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The Arts Paper a free publication of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven • newhavenarts.org

October 2014

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The Arts Paper october 2014

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Fringe or mainstream? Playwright, filmmaker David Pilot’s documentarian impulse

staff Cynthia Clair executive director Soonil Chun director of finance Julie Trachtenberg director of development & marketing Debbie Hesse director of artistic services & programs Stephen Grant communications manager Winter Marshall executive administrative assistant Denise Santisteban event coordinator/ administrative assistant David Brensilver editor, the arts paper Amanda May Aruani design consultant

Revealing secrets of a 15th century map Beinecke welcomes multispectral imaging project

board of directors Robert B. Dannies, Jr. president Eileen O’Donnell vice president Lois DeLise second vice president Ken Spitzbard treasurer Mark Potocsny secretary

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Artspace expands festival programming

A proposal for the future Yale School of Architecture exhibition explores big thinking

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directors Daisy Abreu Laura Barr Wojtek Borowski Susan Cahan Charles Kingsley Kenneth Lundgren Jocelyn Maminta Josh Mamis Dr. James McCoy Elizabeth Meyer-Gadon Frank Mitchell Mark Myrick Vivian Nabeta Uma Ramiah David Silverstone Dexter Singleton Lindsay Sklar Richard S. Stahl, MD Rick Wies

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october 2014  •


The Arts Paper october 2014

Letter from the editor As we’ve said before in these pages, if it’s October, it’s CityWide Open Studios. This month, the folks at Artspace who’ve organized and presented the annual art festival since 1998, invite us to be “transported/illuminated” by the work being presented in venues throughout the city – including the Goffe Street Armory, which, for the second consecutive year, is the festival’s “alternative space.” In the feature story she contributed to this issue of The Arts Paper, Amanda May Aruani, quoted Artspace Executive Director Helen Kauder as saying, “Our hope is that visitors who come feel a sublime sense of being transported in front of the work and in conversation with artists in their studios.” There’s plenty that’s new surrounding City-Wide Open Studios this year, and, as always, there’s a wealth of artwork to be seen over the course of four weekends this month. We at the Arts Council encourage you to make plans to experience as much of the annual festival as you’re able. Also worth checking out is an exhibition at the Yale School of Architecture called Infra Eco Logi Urbanism, a thought-provoking “proposal” conceived and created by the Toronto- and Ann Arbor-based design firm RVTR. In an article about the exhibition included herein, I wrote: “In great detail, Infra Eco Logi Urbanism makes a case for how we might begin to address energy, environmental, and other crises from a design perspective – starting first with big thinking about the places we live, and how those places are connected, economically and in so many other ways, to one another.” In addition to that article, I felt compelled, after seeing Infra Eco Logi Urbanism the day it opened to the public, to write a few words about that experience. In my Sounds Off column, I explained that “just as it challenges the current notion of boundaries, Infra Eco Logi Urbanism urges us – implicitly – to forget the labels and ideologies that divide us and to think about the common good, which, by definition, promises bene-

fits to each of us.” And as I wrote in conclusion, “consider this a recommendation to experience Infra Eco Logi Urbanism at the Yale School of Architecture sometime between now and November 20.” Another story that captured our attention in August was news that a team of researchers and multispectral imaging experts had spent 10 days with a 15th century map of the world that makes its home at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. “It’s one of the most important maps of the 15th century,” I quoted noted independent scholar Chet Van Duzer as saying in an article I contributed to these pages. As one might expect, the map, created around 1491 by German cartographer Henricus Martellus, has faded over time to the extent that much of its Latin text is illegible if not invisible to the naked eye. Thanks to multispectral imaging, Van Duzer and the research team that captured new images of the map in August are hoping to share with us processed images that depict the map in its earliest form. For this month’s Artists Next Door feature, Hank Hoffman talked with local playwright and filmmaker David Pilot. As Hank tells us in his piece, Pilot’s “plays have been staged at the Williamstown Theater Festival, the West End Theater, the New York International Fringe Festival, Collective Unconscious, and elsewhere.” Having relocated back here to his hometown after living for years in New York, Pilot told Hank, “What I love about New Haven is it’s a place that’s receptive to developing new ideas.” As you’ll read in Hank’s story, Pilot is involved in some very intriguing projects. Last but by no means least, Natalie Elicker, who assumed the directorship of the Institute Library in May, contributed to this issue of The Arts Paper a Roundtable column that details her experiences as she navigated her way from one career to a new one, as well as some of the wonderful programming the organization has on tap. By way of her column, Elicker points out that “at its inception, the library was a progressive beacon, the active membership of which favored equality and abolition even though these views at the time were unpopular in the region. This progressive character has re-emerged as a mainstay of today’s institution, offering, among other things, a

safe space for teen groups to meet, an art gallery that recently exhibited politically engaged art, and events that have opened doors to and minds of young and old alike.” In the November issue of The Arts Paper, we plan to explore the milestone anniversaries that several local arts organizations are celebrating this year. We hope you enjoy the stories presented herein and that you’ll remember to recycle this print publication once you’ve finished reading it. n Sincerely,

David Brensilver, editor The Arts Paper

In the next issue … The November edition of The Arts Paper will explore the milestone anniversaries that are being celebrated by several of New Haven’s iconic arts organizations. Pictured are Rex Harrison and Julie Andrews in the 1956 premiere of My Fair Lady at the Shubert Theater. Photo courtesy of Shubert Theater.

On the Cover Attendees of last year’s City-Wide Open Studios discuss a work at the opening reception at Artspace. This year’s CWOS will take place October 2-26. See story on page 8. Photo courtesy of Artspace.

picture talking James Northcote & the Fables October 2–December 14, 2014

Roman in the Provinces Art on the Periphery of Empire On view through January 4, 2015 britishart.yale.edu free admission 1080 Chapel Street at High Street

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James Northcote, “The Bee and the Drones” (p. 60, detail), pen and ink with hand-cut collaged engravings, from “One Hundred New Fables, Embellished with Designs to Each Fable,” 1817, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Fund

YALE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY Free and open to the public Tues.–Fri. 10 am–5 pm | Thurs. until 8 pm (Sept.–June) | Sat.–Sun. 11 am–5 pm 1111 Chapel Street, New Haven, Connecticut | 203.432.0600 | artgallery.yale.edu Image: African Red Slip Pelike, Tunisia, late 2nd–3rd century A.D. Terracotta. Yale University Art Gallery, Gift of Rebecca Darlington Stoddard

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The Arts Paper october 2014

artists next door

Fringe or mainstream?

Playwright, filmmaker David Pilot’s documentarian impulse

hank hoffman

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avid Pilot went to the heartland of America and came back with a story about the dark underbelly of the American Dream. His documentary Skin In the Game: The Raven Riley Story is “an intimate story of a girl and her boyfriend who got involved in a rollercoaster ride in Internet porn,” Pilot says in an interview at his New Haven loft apartment. Pilot is currently making final edits to the film. He began the project about six years ago when a friend who is a lighting designer and photographer called from Ohio to invite him to shoot a “behind the scenes” film about the making of a feature-length erotic horror film called Succubus. It was Riley’s first starring role but Pilot found many of her associates — the director, her business partners involved with her Web site, her boyfriend — just as interesting, if not more so. Once they got to trust Pilot, “they were happy to share their lives in the adult industry and their struggles,” he says. “These people were very brave to put their reputations on the line.” Pilot pursued the documentary on “the gut feeling that this would be an interesting story and a look into part of America that is very real and which is important because it’s a look at ourselves.” A playwright, filmmaker, and director whose plays have been staged at the Williamstown Theater Festival, the West End Theater, the New York International Fringe Festival, Collective Unconscious, and elsewhere, Pilot has written about 12 plays and is working on others. He is currently re-cutting Saving Manhattan, a feature film completed in 1998, to be marketed as an episodic series. Pilot returned to New Haven, where he grew up, a year and a half ago after living in New York City for 30 years. Last fall he produced and helped direct Steve Bellwood’s play The Specials, which was staged at the Whitney Arts Center. “What I love about New Haven is it’s a place that’s receptive to developing new ideas,” Pilot says. Pilot’s goal in New Haven is “to build a community of writers, artists, and directors.” Pilot formed the New York Theater Ensemble — a group with which he is still involved — four years ago. He felt it was “important to work with specific people in process mode in a workshop environment.” With NYTE, Pilot has tackled a couple of projects begun in his work at the Williamstown Theater, Hans: A Case Study and I.D> Interpretation of Dreams. He is also developing a TV series with the ensemble called Local Law 10. “The art of ensemble is very difficult to achieve because it requires a particular type of personality that can incorporate listening and sharing and understands it’s not an individual but a group expression,” explains Pilot. Which is not to say that the individual ex-

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David Pilot. Photo by Vern Williams.

pression is unimportant. “It’s a group of individuals. You want them to be symphonic, to harmonize even in their own dissonance to work together to create something that moves us, makes us reflect on who we are,” continues Pilot. “And entertains us. I don’t think that’s a bad word.” Hans was inspired by Sigmund Freud’s study of a 5-year-old boy, a study that became the basis for child psychoanalysis. Pilot — whose father was a research psychiatrist at Yale University — did intense background study for Hans. The work afforded him both the opportunity to work with artists and scientists together and to explore some of his own personal issues as someone who had been analyzed as a child. In the case of I.D>, Pilot drew on The Red Book by Carl Jung and the Egyptian Book of the Dead. As important, he solicited peoples’ dreams to act as catalysts for “metamedia” presentations — engaging “live musicians, artists, dancers, and actors working together to interpret those dreams as they are being narrated.” “Dreams are a very democratic storytelling art form. All people have dreams,” says Pilot. Because dream language is a common language, “I thought working with dreams in a mixed-media format with musicians and artists would have synergy.”

I.D> is emblematic of Pilot’s approach to theater and film in two ways: It relies on primary sources — adaptations of canonical works and the collected dreams of contemporary individuals, for example — and it is developed through improvisation for ensemble performance. “I’m interested in theater and film that is documentary in nature. Just as in collecting peoples’ dreams, collecting peoples’ stories — whether pre-existing or ongoing — is really fascinating,” Pilot says. He seeks to frame the stories “in a way that communicates to a wider audience.” This is where the Raven Riley documentary fits in with Pilot’s larger oeuvre. As a documentarian and storyteller, he is drawn to “people on the fringe who desire to be included in the mainstream and who suffer and experience in a deep way a sense of isolation and alienation” because their yearnings go unrequited. The irony, of course, is that the adult industry is both fringe and mainstream at the same time. This dilemma is manifested in the fact that in her first year in the business, Riley’s webcam site — she was a one-third partner with “Triple-X Tom” and “Jayman Ca$h” — earned $1 million, yet she had to keep her work secret from friends and family. (They eventually found out, causing her and

her boyfriend Kevin — he is a particularly sympathetic and candid figure — some large measure of social ostracism.) In Skin In the Game, pornography and evangelical Christianity “share the same place on the cultural highway,” Pilot says. There is a recurring image in the film of a giant statue nicknamed the “Touchdown Jesus” — socalled because the 62-foot tall Christ was posed with arms up as if signaling a touchdown — outside the local megachurch. (Over the course of the making of the documentary the statue was destroyed in a fire caused by a lightning strike and a replacement with a different design was built.) By the end of the documentary, Tom Leach aka “Triple-X Tom” —one of Riley’s estranged former business partners — has quit the porn business and returned to the church (and a new business custom-painting guns). Jay Morris aka “Jayman Ca$h” became a heroin addict, now in recovery. Riley — her real name is Sarah Pate — quit the adult industry and works as a hair stylist. The movie begins with the image of a computer turning on. “What I wanted to say by that is that we’re the ones who create Raven Riley by turning her on, by going online, by becoming members, by watching her,” says Pilot. n

october 2014  •


The Arts Paper october 2014

Revealing secrets of a 15th century map beinecke welcomes multispectral imaging project david brensilver

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n 1962, thanks to an anonymous donation, the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University acquired a 15th century world map created around 1491 by German cartographer Henricus Martellus. According to Michael Phelps, director of the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library in Rolling Hills Estates, California, the map – or a version of it created by Martellus – is likely one that Christopher Columbus consulted prior to embarking on the 1492 voyage that landed him on the shores of the New World. A map made in 1507 by another German cartographer, Martin Waldseemüller, makes use of the Martellus map, Phelps said, explaining that the latter represents “a real turning point in history.” The problem with learning more from the Martellus map, until this point, had been that to the naked eye, Phelps said, “it’s indistinct.” Time has caused the map to fade. Phelps said that in the 15th century, rivers and cities on the map would have been in great contrast, in terms of the colors that were used to depict them, but that over time, those colors have become muted and (again) indistinct. Until now. In August, a team of researchers led by independent scholar Chet Van Duzer spent 10 days at the Beinecke using a multispectral imaging process to bring out the history of the map. Mike Cummings, the Beinecke’s public-relations manager, said the library welcomed the multispectral imaging team. “We support all kinds of scholarship and we’re excited to see what they are able to produce,” Cummings said. Van Duzer said he first began studying the Martellus map as a source for the 1507 Waldseemüller map that resides at the Library of Congress. The significance of the Waldseemüller map, Van Duzer said, is that it was the “first map to apply the name America to the New World.” Wanting to compare the two maps, Van Duzer first studied ultraviolet images that were taken of the Martellus map in the early 1960s – before the map was acquired by Yale University. In 2010, after staff at Yale the previous year made new ultraviolet, infrared, and natural-light images of the map, Van Duzer studied those images at the independently run John Carter Brown Library, on the campus of Brown University, in Providence, Rhode Island. Able to read about one-third of the map’s previously illegible text, Van Duzer wrote a book on the subject. “It’s one of the most important maps of the 15th century,” Van Duzer said. “I’ve been sitting on the book for three years now,” he said, waiting for the results of the multispectral imaging process that was conducted at the Beinecke in August. He’s in the process of expanding on his book about the Martellus map. The technology for the Martellus map multispectral imaging project was made available by Gregory Heyworth, a professor in the English department at the University of Mississippi and the director of the not-for-profit Lazarus Project, which connects researchers with portable, high-end multispectral imaging equipment. The project itself was funded through a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Whereas in 2010 he spent a week in Providence trying, with the 2009 images taken at Yale, to read a block of text in the lower-right corner of the Martellus map, Van Duzer said images captured in August have allowed him to read that same text “without any difficulty whatsoever.” Still, he said, “the processing of the images is an art” that takes a while. At press time, only a handful of the images captured at Yale had been processed. Eagerly, Cummings said he and his colleagues at the Beinecke will “be able to put the images on our website, and

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The Martellus map on an easel, which allowed the object to be repositioned for the camera. Image courtesy of Chet Van Duzer.

we’re excited for that.” Phelps, in an email, explained the multispectral imaging process in detail. “Multi-spectral imaging,” Phelps wrote, “involves capturing a set of images of a single object at different wavelengths or bands of light, in order to better discern information about the object. Colors of light, including those the human eye can see and those it cannot, can be arranged along a spectrum according to their wavelengths. On this spectrum, the human eye perceives a broad band of different colors or wavelengths of light. … Multi-spectral imaging [MSI] involves capturing individual images at specific wavelengths or narrow bands along this spectrum, in order to discern new information about an object.” Roger Easton, Phelps wrote, a professor of imaging science at the Rochester Institute of Technology who, along with Phelps (and Heyworth), sits on the Lazarus Project’s Board of Directors, developed the technology, which “creates derivative images that combine data from the captured images.” The technology’s “application to cultural heritage is certainly new,” Phelps explained. A most important part of this kind of project, he pointed out, is the “feedback loop between scholar and scientist” – that is, in this case, between Van Duzer and Easton – through which the team works “to try to extract as much information as we can from the information we extracted from the map.” In his above-mentioned email, Phelps explained that Easton “processes the captured images of the Martellus map in order to generate a series of derivative, processed images which maximize the legibility of text and other information on the map. Roger builds an ‘image cube,’ in a sense a stack of the captured images, and then uses statistical methods to analyze the collected data and to distinguish features of the map. Some of these features, such as faded writing, may be illegible to (the) naked eye, but can be isolated statistically and then rendered legible in processed images. A feedback loop between Roger Easton, project scientist, and Chet Van Duzer, project scientist, improves the processed result and insures that we maximize the legibility of faded and obscured text on the map.”

Heyworth pointed out that capturing the images is only 15 percent or 20 percent of the process. The majority of a multispectral imaging project involves the image processing and the task of reading and understanding what’s revealed. “Multispectral imaging is an esoteric science,” Heyworth said, explaining that “we do textural science,” and that “the technology … is in its inception.” The goal, he said, is “to reveal writing that is not visible … and also to create a highly color accurate … digital reproduction of the object,” a reproduction that reaches back in time. He likened the process to looking at stars. Through the multispectral imaging process, one “looks into the earliest history of the object,” he said. And through that technology, he said, “we’re changing the canon.” n

“It’s one of the most important maps of the 15th century.” – Chet Van Duzer The Martellus map multispectral imaging project at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library was a collaboration between the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library, which oversaw the imaging process, and the Lazarus Project, which provided the equipment. The imaging team included independent scholar Chet Van Duzer, who led the project; Gregory Heyworth, a professor of medieval studies at the University of Mississippi and the director of the Lazarus project, who conducted the imaging; Michael Phelps, the director of the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library, who served as the project manager; Roger Easton, a professor of imaging science at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the imaging team’s project scientist; and Kenneth Boydston, CEO of the digital imaging company MegaVision, who designed the camera used in the imaging process and helped to capture images of the Martellus map. Learn more about the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library at emelibrary.org. Learn more about the Lazarus Project at lazarusprojectimaging.com. And visit the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library online at beinecke.library.yale.edu.

newhavenarts.org  • 5


The Arts Paper october 2014

the ac sounds off on ...

Infra Eco Logi Urbanism david brensilver The day the exhibition opened to the public, I went with a friend to experience Infra Eco Logi Urbanism at the Yale School of Architecture. I’d interviewed Geoffrey Thün, a partner at RVTR – the Toronto- and Ann Arbor-based design firm that conceived and created the exhibition – and an associate professor of architecture at the University of Michigan, I’d talked with Brian Butterfield, the Yale School of Architecture’s exhibitions director, and I’d read a detailed, narrative overview of the project – all in preparation for writing the piece that appears on page 10 of this publication. Infra Eco Logi Urbanism is a proposal for how we as a society might plan for a future in the megaregions we call home. Using the Great Lakes Megaregion (GLM) as a test case, Thün, Kathy Velikov – a partner at RVTR and an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Michigan – and RVTR partner Colin Ripley have reimagined the systems – infrastructure, economies, transportation – that connect the cities within larger geographic areas and the residents who reside therein. The aesthetic simplicity of the exhibition definitely offsets the complexity of what is

being proposed. And that is the key word – proposed – as that’s how the project’s creators view it. During a telephone interview, Thün (as you’ll read in my piece on page 10) said, “Implicit in the work … (is) an explicit mandate that we need to be thinking in radically different ways.” Consisting of three, three-dimensional models and a number of panels hanging from the gallery ceiling, the exhibition challenges us to think big about our collective future. Butterfield, during our telephone conversation, described the exhibition – the proposal – as big thinking, the kind of thinking that’s utopian in the best possible way. With Infra Eco Logi Urbanism, Thün, Velikov, and Ripley have identified a range of problems we face and they’ve proposed a model for solutions

thereto. That model requires us to think about one another, about our common needs, and about how those needs are served. Language on one of the above-mentioned panels (titled “Bordelines”) reads: “This work proposes to rethink relationships, flows and potential futures in a manner that will fundamentally challenge the authority of each real and imagined boundary within the region.” Part of RVTR’s extraordinary proposal details the benefits that could be realized by directing profits from renewable-energy distribution to public infrastructure. This had me and my equally fascinated friend lamenting the fact that a significant portion of the U.S. population would interpret that suggestion as belonging to a socialist agenda (cue spooky music).

“It’s the kind of big thinking we ought to be doing – as individuals and together, as a community, with an interest in planning for a livable future.”

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Just as it challenges the current notion of boundaries, Infra Eco Logi Urbanism urges us – implicitly – to forget the labels and ideologies that divide us and to think about the common good, which, by definition, promises benefits to each of us. The proposal also urges us to think objectively, rationally, and scientifically. This, of course, will be a stretch for those among us who eschew science to prevent their ideologies from being challenged. Which brings me to general semantics, a field of study and a way of thinking that’s of some interest to me and the friend with whom I experienced Infra Eco Logi Urbanism. Pioneered by a psychologist named Wendell Johnson, general semantics is the application of scientific thinking to personal, everyday problem-solving. Naturally, the subject of politics came up as my friend and I studied the information presented in Infra Eco Logi Urbanism. Again and again, we commented to each other that about half the country would balk at the very idea of messing around with our capitalist paradigm with an eye toward bettering all our lives. We hear the complaints all the time from the more economically conservative portions of the population. And all we hear from those folks, by way

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october 2014  •


The Arts Paper october 2014

of solutions, are different ways of dividing the pie, with the biggest pieces going to the most affluent. Inspiringly, Thün, Velikov, and Ripley have, with Infra Eco Logi Urbanism, put forth a series of linked solutions to specifically identified problems facing the public at large. The proposal isn’t at all political. It’s reasoned and forward-thinking. It’s the stuff of science and imagination, presented by folks who’re working, figuratively speaking, for us. We are all the end-users that Thün, Velikov and Ripley are talking to – whether we live somewhere in the Great Lakes Megaregion, here in the Northeast Megaregion, or elsewhere. Infra Eco Logi Urbanism is indeed, as Butterfield pointed out during our telephone conversation, a utopian proposal. Still, it’s not the stuff of fantasy. It’s the kind of big thinking we ought to be doing – as individuals and together, as a community, with an interest in planning for a livable future. Consider this a recommendation to experience Infra Eco Logi Urbanism at the Yale School of Architecture sometime between now and November 20. n David Brensilver is the editor of The Arts Paper. This is his opinion.

The Toronto Gateway: proposal for a complex in the form of a monumental landscape and a new port of arrival, orientation, congregation, sport, and research. (Physical model © RVTR 2013 photo (detail): Adam Smith). Image courtesy of RVTR.

Join the Arts Council! The Arts Council of Greater New Haven is dedicated to enhancing, developing, and promoting opportunities for artists, arts organizations, and audiences throughout the Greater New Haven area. Join us today! newhavenarts.org/membership The Arts Paper Read our feature articles and download the latest edition. issuu.com/artscouncil9 #ARTNHV Blog The Arts Council of Greater New Haven is pleased to announce the launch of our new blog, #ARTNHV. The blog covers all things art in the Greater New Haven area. artNHV.com Arts Council on Facebook Get the inside scoop on what’s happening in the arts now! facebook.com/ artscouncilofgreaternewhaven Creative Directory Looking for something? Find local creative businesses and artists with our comprehensive arts-related directory. You should be listed here! newhavenarts.org/directory E-newsletter Your weekly source for arts happening in Greater New Haven delivered right to your inbox. Sign up at: newhavenarts.org

  •  october 2014

Photography Intimate and Timeless

Judy Sirota Rosenthal ~ info@sirotarosenthal.com ~ www.sirotarosenthal.com newhavenarts.org  • 7


The Arts Paper october 2014

Be “transported & illuminated” at

City-Wide Open Studios 2014 festival expands expert-led guided tours, revisits armory amanda may aruani images courtesy of artspace

I

f it wasn’t for City-Wide Open Studios, I wouldn’t have met my husband. Mine is just one example of countless couples, collaborators, and exhibitions that have come to be thanks to Artspace’s annual visual-art festival. The effects of CWOS have rippled out to effect the culture and lifeblood of New Haven since 1998. This year, the event’s 17th, organizers invite you to be “transported / illuminated.” “We mean it in all senses of the word (transported),” explained Helen Kauder, Artspace’s executive director. “Our hope is that visitors who come feel a sublime sense of being transported in front of the work and in conversation with artists in their studios. It alludes to programmatic aspects as well; it’s about getting from place to place, the journey.” The already accessible “exhibition the size of the city” is adhering to its theme, offering to take people around on tours. “New this year, we have guided tours for each of the weekends (before it was just a patron-level event),” Kauder said. “People loved it. (This year) we are inviting people from the world of art and culture to curate tours. “The idea was, how do we stimulate people to move through the city… and feel compelled to make connections and to make the journey?” Kauder explained. These smallish tours (capacity 20 people) will take place twice a day. Tours will be $5 for students and seniors, and $10 for the general public. According to Kauder, “there will be a range of tours, (led by) everyone from Camilo Alvarez, who runs a gallery in Boston, to Yale’s first lady, Marta Elisa Moret, to Cathy Edwards of the International Festival of Arts &

The Goffe Street Armory will once again be the “alternative space” during the festival.

8  •  newhavenarts.org

Ideas. There will also be a tour for children. Each day there will be two tour options.” At press time, the following “tour curators” were listed on the CWOS website: Camilo Alvarez, Courtney Baker, Claire Barliant, Daniel Belasco, Nova Benway, Theresa Choi, Deborah Dancy, Cathy Edwards, Daniel Fuller, Emily Larned, Julius LaVaughn Stone Jr, Marta Elisa Moret, Terri Smith, Rena Tobey, and Andres Verzosa. Visit CWOS.org for the complete updated list and to reserve a spot. “On a typical tour you will probably visit three to four studios. It will be personalized, intimate,” said Kauder. “During the ‘Transported Weekend’ (formerly “Passport Weekend”) we will have shuttle buses taking people around for the tours, the other weekends, tours will begin in front (of the Goffe Street Armory/ Erector Square) and dive right in.” The “illuminated” portion of the theme refers to being “enlightened, gaining a deeper understanding of artists working in their studios,” Kauder said. The National Endowment of the Arts has recognized CWOS as a worthy endeavor, awarding one of its “Our Town” grants to the organization, in collaboration with the city of New Haven, for $50,000. “The grant supports (our) efforts, for this year and next,” Kauder said. In addition to the tours, visual effects of the grant will this year come in the form of nighttime projections on the exterior of the armory and in 9th Square following the opening reception (a continuation of LAMP), as well as special commissioned works. “In the spirit of illumination, this year’s CityWide Open Studios will feature 12 site-responsive commissions installed in and around the 200,000 square foot drill hall of the historic Goffe Street Armory over the October 11-12 weekend,” Sarah Fritchey, visual arts coordinator and gallery manager of Artspace, said. “The drill hall will feature a cocoon-like ceiling-hanging composed of hundreds of lumber scraps and mason’s string by John Kleinschmidt and Andrew Sternad of Shallow Studio that plays off the uniform pattern of the floor boards,” Fritchey detailed in an email, further explaining that “the second floor locker room will feature 10 audio recordings of five year old American boys vividly describing fantastical wars, documented by Regan Avery. Jeanne Criscola and Joan Fitzsimmons will collaborate on an interactive project presented in the second floor kitchen that will feature a growing archive of family recipes that visitors may rummage through, add to, or sample from. The front lawn and entrance will also be activated for the first time by a series of performances, moving exhibition designs, and interactive installations.” According to Kauder they were “overwhelmed by proposals,” something she attributes to the fact that the artists already knew the space (the armory), as it was last year’s “alternative space.”

Proposal for Against the Grain (drill hall installation), by John Kleinschmit and Andrew Sternad of Shallow Studio. This site-responsive installation will be just one of eighteen comissioned works that will be on display at the Goffe Street Armory (CWOS’ “alternative space”) thanks to a $50,000 NEA grant awarded to Artspace.

“If it wasn’t for City-Wide Open Studios, I might not be in New Haven, and I think it’s true for many artists!” – Helen Kauder

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The Arts Paper october 2014

Jeff Carter in his studio, CWOS 2013.

Occupying the Goffe Street Armory for the second year in a row is a bit of an anomaly. “We only very occasionally repeat sites (one example was Hamden Middle School), but it was such a grand space and we got such good feedback,” Kauder explained. “Artists were telling us ‘best space ever,’ and ‘best one yet.’ And with the redevelopments happening on Whalley (Avenue), we felt we had just scratched the surface last year. A whole other wing will be open this year.” Also new this year, open studios at Erector Square will be the culminating weekend (October 25-26) for a variety of reasons, including the cooler weather. In past years it has been the first weekend. A keynote address featuring Tom Eccles is new this year as well. “The keynote is an effort to connect CWOS with the broader art world and to make people from the art world aware of what we’re doing and to immerse them in it,” Kauder said. “Tom Eccles ran the public art fund and was a major commissioner of outdoor work, and is currently the executive director of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College, which is producing leading curators in museums and galleries. It will be great for our local audiences to hear what he thinks.” The ticketed event ($70-plus) will be a fundraiser for Artspace. It will take place in the armory’s drill hall. Eccles will speak, food trucks will be serving their specialties, and following that, there will be guided

Gar Waterman in his studio, CWOS 2013.

2013’s opening reception for City-Wide Open Studios.

Frank Bruckman in his studio, CWOS 2013.

Matt Feiner talks with attendees of last year’s City-Wide Open Studios at the Goffe Street Armory.

tours to specific installations in the building, according to Kauder. “It will be an exciting launch to the festival,” she said. This year, because the Friday night opening reception falls on Yom Kippur (October

3, 5-8 p.m.), there will be a soft opening on Thursday, October 2, 5-8 p.m. The Friday reception will still be the night with most of the artists in attendance, light projections on the buildings in 9th square, and the tie-in with the 1st Friday events in 9th

Square. “The street will be blocked off, and the reception will spill out into the streets,” Kauder promised. n Visit CWOS.org for event information.

Accendo: Day to Night by Jo Yarrington will be in the main drill hall of the Goffe Street Armory during City-Wide Open Studios.

  •  october 2014

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The Arts Paper october 2014

A proposal for the future exhibition explores big thinking about megaregions david brensilver images and captions courtesy of rtvr

O

n view since late August at the Yale School of Architecture, an exhibition called Infra Eco Logi Urbanism proposes big, regional thinking. And by “regional,” the show’s creators – architects at the Toronto- and Ann Arbor-based firm RVTR – refer to vast geographical areas called megaregions. While it’s been shown at Ryerson University in Toronto, and at the Université du Québec à Montréal, Brian Butterfield, the Yale School of Architecture’s exhibitions director, saw the makings of Infra Eco Logi Urbanism in February 2013 at the University of Michigan, when the Piranesi Variations – a project created by the Yale School of Architecture for the 2012 Venice Biennale – was on view at the school’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning. During a telephone conversation in late August, Butterfield said he was immediately intrigued with the exhibition because, in part, it looked beyond Detroit and other industrial cities, and, more important, is absolutely a statement of big thinking – one that he’d argue is utopian in the best

Composite drawing of interconnected energy, economy, resource and mobility networks within the Great Lakes Megaregion, with proposed nodal developments. (Drawing © RVTR 2014).

Chris Brubeck

possible way. Architects, Butterfield said, have always been interested in system sciences and how they apply to larger regions. While Europe is far ahead of this country in that regard, he pointed out that here, in the United States, we are starting to look at megaregions – and that big thinking offers “opportunities for designers to get involved in these megaregion design exercises.” Infra Eco Logi Urbanism uses the Great Lakes Megaregion – the GLM – as a test case for how such areas could be reimagined in terms of the interconnectivity of the population centers, economies, resources, and infrastructure therein. During a telephone interview in late August, RVTR partner Geoffrey Thün, an associate professor of architecture at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, said megaregions are phenomena that began to be identified in the 1960s and 1970s by geographers and urban planners. He described them, briefly, as “polycentric territories with multiple city centers.” The GLM includes, for example, the cities of Chicago, Detroit, and Toronto, and all that connects those urban centers. The Regional Plan Association’s policy planning initiative American 2050,

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Explore Greater New Haven living and the people and places that make it unique.

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identifies the “principal cities” in the GLM as Chicago, Detroit, Toronto, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Minneapolis, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis. In an explanatory email, Thün and Kathy Velikov, a partner at RVTR and an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Michigan, wrote: “Due to their scale, complexity and diversity, megaregions challenge the functional efficacy of pre-established jurisdictional units — be they those of cities, electoral districts, states, provinces, or nations. The GLM, one of the most expansive of the emerging global megaregions, spans two countries, eight states, two provinces, twelve major metropolitan areas, and encompasses the watershed of five Great Lakes (that contain one-fifth of the world’s fresh water).” A narrative overview of Infra Eco Logi Urbanism provided to The Arts Paper by Thün and Velikov explains that the exhibition “is a design research project that explores possible urban and architectural futures within the Great Lakes Megaregion of North America.” The overview indicates that “culturally, our aim is to foster urgent debate across silos of expertise, between individuals and governments around the questions that face megaregions today.” Infra Eco Logi Urbanism began conceptually, in 2008, as a meta-project. The exhibition, Thün said during a telephone interview, is the “latest layer to the thinking

The Detroit-Windsor Crossing: The Centre for Great Lakes Governance where collective regional issues such as infrastructure, environment, resources and labor are debated. (Physical model © RVTR 2013 photo: Michel Brunelle).

Continued on page 17

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READING ENGLISH An Exhibition Celebrating the James Marshall & Marie-Louise Osborn Collection September 5 –December 15, 2014 This exhibition marks the 80th anniversary of the James Marshall

June 2 - November 2, 2014

and Marie-Louise Osborn Collection of English Literary and Historical Manuscripts, held at Yale’s Beinecke Library. Renowned for its holdings in English manuscripts, archives, and annotated books, the Osborn Collection has had since its inception a formative influence on early modern British scholarship. This was the intention of the collection’s founder, James Marshall Osborn, who studied English Literature at Oxford University before settling at Yale. The exhibition introduces the collector alongside the collection: scholar and collector of early modern British manuscripts; colleague and friend of literary critics Cleanth Brooks, William Wimsatt, Robert Penn Warren, Maynard Mack, and Wilmarth Lewis; and active participant in Yale University’s emergence as the leading center for literary criticism in 20th-century America. Free and open to the public Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library 121 Wall Street, New Haven, Connecticut

beinecke.library.yale.edu

1 State Street, New Haven • Free Admission & Parking 203-865-0400 • kofcmuseum.org

  •  october 2014

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The Arts Paper october 2014

CALENDAR Classes & Workshops ACES Educational Center for the Arts 55 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-777-5451. aces.org/schools/eca. Creative Dramatics. Quality acting classes for kids and teens offered on Saturdays, through May, for ages 8-11 and 12-16. Call Ingrid Schaeffer, chair, theater department, at 203-795-9011 or email ingrids@optonline.net. Classes are 9-10:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Please call or write for more information. Connecticut Natural Science Illustrators Yale Peabody Museum Community Education Center 230 West Campus Drive, Orange. 203-934-0878. ctnsi.com. Fall Art Classes. Check out our exciting new fall line-up of art classes at CTNSI. We are offering a variety of courses including Fundamentals of Natural Science Illustration, Colored Pencil on Mylar, Insects Writ Large, Botanical Watercolor, Drawing and Painting Birds, Landscapes in Oil, and Drawing from the Dioramas. To register, visit ctnsi.com or email ctnsi.info@ gmail.com. Classes are offered Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m., through October 27. Art Classes in Natural Science Illustration. Delve into natural history drawing and painting with a wide array of courses. We offer classes and workshops in Beginning Drawing, Botanical Watercolor, The Science of Color, Drawing and Painting Birds, Landscapes in Oil, Colored Pencil and Insects Writ Large. Visit ctnsi.com or email ctnsi.info@gmail.com for details. Classes are offered Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., through December 13. Creative Arts Workshop 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-562-4927. birdabode2014.org. Fall Session: Classes and Workshops. Have you ever wanted to paint a landscape? Or shoot great family photos? Or make your own jewelry? Give your creativity a kick-start with visual art classes for all ages and experience levels in book arts, design, drawing and painting, fiber, fashion, jewelry, photography, pottery, and sculpture. Register online today! Session runs through December 5. Guilford Art Center 411 Church St., Guilford. 203453-5947. guilfordartcenter.org. Fall Semester of Classes at Guilford Art Center Classes for all ages and skill levels available, in media such as ceramics, painting and drawing, sewing, blacksmithing, jewelry and metalsmithing, stone carving, photography, and more. After-school classes for youth. Visit website for information and to register. Classes run through November 15.

Call or click to discuss your project. www.meamobile.com 59 Elm Street | New Haven, CT

info@meamobile.com 203.599.1111

12  •  newhavenarts.org

Musical Folk First Presbyterian Church 704 Whitney Avenue, New Haven. 203-691-9759. MusicalFolk.com. Daily Music Together Classes for Toddlers. A fun creative music and movement program for kids ages 0-5 and the grownups who love them! Come sing, dance, and play instruments in an informal setting. Classes and demonstration classes ongoing through December 15 in New Haven, Woodbridge, Hamden, East Haven, and Cheshire. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Demonstration classes are free and open to the public. Eleven week semester is $249 and includes a CD and songbook. Each semester features a new collection of music. Neighborhood Music School 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org. English Country Dance. Beautiful music, cheerful dance, and friendly community. All dances taught by Paul McGuire. Come with or without a partner. Beginners welcome. Live music by Marshall Barron, Grace Feldman, Phoebe Barron, Margaret Ann Martin, and musicians from Marshall’s Dance Band Workshops. October 3 and October 17. 8-10:30 p.m. Royal Scottish Country Dance Society Whitney Arts Center, 591 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-2816591. rscdsnewhaven.org. Scottish Country Dancing. Enjoy dancing the social dances of Scotland. Come alone or with a friend. All dances taught. Wear soft-soled non-street shoes. Every Tuesday evening through mid-December. $8 per evening. First night free. 7:45-10 p.m. The Institute Library 847 Chapel St., New Haven. (203) 562-4045. institutelibrary.org. Storytelling Workshops. This fall, The Institute Library and the Connecticut Storytelling Center will offer a workshop series to help members become more intentional and thoughtful about how they tell stories. Each participant will have the opportunity to choose a brief story to tell, and we will help each other hone our stories. Your story may be based on your own experience, it may be a traditional folktale or legend, or you may find another genre. The workshops will be held on four Thursdays -- September 25, October 9, October 23, and November 6 – from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. They will be led by Arnie Pritchard, a storyteller from New Haven and longtime member of the Connecticut Storytelling Center. We hope you can make all four workshops, but feel free to jump in at any time! The series is completely free for library members. Membership is available for only $25, at institutelibrary.org/join.html. Sign up for the workshop series by registering at storytellingatthelibrary.

[

App Development Websites Mobile Strategy

eventbrite.com. Learn about the Connecticut Storytelling Center by visiting connstorycenter.org.

reception: Sunday, October 5, 2-5 p.m. Gallery hours: Thursday-Sunday, 12-4 p.m., or by appointment. Free.

West Cove Studio 30 Elm St., West Haven. 203-7870072. katyavetrov.com. Japanese Moku Hanga Woodblock Printing Workshop. Instructor Margot Rocklen will hold a two-day relief printing workshop. Margot will demonstrate moku hanga (Japanese woodblock), explaining image conception, color separation, block preparation and cutting, paste consistency, kento registration, and how to achieve the delicate line and tonal/color gradations characteristic of the Japanese print. Specific dates through October 25. Contact Katya Vetrov at katya8@sbcglobal.net. $225. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Creative Arts Workshop 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-562-4927. birdabode2014.org. Creative Arts Workshop Faculty Show. A biannual exhibition of new work by CAW’s faculty of professional artists. The exhibition features a diverse selection of work including oil, acrylic, watercolor, collage, metals, fiber, photography, pottery, printmaking, sculpture, and more with styles ranging from representational to abstract. On view through October 17. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Free.

Yale Center for British Art 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Exploring Artism: A Program for Families. A program for families with children ages 5-12 who are on the autism spectrum. Families learn to look and respond to artwork in the museum’s galleries with a follow-up art project. The program is free but preregistration is required. Email ycba.education@yale.edu or call 203432-2858 with your contact information. October 18. Free. preregistration required. 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Sketching in the Galleries. Sketch from original works of art in the center’s collection and special exhibitions with Jaime Ursic, MFA ‘02 and the center’s assistant curator of education. Drawing materials will be provided and all skill levels are welcome. Preregistration requested: Email ycba.education@yale.edu. October 29. Free. Preregistration requested. 5:30-7 p.m.

Exhibitions Atticus Bookstore Cafe 1082 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-776-4040. Watercolor Painting Exhibit, Watercolor exhibit of abstract compositions by Rosemary Benivegna of the natural and manmade environment, influenced by the artist’s architectural background. Works are rendered in analogous or complimentary colors with transparent washes bathing the paintings in light from unknown sources. O view through November 9. Monday-Thursday, 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. City Gallery 994 State St, New Haven. 203-7822489. city-gallery.org. Why Not? City Gallery presents Why Not? – new sculpture and painting by Nancy Eisenfeld. The work juxtaposes surprise and involvement, work and play, and is triggered by her spontaneous reaction to the world. On view October 2-October 26. Opening

Guilford Art Center 411 Church St., Guilford. 203453-5947. guilfordartcenter.org. Guilford Art League Annual Juried Exhibition. Featuring original paintings, drawings, mixed-media, printmaking, and sculpture. On view through October 4. Gallery hours: Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunday, 12-4 p.m. Free. John Slade Ely House Center for Contemporary Art 51 Trumbull St., New Haven. 203-624-8055. elyhouse.org. New Haven Paint and Clay Club Active Members Exhibit. The exhibit will feature over 100 works by artist members of the New Haven Paint and Clay Club in all forms of painting, mixed media and sculpture. The New Haven Paint and Clay Club was founded in 1900. On view through October 5. Gallery hours: Wednesday-Friday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 2-5 p.m. Exhibits are always free and open to the public. Kehler Liddell Gallery 873 Whalley Ave., New Haven. 203-389-9555. kehlerliddell.com. Signs of Life. Kehler Liddell Gallery presents Signs of Life – a reflection of the nature of people both real and imagined--featuring multimedia artist Julie Fraenkel and photographer Matthew Garrett. On view through October 12. Free and open to the public. Visit website for more information. Free. Knights of Columbus Museum 1 State St., New Haven. 203-865-0400. kofcmuseum.org. Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible. This exhibition showcases a handwritten and illuminated Bible, commissioned by the Benedictine monks of Saint John’s Abbey in Collegeville, Minn. It is monumental in both size and scope, with nearly 1,150 pages (24 x 16 inches) comprised in seven volumes. The project required 15 years and 23 professional artists and scribes to complete. On view daily, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through November 2. Free admission and parking.

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The Arts Paper october 2014

New Haven Lawn Club 193 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-777-3494. phylliscrowley.com. Above and Below. Three galleries of photographic work by Phyllis Crowley comprising swimmers, pools, and seascapes. On view through October 26. The club is open to visitors every day. Free.

present Northcote as artist, cultural broker, gossip, and chronicler of his time. On view October 2-December 14. Gallery hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday, 12-5 p.m. Open until 8 p.m. on Thursdays, December 4, December 11, and December 18. Free – all are welcome. Figures of Empire: Slavery & Portraiture in 18th-Century Atlantic Britain. This exhibition explores the complex relationship between slavery and portraiture in 18th century British art, as represented in the collections of the center and neighboring Yale institutions. On view October 2-December 14. Museum hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 12-5 p.m. Open until 8 p.m. on Thursdays, December 4 and December 11. Free – all are welcome.

New Haven Museum 114 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-562-4183. newhavenmuseum.org. Interpreting Old Bones: Art and Science Give New Meaning to Remains Found for “Nothing is Set in Stone: The Lincoln Oak and the New Haven Green.” An exhibition pairing powerful interpretive art created by seven well-known Connnecticut artists with scientific analysis by noted bioarchaeologists – an informative and revelatory tribute to the historic Lincoln Oak, which was felled by Hurricane Sandy, revealing human skeletal remains. On view through November 1. See website for times. Adults $4, seniors $3, students $2, those younger than 12 admitted free. Every first Sunday of the month admission is free of charge. Value Systems. A groundbreaking new exhibition collaboration between the New Haven Museum and Artspace that couples material from the Flatfile’s holdings of contemporary art with selections from the New Haven Museum’s historical collections. Value Systems is inspired by the dynamic history of New Haven. On view through October 31. Gallery hours: Tuesday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Saturday, 12-5 p.m. Free of charge every first Sunday of the month, 1-4 p.m. Adults $4, seniors $3, students $2. From Clocks to Lollipops: Made in New Haven. From the Colonial era to present, New Haven has produced an astonishing array of goods including carriages, auto parts, guns, corsets, clocks, and candy just to name a few! More than 100 objects from the museum are featured in this fascinating look at the production of consumer goods in New Haven over the past three centuries. On view through February 28, 2015. Adults $4, seniors $3, students $2, those younger than 12 admitted free. Free the first Sunday of the month, 1-4 p.m. Silk Road Art Gallery 83 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-772-8928. silkroadartnewhaven.com. Chinese Ink and Wash Painting. Enjoy the intricate and impressionistic landscape, bird-and-flower, and figurative work of four mid-career brush painters from central China: Hui Min, Wang Bao’an, Li Yunji, and Yang Jiahuan. On view Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., through November 4. Free of charge. Spectrum Gallery and Store Arts Center Killingworth, 61 Main St., Centerbrook. 860-767-0742. spectrumartgallery.org. Arts Festival Group Show. On view October 10-November 9, this exhibition features works by local and regional fine artists and artisans participating in the annual Outdoor Autumn Arts Festival, held on the Madison Town Green the weekend of October 11& October 12. Opening reception: October 10. 6:30-9 p.m. The gallery is an expansion of the non-profit arts organization Arts Center Killingworth. The Spectrum Gallery is open Wednesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. The Institute Gallery 847 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-562-4045. institutelibrary.org.

Film 29 Wednesday Apparition of the Eternal Church A film by Paul Festa (Yale College ‘96) featuring eight artists with connections to Yale. Screening followed by panel discussion. 7:30 p.m. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Ave., New Haven. 203-432-5062. ism. yale.edu/event/ film-screening-apparition-eternal-church.

30 Thursday Belle Amma Asante, director (2013, rated PG; 104 minutes, 35 mm). Shown in conjunction with the Yale Center for British Art exhibition Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18th Century Atlantic Britain, this film screening and discussion will be held at the Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St. 7-9:15 p.m. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

Galas & Fundraisers Creation, Donald Jackson, Copyright 2003, The Saint John’s Bible, Saint John’s University, Collegeville, Minnesota. The Knights of Columbus Museum current feature exhibition, Illuminating the Word: The Saint John’s Bible, showcases the first handwritten and illuminated Bible in 500 years. Illuminating the Word presents 68 original pages of The Saint John’s Bible with tools, sketches, materials and rare books. The project was completed over a 15-year span by a team of 23 professional scribes, artists and assistants in Wales, under the artistic direction of renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson. The complete work includes 1,127 handwritten pages and more than 160 major artworks.

Stilled Life at the Institute Library. Featured artists: April Childers, Angelina Gualdoni, Keiko Narahashi, and Tom Reilly. Curated by Sophie Aston. On view through October 11. Gallery hours: Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Whitney Humanities Center Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall Street, New Haven. 203-432-0670. www.yale.edu/whc/GalleryAtTheWhitney/current. html. Conversing with Things: Drawings, Paintings, and Pastels by Karsten Harries. These pictures by Karsten Harries do not try to make a point. They do not demonstrate anything. They seek to respond to some often not particularly memorable objects, a rock formation, a seashell, roots, flowers, fruit, garbage, and especially the sea. September 3 - December 10 . 3 pm–5 pm Viewing hours are Mon/Wed 3–5pm or by appointment by calling (203) 432-0670. Free.

Yale Center for British Art 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 18371901. This exhibition, the first of its kind undertaken by a museum, examines the making and viewing of sculpture in Britain and its empire during the reign of Queen Victoria. Co-organized by the Yale Center for British Art and Tate Britain. On view through November 30. Gallery hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, 12-5 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables. Celebrating an extraordinary manuscript in the center’s collection, a set of fables written and illustrated by James Northcote (1746-1831), this exhibition will

11 Saturday Surfin’ USA: A Musical Tribute to Benefit the New Haven Chorale A fun-filled, Beach Boys-themed gala to support the community work of the New Haven Chorale. Live and silent auctions, cocktails and appetizers, wine and dinner, followed by timeless Beach Boys hits performed by the popular and versatile tribute band The Beach Meanies. The Farms Country Club, 180 Cheshire Road, Wallingford. 203-776SONG. newhavenchorale.org.

18 Saturday The Art of Wine Gala benefitting Young Audiences Arts for Learning Connecticut—VSA, featuring performances by Ginga Brasileira and Iddi Saaka. Wall of Wine Raffle, silent auction, creation station, hors d’oeuvres, drink ticket, desserts and coffee – and much more. Laurel View Golf and Country Club, 310 West Shepard Ave., Hamden. 203-230-8101. yaconn.org.

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  •  october 2014

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The Arts Paper october 2014

Music 2 Thursday Classics Series: Beethoven and The Don On opening night with the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, visit with a Latin lover, a true romantic, and a tortured genius. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $15-$74, students $10, KidTix free with adult. Woolsey Hall, 500 College St. (at Grove St.), New Haven. 203-865-0831. NewHavenSymphony.org.

3 Friday Yale Schola Cantorum: Evensong Music of Howells, Stanford, and Bax. David Hill, conductor. 5:30 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Christ Church Episcopal, 84 Broadway, New Haven. 203-432-5062. ism.yale.edu/event/yale-schola-cantorum-evensong.

7 Tuesday Music Haven Photo Exhibit Hear promising young student string quartets perform, then treat yourself to Claire’s fabulous vegetarian fare as you view an inspiring photography exhibit. Images of Music Haven musicians, taken by photographer (and Music Haven communications manager) Kathleen Cei, remain on view daily through October 31. 6 p.m. Free. Claire’s Corner Copia, 1000 Chapel St., New Haven . 203745-9030. musichavenct.org.

11 Saturday Hispanic Heritage Concert with the Haven String Quartet Celebrate Hispanic Heritage month with the Haven String Quartet! This interactive program features the music of Ástor Piazzolla (Tanguedia III), Javier Álvarez (Metro Chabacano), and Paquito D’Rivera (Wapango). 2 p.m. Free. Fair Haven Branch Library, 182 Grand Ave., New Haven . 203-745-9030. musichavenct.org.

15 Wednesday Chamber Music Concert Graduate students from the Yale School of Music will perform in the Library Court. Please note that seating is limited. 12:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

16 Thursday Classics Series: American Rhapsody Twelve-yearold piano prodigy Emily Bear and the New Haven Symphony Orchestra celebrate American music, from Simple Gifts to hot jazz. 7:30- 9:30 p.m. $15-$74, students $10, KidTix free with adult. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-865-0831. NewHavenSymphony.org.

heart to this delightful 45-minute concert of madrigals, hilarious music of P.D.Q. Bach, rousing rounds, and scary favorites to celebrate Halloween. Singalong opportunities and a post-concert reception with goodie bags! Come in costume! 2 p.m. Free. Trinity Church on the Green, Temple and Chapel streets, New Haven. 203-776-SONG. newhavenchorale.org. Adult Chamber Fest 2014 New weekend program for amateur adult musicians of all ages and playing levels! Enjoy two days of musical growth, playing in two different chamber ensembles coached by experienced artist-faculty in a warm and relaxed setting. Music is sent out in advance. All levels! Contact Kathryn Giampietro at 203-415-5100 or kgiampietro@neighborhoodmusicschool. October 25 & October 26. Visit website for schedule and details 12-8:15 p.m. $195. Includes workshop, pizza social event, and free admission to a faculty brunch concert. Neighborhood Music School, 100 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-624-5189. neighborhoodmusicschool.org.

26 Sunday Reformation Sunday Concert The Bethesda Music Series presents Bach Cantata No. 107 and other music for choir and orchestra, featuring the choirs of Bethesda and Spring Glen Church, directed by Lars Gjerde and Wyatt Smith. Free parking. Reception to follow. 4 p.m. Freewill offering. Bethesda Music Series, Bethesda Lutheran Church, 450 Whitney Ave., New Haven. 203-787-2346. bethesdanewhaven.org.

29 Wednesday Windsbacher Knabenchor The German Windsbacher Boys Choir is one of the leading ensembles of its kind. Sacred music, from the Renaissance to the present, forms the core of its repertoire. A unique synthesis of musicality, versatility, precision, and purity of sound is the choir’s trademark. 7:30 p.m. Suggested donation at the door is $15.00 per person ($10 senior/student). Trinity Episcopal Church on the Green, Corner of Temple and Chapel streets, New Haven. 203-776-2616. Trinitynewhaven.org.

to join, come to our rehearsal at the Spring Glen Church in Hamden at 6:30 p.m. We make great harmony and wonderful friends. Come find your voice. Contact Lynn at 203-623-1276. Free. Spring Glen Church, 1825 Whitney Ave., Hamden. silknsounds.org.

11-12 Saturday-Sunday Annual Outdoor Autumn Arts Festival The event offers a wide-range of artists including representational and abstract painters, photographers, sculptors, potters, ceramicists, jewelry designers, and fine artisans working with glass, fabric, wood, and more. Also enjoy live music and food! Presented by the nonprofit arts organization Arts Center Killingworth. October 11 - October 12. Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sunday, 5 p.m. Free. Boston Post Road and Copse Road, Madison. 860-663-5593. artscenterkillingworth.org.

14 Tuesday October Meeting and Artist Demonstration Connecticut artist Elizabeth Rhoades will present “Emphasis on Underpainting.” She will demonstrate how to build a pastel painting on top of a watercolor underpainting, lending mystery and softness to the work. A Signature Member of the Connecticut Pastel Society, her work depicts a knowledge of and passion for the spiritual qualities of the landscape. Coffee and conversation begins at 7 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting at 7:15 p.m., and the artist’s demonstration at 7:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. 2901 Dixwell Ave., Hamden. 203-494-2316. hamdenartleague.com.

18 Saturday Homecoming 2014 LOL Comedy Night Nicole Byer is one of comedy’s fastest rising stars. As a breakout of MTV’s hit show Girl Code, she holds more than

166,000 Twitter followers and now regularly appears all over the network. Pete Davidson can be seen as a series regular on three MTV programs Guy Code, Wild ‘N’ Out, and Failosophy. See our site for additional performers. 8 p.m. $15 general public, $5 faculty/ staff/active alumni and SCSU student guests (limit two), free for SCSU students with valid ID (limit one). General admission. For mature audiences. 501 Crescent St., New Haven, New Haven. 203-392-6154. tickets.southernct.edu.

25 Saturday A Jew Grows in Brooklyn The smash hit comedy musical about the search for identity and meaning. This benefit performance is presented by Community One to support the Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven! 7:30 p.m. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com.

31 Friday Preview Reception for the Celebration of American Crafts A special preview night- free and open to the public. Members receive a 15 percent discount during the preview, and all opening weekend! 5-8 p.m. Creative Arts Workshop, 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-562-4927. birdabode2014.org. Celebration of American Crafts An annual exhibition and sale of fine, contemporary crafts sponsored by Creative Arts Workshop. The exhibition is held in CAW’s handsome two-story Hilles Gallery. All proceeds from the Celebration of American Crafts directly support the artists and CAW’s community programming. Open through December 24. Monday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thursday, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday, 1-5 p.m.; December 24, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Creative Arts Workshop, 80 Audubon St., New Haven. 203-5624927. birdabode2014.org.

30 Thursday Three Mo’ Tenors “a lively and unexpectedly moving evening of music.” -- Joy Goodwin, The New Yorker. Proceeds to benefit Christian Community Action’s emergency and transitional housing programs and other services for families in crisis in New Haven. 7:30 p.m. Tickets ($35, $45, $55, and $65) on sale after Labor Day. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. ccahelping.org.

31 Friday Haven String Quartet Wind down after work with a 40-minute show and a glass of a wine. Explore Zoltán Kodály’s Intermezzo for String Trio and Astor Piazzolla’s Six Tango Etudes in a relaxed setting, and discover what makes the music brilliant. Tonight’s program includes performances by resident musicians Yaira Matyakubova, Colin Benn, and Philip Boulanger. 5:30 p.m. $8. Music Haven, 117 Whalley Ave., New Haven . 203-745-9030. musichavenct.org.

18 Saturday Yale Schola Cantorum – Zelenka: Missa Dei Patris, ZWV 19 Masaaki Suzuki, conductor With Juilliard 415. 7:30 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, St. Mary’s Church, 5 Hillhouse Ave., New Haven. 203432-5062. ism.yale.edu/event/ yale-schola-cantorum-zelenka-missa-dei-patris-zwv.

Yale School of Music Brass Quintet Music by William Byrd, Gustav Holst, Kenneth Alford, and other British composers. Carl Stanley, trumpet; Patrick Durbin, trumpet; Thomas Park, French horn; Curtis Biggs, trombone; and Daniel Fears, bass trombone. Library Court. Please note that seating is limited. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

Special Events 3 Friday

Liuwe Tamminga, Organist Music of Guami, Trabaci, Palestrina, Gabrielle, and de Murcia with Bruce Dickey, cornetto. 5 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Marquand Chapel, 409 Prospect St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. ism.yale.edu/event/ guest-artist-liuwe-tamminga-organist.

MFA Readings at the Institute Library Students and alumni of Fairfield University’s MFA in Creative Writing program read from their original works from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Institute Library, 87 Chapel St., New Haven. Participants include Sean Buckley, Dan Gunderman, Lawrence Lyman, David Legere, Dan Hadjucky, Elizabeth Hilts, Joshua Wise, Jenni Swan, Kristin Rose, Joe Reynolds, Kate Gorton, Zac Zander, Jillian Ross, Samantha Stephenson, Colin Hosten, and Daisy Abreu. For more information about Fairfield University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, visit fairfield.edu.

25 Saturday

7 Tuesday

19 Sunday

New Haven Chorale Halloween Concert Trick or Treat! The New Haven Chorale and The Trinity Girls’ Choir welcome children and all who are young at

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Fall Membership Drive Silk’n Sounds is continuing its fall membership drive. If you’re a woman who loves to sing and has been looking for just the right chorus

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The Arts Paper october 2014

Talks & Tours 1 Wednesday “Inspiration and Eccentricity: The Ups and Downs of James Northcote” In this opening lecture for the special exhibition Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables, Mark Ledbury of The University of Sydney will examine Northcote’s inventive and strange collages, and explore some of the reasons that Northcote’s career is so colorful and telling for historians of British art and culture. 5:30 p.m. Free – everyone welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

2 Thursday Members’ Tour: Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables A tour of this special exhibition by the exhibition curators for members of the Yale Center for British Art. Membership is free: please visit britishart.yale.edu for more information. 3 p.m. Free for members of the Yale Center for British Art. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Literature & Spirituality: Pat Boswell “Not a Tame Lion: Love and Faith in the Letters of John Boswell.” Presented in collaboration with the Yale Divinity Student Book Supply, with support from the St. Thomas More Chapel and Center at Yale; additional support from Yale Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies 5:30 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, Golden Center, St. Thomas More Chapel and Center at Yale, 268 Park St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. ism.yale. edu/event/literature-spirituality-pat-boswell.

4 Saturday Introductory Tour An introductory tour of the Yale Center for British Art by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – everyone welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

5 Sunday Exhibition Tour: Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention A tour of the special exhibition led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart. yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

6 Monday Liturgy Symposium: Bridget Nichols “Must We Mean What We Pray?” Bridget Nichols, Lay Chaplain to the Bishop of Ely and Visiting Scholar, Sarum College (UK). 4:30 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, ISM Great Hall, 409 Prospect St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. ism.yale.edu/event/ liturgy-symposium-bridget-nichols.

7 Tuesday Art in Context – Close Looking: A Northcote Collage in Detail Gallery talk by A. Cassandra Albinson, curator and acting head of the Department of Paintings and Sculpture, Yale Center for British Art, and co-curator of the exhibition Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables. 12:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

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8 Wednesday

14 Tuesday

Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18th Century Atlantic Britain Opening Panel Discussion for this special exhibition with Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art, Yale University; Kobena Mercer, professor, history of art and African American studies, Yale University; and Titus Kaphar, artist. 5:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

Art in Context Gallery Talk by Meredith Gamer Meredith Gamer is a PhD candidate at the Department of the History of Art, Yale University, and co-curator of the exhibition Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18th Century Atlantic Britain. 12:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

9 Thursday Exhibition Tour: Figures of Empire A tour of the special exhibition Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in Eighteenth-Century Atlantic Britain. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Art Circles Led by Jaime Ursic, assistant curator of education, each session of these 30-minute discussions in the center’s galleries explore a different highlight of the center’s collections. Please meet at the information desk. 12:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Members’ Tour: Figures of Empire A special tour for members of the Yale Center for British Art of the special exhibition Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18th Century Atlantic Britain. Membership is free. Please visit britishart.yale.edu/membership for more information. 3 p.m. Free for members of the Yale Center for British Art. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

10 Friday “An Anglo-American Object?” Martina Droth, associate director of research and curator of sculpture at the Yale Center for British Art, and co-curator of the exhibition Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837-1901. 5:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart. yale.edu.

11 Saturday Introductory Tour An introductory tour of the Yale Center for British Art led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart. yale.edu.

12 Sunday Exhibition Tour – Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables A tour of the special exhibition led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart. yale.edu.

15 Wednesday “Elasticity and Sculptural Form” This lecture by Caroline Arscott of The Courtauld Institute, London, will consider the way that Victorian physics understood energy to act on and in substance. It is presented in conjunction with the Yale Center for British Art exhibition Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837-1901. 5:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

16 Thursday Exhibition Tour: Figures of Empire Tour of the special exhibition Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18th Century Atlantic Britain. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

18 Saturday Architecture Tour A tour of the Yale Center for British Art’s architecture led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Exhibition Tour: Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables A tour of the special exhibition led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

19 Sunday Exhibition Tour: Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention A tour of the special exhibition led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart. yale.edu. Student Guided Tour A tour designed and led by a Yale University undergraduate student guide. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 2 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Patrick Oliphant’s Interpretation of U.S. Presidents from Johnson to Obama A discussion between Patrick Oliphant, political cartoonist, and David McCullough, biographer. This lecture will take place at the Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St., New Haven. 3 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-4322800. britishart.yale.edu.

Twelve-year-old pianist Emily Bear performs with the New Haven Symphony Orchestra on October 16 at the Shubert Theater. Photo courtesy of the NHSO.

Kavanagh Lecture: Gordon Lathrop “Saving Images: New Testament Metaphors and the Purposes of Christian Worship.” Gordon Lathrop Professor of Liturgy Emeritus, the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia. 2 p.m. Free. Yale Institute of Sacred Music, ISM Great Hall, 409 Prospect St., New Haven. 203-432-5062. ism.yale.edu/event/ kavanagh-lecture-gordon-lathrop.

24 Friday Arts and Culture Festival – Author Gary Rosenblatt: Between the Lines The Arts and Culture Festival at the JCC is a series of art, music, and author events. Author Gary Rosenblatt will speak about his book, Between the Lines. 12 p.m. JCC of Greater New Haven, 360 Amity Road, Woodbridge. 203-387-2522. jewishnewhaven.org/events/ arts--culture-festival-2014.

25 Saturday Introductory Tour An introductory tour of the Yale Center for British Art led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Exhibition Tour: Figures of Empire A tour of the special exhibition Figures of Empire: Slavery and Portraiture in 18th Century Atlantic Britain. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

26 Sunday Exhibition Tour – Picture Talking: James Northcote and the Fables A tour of the special exhibition led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 1 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

28 Tuesday Art in Context Gallery Talk A gallery talk by Tess Korobkin, PhD candidate, department of the history of art, Yale University. This talk is offered in conjunction with the special exhibition Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention, 1837-1901. 12:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

23 Thursday “Offensive Vulgarity in an Age of Enlightenment” This lecture by Steve Bell, principal political cartoonist for The Guardian newspaper in Britain, will explore William Hogarth’s continuing legacy for contemporary graphic satire and will address the question of just how necessary it still is to offend. 5:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart. yale.edu.

30 Thursday Exhibition Tour: Sculpture Victorious: Art in an Age of Invention A tour of the special exhibition led by a docent. Please meet in the Entrance Court. 11 a.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu.

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Theater Godspell Book by John Michael Tebelak, music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz. Conceived and originally directed by John Michael Tebelak. Based on the Gospel according to St. Matthew. Directed and choreographed by Larry Nye. Friday & Saturday, October 10 & October 11, 8 p.m.; Sunday, October 12, 2 p.m.; Thursday & Friday, October 16 & October 17, 8 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday, October 18 & October 19, 2 p.m. Tickets: $10 general public, $5 SCSU faculty/staff and SCSU student guests (oneticket limit), $5 all non-SCSU students (with valid student ID), free for SCSU students (ticket required, one-ticket limit, with valid ID). Mainstage seating is general admission. John Lyman Center for the Performing Arts, Southern Connecticut State University, 501 Crescent St., New Haven, 203-392-6154. tickets.southernct.edu.

The Wicked Witch of the West: Kansas or Bust Pantochino presents its new musical by Bert Bernardi and Justin Rugg. Follow the yellow brick road back to Kansas with all of the best loved characters from Oz as they search for Dorothy in this fun-filled musical. Perfect entertainment for the entire family! October 24-November 2. Friday, October 25, 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, October 26, 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.; Sunday, October 27, 2 p.m.; Saturday, November 1, 2 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.; and Sunday, November 2, 2 p.m. All seats $18 if purchased online or $20 at the door. Milford Arts Council, 40 Railroad Avenue South, Milford. 203-937-6206. pantochino.com. A Jew Grows in Brooklyn A Broadway hit comedy musical by Jake Ehrenreich about the search for identity and meaning. “Dazzling … Funny … Touching … Beautiful! You don’t have to be Jewish or Brooklynish … a lot in common with Billy Crystal’s 700 Sundays.” – The New York Times. Community One returns with the premier fundraising event for PACE. Your PACE fund can secure the future of

our Jewish community. October 25. 7:30 p.m. For ticket information, please contact the Shubert Theatre Box Office, 247 College St., New Haven. (203) 562-5666. shubert.com. $200, $125, $50. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. shubert.com/ presentations/current-season/ a-jew-grows-in-brooklyn. Staged Reading: Iphigeneia at Aulis A reading of the Euripides play presented by Yale’s English, Classics, and Theater Studies departments and directed by Murray Biggs. October 29. 5:30 p.m. Free – all are welcome. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St., New Haven. 203-432-2800. britishart.yale.edu. Mrs. Independent Presented by Priest Tyaire, starring Robin Givens and Christopher Williams. October 31. 8 p.m. Shubert Theater, 247 College St., New Haven. 203-562-5666. shubert.com.

Arts Paper ad and calendar deadlines The deadline for advertisements and calendar listings for the November issue of The Arts Paper is Monday, September 29, at 5 p.m. The deadline for the December issue of the publication is Monday, October 27. Calendar listings are for Arts Council members only and should be submitted online at newhavenarts.org. Arts Council members can request a username and password by sending an e-mail to sgrant@newhavenarts.org. The Arts Council’s online calendar includes listings for programs and events taking place within 12 months of the current date. Listings submitted by the calendar deadline are included on a monthly basis in The Arts Paper.

BULLETIN BOARD

The Arts Council provides the job and bulletin board listings as a service to our membership and is not responsible for the content or deadlines.

Call For Artist Members The Kehler Liddell Gallery in New Haven is seeking applications for new visual arts members. For more information please visit kehlerliddell.com/membership. Artists For the Arts Center Killingworth’s holiday show, The Kindness of Strangers, at Spectrum Gallery. November 21-January 11, 2015. Seeking fine artists and artisans in all media. For artist submission form, visit spectrumartgallery.org or email barbara@spectrumartgallery.org. Spectrum Gallery and Store, 61 Main St., Centerbrook. Intern A student studying in the field of fine arts or art history is sought to assist with all aspects of a nonprofit gallery located on the Connecticut shoreline that focuses on contemporary American crafts and fine art. Primary responsibility will be to organize, with staff, a series of four to five exhibits to take place from February-September, 2016. Successful candidate will have knowledge of contemporary American art and crafts and excellent communications and interpersonal skills. Preference will be given to graduate students or students intending to enter graduate school. Internship runs from September or October to August 2015, with hours to total approximately 100. A small stipend is available. To apply, please send resume and letter of intent to Maureen Belden, executive director, Guilford Art Center, at intern@ guilfordartcenter.org. Resident Artist Guilford Art Center is launching a pottery residency program and is seeking emerging artists. The residency is one year long, beginning as early as September. The position will provide opportunities, in the form of tools, working time, and space, for artists to develop their own ceramic art while contributing to the workings of a communal pottery studio in an educational environment. The resident will be responsible for monitoring of open studio practice times, including interacting with, inspiring, and assisting students. The studio runs year-round on a four-semester basis, offering classes and workshops for students and enthusiasts of all levels. There are also opportunities to learn about technical aspects of the studio, including firings and glaze mixing, if the resident so wishes. Singers The award winning Silk’n Sounds Chorus is looking for new members from the Greater New Haven area. We invite women to join us at any of our rehearsals to learn more. We enjoy four part a cappella harmony, lively performances, and

16  •  newhavenarts.org

wonderful friendships. Rehearsals are every Tuesday from 6:30-9 p.m. at the Spring Glen United Church of Christ, 1825 Whitney Ave., in Hamden. Contact Lynn at 203-623-01276 for more information or visit silknsounds.org.

arts newspaper editor, current art director of the New Haven Free Public Library, and independent curator of many venues. Call Johnes Ruta at 203387-4933, visit azothgallery.com, or send email to azothgallery@comcast.net.

Student Artists and Performers Information about the Shoreline Arts Alliance Scholarship in the Arts for high school juniors and seniors is available now at shorelinearts.org or by calling 203-453-3890. $1,000 cash prizes awarded in creative writing, dance, instrumental music, vocal Music, theater, and visual arts. Applicants must reside in one of the 24 towns served by the Shoreline Arts Alliance. Application deadline (postmarked by): December 19. Auditions/portfolio reviews: late January and early February.

Birthday Parties at Guilford Art Center Schedule a two-hour party and our youth program instructors will tailor projects to your child’s creative interests. Themes include Outer Space, Pirates, Clay, Puppets, Jewelry, Fairies, and others. Art parties offer a fun and creative environment for children’s celebrations. Please call Lynn Fischer at 203-453-5947 x. 11 for more information and to request a brochure. $100 for five children minimum; $15 for each addition child. guilfordartcenter.org.

Volunteers Learn new skills, meet new people, and be part of a creative organization that gives to the community. Upcoming volunteer opportunities: Outdoor Autumn Arts Festival, Madison Town Green, October 11 and October 12, and Jazz Night Out Concert, The Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center, Old Saybrook, November 22. Teens are welcome and earn community-service credit. The Arts Center Killingworth is a non-profit arts organization. Visit artscenterkillingworth.org for more details or call 860-663-5593.

Chair Repair We can fix your worn-out chair seats if they are cane, rush, Danish cord, Shaker Tape, or other woven types! Celebrating our 25th year! Work is done by artisans at The Association of Artisans to Cane, a project of Marrakech, Inc., a private nonprofit organization that provides services for people with disabilities. Open Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m,-4 p.m. 203-776-6310.

Volunteers The New Haven Museum’s Whitney Library performs much of its paper conservation in-house. Our volunteer conservator wishes to train individuals who can commit to one day (four to six hours) per week, to carry on this work. Typical projects include basic repairs to documents and books, replacing acidic folders, and preparing Phase Boxes and Mylar enclosures. Outside professional conservators are used for more complex tasks or on especially important items. Please contact library@newhavenmuseum.org if you are interested. No phone calls, please. Writers New Voices in Children’s Literature: Tassy Walden Awards. The statewide competition is open to unpublished Connecticut writers and illustrators of children’s books. Submission deadline (postmarked by): February 2, 2015. Submission guidelines and an entry form are available at shorelinearts.org or by calling 203-453-3890.

Services Art Consulting Services Support your creativity! Low-cost service offers in-depth artwork analysis, writing, and editing services by former

Creative Art Birthday Parties You bring the children and cake, we do the rest! Themes: Jewelry Design for Boys and Girls, Clay and Painting Discovery, Personalized Perfumes, Felting Critters/ Flowers, and Rock Star! Arts Center Killingworth, 276 North Parker Hill Road, Killingworth. Visit artscenterkillingworth.org or call (860) 663-5593. Historic Home Restoration Period-appropriate additions, baths, kitchens, and remodeling. Sagging porches straightened/leveled, wood windows, plaster, and historic molding and hardware restored. Vinyl/aluminum siding removed. Wood siding repaired/replaced. Connecticut and New Haven Preservation Trusts. R.J. Aley Building Contractor 203-226-9933. jaley@rjaley.com. Japanese Shoji Screens Designed for Connecticut homes. Custom built for windows, doorways, or freestanding display, they allow beautiful filtered light to pass through while insulating. For a free quote, contact Phillip Chambers at 203888-4937 or send email to pchambers9077@ sbcglobal.net. Professional Art Installation For residential and commercial work. More than 15 years’ experience in museums, galleries, hospitals, and homes in New York City, Providence, New Haven, Chester, and elsewhere. Rate is $30 an hour, no job too

small or large. Call Mark at 203-772-4270 or send email to livepaint@aol.com. More information and examples at ctartinstall.com. Web Services Startup business solutions. Creative, sleek Web design by art curator for art, design, architectural, and small-business sites. Twenty-five years’ experience in database, logistics, and engineering applications. Will create and maintain any kind of website. Hosting provided. Call 203-387-4933, visit azothgallery.com, or send email to azothgallery@comcast.net.

Space Artist Studio West Cove Studio & Gallery offers work space with two large Charles Brand intaglio etching presses, lithography press, and stainless-steel work station. Workshops and technical support available. Ample display area for shows. Membership: $75/month. 30 Elm St., West Haven. For more information, call (609) 638-8501 and visit westcovestudio.com. Performance Space Elegant contemporary performance space with seating for up to 376 people. Great for concerts and recitals. Free onsite parking, warm lighting, and built-in sound system, adjacent social hall and kitchen available. Unitarian Society of New Haven, 700 Hartford Turnpike, Hamden. Call 203-288-1807 x. 201 or visit usnh.org. Studio Space Thirteen-thousand square feet of undeveloped studio space available in old mill brick building on New Haven harbor. Conveniently located one minute off I-95, Exit 44 in West Haven. Owners willing to subdivide. Call (609) 638-8501.

Jobs Please visit newhavenarts.org for up-to-date local employment opportunities in the arts. october 2014  •


The Arts Paper october 2014

A proposal for the future Continued from page 11 of the project.” In their email, Thün and Velikov wrote: “The gallery is a powerful site for not only engaging and communicating urban ideas to the public, but also a space that has the capability to produce knowledge beyond the content of an exhibition itself.” While different parts of the project have been published in discreet places, the exhibition, Thün said, “brings together the totality of the proposition.” The proposal was driven in part by a resistance to the role designers traditionally play – that is, they execute predetermined projects. As Thün sees it, the role of designers is to “propose alternate worlds.” In their email, Thün and Velikov wrote: “As designers operating as ‘problem-seekers’ as opposed to ‘problem-solvers’ we are able to address a far broader scope and scale of inquiry than what would be limited by conventional practice models and to have a central role in developing the questions we then seek to engage through design.” In terms of population, Thün said, there is a global pattern of “increased mobility to urban centers.” Thinking about the connections between the city centers that make up the GLM, Thün said the interstate highway system is a “poignant example”

of how various systems can be reimagined to better serve the territory’s residents. In Infra Eco Logi Urbanism, RVTR proposes a system of bundled infrastructure supported by renewable energy initiatives. Language in the above-mentioned narrative overview of Infra Eco Logi Urbanism reads: “Within the situation of the GLM, a point of leverage is proposed: what if the potential yield from renewable energy resources could be harnessed, not for maximum private profit, but rather for a retooling of current conditions within the megaregion? … The proposal begins with a restructuring of the highway’s constituent DNA from a simple, single-purpose and single-access surface to an intelligent network of bundled modes of mobility that can provide access for multiple vehicle types, conveyances and speeds: cars and trucks, renewable-grid-tied elevated high speed rail, renewable power transmission, high capacity data transmission, fresh water supply and waste conveyance.” In an age of fiscal austerity and constraint, Thün said in an interview, we can rethink multiple agendas for the public good. And that line of thought begs the question, as asked rhetorically by Thün: “What rights should we hold as common amongst us?” – referring to physical and nonphysical resources. “Implicit in the work,” Thün said, “(is) an explicit mandate that we need to be thinking in radically different ways.” For obvious reasons, the team at RVTRThün, Velikov, and partner Colin Ripley- has tried to present Infra Eco Logi Urbanism

RVTR partners, left to right, Kathy Velikov, Geoffrey Thün, and Colin Ripley. Photo courtesy of RVTR.

in a way that’s not polemical. Pointing to NAFTA and the Great Lakes Compact, Thün suggested that if opportunity is perceived – from a capital perspective – people could find themselves open to ideas to which they might otherwise be ideologically opposed. This approach to thinking big at the scale of interconnectivity of complex systems, Thün said, is as important to capital markets as it is to the public domain. In great detail, Infra Eco Logi Urbanism makes a case for how we might begin to address energy, environmental, and other crises from a design perspective – starting first with big thinking about the places we live, and how those places are connected,

economically and in so many other ways, to one another. Butterfield pointed out in late August that “this show, graphically, communicates itself very well.” It was important to him that the exhibition be academically rigorous while still accessible to the public. As far as the kind of thinking that Infra Eco Logi Urbanism urges, Butterfield said, “We know the conversation is going to start within the school,” and, “I don’t think this is the kind of thinking that is foreign to the Yale School of Architecture.” n Infra Eco Logi Urbanism is on view at the Yale School of Architecture thought November 20. Visit architecture.yale.edu for more information.

Actor-Network of the infrastructural, ecologic, logistic and social actors and agents implicated in the situation of the Detroit-Windsor node. (Drawing © RVTR 2013).

  •  october 2014

newhavenarts.org  • 17


The Arts Paper october 2014

The Roundtable

Venerable Institute Library once again proves progressive

natalie elicker

F

our months is the blink of an eye in the life of the Institute Library, the 188-year-old organization whose dayto-day operations I began to manage in May 2014. Nevertheless, these months have allowed me to reflect on its position, and mine, in the Greater New Haven community and perhaps to draw a meaning appropriate to the circumstances. It took no time at all for me to recognize how the community in and around the Institute Library is itself a tremendous asset. Functionally, the library’s board, its members, and its partnerships with other organizations have provided much needed know-how and experience, have advanced our ability to reach new people and institutions, and have allowed us to quite literally grow the size of the library’s community. Qualitatively, new and wonderful things have come from this interaction and collaboration of individuals and institutions. To illustrate, I offer my own start at the library as a case in point. Despite its full and official name — the Young Men’s Institute Library — the library was coeducational by 1835, nine years after its founding (and more than a century before Yale University went co-ed). At its inception, the library was a progressive beacon, the active Now I found myself having to navigate the membership of which favored equality and possibility of a forthcoming maternity leave abolition even though these views at the at a small non-profit where I was interviewtime were unpopular in the region. This ing. Initially I thought about withdrawing progressive character has re-emerged as a from the process. After mainstay of today’s all, who was I to change institution, offering, jobs only to announce among other things, on day one, “Hey, folks, a safe space for teen thanks for hiring me, but groups to meet, I’ll need a few months an art gallery that off nine months from recently exhibited now — just so you politically engaged – Natalie Elicker know”? Fortunately a art, and events that close confidant urged me not to lose sight have opened doors to and minds of young of the bigger picture. If my goals and the and old alike. But what the library offers without, it also board’s fit long-term, then these were waters I needed to test. Upon receiving a job practices within. During my interview for offer, I let the board president know that my the position of executive director, I learned inquiries about family leave were not hypothat my personal life would be changing.

“At its inception, the library was a progressive beacon”

Natalie Elicker. Photo by Judy Sirota Rosenthal.

thetical. He reassured me that the library would make it work. Not only was I relieved, I was heartened. The board’s support and commitment to allowing for this arrangement spoke volumes about the thriving progressive roots of the organization and the community-mindedness of its board leadership. This spirit not surprisingly continues to characterize the Institute Library’s programming. Just consider its collaborations with other community-minded partners. On September 4, the Library hosted an opening night event for Whispering Galleries, an event that also featured a resident violinist from Music Haven. Moreover, the New Haven Review, a formal program of the library since March 2014, will revive its collaboration with the New Haven Theater

Company in its relaunch of its Listen Here short-story reading series for the fall of 2014. And then there is our featured fall presenter, Arnie Pritchard, a longtime member of the Connecticut Storytelling Association, who will lead four biweekly storytelling workshops starting September 26 and culminating in a November “Tellabration!” In combination, these programs perform exactly the traditional “oratory” function the library was famous for — remember, Frederick Douglass once was a speaker at the Institute Library — enriching the discourse of the local communities of which it is a part and staking a claim as one of New Haven’s centers of civic dialogue. Natalie N. Elicker is the executive director of the Institute Library in New Haven.

yale institute of sacred music presents

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saturday, october 18 7:30 pm st. mary’s church

sunday, october 19 5 pm marquand chapel

saturday, november 1 5 pm woolsey hall

Yale Schola Cantorum Masaaki Suzuki, conductor Zelenka: Missa Dei Patris

Liuwe Tamminga, organ Bruce Dickey, cornetto Music of Palestrina, Gabrieli and more

The Choir of Westminster Abbey James O’Donnell, conductor Daniel Cook, organ Music from the Royal Wedding and more

CM

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All events are free; no tickets required. ism.yale.edu

18  •  newhavenarts.org

october 2014  •


The Arts Paper member organizations & partners

Arts & Cultural Organizations A Broken Umbrella Theatre abrokenumbrella.org 203-868-0428 ACES Educational Center for the Arts aces.k12.ct.us 203-777-5451 Adele Myers and Dancers adelemyersanddancers.com Alyla Suzuki Early Childhood Music Education alylasuzuki.com 203-239-6026 American Guild of Organists sacredmusicct.org The Amistad Committee ctfreedomtrail.org Another Octave CT Women’s Chorus anotheroctave.org ARTFARM art-farm.org Arts Center Killingworth artscenterkillingworth.org 860-663-5593 Artspace artspacenh.org 203-772-2709 Artsplace: Cheshire Performing & Fine Art cpfa-artsplace.org 203-272-2787 Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library library.yale.edu/beinecke Bethesda Music Series bethesdanewhaven.org 203-787-2346 Blackfriars Repertory Theatre blackfriarsrep.com Branford Art Studio branfordartstudio.com 203-488-2787 Branford Folk Music Society folknotes.org/branfordfolk

Center for Independent Study cistudy.homestead.com Chestnut Hill Concerts chestnuthillconcerts.org 203-245-5736 The Choirs of Trinity Church on the Green trinitynewhaven.org City Gallery city-gallery.org 203-782-2489 Civic Orchestra of New Haven conh.org Classical Contemporary Ballet Theatre ccbtballettheatre.org Connecticut Dance Alliance ctdanceall.com Connecticut Gay Men’s Chorus ctgmc.org 800-644-cgmc Connecticut Guild of Puppetry ctpuppetry.org Connecticut Natural Science Illustrators ctnsi.com 203-934-0878 Connecticut Storytelling Center connstorycenter.org Creative Arts Workshop creativeartsworkshop.org 203-562-4927 Creative Concerts 203-795-3365 CT Folk ctfolk.com DaSilva Gallery gabrieldasilvagallery.com 203-387-2539 Elm City Dance Collective elmcitydance.org Elm Shakespeare Company elmshakespeare.org 203-874-0801 Fellowship Place fellowshipplace.org

  •  october 2014

Firehouse 12 firehouse12.com 203-785-0468 Fred Giampietro Gallery giampietrogallery.com 203-777-7760 Greater New Haven Community Chorus gnhcc.org 203-624-1979 Guilford Art Center guilfordartcenter.org 203-453-5947 Guitartown CT Productions guitartownct.com 203-430-6020 Hamden Art League hamdenartleague.com 203-494-2316 Hamden Arts Commission hamdenartscommission.org 203-287-2546 Hillhouse Opera Company hillhouseoperacompany.org 203-464-2683 Hopkins School hopkins.edu Hugo Kauder Society hugokauder.org The Institute Library institutelibrary.org International Festival of Arts & Ideas artidea.org International Silat Federation of America & Indonesia isfnewhaven.org John Slade Ely House elyhouse.org Kehler Liddell Gallery kehlerliddell.com

Lyman Center at SCSU www.lyman.southernct.edu

New Haven Chamber Orchestra newhavenchamberorchestra.org

Silk Road Art Gallery silkroadartnewhaven.com

Creative Businesses

Madison Art Society madisonartsociety.blogspot.com 860-399-6116

New Haven Chorale newhavenchorale.org 203-776-7664

Susan Powell Fine Art susanpowellfineart.com 203-318-0616

Best Video 203-287-9286 bestvideo.com

Madison Lyric Stage madisonlyricstage.org

New Haven Free Public Library nhfpl.org 203-946-8835

Theatre 4 t4ct.com 203-654-7711

Fairhaven Furniture fairhaven-furniture.com 203-776-3099

New Haven Oratorio Choir nhoratoriochoir.org

Trinity Players/ Something Players 203-288-6748

Foundry Music Company www.foundrymusicco.com

Magrisso Forte magrissoforte.com 203-397-2002 Make Haven makehaven.org Mamas Markets mamasmarketsllc.com Marrakech, Inc./Association of Artisans to Cane marrakechinc.org Meet the Artists and Artisans meettheartistsandartisans.com 203-874-5672 Melinda Marquez Flamenco Dance Center melindamarquezfdc.org 203-361-1210 Milford Fine Arts Council milfordarts.org 203-878-6647 Music Haven musichavenct.org 203-215-4574

New Haven Museum newhavenmuseum.org 203-562-4183 New Haven Paint and Clay Club newhavenpaintandclayclub.org 203-288-6590 New Haven Preservation Trust nhpt.org New Haven Review newhavenreview.com New Haven Symphony Orchestra newhavensymphony.org 203-865-0831 New Haven Theater Company newhaventheatercompany.com Orchestra New England orchestranewengland.org 203-777-4690 Pantochino Productions pantochino.com

Music Mountain musicmountain.com 860-824-7126

Paul Mellon Arts Center choate.edu/artscenter

Music with Mary accordions.com/mary

Play with Grace playwithgrace.com

Musical Folk musicalfolk.com

Reynolds Fine Art reynoldsfineart.com

Neighborhood Music School neighborhoodmusicschool.org 203-624-5189

Knights of Columbus Museum kofcmuseum.org

New England Ballet Company newenglandballet.org 203-799-7950

Legacy Theatre legacytheatrect.org 203-457-0138

New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema nefiac.com

Long Wharf Theatre longwharf.org 203-787-4282

New Haven Ballet newhavenballet.org 203-782-9038

Hull’s Art Supply and Framing hullsnewhaven.com 203-865-4855

University Glee Club of New Haven universitygleeclub.org

MEA Mobile meamobile.com

Wesleyan University Center for the Arts wesleyan.edu/cfa

The Owl Shop owlshopcigars.com

West Cove Studio & Gallery westcovestudio.com 609-638-8501

Toad’s Place toadsplace.com

Whitney Arts Center 203-773-3033

Community Partners

Yale Cabaret yalecabaret.org 203-432-1566

Department of Arts Culture & Tourism, City of New Haven cityofnewhaven.com 203-946-8378

Yale Center for British Art yale.edu/ycba

DECD/CT Office of the Arts cultureandtourism.org 860-256-2800

Yale Glee Club yale.edu/ygc Yale Institute of Sacred Music yale.edu.ism 203-432-5180 Yale Repertory Theatre yalerep.org 203-432-1234

Fractured Atlas fracturedatlas.org JCC of Greater New Haven jccnh.org Overseas Ministries Study Center omsc.org

Yale School of Music music.yale.edu 203-432-1965

Royal Scottish Country Dance Society, New Haven Branch rscdsnewhaven.org 203-878-6094

Town Green Special Services District infonewhaven.com

Yale University Art Gallery artgallery.yale.edu 203-432-0600

Visit New Haven visitnewhaven.com

Shoreline Arts Alliance shorelinearts.org 203-453-3890

Yale University Bands yale.edu/yaleband 203-432-4111

Shubert Theater shubert.com 203-562-5666

Young Audiences of Connecticut yaconn.org

Westville Village Renaissance Alliance westvillect.org

Silk n’ Sounds silknsounds.org

newhavenarts.org  • 19


The Arts Paper arts council programs

Perspectives … Gallery at Whitney Center Location: 200 Leeder Hill Drive, South Entrance, Hamden Hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4-7 p.m. & Saturdays, 1-4 p.m.

On The Spiritual in Art: Connecting to our inner inclinations Curated by Debbie Hesse Dates: Coming soon Visit newhavenarts.org for more information.

Sumner McKnight Crosby Jr. Gallery Location: The Arts Council of Greater New Haven, 70 Audubon St., 2nd Floor, New Haven Hours: Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Thinking Through Painting A group show of artists participating in a painters art critique group Dates: Through November 7 Public reception: Thursday, October 2, 5-7 p.m.

Advice from the AC Perspectives … The Gallery at Whitney Center. Installation detail, Leah Caroline.

Let the Arts Council staff help you find exhibition space/opportunities, performance/rehearsal space and develop new ways to promote your work or creative events and activities. Debbie Hesse, the organization’s director of artistic services and programs, will be available for one-on-one appointments. To schedule an appointment call 203772-2788 or email info@ newhavenarts.org. Walkins are also welcome. Dates: Thursdays, October 2 & 9, 1-4 p.m. Location: The Gallery at EleMar, 2 Gibbs St., New Haven

Photo Arts Collective Stephen Grant (standing) with members of the Elm Shakespeare Company.

Photo Arts Collective. Beverly Peterson Stearns.

The Photo Arts Collective is an Arts Council program that aims to cultivate and support a community of individuals who share an interest in photography, through workshops, lectures, exhibitions, portfolio reviews, group critiques, and events. The Photo Arts Collective meets the first Thursday of the month at the Kehler Liddell Gallery, 873 Whitney Ave., New Haven, at 7 p.m. To learn more, send e-mail to photoartscollective@ gmail.com.

ON AIR

Sumner McKnight Crosby Jr. Gallery. Leticia Galizzi (left), Dina Fisher (right).

Listen to the Arts Council’s Arts ON AIR broadcast every third Monday of the month during WPKN’s Community Programing Hour. Hosted by Stephen Grant, Arts ON AIR engages in conversations with local artists and arts organizations. Links to past and streaming episodes are available at artnhv.com/on-air.

Save the date for the 2014 Arts Awards Date: Friday, December 5, 11:45 a.m. Location: New Haven Lawn Club, 193 Whitney Ave., New Haven

Photo Arts Collective. Kenneth Hanson.

For more information about these events and more visit newhavenarts.org or check out our mobile events calendar using the ANDI app for smartphones.

Profile for Arts Council

The Arts Paper - October 2014  

October 2014

The Arts Paper - October 2014  

October 2014

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