero, Tony Rice, in concert. I had seen him the year before at the Turning Point in New York, and it rekindled my passion for his music. The concert in May was a sellout at the Little Theater (Lincoln Theater) in New Haven. I decided to pursue more concerts and started GuitartownCT Productions, LLC, that summer, mostly to seem more "legitimate" in the eyes of agents. I also started our website and began online ticket-selling. Q: What have you learned since the series' inception about local audiences – in terms of supporting live music performances? A: That it's impossible to predict with any certainty how many people will come to a given show. Early on we were the only venue in Connecticut presenting the big bluegrass stars. Lately, everyone is in the game, and the audience is diluted. However, our fans are pretty loyal and we see many of the same people at our shows, which is very gratifying. Q: How do you go about programming concerts and choosing which artists to present? A: First and foremost, I choose artists that I like. The hardest

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Del McCoury with Chris Wuerth. Photo by Phil Rosenthal.

Hot Rize (Pete Wernick, banjo; Nick Forster, bass; Tim O’Brien, mandolin; and Bryan Sutton, guitar) performs at the Unitarian Society Hall in Hamden. Photo by Marilyn Catasus.

thing for me is not getting carried away and doing too many shows. All the bluegrass agents know about GuitartownCT and are trying to get their artists gigs here. It would be easy to overbook myself. I try to present … six to eight shows a year. I've consciously tried to present the biggest and best bluegrass acts in America. Some are newer performers, some are legends. I'm generally, but not always, drawn to more traditional bluegrass rather than newgrass/jam bands. In terms of getting the people out, I do extensive e-mailing to several lists which I have accumulated. I also put up around 100 posters, with some volunteer help, for each show. We have had many of our performers interviewed on various Connecticut radio stations, although two big bluegrass shows are no longer on the air: The Black Diamond Show on WNHU and The Chris Teskey Show on WPKN. We've also gotten some great press from Connecticut Magazine and the local print media, i.e. New Haven Register. We've surveyed our patrons and most of them heard about the shows through direct e-mail from us. Q: When and how did you develop an interest in bluegrass music? A: I think I always liked acoustic music, although I was primarily a Beatles fan starting at age 10. I was a living-room guitar picker and was a big fan of people like James Taylor, Crosby Stills and Nash, and Jonathan Edwards. I used to go to the fiddle contest in Craftsbury, VT, and the Pickin' Parlor and Enormous Room in New Haven. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band album Will the Circle be Unbroken was a big influence. I also had a teenage friend who was a huge Norman Blake fan, he played fiddle tunes on the guitar, and he was

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the first person I knew with a Martin guitar. My real introduction to bluegrass was through the playing and singing of Tony Rice. I only recently "discovered" Bill Monroe, Flatt & Scruggs, and the real pioneers of the music. Q: How would you describe the bluegrass scene in this region? In other words, where have bluegrass artists found audiences to perform for and where have bluegrass fans been able to see and hear their favorite artists? A: Connecticut has always had a pretty vibrant bluegrass/country music scene, dating back to the ’50s. My experience started in the ’70s with the Pickin' Parlor on State Street, New Haven, and the Enormous Room on York Street. Connecticut has also been home to two wellknown bluegrass festivals, Podunk and Strawberry Park. When I started doing shows, the only small venue that I knew of in the state was the Salem Barn series run by Kim Cyr of the Connecticut Bluegrass Music Association. These days there are more than six Connecticut venues presenting bluegrass regularly. The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, Café Nine, Ridgefield Playhouse, Infinity Hall, Bridge Street Live, and Outer Space are some of the venues now doing bluegrass. Q: To what extent do you think you've been able to introduce local fans of the music you present to artists they weren't previously familiar with? What are some of the ways you stay up on emerging artists? A: I've tried to especially bring in younger fans, by presenting up-and-coming bluegrass

‘I've consciously tried to present the biggest and best bluegrass acts in America. Some are newer performers, some are legends.’

Join the Arts Council! The Arts Council of Greater New Haven is dedicated to enhancing, developing, and promoting opportunities for artists, arts organizations, and audiences throughout the Greater New Haven area. Join us today! newhavenarts.org/membership The Arts Paper Read our feature articles and download the latest edition. theartspaper.com Arts Council on Facebook Get the inside scoop on what’s happening in the arts now! facebook.com/artscouncilofgreaternewhaven

—Chris Wuerth

Media Lounge Sample the artistic bounty our region has to offer. Check out this virtual multimedia gallery of local talent. newhavenarts.org/medialounge

artists, with some success. I usually offer discounts, or in some cases free tickets, to teenagers. I think as word of our shows has gotten around the area, many people now come out to Guitartown shows even if they don't know the artist, because they know that they'll hear something great. In terms of emerging artists, I read the trade publications, follow music closely on YouTube, and now many agents will send me CDs of younger artists for my review. Nice! However, attracting the younger crowd is a huge challenge. Learn more about GuitartownCT Productions at GuitartownCT.com.

Creative Directory Looking for something? Find local creative businesses and artists with our comprehensive arts-related directory. You should be listed here! newhavenarts.org/directory E-newsletter Your weekly source for arts happening in Greater New Haven. Sign up at: newhavenarts.org

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• november 2013

BETTER IITS, TS, S CREST CREST AUTO, AUT TO, O BETTER

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Deep Banana Blackout appears at Toad’s Place on Nov. 27. Photo courtesy of Bob Kennedy, RFK Artists and Events.

Classes & Workshops ACES Educational Center for the Arts 55 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-777-5451. aces.org/schools/eca. Modern & Ballet Dance Classes. ACES Educational Center for the Arts offers modern dance classes with Pamela Newell and ballet with Suzanne Stack. Open to the public. Contact Mariane Banar Fountain at x. 14202 or send e-mail to mbanarfountain@aces.org. Every Monday and Tuesday. $15, $100 for 10-class pass, free for ECA alumni. Annie Sailer St. Paul/St. James, 57 Olive St. (corner of Chapel and Olive), New Haven. 347-3067660. anniesailer.com. Modern Dance Classes. Open level class, emphasis on release of tight muscles, pelvis/spine initiated, free-flow movement, correct body alignment, rhythmic and spatial clarity. Annie Sailer has an MA in dance, has taught for 30 years, and directs the New York City-based Annie Sailer Dance Company. Through December 19. Thursday evening classes at St. Paul’s and Wednesday classes at Mollie’s House, 30 Averill Place, Branford. $15 for single class, $135 for 10 classes. 6-7:30 p.m. Arts Center Killingworth 276 North Parker Hill Road, Killingworth. 860-663-5593. artscenterkillingworth.org. Fall Art Programs. We offer art programs year round and seasonal events. Fall programs include adult weekend workshops, classes, and intensives: Sewing, Fashion Illustrator Study, Jewelry Design, Photography, Silk Scarf Painting, Encaustic Painting; Adult Weekday Classes: Oil & Acrylic Painting, Drawing I & II; Just4 Kids: Sculpting, Painting, Drawing, Preschool Art.

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Artsplace 1220 Waterbury Road, Cheshire. 203272-2787. cpfa-artsplace.org. Fall Classes. Art classes for all ages, most in sessions of seven weeks and some one-day workshops. All supplies included. Classes are taught by 18 professional artists five days a week. Fall classes include: Abstract Landscapes, Pastels, Watercolor Through Thick & Thin, Felting, Tot Art Experience, Collage, Studio Drawing, etc. See our website for full descriptions. Monday-Thursday, 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Cost varies. Elm City Dance Collective Center for the Arts at Christ Church, 84 Broadway, New Haven. 401-7418140. elmcitydance.org. Contemporary Dance Technique. Intermediate/advanced contemporary technique classes taught by Chloe Carlson. Come explore contemporary dance technique in a welcoming, high-energy class. Thursday evenings through December. $150 for the semester, $17 drop-in, $14 student drop-in. 67:30 p.m. Encore Music Creations Bethesda Lutheran Church, 305 St. Ronan St., New Haven. 585-7663355. EncoreMusicCreations.com. Music Lesson. We welcome students of all ages and levels to study piano, jazz piano, organ, harpsichord, music theory, or music history. We are supportive, flexible, and prepared to help you meet your individual goals. Prepare for auditions or AP exams with expert tutors. Based in New Haven, our instructors have graduate degrees from Yale University and the Eastman School. Contact us for pricing options. Encore@EncoreMusicCreations.com.

Church Music Skills. Mini-retreat on choral and organ music, taught by members of the New Haven AGO: Walden Moore, Brett Judson, Simon Jacobs, Robert Bennesh, and Lynda Pedersen. Workshops are free. Lunch is $10 (signup required). Used music sale. Contact Bill Speed to sign up: bill@firstchurchguilford.org. Nov. 2. Free (lunch $10). 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Milford Center for the Arts 40 Railroad Ave., Milford. 203-878-6647. milfordarts.org. Creative Drawing with Barbara Hart. The Milford Arts Council offers fall drawing classes in charcoal and Cray-Pas for adults. Tuesday evenings through Nov. 12, 6:30-8 p.m. Program fee is $160 ($144 seniors). Materials will be provided. Barbara Hart is a local Milford artist. Download a registration form at milfordarts.org. Melinda Marquez Flamenco Dance Center St. Paul/St. James, 57 Olive St. (corner of Chapel and Olive), New Haven. 347-306-7660. Flamenco Dance Classes. Flamenco Dance Classes for all levels. Ages 4 through adult. Contact MMFDC for more information about our fall session. melindamarquezfdc.org. Neighborhood Music School 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org. English Country Dance. All dances will be taught by Paul McGuire. Come with or without a partner. Beginners welcome. Live music by Marshall Barron, Grace Feldman, Phoebe Barron, Margaret Ann Martin, and musicians from Marshall’s Dance Band Workshops. 8-10:30 p.m. $15 per class.

Dance 2 Saturday Fall Thesis Dance Concert A collection of new works presented by senior choreographers as part of their culminating projects for the dance major. 8 p.m. Patricelli ’92 Theater, Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, 213 High St., Middletown. 860-685-3355. www.wesleyan.edu/cfa.

15-16 Friday-Saturday Kyle Abraham/Abraham.In.Motion — Pavement Choreographer Kyle Abraham was born into hip hop culture in 1977, and his artistic upbringing included classical cello, piano, and the visual arts. He has created works for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, performed with Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and David Dorfman Dance, and founded the ensemble Abraham.In.Motion. 8 p.m. Patricelli ‘92 Theater, Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, 216 High St., Middletown. 860-685-3355. www.wesleyan.edu/cfa.

15-16 Friday-Saturday Elm City Dance Festival Elm City Dance Collective aims to invigorate and expand the contemporary dance community in New Haven with this twoday dance event featuring a performance on Saturday evening showcasing beautiful contemporary choreography from around the region, two master classes on Saturday morning, and an improvisational jam on Friday evening. All are welcome! ECDF performance: Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Master classes: Saturday at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Improvisation Jam: Friday, 7-9 p.m. Cooperative Arts & Humanities High School, 177 College Street, New Haven. 401-741-8140. www.elmcitydance.org.

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20-21 Wednesday-Thursday Rough Edges 2013 Join us for an exciting, thought-provoking, and uncommon dance concert featuring new student choreography. Presenting solos and duets inspired by the early pioneers of modern dance, personal heritage and family traditions using musical forms as the foundation for the creative process, and work based on the masters’ inspirations and movement styles. Snow date: Friday, Nov. 22. Follow us on Twitter @JHiruo. 7 p.m. ACES Educational Center for the Arts, 55 Audubon Street, New Haven. 203-7775451. www.aces.org/schools/eca.

Exhibitions ACES Educational Center for the Arts 55 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-777-5451. aces.org/schools/eca. The Early Years: New Works from the First Quarter. The ACES ECA Visual Arts Department presents The Early Years: New Works from the First Quarter on Monday, Nov. 4, 5-7 p.m. Snow date: Wednesday, Nov. 6. Open to the public. 5-7 p.m. Artspace 50 Orange St., New Haven. 203-7722709. cwos.org. Futurecast. This exhibit showcases a diverse group of artists who make work addressing the unprecedented weather patterns that have become a new reality for Americans. Featuring Paul Duda, Bryon Finn, Stacy Fischer, Noel King, Katya Kiriloff, Lynn Palewicz, Sabrina Marques, Kevin Van Aelst, and Hilary Wilder. November 8-January 25, 2014. Gallery hours: Wednesday-Thursday, 12-6 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 12-8 p.m. Free and open to the public. Beverly Kaye Gallery 15 Lorraine Drive, Woodbridge. 203-387-5700. artbbrut.com/BeverlyKayeGallery.blogspot.com. Anthony Guyther, 92 and Still Going. Anthony Guyther began showing his symbolist collages 60 years ago in New York City galleries and is still going strong. A large body of his one of a kind works, made up of hand-colored engravings from the 18th and 19th century, are offered at this private Woodbridge dealer’s gallery by appointment at your convenience. Books by Guyther are also available. Through December 19. Call for an appointment: 203 387 5700. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Creative Arts Workshop 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-562-4927. creativeartsworkshop.org. Forty-Fifth Annual Celebration of American Crafts. An exceptional selection of fine contemporary crafts by more than 300 artists from across the United States. From Nov. 2 through Dec. 24, the two-story Hilles Gallery is transformed into a oneof-a-kind holiday shopping destination offering

ceramics, decorative and wearable fiber, jewelry, furnishings, handmade toys, and more. MondaySaturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 p.m.; Dec. 24, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Davison Art Center Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, 301 High St., Middletown. 860-6852500. wesleyan.edu/dac. Themes and Variations: Seriality in American Print, 1960-1980. Making sets and series is inherently part of the printmaking process. With the boom in printmaking in the 1960s, many artists explored ways to develop themes and variations within print portfolios. Drawn from the collection of the Davison Art Center, this exhibition also will include works by many other artists. Through Dec. 8. Dates closed: Oct. 18-22 and Nov. 25-Dec. 2. TuesdaySunday, 12-4 p.m. Free. Elm City Artists Gallery 55 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-922-2359. elmcityartists.com. Holiday Showcase. Traditional to contemporary paintings by Sharon R. Morgio, Tracey Kafka, Ralph R. Schwartz, Regina M. Thomas, and Laura Wilk. Functional and decorative pottery by Margaret Ulecka Wilson. See works in watercolor, collage/mixed media, acrylic, oil, and pastel. Small works perfect for gift-giving, larger paintings for over your sofa or fireplace. Through Jan. 4. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, 283 Washington Terrace, Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. The Alumni Show II. Presented in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Center for the Arts, Alumni Show II looks back at four decades of Wesleyan artists, featuring 17 individuals whose work spans a broad range of contemporary practice and media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, installation art, video art, performance, and films. Through Dec. 8. Tuesday-Sunday, 12-5 p.m. Closed Nov. 20-25. Free. Fred Giampietro Gallery 91 Orange St., New Haven. 203-777-7760. giampietrogallery.com. New Work by Elizabeth Gourlay and Kevin Finklea. The Fred Giampietro Gallery is pleased to announce the opening of its new satellite gallery located in downtown New Haven (91 Orange St.), exhibiting new work by artists Elizabeth Gourlay and Kevin Finklea. Through Nov. 2. WednesdaySaturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Clint Jukkala: Off Course, and Alexis Granwell: Ghost Stories. Jukkala’s paintings combine color, geometry, and textured surfaces to create images that are ostensibly abstract. His work suggests figures, architecture, and landscape. Granwell will be presenting sculptures and monumental prints depicting metaphysical structures that have an ancient quality with imagery that expands, erases, and

erupts. Through Nov. 2. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appointment. Free. Jewish Community Center of Greater New Haven 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge. 203-3872522. newhaven.fedweb.org/local_includes/downloads/64925.pdf. Arts & Culture Festival: Global Day of Jewish Learning. “Sacred Expression” by Sharon Zirkin-Dagan. The artist will discuss her paintings and Rabbi Hesch Sommer of Jewish Family Service will provide insight into the psalms represented in her artwork. For more information about the Arts and Culture Festival at the JCC, contact shelleyg@jccnh.org or (203) 387-2522 x. 206. Sunday, Nov. 17, 46 p.m. Free. Kehler Liddell Gallery 873 Whalley Ave., New Haven. 203-389-9555. kehlerliddell.com. Masks: Photographs by Rod Cook. This exhibit explores how the private condition is veiled by a façade or mask when presented to the public. Cook dove into the idea that how people outwardly represent themselves speaks more to how they wish to be received, rather than as an actual translation of what they consist of inside. Through Nov. 10. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free and open to the public. Dot Works 2000-2004 by Gerald Saladyga. The artist conjures the early American Luminist painters’ depictions of the American landscape and seascape, taking their initial representations and isolating the concept within a contemporary

Buddy Valastro, the “Cake Boss,” appears at Southern Connecticut State University’s John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts on Nov. 8. Photo courtesy of the Lyman Center.

minimalist framework. Through Nov. 10. 11a.m.-4 p.m. Free and open to the public. Out of Hand: A Holiday Show. Presented by the artists of Kehler Liddell Gallery. Using the phrase “out of hand” to describe a situation implies a complete lack of control and reckless abandon for the order of things. On the contrary, the artists of KLG chose this title to demonstrate the opposite. Nov. 14-Dec. 22. Opening reception: Sunday, Nov. 17, 4-6 p.m. Free and open to the public. Knights of Columbus Museum 1 State St., New Haven. 203-865-0400. kofcmuseum.org. Windows into Heaven: Russian Icons & Treasurs. Few customs or traditions have endured for longer than a millennium, but the use of icons in Russia is among them. The exhibition features more than 225 Russian Orthodox icons along with other liturgical and devotional items. Icons are often called “windows into heaven” because they are said to give viewers a glimpse of the eternal realm. Through April 27, 2014. Open daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free admission and parking.

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Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies Gallery Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, 343 Washington Terrace, Middletown. 860685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. Faces of China, 1981: Photographs by Tom Zetterstrom. Tom Zetterstrom’s photographs offer a glimpse of China’s people in only the third year of Deng Xiaoping’s “Reform and Opening Up.” The people in these color and black-and-white portraits are guileless, everyday people who stand on the brink of enormous social change. Through Dec. 6. Closed Nov. 26-Dec. 3. 12-4 p.m. Free.

AtTheWhitney/current.html. The Tenderness of Men in Suburbs: Photographs by Laura Wexler. In the fall of 1968 Laura Wexler began a yearlong project to photograph the Boston suburbs. It was a year of assassination, violence, and protest against the war in Vietnam and against the suppression of civil rights at home. The photographs in this series are from Brookline and Newton, the places she grew up. Laura Wexler was 20 years old. Through Dec. 18. Monday & Wednesday, 3-5 p.m., or by appointment at (203) 432-0670. Free.

present selections from Weill’s German and American periods. 12:15 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

Mary C. Daly, RSM Art Gallery, Mercy Center 167 Neck Road, Madison. 203-245-0401. mercybythesea.org. Warp and Weft: Works on Paper. Anne Doris-Eisner has described her art as embodying the “interplay of oppositional forces which are interdependent.” Her works will be exhibited in this solo show. Through Nov. 30. Gallery hours: Wednesday-Friday, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Free.

Yale Center for British Art 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. In Amicable Conversation. Exhibition opening program with artist Nicola Hicks and independent art curator and writer Patterson Sims. Nov. 13. 5:30-7 p.m. Free.

7 Thursday

Milford Center for the Arts Milford Fine Arts Council, 40 Railroad Ave., Milford. 203-878-6647. milfordarts.org. Natural Science Artists: A Fusion of Nature, Science & Art. The Milford Arts Council and Connecticut Natural Science Illustrators present a collaborative art show. The show will feature the artwork of the Connecticut Natural Science Illustrators faculty. Through Nov. 15. Wednesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 12-2 p.m. Free. Holiday Wreaths Show & Sale. The Milford Arts Council will be presenting a Holiday Wreaths Show & Sale Nov. 20-Dec. 12. Artists and crafters are invited to submit their interpretation of festive, holiday, winter, and seasonal wreaths. Reception: Thursday, Dec. 12, 5:30-7 p.m. Viewing and sale hours: Wednesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday, 12-2 p.m. Receiving dates: Nov. 14 & 15, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.; Nov. 17, 12-2 p.m.; and Nov. 18, 5-6 p.m. Free. New Haven Museum 114 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-562-4183. newhavenmuseum.org. Beyond the New Township: Wooster Square. The exhibition will explore the neighborhood’s significance as seen through events and individuals that contributed to its development. Come see what has gone into New Haven’s first local historic district. Through Feb. 28, 2014. Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday, 12-5 p.m. Adults $4, seniors $3, students $2, children younger than 12 admitted free. Free for everyone the first and third Sundays of the month, 1-4 p.m. Paul Mellon Arts Center Choate Rosemary Hall, 332 Christian St., Wallingford. 203-697-2398. choate.edu/artscenter/boxoffice. Dynamic Cycles: Freeze to Thaw. Artist Nancy Eisenfeld uses materials found in nature which she then reconstructs and transforms into unique installations. The exhibit is free and open to the public. An artist’s reception will be held on Nov. 8, 5:30-7:30 p.m., in the Arts Center Gallery. Nov. 1Dec. 6. When school is in session, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Free. Susan Powell Fine Art 679 Boston Post Road, Madison. 203-318-0616. susanpowellfineart.com. Vincent Giarrano, New Paintings. The focus for his solo show is on life in New York City and contemporary women in the city. Giarrano’s New York moments combine hip and stylish women at work and at ease with Soho’s classic cast iron facades and contemporary interiors. His ability to paint a scene with freshness and immediacy comes from years of drawing and painting en plein air. Nov. 1Dec. 1. Opening reception: Friday, Nov. 1, 6 -8:30 p.m. Hours: Wednesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 12-3 p.m.; and by appointment. Free. Whitney Humanities Center 53 Wall St., New Haven. 203-432-0670. yale.edu/whc/Gallery-

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Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History 170 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-432-5050. peabody.yale.edu. Echoes of Egypt: Conjuring the Land of the Pharaohs. This exhibition will take you on a journey through 2,000 years of fascination with ancient Egypt, the land of the pharaohs. Visitors will enter through a reproduction of the “Egyptianizing” gateway that is the entrance to New Haven’s Grove Street Cemetery (designed by Henry Austin in 1839). Through Jan. 4, 2013. Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 12-5 p.m. $5-$7.

Galas & Fundraisers 16 Saturday Biergarten Gala Join us in celebrating the legacy of our founder, Morris Steinert, and our 120th season as the New Haven Symphony Orchestra! Raise a glass in the Adante Ballroom, transformed into a festive Biergarten, with dinner featuring gourmet German delicacies, music, auction, and a raffle. Honoring past organization presidents James Morley and Robert Dannies. Adante Ballroom, Southern Connecticut State University, 345 Fitch St., New Haven. 203-865-0831. NewHavenSymphony.org.

Kids & Families Musical Folk First Presbyterian Church, 704 Whitney Ave., Hamden. 203-691-9759. MusicalFolk.com. Music Together Classes for Toddlers. Musical Folk is offering Music Together classes for children 5 years old and younger – and the ones who love them! Sing, dance, and play instruments in an informal setting. Classes are ongoing through the year and are held in New Haven, Hamden, Woodbridge, and East Haven. Demonstration classes are free. Each 11-week semester costs $229 and includes a CD and songbook. Thornton Wilder Hall Miller Cultural Complex, 2901 Dixwell Ave., Hamden. 203-287-2546. hamdenartscommission.org. The Pirate, The Princess, and The Pea. The awardwinning Crabgrass Puppet Theater presents its production of The Pirate, The Princess, and The Pea. Join the characters on a thrilling voyage, chock full of sea monsters, sharks, and side-splitting action. Saturday, Nov. 23. 1 p.m. $2 children, $3 adults.

Music 1 Friday Stephan Crump’s Rosetta Trio Jamie Fox, electric guitar; Liberty Ellman, acoustic guitar; Stephan Crump, bass. The Rosetta Trio is a uniquely colorful and hard-grooving all-string chamber jazz ensemble led by Memphis-bred, Grammy Award-nominated Brooklynite bassist/composer Stephan Crump. 8:30 p.m. ($18) and 10 p.m. ($12).

6 Wednesday Great Organ Music at Yale: Daniel Zaretzky Music of Buxtehude and Bruhns. 8 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Marquand Chapel, 409 Prospect St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/DavidZaretzky2013.html.

Harmony in Action Catch Music Haven’s “Harmony in Action” student orchestra in the rotunda before the New Haven Symphony Orchestra presents “Lyricism and Longing.” Woolsey Hall Rotunda, 500 College St., New Haven. Admission for rotunda performance is free. Tickets are required for the NHSO concert. 6:45 p.m. 203-745-9030. musichavenct.org. Soundgarden singer Chris Cornell performs at the Shubert Theater on Nov. 20. Photo by Jake Chessum.

Firehouse 12, 45 Crown St., New Haven. 203-7850468. firehouse12.com. Bach’s Lunch: Jazz Standards Come and enjoy a concert planned specifically to fit into your lunch hour. Neighborhood Music School faculty members Michael Coppola (nine- and six-string guitars) and Mike Asetta (upright bass) will treat you to the sounds of Ellington, Monk, Porter, and others. 12:10-12:50 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

2 Saturday “We Buy White Albums” Event by Rutherford Chang ’02 Browse and listen to a collection of more than 750 first-pressings of The Beatles’ “The White Album” (1968), and sell copies to Rutheford Chang ‘02. He has also created a new version of the album — which visitors can play in the gallery — by layering recordings from 100 albums in his collection over one another. 2-6 p.m. Free. Wesleyan Center for the Arts, Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery, 283 Washington Terrace, Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. Libana Internationally renowned world music and dance ensemble Libana embodies the creativity, vision and spirit of women worldwide. Riveting, transformational, and soul-stirring, Libana takes audiences on a musical journey, reflecting the human experience uniting us all. 7:30 p.m. $25 at the door, $20 in advance, $15 students and seniors. Another Octave: Connecticut Women’s Chorus, Unitarian Society of New Haven, 700 Hartford Turnpike, Hamden. 203-672-1919. anotheroctave.org. Neighborhood Music School Strings Department Recital Students perform for friends, family, and other students. Please join us for an enjoyable afternoon of music! 2 p.m. & 3:30 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

3 Sunday Peter and the Wolf The New Haven Symphony Orchestra presents Peter and the Wolf, a timeless classic for families and children. Sponsored by the Jewish Foundation of Greater New Haven. For more information about the Arts and Culture Festival at the JCC, contact shelleyg@jccnh.org or (203) 387-2522 x. 206. 2-3 p.m. Free. JCC of Greater New Haven, 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge. 203-387-2522. Bach’s Brunch: The Music of Kurt Weill Dr. Caterwaul’s Cadre of Clairvoyant Claptraps (featuring Adam Matlock) with guests the Cygnet Sisters

Lyricism & Longing Traverse emotional heights and depths with concertmaster Ani Kavafian’s soaring Lark Ascending, the haunting melodies of Lady in the Dark, and Barber’s aching Adagio as we celebrate the Beineke Rare Book and Manuscript Library’s 50th anniversary. 7:30-9:30 p.m. New Haven Symphony Orchestra, Woolsey Hall, 500 College St., New Haven. 203-865-0831. NewHavenSymphony.org.

8 Friday Michaël Attias Quintet: “Spun Tree” Kris Davis, piano; Michaël Attias, saxophone; Ralph Alessi, trumpet; Sean Conly, bass; Tom Rainey, drums. 8:30 p.m. ($18) and 10 p.m. ($12). Firehouse 12, 45 Crown St., New Haven. 203-785-0468. firehouse12.com. Elvis Costello, Solo Elvis Costello comes to the Shubert Theater as part of his first major set of solo headlining dates on the East Coast in a decade. 8 p.m. Ticket price based on seating location. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com. Bach’s Lunch: Chamber Music from European Nationalists Come and enjoy a concert planned specifically to fit into your lunch hour. Neighborhood Music School faculty member Alvin Wong (cello) and guest artists Hilary Castle (violin) and Juan Carlos Fernandez-Nieto (piano) perform works by Debussy and Smetana. 12:10-12:50 p.m. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org. Faculty Friday Concert: Fender Meets Steinway In music, the term “improvisation” is most often associated with American jazz. In “Fender Meets Steinway,” David Mills (on a Fender guitar) and Erika Schroth (on a Steinway grand piano) will perform a collection of original compositions, and their improvisation will invoke a menagerie of musical genres. 7:45 p.m. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

9 Saturday Juice Vocal Ensemble London’s Juice Vocal Ensemble is an experimental a cappella trio that mixes contemporary classical with folk, jazz, world music, pop, and electronica. At Wesleyan University, the group will perform vibrant classical works by U.K. composers, new work by a New Yorkbased composer, and unusual arrangements of British folk songs and pop music. 8 p.m. $22 for the general public, $18 for senior citizens, Wesleyan faculty/staff and non-Wesleyan students, and $6 for Wesleyan students. Wesleyan Center for the Arts, Crowell Concert Hall, 50 Wyllys Ave., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. Bluesman Toby Walker Internationally acclaimed

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Toby Walker has been hailed as a roots music finger-style guitar virtuoso. He combines the styles of blues, ragtime, country, bluegrass, rock, and old-time jazz into his own unique style. In 2010 Toby won the New York Music Award for “Best Instrumental CD.” 8 p.m. Admission is $15 for nonmembers, $12 for members, and $5 for children 12 and younger. Pay at the door. Branford Folk Music Society, First Congregational Church of Branford, 1009 Main St., Branford. 203-488-7715. folknotes.org/branfordfolk. Neighborhood Music School Piano Department Recital Students from the NMS Piano Department perform for friends, family, and other students. Please join us for an enjoyable afternoon of music. 2 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org. Frederic Hand, Master Guitar The Milford Arts Council and New England Guitar Society welcome master guitarist Frederic Hand to the stage on Saturday, Nov. 9 at 8 p.m. The Grammy Awardnominated Hand is one of the most versatile guitarists performing today. $20, $18 seniors, $15 MAC members. Milford Fine Arts Council, Center for the Arts, 40 Railroad Ave., Milford. 203-8786647. milfordarts.org.

10 Sunday Mazz Swift: “Solo MazzMuse” Singer, Juilliardtrained violinist, and freestyle, electro-organic composer Mazz Swift has engaged audiences all over the world with the signature weaving of song, melody, and improvisation that she calls MazzMuse. Expect electric violin, acoustic violin, soulful singing, and improvisation that speaks directly to your soul. 3 p.m. Free. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, The Russell House, 350 High St., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. Poems for a Sunday Afternoon: Yale Camerata and Yale Band Yale Camerata with Yale Band, Marguerite L. Brooks and Thomas C. Duffy, conductors Music of Lutoslawski (Trois Poèmes) and Olson (world premiere: Voyelles). 4 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Trinity Lutheran Church, 292 Orange St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/CamerataYaleBand2013.html. Unsung Heroes of the Bass Clef Enjoy the works of Michael East, Couperin, and Bodin de Boismortier performed by Neighborhood Music School faculty member Ravenna Michaelsen (cello) and guest artist Alexander Smith (double bass). 12:10-12:50 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203.-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

11 Monday Veteran’s Day Concert Music Haven students and their teachers – members of the Haven String Quartet – perform a free lunchtime concert in the atrium of Yale’s Smilow Cancer Hospital. Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven, 20 York St., New Haven. Free. 12 p.m. 203-745-9030. musichavenct.org.

14 Thursday Religion and Film Series: Donnie Darko Films at the Whitney supported by the Barbakow Fund for Innovative Film Programs at Yale. Presented with the Initiative for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion, the Program in American Studies, the Film Studies Program, and the Department of Religious Studies. 7:30 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/RelFilmDonnieDarko.html.

15 Friday The Jamie Baum Sextet Jamie Baum: Flute, Compositions November 15 . 8:30 & 10pm 8:30pm - $18 10pm - $12. Firehouse 12, Firehouse 12, 45 Crown

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Firehouse 12 presents Chris Dingman’s The Subliminal and the Sublime on Nov. 22. Photo by Maxwell Stertz.

Street, New Haven. 203-785-0468. firehouse12.com/events.asp?id=161680 Evensong for All Saints Yale Schola Cantorum, David Hill, conductor. Music of Victoria, Howells, Britten, and Jackson. 5 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Christ Church Episcopal, 84 Broadway, New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/ScholaAllSaints13.html. Bach’s Lunch: Fritz Kreisler, Composer, Arranger Enjoy this noontime concert timed perfectly for your lunch hour, featuring Neighborhood Music School faculty member Alexis Zingale (piano), with guest artist Darwin Shen (violin), performing works by Kreisler, Mendelssohn, and Shubert. 12:10-12:50 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

16 Saturday Wesleyan Orchestra Fall Concert The Wesleyan University Orchestra presents symphonic repertoire by Benjamin Britten, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky under the direction of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Nadya Potemkina. 8 p.m. Free. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, Crowell Concert Hall, 50 Wyllys Ave., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

Brooks, conductor. 5 p.m. Freewill offerings accepted. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 1382 Middletown Ave., Northford. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/ events/CamerataStAndrews2013.html. The Tallis Scholars The Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips, director. Music of Taverner, Tallis, and others. 8 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, St. Mary’s Church, 80 Hillhouse Ave., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/TallisScholars2013.html.

20 Wednesday Chris Cornell Grammy Award-winning musician, acclaimed singer, songwriter, and lyricist Chris Cornell appears in a solo acoustic performance showcasing songs from his entire career. With special guest Bhi Bhiman. 8 p.m. Ticket price based on seating location. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com.

borhood Music School faculty members Martha Bennett Oneppo (soprano), Ingeborg Schimmer (alto), Terrence Fay (tenor), and Joe Elbertson (bass). 12:10-12:50 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org. Faculty Friday Concert: “Pleasant Moments” Kick off your weekend with the upbeat sounds of ragtime, including works by Joplin, Lamb, Scott, and others. Performance features NMS faculty members Larry Zukof (recorder), Chris Radawiec (flute), Mary Larew (violin), Reesa Gringorten (clarinet), Yun-Yang Lin (cello), Margaret Ann Martin (piano), and Art Hovey (tuba). 7:45 p.m. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

23 Saturday

Chris Dingman’s The Subliminal and the Sublime Chris Dingman, vibes; Fabian Almazan, piano; Justin Brown, drums; Loren Stillman, saxophone; Ryan Ferreira, guitar. 8:30 p.m. ($18) and 10 p.m. ($12). Firehouse 12, 45 Crown St., New Haven. 203785-0468. firehouse12.com.

The Princess and The Firebird An evening of incandescent ballet music from Russia and France brings Stravinsky’s The Firebird, Delibes’ Dancing Doll, and Tchaikovsky’s Sleeping Beauty to life. School Night at the Symphony: Bring a student K12 free! 7:30-9:30 p.m. New Haven Symphony Orchestra, Woolsey Hall, 500 College St., New Haven. 203-865-0831. NewHavenSymphony.org

Anna Catarina Antonacci, Soprano Anna Catarina Antonacci, soprano, with Donald Sulzen, piano: “Dall’antichitaá al verismo.” Music of Monteverdi, Vivaldi, Gluck, Donaudy, Respighi, and others. 8 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Sprague Memorial Hall, 470 College St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/AnnaAntonacci2013.html.

Music from East Asia This concert features Wesleyan University’s East Asian Ensembles presenting a variety of musical styles and repertories from East Asian cultures. 7 p.m. $2 for Wesleyan students, $3 for all others. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, Crowell Concert Hall, 50 Wyllys Ave., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

Wesleyan Singers Fall Concert Works by Johannes Brahms, Pavel Chesnokov, Alexander Kastalsky, Antonio Lotti, Francis Poulenc, and Eric Whitacre, under the direction of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Music Nadya Potemkina. 7 p.m. Free. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, Memorial Chapel, 221 Church St., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

17 Sunday

Yale Voxtet: “Serenata Italiana” Yale Voxtet, James Taylor, director. 5:30 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Marquand Chapel, 409 Prospect St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/VoxtetSerenataitaliana.html.

Gamelan: Classical Music of Central Java The Wesleyan Gamelan Ensemble, a magnificent orchestra of bronze gongs, xylophones, drums, strings, and voices under the direction of Professor of Music Sumarsam and Artist-in-Residence I.M. Harjito, presents classical music of Central Java. 8 p.m. $2. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, World Music Hall, 40 Wyllys Ave., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

Student Music Recital Choate Rosemary Hall Students perform. 3 p.m. Free. Choate Rosemary Hall, Paul Mellon Arts Center, 332 Christian St., Wallingford. 203-697-2398. choate.edu/artscenter/boxoffice. Camerata Chamber Chorus: “I’m Gonna Sing” Yale Camerata Chamber Chorus, Marguerite L.

22 Friday

Bach’s Lunch: A Quartet of Voices from Renaissance to Romance Come during your lunch hour and treat yourself to the fabulous music of Neigh-

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Another Octave Women’s Chorus: “The Spirit Moves Her” Another Octave’s fall concert embraces the myriad understandings of “spirit” with an eclectic mix that includes hymns and spirituals, country tunes and folk ballads, music from Broadway and the big screen, and songs by writers as diverse as Ysaye Barnwell, John Lennon, and Holly Near. 7 p.m. $22 at the door, $20 in advance, $15 seniors and students. Another Octave: Connecticut Women’s Chorus, Unitarian Society of New Haven, 700 Hartford Turnpike, Hamden. 203-672-1919. anotheroctave.org.

featuring a selection of 17 alumni artists whose work spans a broad range of contemporary practice and media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, installation art, video art, performance, and films. Guest Curator John Ravenal ’81 will talk along with several artists. 2-4 p.m., with special gallery hours from 12-6 p.m. Free. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery, 283 Washington Terrace, Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

5 Tuesday Art in Context: No Stone Unturned: Loss and Change in British Church Monuments 12:30-1 p.m. Free. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

24 Sunday World Guitar Ensemble This concert features the World Guitar Ensemble performing a variety of world music under the direction of Carver Blanchard. 3 p.m. Free. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, World Music Hall, 40 Wyllys Ave., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

7 Thursday Arts and Cultural Festival – Joshua Henkin: The World Without You The author will discuss his moving, mesmerizing new novel about love, loss, and the aftermath of a family tragedy. Book-signing to follow. For more information about the Arts and Culture Festival at the Jewish Community Center of Greater New Haven, send e-mail to shelleyg@jccnh.org or call (203) 387-2522, x. 206. 7:30 p.m. Free. JCC of Greater New Haven, 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge.

Great Organ Music at Yale: Peter Planyavsky Music of Boely, Franck, Pierneé, Fuchs, and Schmidt. 8 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Woolsey Hall, 500 College St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. yale.edu/ism/events/ PeterPlanyavsky2013.html. Neighborhood Music School Suzuki Department Recital Students perform for friends, family, and other students. Please join us for an enjoyable afternoon of music. 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Free. Neighborhood Music School Recital Hall, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

29 Friday Peter Evans’ Zebulon Trio with Dave Liebman and Ron Stabinsky Dave Liebman, saxophone; John Hebert, bass; Kassa Overall, drums; Peter Evans, trumpet; Ron Stabinsky, piano. 8:30 p.m. ($18) and $10 p.m. ($12). Firehouse 12, 45 Crown St., New Haven. 203-785-0468. firehouse12.com.

Special Events Friends of the Davison Art Center Online Auction The Friends of the Davison Art Center is hosting its first-ever online auction featuring many pieces of fine art including works by internationally exhibiting photographers, Wesleyan University faculty, alumni, and friends. The online auction hosted by Bidding for Good runs through Nov. 9. 860-685-3355. fdac.wesleyan.edu.

2 Saturday Davison Art Center Silent Auction The Friends of the Davison Art Center host a silent auction and free champagne reception at the Alsop House. 3-6 p.m. Come get an up-close look at the pieces in the online auction and bid on additional items such as theater tickets, signed books, private tours, one-on-one classes, and handicrafts. Free. 301 High Street, Middletown. 860-685-2500. fdac.wesleyan.edu. John Pinette: Still Hungry Tour This food-obsessed, storytelling comedian delivers smart, original, Bill Cosby-influenced observations on everyday life. 8 p.m. Ticket price based on seating location. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com.

8 Friday

Pianist Leon Fleisher performs in Morse Recital Hall, in Sprague Memorial Hall, on Nov. 13. Photo by Joanne Savio.

exploring the impact of one of Judaism’s greatest cultural icons. Featuring authors Jeremy Dauber and Alisa Solomon, with musical accompaniment by Andrew Rubenoff. Co-sponsored by the Jewish Historical Society of Greater New Haven. For more information, send e-mail to shelleyg@jccnh.org or call (203) 387-2522 x. 206. 10:30 a.m. $10 at jccnh.org or at the door. 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge. 203-387-2522. newhaven.fedweb.org/local_includes/ downloads/64925.pdf.

10 Sunday Arts and Cultural Festival: “The Life and Legacy of Sholem Aleichem” A literary/musical program

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Connecticut Artists Night This reception showcases the work of Connecticut artisans featured in the 45th annual Celebration of American Crafts exhibition at Creative Arts Workshop. Connecticut Artist’s Night is a chance for visitors to meet Connecticut-based artists while they shop, and an opportunity to support local art-makers in the crafts industry in a significant way. 5-8 p.m. Free and open to the public 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-562-4927. creativeartsworkshop.org.

11 Monday “Blood, Muscle, Bone” – A Performative Teach-In Conceived by visiting faculty members Liz Lerman and Jawole Willa Jo Zollar, this performative “teach-in” (a lively and provocative tool of past protest movements) will explore issues surrounding wealth disparity and its impact on the body. The event will culminate in a multidisciplinary performance of the research. 7 p.m. Free. 55 Wyllys Ave., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa.

23-24 Saturday-Sunday Open Studios Weekend: Shoreline ArtsTrail The Shoreline ArtsTrail presents a community of 47 local artists from Branford, Guilford, and Madison. This juried, two-day event showcases calligraphy, cut paper, fiber, found objects, glass, jewelry, metal, mixed-media, paint, photography, pottery, printmaking, sculpture, textiles, and more. Visit shorelineartstrail.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 181 Main St., Branford. 203-589-6995. kristinmerrill.com.

12 Tuesday Artist Demonstration and November Meeting Diana Lyn Coté will return to demonstrate her technique with Oil Paintstiks. She demonstrated the initial stage of “blocking in” a painting last May. This time she will continue the process by adding the next layer in sequence of the “Coté Squiggle” as her work develops from a blank canvas to blocks of color, highlights, shadows, and unique textures. Coffee and conversation at 7 p.m.; brief business meeting at 7:15 p.m.; artist’s demonstration at 7:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. If library is closed due to inclement weather, the meeting will be cancelled. 2901 Dixwell Ave., Hamden. 203-494-2316. hamdenartleague.com.

9 Saturday Craft Fair and Holiday Bazaar Join us for a fun day of shopping for the holidays. You will find a wonderful selection of gift ideas from our talented craft vendors. Also enjoy our White Elephant, Penny Raffle, and Bake Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. 2630 Whitney Ave., Hamden. 203-2397104. silknsounds.org.

21 Thursday

17 Sunday “Celebrate Style” Fashion Show A champagne reception and fashion show highlighting items of fiber and jewelry made by artists in the 45th annual Celebration of American Crafts at Creative Arts Workshop. Featuring distinctive and beautifully designed pieces for men, women, and children of all ages, the exhibition and sale has become a fashion destination for sophisticated shoppers. 11-1 p.m. $20. 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-5624927. creativeartsworkshop.org.

24 Sunday JCC Arts and Crafts Fair Gifts, accessories, home décor, pottery, jewelry, and more from local artisans! 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center of Greater New Haven at 360 Amity Road in Woodbridge. Free and open to the public. Visit jccnh.org for directions. For more information call Tanya Weinberg at 203-387-2522 x. 216 or send email to tanyaw@jccnh.org. Free. Items for purchase. Crafternoon Going beyond the usual knitting circle, this is an invitation to craft-makers of all mediums to come together and work side by side during the Celebration of American Crafts. Crafternoon is a fun, inclusive occasion to network, learn about the contemporary crafts market, and gain valuable feedback on your work from peers in the crafts community. 2-4 p.m. Free and open to the public. 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-5624927. creativeartsworkshop.org.

Talks & Tours 2 Saturday

Lewis Walpole Library Lecture “The Ladies Library: Or, Benjamin Franklin’s Sister’s Books.” 5:307 p.m. Free. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

10 Sunday Arts and Cultural Festival – Ronald Balson: Once We Were Brothers A Holocaust survivor sues a famous philanthropist for war crimes, accusing him of being a Nazi in disguise. It is revealed that the survivor and the alleged Nazi grew up as brothers in the same household. A contemporary legal thriller and poignant look back into the lives of small town. Poland during World War II. Sponsored by Temple Beth David. 4:30 p.m. Free. JCC of Greater New Haven, Temple Beth David, 3 Main St., Cheshire. 203-387-2522. newhaven.fedweb.org/local_includes/ downloads/64925.pdf.

12 Tuesday Artful Lunch Series: Mark Slobin One artwork, one speaker, 15 minutes. Join the Friends of the Davison Art Center and Mark Slobin, WinslowKaplan Professor of Music, as he talks about an instrument in Wesleyan University’s World Instrument Collection. Bring your bag lunch and enjoy coffee, homemade cookies, and conversation following the talk. 12:10 p.m. Free. Wesleyan University Center for the Arts, Davison Art Center, Alsop House Dining Room, 301 High St., Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. Arts and Cultural Festival – Judy L. Mandel: Replacement Child: A Memoir Mandel will read from her memoir of being the “replacement child” her parents brought into the world to provide “a salve for the burns.” A memoir of love and lies, family and hope. Book-signing to follow. Co-sponsored by Women’s Philanthropy of the Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven. For more information, send e-mail to shelleyg@jccnh.org. 11 a.m. Suggested $6 donation payable at the door. JCC of Greater New Haven, Vine Auditorium, 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge. 203-387-2522. newhaven.fedweb.org/local_includes/downloads/64925.pdf.

14 Thursday Andrew Carnduff Ritchie Lecture Robin Rhode, artist. Robert L. McNeil Jr. Lecture Hall, Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St. 5:30-7 p.m. Free. 203-432-2800.

Homecoming/Family Weekend Reception for The Alumni Show II The Alumni Show II looks back at four decades of Wesleyan University artists,

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19 Tuesday Arts and Cultural Festival – Daniel Bergner: What Do Women Want? Are women actually the less monogamous gender? Bergner explores the latest scientific research and paints an unprecedented portrait of women’s sexuality. Book-signing to follow reading/discussion. For more information about the Arts and Culture Festival at the Jewish Community Center for Greater New Haven, send e-mail to shelleyg@jccnh.org or call (203) 387-2522 x. 206. 8 p.m. Free. JCC of Greater New Haven, JFGNH Shoreline Office, 705 Boston Post Road, Guilford. 203-387-2522. newhaven.fedweb.org/local_includes/ downloads/64925.pdf.

20 Wednesday Arts and Cultural Festival – Lynn Povich: The Good Girls Newsweek’s first female senior editor tells the compelling story of the women writers who sued the magazine for sexual discrimination in hiring and promotion. Reception and book-signing to follow. Sponsored by Shoreline Hadassah. Send e-mail to jwlesage@jewishnewhaven.org or call (203)738-0033. 7:30 p.m. Suggested $5 donation. Shoreline Office of the Jewish Federation, 705 Boston Post Road, Guilford. 203-738-0033.

22 Friday Lecture “Handwriting on the Wall: John Martin’s Belshazzar’s Feast (1820).” 1:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

Theater Owners Her husband wants her dead, but Marion’s too busy to notice. The North London real estate

market is booming, and she’s out to make a killing. When Marion discovers she can’t buy out a family from one of her properties, she instead takes ownership of their most prized possession. Owners is a savagely funny play by playwright Caryl Churchill. Through Nov. 16. Tuesday-Saturday at 8 p.m. $20$98. Student, senior, and group discounts available. Yale Repertory Theatre, 1120 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-1234. yalerep.org. The Visit by Friedrich Durrenmatt Translated by Maurice Valency, directed by Cole Lewis. An impossibly wealthy woman returns to her povertystricken hometown. She promises its citizens a sum of money so vast it will return the town to its former glory — on one horrifying condition: the townspeople must kill the man who wronged her in her youth. Through Nov. 2. Yale University School of Art, 1156 Chapel St., New Haven. 203432-1234. drama.yale.edu/onstage. You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown Based on the famous comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schultz, this is a heartwarming, fun-loving musical that the whole family will enjoy. Come cheer Charlie and the gang as they pursue that fleeting thing called happiness. Produced by Choate Rosemary Hall’s theater department. Nov. 1-3. Adults $15, seniors (65 and older)/students/children $10. Chase Bear Experimental Theater, 332 Christian St., Wallingford. 203-697-2398. choate.edu/artscenter/ boxoffice. “Acting Out” at The Institute Library Theatre 4 presents its fifth annual “Acting Out” series of new, site-specific plays. Audiences are invited to Connecticut’s oldest independent lending library to watch the stories unfold. Nov. 6-8 at 7 p.m. with doors opening at 6:30 p.m. Reservations recom-

mended. To reserve tickets visit, t4ct.org. Several pay-what-you-can tickets available beginning at 6:30 p.m. the night of the show. First come, first served. The Institute Library, 847 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-654-7711. t4ct.org.

duced by Choate Rosemary Hall’s theater department. Nov. 14-16. 7:30 p.m. Adults $15, seniors (65 and older) and all students $10. 332 Christian St., Wallingford. 203-697-2398. choate.edu/artscenter/boxoffice.

ACES Educational Center for the Arts Presents its 13th Annual Student Cabaret The cabaret features songs, dances, spoken word, and more! All performances are devised and created by theater department students, with assistance from faculty advisors Carolyn Ladd and Peter Loffredo. Nov. 7. Snow date: Nov. 8. 7 p.m. Tickets $10. ACES Educational Center for the Arts, 55 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-777-5451. aces.org/schools/eca.

Mamma Mia! This smash-hit musical combines ABBA’s greatest hits with an enchanting tale of a mother, a daughter, and three possible dads. This feel-good show has audiences coming back again and again because every time feels like the first time. Nov. 22-24. Ticket price based on seating location. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com.

Forgot to Laugh: Sideshow and Animation Festival A crazy mix of live vaudeville performances featuring a sword-swallower, mime, magician, short animation films, and more. Nov. 9. 7 p.m. Tickets $12. Proceeds benefit New Haven Home Recovery. 827 Whalley Ave., New Haven. 203389-8885. forgot2laugh.com. The Seagull by Anton Chekhov Associate Professor of Theater Yuri Kordonsky directs Anton Chekhov’s once revolutionary and now classic masterpiece The Seagull. (1896). Nov. 13-16. $8 for the general public, $5 for senior citizens, Wesleyan University faculty/staff and non-Wesleyan students, and $4 for Wesleyan students. 271 Washington Terrace, Middletown. 860-685-3355. wesleyan.edu/cfa. Molière’s Tartuffe Whether set against its original backdrop, the court of Louis XIV, or modern statesponsored totalitarianism, Molière’s farce exposes hypocrisy as it probes the dynamics of power through social satire and psychological truth. Pro-

A Christmas Carol This joyful musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’ holiday classic features favorite Christmas carols in a production the whole family will enjoy. The story of the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge — who discovers the true meaning of Christmas — captures all the warmth, goodwill, and musical memories of the season. Nov. 29-Dec. 1. Ticket price based on seating location. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com. Accidental Death of an Anarchist Only one man can cut through massive bureaucratic duplicity and reveal what happened to the suspected anarchist who died at the bottom of a fourth-floor police station window. In a world of commonplace deception and organized corruption, he stands as a bastion of honor and justice — he also happens to be a quick-change con artist and certified maniac. Nov. 30-Dec. 21. 8 p.m. $20-$98. Student, senior, and group discounts available. Yale Repertory Theatre, 1120 Chapel St., New Haven. 203432-1234. yalerep.org/on_stage/2013-14/anarchist.html.

The Arts Council provides the job and bulletin board listings as a service to our membership and is not responsible for the content or deadlines.

Call For Artists Connecticut-based visual artists and cultural producers of all kinds are invited to submit materials and ideas to be considered for A People’s History of Art, on display at Artspace Feb. 7-March 22, 2014. Inspired by Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, this group exhibition focuses on artists who exist outside of the mainstream art establishment, who make artwork that critiques its mechanisms, and who challenge dominant histories. Artworks will be selected by independent curator, Christina Vassallo. To apply please visit Artspacenh.org/galleries/submit and upload the requested material by Nov. 15. Artists Guilford Art Center is seeking contemporary craft artists to participate in Craft Expo 2014, one of the oldest and finest outdoor craft shows in the northeast. The juried show, to be held July 1820, 2014, is open to crafts made by hand or with the use of appropriate tools, by an individual and/or with help from a limited number of assistants/apprentices. Works must be handmade in the United States or Canada and be of high quality, well-designed, and convey artistic originality and vision. The event benefits Guilford Art Center’s educational programs. Applications may be filed online at zapplication.org. The entry deadline is Jan. 10, 2014. $40 entry fee, $60 late fee. guilfordartcenter.org. Singers The award winning Silk’n Sounds Chorus is looking for new members from the New Haven area. We invite women to join us at any of our rehearsals to learn more. We enjoy four part a cappella harmony in the barbershop style, lively

• november 2013

performances, and wonderful friendships. Rehearsals are Tuesdays, 7-9 p.m., at the Spring Glen United Church of Christ, 1825 Whitney Ave., Hamden. Call Lynn at 203 623-1276 for more information. silknsounds.org. Vendors The Jewish Community Center of Greater New Haven Arts and Crafts Fair takes place Sunday, Nov. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the JCC of Greater New Haven, 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge. Vendors must reserve their space by Nov. 3. 8’x 10’ exhibit space is available for nonrefundable $70-$85. Chairs are included. Tables are available for an additional $15. Set-up time is 8-10 a.m. All merchandise must remain on display until closing. The center is not responsible for any loss or damage to the crafter’s property and it is the crafter’s responsibility to clean up at the end of the event. For more information call Tanya Weinberg at 203-387-2522 x. 216 or send e-mail to tanyaw@jccnh.org.

Services Art Consulting Service Support your creativity! Low-cost service offers in-depth artwork analysis, writing and editing services by Johnes Ruta, former arts newspaper editor, present art director of the New Haven Free Public Library, and independent curator of many venues. 203.387.4933. azothgallery.com. azothgallery@comcast.net. Art Installer Professional art installer for residential and commercial work. Over 15 years’ experience in museums, galleries, hospitals, and homes in New York City, Providence, New Haven, Chester, etc. Rate is $30 an hour, no job too small

or large. Call Mark at (203)772-4270 or send email to livepaint@aol.com. More information and examples at ctartinstall.com. Bookkeeping for Artists and Creative Professionals Get help with the “business” part of your creative business: A/P, A/R, billing, payroll, tax filings, collections, benefits, state and federal compliance, and more. Kristin Merrill has more than 20 years’ experience as a bookkeeper, business manager, and artist. Call 203-589-6995 or send email to kmerrill@riversideconsulting.biz. Japanese Shoji Screens Designed for Connecticut homes. Custom built for windows, doorways, or freestanding display, they allow beautiful filtered light to pass through while insulating. For a free quote, call Phillip Chambers at 203-888-4937 or send e-mail to pchambers9077@sbcglobal.net. Private Art Instruction For adults and children. Take this opportunity to learn in a working artist’s studio. Learn drawing, painting, print-making, and collage in a spacious, light-filled studio. I can also come to you. Send e-mail to lizpagano@snet.net or call 203-675-1105. Schedule varies and depends on your needs. Erector Square, 315 Peck St., New Haven. 203-675-1105. lizpagano.com. Web-Design Service Startup business solutions. Creative, sleek web design by art curator for art, design, architectural and small business sites. Twenty-five years’ experience in database, logistics, and engineering applications. Will create and maintain any kind of website. Hosting provided. 203.387.4933. azothgallery.com. azothgallery@comcast.net.

Jobs Please visit newhavenarts.org for up-todate local employment opportunities in the arts.

Space Artist Studio West Cove Studio & Gallery offers work space with two large Charles Brand intaglio etching presses, lithography press, and stainlesssteel work station. Workshops and technical support available. Ample display area for shows. Membership is $75 per month. 30 Elm St., West Haven.(609)638-8501. westcovestudio.com. Performance Space Elegant contemporary performance space with seating for up to 376 people. Great for concerts and recitals. Free on-site parking, warm lighting, built-in sound system, adjacent social hall and kitchen available. Unitarian Society of New Haven, 700 Hartford Turnpike, Hamden. 203-288-1807 x. 201. usnh.org. Studio Space Thirteen-thousand square feet of undeveloped studio space available in old mill brick building on New Haven harbor. Conveniently located one minute off I-95, Exit 44, in West Haven. Owners willing to subdivide. (609) 6388501.

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november 2013

Space empire expands in Hamden Steve Rodgers caters to music fans of all ages hank hoffman Ruthlessness is the foundation of most empires. But Steve Rodgers’ empire — his “Space” empire, if you will — is built on the twin pillars of music and community. Rodgers opened The Space in Hamden as an all-ages venue in May 2003. Just 25 at the time, he remembered how frustrating it had been for him when he was unable to see his favorite bands because they were playing in bars and he was underage. “I wanted a place people of any age could go,” says Rodgers in an interview on the patio adjoining The Outer Space. “They’re so hungry for music.” Seemingly hidden away in a nondescript industrial park, Rodgers’ empire of musical venues has expanded threefold over the past few years. The Outer Space debuted in 2011, and the Spaceland Ballroom opened this past spring. In a role reversal, the younger sibling clubs cater to an older crowd, serving beer and wine as well as music. Upon opening, The Space quickly became an oasis for young people. Parents from around the state could feel comfortable dropping off their teenagers for shows. And for young people who might otherwise have felt like outcasts, The Space was a place where they could be themselves. “In the last couple of years, I’ve had a bunch of twentysomethings sitting at The Outer Space tell me (The Space) kind of saved them in high school,” Rodgers says. Rodgers has always pursued an eclectic booking policy, “open to almost anything as long as it has a positive message.” In practice, The Space has by necessity surfed the trends of music popular with teens: ska, indie rock, pop punk, and — somewhat less to Rodgers’ personal taste — metalcore. With every regional and national act, Rodgers and his team face a balancing act: “What age group is this band going to

The Spinney Brothers perform at the Spaceland Ballroom. Photo by Marilyn Catasus.

draw? What room sonically does this music work best in? Sometimes those things don’t match up.”

The opening of The Outer Space addressed the weakness of The Space’s allages policy — the venue’s clientele had a

‘The Space has never been about the money. … Success is in the fact that a bunch of young kids over the last 10 years have gotten the opportunity to get their feet wet playing somewhere.’ —Steve Rodgers

tendency to “age out” after they reached 21. Besides becoming a center of local beer culture — the bar has dozens of craft microbrews as well as an extensive selection on tap — it has also created opportunities to nourish different musical communities. Rodgers notes that The Outer Space has become a popular destination for bluegrass bands and their fans. The larger Spaceland Ballroom — adjacent to The Outer Space and connected by a corridor — can book bigger draws. Rodgers and his brother Jonny led Mighty Purple, a rock band that not only played to full rooms locally during the 1990s but also toured extensively. (The group still plays occasional shows, including an upcoming Spaceland Ballroom gig on Nov. 1.) Beginning in 1993, Steve Rodgers began hosting open mics and informal concerts for touring acts in the group’s rehearsal space, across the street from The Space’s current location. Disconsolate upon receiving an eviction notice from a new landlord on a Friday in early 2003, Rodgers walked across Treadwell Street and saw a “For Rent” sign on a small building in the middle of the parking lot. He signed a lease the following Monday. “That night after I signed the lease, my wife and I found out we were pregnant with our first kid,” Rodgers recalls. “I think it’s good it happened in that order because I might have been a little freaked out, going ‘What am I doing?’” “The Space has never been about the money,” Rodgers tells me. “Success is in the fact that a bunch of young kids over the last 10 years have gotten the opportunity to get their feet wet playing somewhere that has a professional P.A., is run professionally, and had the opportunity to come see bands that might not have even come into the state” were it not for The Space.

Anna Caterina Antonacci, soprano Dall’antichitá al verismo with Donald Sulzen, piano Music of Monteverdi, Vivaldi, Gluck, Donaudy, Respighi, and more

saturday, november 16 · 8 pm Sprague Memorial Hall, 470 College St.

The Tallis Scholars Peter Phillips, director Music of Taverner, Tallis, and more

sunday, november 17 · 8 pm St. Mary’s Church, 5 Hillhouse Ave. Both concerts are free; no tickets required. www.yale.edu/ism Presented by Yale Institute of Sacred Music Celebrating 40 Years at Yale

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member organizations & partners

Arts & Cultural Organizations A Broken Umbrella Theatre abrokenumbrella.org 203-823-7988 ACES Educational Center for the Arts aces.k12.ct.us 203-777-5451 Alyla Suzuki Early Childhood Music Education alylasuzuki.com 203-239-6026 American Guild of Organists sacredmusicct.org The Amistad Committee ctfreedomtrail.org Another Octave – CT Women’s Chorus anotheroctave.org 203-672-1919 ARTFARM art-farm.org Arts Center Killingworth artscenterkillingworth.org 860-663-5593 Artspace artspacenh.org 203-772-2709 Artsplace: Cheshire Performing & Fine Art cpfa-artsplace.org 203-272-2787 Azoth Gallery azothgallery.com Backstage Players Company backstageplayerscompany.org Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library library.yale.edu/beinecke Bethesda Music Series 203-787-2346 bethesdanewhaven.org Blackfriars Repertory Theatre blackfriarsrep.com Branford Art Studio branfordartstudio.com 203-488-2787

Branford Folk Music Society folknotes.org/branfordfolk Center for Independent Study cistudy.org

Giampietro Gallery giampietrogallery.com 203-777-7760

Chestnut Hill Concerts chestnuthillconcerts.org 203-245-5736

Greater New Haven Community Chorus gnhcc.org 203-624-1979

The Choirs of Trinity Church on the Green trinitynewhaven.org

Guilford Art Center guilfordartcenter.org 203-453-5947

City Gallery city-gallery.org 203-782-2489

Guilford Art League 203-318-0411

Civic Orchestra of New Haven conh.org Connecticut Dance Alliance ctdanceall.com Connecticut Guild of Puppetry ctpuppetry.org Connecticut Natural Science Illustrators ctnsi.com 203-934-0878

Guitartown CT Productions guitartownct.com 203-430-6020 Hamden Art League hamdenartleague.com 203-494-2316 Hamden Arts Commission hamdenartscommission.org 203-287-2546 Heritage Chorale of New Haven heritagechoralenewhaven.org

Connecticut Storytelling Center connstorycenter.org

Hillhouse Opera Company 203-464-2683

Connecticut Women Artists ctwomenartists.org

Hugo Kauder Society hugokauder.org

Creative Arts Workshop 203-562-4927 creativeartsworkshop.org

The Institute Library institutelibrary.org

DaSilva Gallery gabrieldasilvagallery.com 203-387-2539 Elm City Artists, LLC elmcityartists.com 203-218-3832 Elm City Dance Collective elmcitydance.org Elm Shakespeare Company elmshakespeare.org 203-874-0801 Encore Music Creations encoremusiccreations.com

International Festival of Arts & Ideas artidea.org Kehler Liddell Gallery kehlerliddell.com 203-389-9555 Knights of Columbus Museum kofcmuseum.org Legacy Theatre legacytheatrect.org 203-457-0138 Long Wharf Theatre longwharf.org 203-787-4282 Lyman Center at SCSU lyman.southernct.edu

Firehouse 12 firehouse12.com 203-785-0468 Greene Art Gallery greeneartgallery.com 203-453-4162

Madison Art Society madisonartsociety.blogspot.com 860-399-6116

Magrisso Forte magrissoforte.com 203-397-2002

New Haven Oratorio Choir nhoratoriochoir.org

Meet the Artists and Artisans meettheartistsandartisans.com 203-874-5672 Melinda Marquez Flamenco Dance Center melindamarquezfdc.org 203-361-1210 Milford Fine Arts Council milfordarts.org 203-878-6647 Music Haven musichavenct.org 203-215-4574

New Haven Paint and Clay Club newhavenpaintandclayclub.org 203-288-6590 New Haven Sister Cities nhsistercities.org 203-787-2288

New Haven Theater Company newhaventheatercompany.com

Pantochino Productions pantochino.com

Music with Mary accordions.com/mary Musical Folk musicalfolk.com

Paul Mellon Arts Center choate.edu/artscenter Play with Grace playwithgrace.com

Neighborhood Music School neighborhoodmusicschool.org 203-624-5189 New England Ballet Company newenglandballet.org 203-799-7950 New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema nefiac.com New Haven Ballet newhavenballet.org 203-782-9038

Reynolds Fine Art reynoldsfineart.com 203-498-2200 Royal Scottish Country Dance Society, New Haven Branch rscdsnewhaven.org 203-878-6094 Shoreline Arts Alliance shorelinearts.org 203-453-3890

New Haven Chamber Orchestra newhavenchamberorchestra.org

Shoreline School of Art and Music shorelineartandmusic.com 203-481-4830

New Haven Chorale newhavenchorale.org 203-776-7664

Shubert Theater shubert.com 203-562-5666

New Haven Free Public Library nhfpl.org 203-946-8835

Silk n’ Sounds silknsounds.org

New Haven Improvisers Collective nhic-music.org New Haven Museum newhavenmuseum.org 203-562-4183

Creative Businesses Fairhaven Furniture fairhaven-furniture.com 203-776-3099

Trinity Players/ Something Players 203-288-6748

Foundry Music Company www.foundrymusicco.com

University Glee Club of New Haven universitygleeclub.org

New Haven Symphony Orchestra newhavensymphony.org 203-865-0831

Orchestra New England orchestranewengland.org 203-777-4690

Music Mountain musicmountain.com

Theatre 4 t4ct.com 203-654-7711

Hull’s Art Supply and Framing hullsnewhaven.com 203-865-4855

UpCrown Entertainment upcrown.com

Q River Creatives, LLC qrivercreatives.com 203-745-9645

Wesleyan University Center for the Arts wesleyan.edu/cfa

Toad’s Place toadsplace.com

West Cove Studio & Gallery westcovestudio.com 609-638-8501

Community Partners

Whitney Arts Center 203-773-3033 Whitney Humanities Center yale.edu/whc

Department of Arts Culture & Tourism, City of New Haven cityofnewhaven.com 203-946-8378

Yale Cabaret yalecabaret.org 203-432-1566

DECD/CT Office of the Arts cultureandtourism.org 860-256-2800

Yale Center for British Art yale.edu/ycba

Fractured Atlas fracturedatlas.org

Yale Institute of Sacred Music yale.edu.ism 203-432-5180

Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce gnhcc.com

Yale New Haven Children’s Hospital, Child Life Arts & Enrichment Program ynhh.org 203-688-9532

Hopkins School hopkins.edu Jewish Community Center of Greater New Haven jccnh.org

Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History peabody.yale.edu 203-432-5050

Overseas Ministries Study Center omsc.org Town Green Special Services District infonewhaven.com

Yale Repertory Theatre yalerep.org 203-432-1234

Visit New Haven visitnewhaven.com

Site Projects www.siteprojects.org

Yale University Art Gallery artgallery.yale.edu 203-432-0600

Susan Powell Fine Art susanpowellfineart.com 203-318-0616

Yale University Bands yale.edu/yaleband 203-432-4111

Tabor Community Arts Center 203-488-5668

Young Audiences of Connecticut yaconn.org

Westville Village Renaissance Alliance westvillect.org

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theartspaper.com • 19


ArtsPaper Nov 2013 10/15/13 11:52 PM Page 20

arts council programs

Perspectives … Gallery at Whitney Center Location: 200 Leeder Hill Drive, South Entrance, Hamden Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4-7pm and Saturdays, 1-4pm VIBRANT. A Look at Contemporary Lyricism Dates: Nov. 12 – Feb. 22, 2014 Curated by: Debbie Hesse and Insook Hwang

Sumner McKnight Crosby Jr. Gallery Location: The Arts Council of Greater New Haven, 70 Audubon St., 2nd Floor, New Haven Hours: Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm The Arts of Picture Books: Seven Illustrators Share Their Creative Process Dates: Nov. 8 – Jan. 3, 2014 Reception: Nov. 7, 5-7pm

Katalina’s Location: 74 Whitney Avenue, New Haven Hours: Mon-Friday, 8:30am – 7pm

Perspectives • Annie Sailor

Visual Treats: Syntax Dates: Nov. 1 – Jan. 3, 2014 Reception: Nov. 1, 6-8pm

Save the date for the 2013 Arts Awards Date: Friday, December 6, 11:45 a.m. Location: New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave., New Haven

Advice from the AC Dates/Locations: Nov. 7 & Nov. 21, 2-5 p.m., Keefe Community Center, 11 Pine St., Hamden

Sumner McKnight Crosby Jr. Gallery • Fred Dormer

Sumner McKnight Crosby Jr. Gallery • Sanna Stanley

Let the Arts Council staff help you find exhibition space/opportunities, performance/rehearsal space, and develop new ways to promote your work or creative events and activities. Debbie Hesse, Director of Artist Services and Programs, will be available for one-on-one appointments. To schedule an appointment call: (203) 772-2788. Walk-ins are welcome.

Make Art Work Career Strategies for Visual Artists – Season 2

Katalina’s • Syntax Mixed Media Artists

Make.Art.Work., a comprehensive professional practice program for visual artists in Connecticut, launches its second season of workshops this month. The program runs through June 2014 and is designed to support artists who are in pursuit of a professional career as an artist (actively showing and selling their work) to take the next steps toward achieving their goals. For more information visit makeartwork.org. Program presented by The Arts Council of Greater New Haven, Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County, and the Greater Hartford Arts Council, with support from the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation.

Katalina’s • Syntax Mixed Media Artists

Photo Arts Collective

Photo Arts Collective • Beverly Peterson Stearns

The Photo Arts Collective is an Arts Council program that aims to cultivate and support a community of individuals who share an interest in photography, through workshops, lectures, exhibitions, portfolio reviews, group critiques, and special events. The Photo Arts Collective meets the first Thursday of the month at the Kehler Liddell Gallery, 873 Whalley Ave., New Haven, at 7 p.m. To learn more, e-mail photoartscollective@gmail.com.


The Arts Paper - November 2013