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Arts Course Guide Fall 2010

FACULTY OF

ARTS


Welcome to the Faculty of Arts Contents Academic Advisors

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Course Selection – what to do next…

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Arts Course Descriptions

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One of the first and most important things you’ll need to do as an Arts student is to choose your classes for the Fall 2010 term. To help you with this we’ve developed this Arts Course Guide which lists many of the Arts courses offered for the Fall term. Reading your Arts Course Guide now will allow you to consider the Arts courses offered this Fall and plan your schedule. You’ll use the Arts Course Guide in conjunction with your Arts New Student Guide to select your classes. Later on you’ll need to refer to the online UW Course Guide, which will be sent to you after you accept your offer, for a final list of course offerings for the Fall and to read more about Quest. We want you to succeed – plan to attend your Course Selection Preview Session to learn about Quest, review your requirements and have your questions answered before you have to select your courses. It’s up to you how successful you’ll be at university. The first step to success is meeting with your academic advisor. If you can’t attend the Course Selection Preview Session view all the information you need online and contact your academic advisor for approvals before selecting classes. For more information about course selection see page 4.

IMPORTANT: The information provided in this Arts Course Guide is subject to change. The final course listings for Fall 2010 are usually available in May on the Schedule of Classes at www.quest.uwaterloo.ca. Consult the Schedule of Classes, the UW Course Guide and your academic advisor before making your final course selections in July.

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Meet your Academic Advisor… To find out more about your course selection session, further instructions, and updates visit www.arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/nextstep_offers.html.

First-year (Honours Arts, Arts and Business regular), Upper-year Liberal Studies, and Mature Student advisors 519-888-4567, ext. 35870 Betsy Zanna Academic Advisor Honours Arts; New upper-year transfer students, Liberal Studies bzanna@uwaterloo.ca

Eric Breugst Academic Advisor Arts and Business regular; Honours Arts ebreugst@uwaterloo.ca

Accounting and Financial Management The School of Accounting and Finance 519-888-4567, ext. 36537 Carol Ann Treitz Undergraduate Studies Co-ordinator ctreitz@uwaterloo.ca ext. 36537

Darren Charters Undergraduate Officer ext. 32570

Advising of Renison University College Social Development Studies and Honours Arts students takes place at Renison.

Mary Jane Crusoe Registrar, Renison University College Honours Arts; Social Development Studies mjcrusoe@renison.uwaterloo.ca 519-888-4567, ext. 28633

For first year academic assistance contact the Undergraduate Studies Co-ordinator.

Advising of St. Jerome’s University Honours Arts students takes place at St. Jerome’s.

Independent Studies Susan Andrews Academic Advisor Arts and Business co-op sandrews@uwaterloo.ca ext. 32005

Students registering in Arts through the University Colleges at Waterloo

Computing and Financial Management

Susan Wismer Director 519-888-4567 ext. 32345 isinfo@uwaterloo.ca www.is.uwaterloo.ca

Tracy Hilpert Manager 519-888-4567 ext. 37033 www.cfm.uwaterloo.ca

Dana Sheldrake Academic Advisor Mature Students; New upper-year transfer students, Liberal Studies mature@uwaterloo.ca

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Donna Wright Student Program Advisor Honours Arts dswright@uwaterloo.ca 519-888-4567, ext. 28210 Toll free: 1-888-752-4636


Course Selection – the next step… Early June: Visit www.arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/course_ selection.html to find out what you MUST do to prepare to select your courses. You have some VERY important things to complete in order to be prepared for course selection beginning July 12th.

NOTE: Classes fill quickly. Do not delay adding your courses.

1. Attend the Course Selection Preview Session – UW main campus, Renison, and St. Jerome’s

Mid-June: An updated listing of all Fall courses available will be sent to you Updated course offerings for Fall 2010 and Winter 2011 Comprehensive instructions for using Quest

This group session, which includes an overview of the registration process, will help you select appropriate courses and electives for your program, and will allow you to meet your academic advisor and learn about Quest so you’ll be prepared to add your courses online on July 12th. This session will take place the week before course selection begins. Check www.arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/course_ selection.html – registration for this session begins in early June.

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Late June: Complete planning your course selections for Fall 2010 I I I

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Review the Arts New Student Guide carefully Begin creating a conflict-free schedule Attend your on-campus Course Selection Preview Session and view the online Course Selection Tutorials Submit your Course Selection Approval Form to your academic advisor

2. Submit your course selections online for approval I

Late June: Deadline to submit your online Course Selection Approval Form to your academic advisor.

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July 12th: First-year course selection begins on Quest. Have you had your course selections approved? Do you have your Quest password? You must add your courses today!

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Submit your course selections online for approval Your academic advisor will respond to your request for approval as quickly as possible View your online Course Selection Tutorials

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3. Online Course Selection Tutorials

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Online Course Selection Tutorials will be available in late June for you to review and to use while you add your courses on July 12th. Also, when you’re choosing your courses for approval and when you’re adding them on Quest, use this valuable resource to find out exactly what you MUST do to complete your course selection properly.

July 12th-13th: Have questions? Academic advisors are online in the Arts Academic Forum to chat and answer your questions Visit the Course Selection web page to log on and get your questions answered www.arts.uwaterloo.ca/arts/ugrad/course_selection.html I

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AFM students only choose one course in the fall term and do not need to seek approval from their academic advisor unless there are questions about the Area-of-interest.

NOTE: Accounting and Financial Management, Arts and Business, and Social Development Studies students – some of your required courses will be added to your schedule for you. You’ll need to check your schedule to see which times have already been arranged for you and then fit your other classes around those times. You’ll be able to view your schedule when you go online in July.

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Arts Course Descriptions – Fall 2010 as of December 2009 (subject to change) ARTS

AFM 123 LEC,TST,TUT 0.50 Accounting Information for Managers

ARTS 111 LEC 0.50 Career Development and Decision-Making

This course is designed for non-accountants who will use accounting information for planning, control and decision making. Prereq: Arts and Business, Environment and Business, Science and Business, Honours Recreation and Leisure Studies, Honours Recreation and Business, Honours Biotechnology/Economics or Human Resources Management students. Antireq: AFM 101, 102, 121, 122 (Cross-listed with ARBUS 102)

This course is designed to assist students in understanding themselves, the career development process and occupational information in order to make informed and appropriate occupational and educational decisions. Students will study key career development theories and learn how to integrate self-knowledge into occupational/life decisions, set goals and devise strategies to attain these goals.

ARTS 122 LEC 0.50 Quest for Meaning in the Modern World This course invites students on a quest for meaning in the context of a time in which traditional meanings and definitions have been challenged by rapidly-shifting cultural and religious values.

ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AFM 101 LEC,TST,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Financial Accounting This course is an introduction to financial accounting. The preparation and use of financial statements is examined. The accounting cycle, assets and liabilities reporting, is discussed. Prereq: Not open to students in Arts and Business, Environment and Business, Science and Business or Human Resources Management. Antireq: AFM 121, 123/ARBUS 102, AFM 128

ANTH 102 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology The dynamic nature of socio-cultural systems is examined. Topics include language, technology, social organization, economics, politics, and religion. Data are drawn from a broad ethnographic base, including both 'primitive’ cultures and modern, developed societies. Also offered by Distance Education

ARTS AND BUSINESS AFM 131 LEC,TST 0.50 Introduction to Business in North America The functional areas of business: finance, personnel administration, production, marketing, and accounting are examined within differing organizational structures. Coverage also includes study of the principles of effective management and the financial system as a source of corporate capital. Prereq: Not open to Honours Arts and Business students. Antireq: BUS 111W (Cross-listed with ARBUS 101) Also offered by Distance Education

ANTHROPOLOGY ANTH 101 LEC 0.50 Human and Cultural Evolution A survey of the discoveries of Physical Anthropology and Anthropological Archaeology. Lectures on living and fossil primates, the fossil evidence for the origins and development of humans, and archaeological evidence concerning the origins and development of culture from the earliest tool making through the beginnings of civilization. Also offered by Distance Education

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ARBUS 101 LEC,TST 0.50 Introduction to Business in North America The functional areas of business: finance, personnel administration, production, marketing, and accounting are examined within differing organizational structures. Coverage also includes study of the principles of effective management and the financial system as a source of corporate capital. Prereq: Arts and Business Co-op and Regular students. Antireq: BUS 111W (Cross-listed with AFM 131) Also offered by Distance Education


CHINESE CHINA 101R LAB,LEC,TUT 0.50 First-Year Chinese 1 An introductory course for students who have little or no prior background in writing, speaking, or understanding any dialect of the Chinese language to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Practical oral and written exercises are used to provide a firm grammatical foundation for further study. [Note: A Placement Application form must be completed at Renison University College prior to enrolment. CHINA 101R is not open to speakers of any Chinese dialect.] Department Consent Required Antireq: CHINA 120R

CHINA 120R LAB,LEC,TUT 0.50 Advanced First-Year Chinese Equivalent to 101R and 102R but covered in one term. This introductory Chinese course is designed for two major groups of students who have different initial advantages in learning Chinese: 1) students who have substantial aural-oral proficiency but limited ability in reading and writing Chinese characters and 2) those who know characters but cannot speak Mandarin (Putonghua). [Note: A Placement Application form must be completed at Renison University College prior to enrolment. CHINA 120R is not open to students with native, nearnative or similar advanced ability.] Department Consent Required Antireq: CHINA 101R, 102R

CLASSICAL STUDIES CLAS 100 LEC 0.50 An Introduction to Classical Studies

CLAS 103 LEC 0.50 Colossos – The Major Figures of Classical Antiquity An introductory study of the achievements of ancient Greece and/or Rome through some of their major figures. Each year two figures will be featured. These may include Homer, Pericles, Socrates, Alexander the Great, Cleopatra, Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Seneca, Hadrian, and Constantine.

CLAS 105 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Medieval Studies An introduction to Medieval European civilization focusing on essential aspects of the discipline: history, literature, philosophy, religion, art, architecture and archaeology, law, and science and technology.

CROATIAN CROAT 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Elementary Croatian 1 For students with little or no knowledge of Croatian. The basic elements of Croatian grammar with emphasis on oral practice and pronunciation are stressed. [Note: CROAT 101 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Also offered by Distance Education

DRAMA DRAMA 101A LEC 0.50 Introduction to the Theatre 1 Introductory study of the theatre as a major art form. Selected plays as produced in their historical contexts. Contributions of the actor, designer and technician to theatrical production.

An introduction to Greek and Roman civilization, focusing on six key aspects of the discipline of classical studies: history, literature, philosophy, myth and religion, art and architecture, and classical archaeology.

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DRAMA 102 LAB 0.50 Introduction to Performance Designed for majors in Drama and in Speech Communication, this workshop introduces the student to the tools of performance. Students will gain confidence through individual and group exercises in physical and emotional awareness, improvisational skills, scene study, character creation and voice. [Note: Must attend first class. May be subject to priority enrolment.] Coreq: DRAMA 101A (Cross-listed with SPCOM 102)

DUTCH DUTCH 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Elementary Dutch I The basic elements of Dutch grammar with emphasis on oral practice and pronunciation. Introduction to aspects of Dutch culture. [Note: DUTCH 101 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Also offered by Distance Education

ECONOMICS ECON 101 LEC,TST 0.50 Introduction to Microeconomics This course provides an introduction to microeconomic analysis relevant for understanding the Canadian economy. The behaviour of individual consumers and producers, the determination of market prices for commodities and resources, and the role of government policy in the functioning of the market system are the main topics covered. Also offered by Distance Education


ECON 102 LEC,TST 0.50 Introduction to Macroeconomics

ENGL 105A LEC 0.50 20th-Century Literature in English, 1900-45

ENGL 129R LEC,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Written English

This course provides an introduction to macroeconomic analysis relevant for understanding the Canadian economy as a whole. The determinants of national output, the unemployment rate, the price level (inflation), interest rates, the money supply and the balance of payments, and the role of government fiscal and monetary policy are the main topics covered. [Note: Fee of up to $100 may be required for subscription to a test/assignment service.] Also offered by Distance Education

A close examination of a representative selection of works by major authors writing in English such as Yeats, Woolf, Lawrence, Eliot, Hemingway, and Faulkner.

This writing skills course is open only to students whose first language is not English. It provides instruction in basic grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, elements of composition and essay writing including a focus on theme, development of central ideas, exposition and argumentation. (Cross-listed with ESL 129R) Also offered by Distance Education

ENGL 108E LEC 0.50 Women in Literature

ENGLISH

A study of the nature and role of women in British, Canadian, and American literature. Works by both men and women will be studied in which women are seen in such forms as mothers, saints, sex objects, and witches. (Cross-listed with WS 108E)

ENGL 101A LEC 0.50 Introduction to Literary Studies

ENGL 108H LEC 0.50 Isolation and Alienation

An introduction to the study of literature, covering such areas of enquiry as literary history, genre, criticism, analysis, and theory.

The study of a variety of works centering on the theme of individuals in crisis, the stress being on people at variance with their inner selves, other persons, or their world. The course will discuss the process in which wisdom and maturity are gained as the ultimate products of suffering.

ENGL 101B LEC 0.50 Introduction to Rhetorical Studies An introduction to the study and practice of persuasion, including the history and theory of rhetoric, the structures and strategies of arguments, and the analysis of texts and artifacts.

ENGL 102A LEC 0.50 The Major Forms of Literature: Short Stories and Drama

ENGL 108M LEC 0.50 Youth and Adolescence Studies the portrayal of young protagonists as they respond to the mores of adult society; their own physical, mental, and psychological development; and the expectations placed upon them by themselves and by others.

ENGL 140R LEC 0.50 The Use of English 1 The use and abuse of spoken and written English. The study and evaluation of language as it is used for various purposes (e.g., colloquial, scientific, legal, political, commercial, journalistic, literary) in order to increase critical awareness and to help students to write clearly and effectively.

ENGL 190 LEC 0.50 Shakespeare Designed for students in all faculties, the course examines some of Shakespeare’s comedies, history plays, and tragedies. Shakespeare’s variety and flexibility in developing characters and dramatic structures are stressed, as are significant themes. [Note: No previous work in Shakespeare is required.] Also offered by Distance Education

A study of short stories and drama to determine how the shape of a literary work contributes to its meaning.

ENGL 109 LEC,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Academic Writing

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

ENGL 104 LEC 0.50 Rhetoric in Popular Culture

The course will explore a variety of issues in academic writing such as style, argument, and the presentation of information. Frequent written exercises will be required. Also offered by Distance Education

ESL 101R LEC 0.50 Fundamentals of Spoken English

This course examines the role of persuasion in contemporary society by focusing on one or more topic areas: film, television, video games, comic books, music, fashion, etc. Students will explore the topic area(s) in depth using a variety of rhetorical theories and methods.

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This course teaches the organizational, vocal, listening, and critical skills required for oral communications. It features intensive work on spoken English in all contexts, from conventional gambits to public speaking, including an emphasis on phonology and prosody to improve comprehensibility. Minimum of four hours of instruction each week. [Note: Open only to students whose first language is not English.]


ESL 102R LEC,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Error Correction in Writing

FINE 120 STU 0.50 Fundamentals of Visual Art 1

FR 152 LAB,LEC 0.50 Basic French 2

This course offers sentence-level instruction in grammar and idiom to teach students to produce, evaluate, and edit writing under time constraints. It emphasizes readability and error reduction in sentences and paragraphs. Minimum of five hours of instruction each week. [Note: Open only to students whose first language is not English and who lack language mastery for admission to other introductory English courses.]

An introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of visual art through a series of exercises using a variety of materials. [Note: Studio course. This course is primarily for students who are considering a specialization in Fine Arts. It includes a significant component of mandatory work – drawing, painting, other media – from the life model. Please see the Fine Arts Academic plans concerning admission to upper level studio courses.]

A continuation of the work done in FR 151. [Note: Not open to students who have completed high school French immersion program. Not open to students with advanced, near-native or native ability in French.] Prereq: FR 151 or Ontario Grade 11 French. Antireq: Ontario Grade 12 French and/or OAC French or 4U Core French or Immersion French or Extended French. Also offered by Distance Education

ESL 129R LEC,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Written English This writing skills course is open only to students whose first language is not English. It provides instruction in basic grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, elements of composition and essay writing including a focus on theme, development of central ideas, exposition and argumentation. (Cross-listed with ENGL 129R) Also offered by Distance Education

FINE 250 LAB,SEM 0.50 History of Film 1 (1895-1940) History of world cinema in its silent and early sound era, covering the work of outstanding directors, national productions and movements, and their contribution to the film medium’s development into a prominent art form of the 20th century. Film screenings. [Note: Film Studies course]

FRENCH STUDIES

This course is not intended to be a chronological survey of the history of art. Rather, it is an introduction to art and to art in history. The primary aims of the course are: to develop the visual skills and acquire the vocabulary needed to analyze a work of art; to examine works of art according to techniques and materials (e.g. how the ‘Mona Lisa’ was executed); and to examine works of art within the context in which they were created. Modes of artistic education and the exhibition of art objects are also explored. Examples of art are drawn from various time periods and cultures. A field trip fee of $10-$15 may be required. [Note: Art History course]

An intensive French Language course. Vocabulary enrichment and development of reading, writing and oral expression. Prereq: OAC Core French or 4U Core French or FR 152. Antireq: High School Immersion French or Extended French Also offered by Distance Education

FR 192B LAB,LEC,ORL 0.50 French Language 1: Module 2

FINE ARTS FINE 110 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Art History

FR 192A LAB,LEC,ORL 0.50 French Language 1: Module 1

FR 151 LAB,LEC 0.50 Basic French 1 For students with some elementary or secondary school French not exceeding Year Two (Grade Ten in Ontario) or equivalent. Emphasizes comprehension, grammar and basic speaking skills. [Note: Not open to students who have completed high school French immersion program or FR 152. Not open to students with advanced, near-native or native ability in French.] Antireq: Ontario Grade 11 French or OAC French or 4U Core French or Immersion French or Extended French. Also offered by Distance Education

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An intensive French Language course. Vocabulary enrichment and development of reading, writing and oral expression. Prereq: High School Immersion French or Extended French or FR 192A Also offered by Distance Education

FR 197 LEC 0.50 French Culture & Literature: Origins to 1715 A survey of French culture and literature from their origins to 1715. Prereq: FR 192A or 192B Also offered by Distance Education

FR 203 LAB,LEC 0.50 Introduction to Phonetics of French An introduction to the structure of the French sound system with a view to improving pronunciation. Careful attention will be paid to the individual student’s difficulties. Prereq: FR 192A or 192B


GEOGRAPHY

GERMAN

GER 203 LAB,LEC 0.50 Written Communication

GEOG 100 LEC 0.50 On Becoming a Geographer

GER 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Elementary German I

An introduction to geographic themes and methods of inquiry. The emphasis will be placed on practical skills including literature searches, field observation, scholarly debate and professional writing. Prereq: Year 1 or 2 Geography and Environmental Management or Arts students

For students with little or no knowledge of German. The basic elements of German grammar with emphasis on group and individual oral practice. Development of skills in listening/comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Introduction to aspects of German culture and everyday life. Tapes and computer exercises accompany each chapter of the textbook. Students are encouraged to use them in the language laboratory and at home. [Note: GER 101 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Antireq: OAC German or 4U German Also offered by Distance Education

The most important elements of German grammar are examined, and students develop the skills necessary for various types of written communication. [Note: Students intending to major in German or preparing for work or study terms in German-speaking Europe are encouraged to take GER 201 and 203 concurrently. Students who wish to take only one German language course in a semester are encouraged to start with GER 201 if they feel a need to review basic concepts, and GER 203 if they wish to focus on their written skills. GER 203 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Prereq: GER 102 or OAC German or 4U German

GER 102 LAB,LEC 0.50 Elementary German II

GREEK

GEOG 101 LEC 0.50 Geography and Human Habitat An introduction to human geography through a survey of some of the concepts, methods, techniques and applications of geographic analysis to the human cultural environment. Directed towards peopleland and location analysis themes.

GEOG 102 LEC 0.50 Geography and Our Planetary Environment Emphasis on the natural environment as an integrated system. Selected aspects of weather – climate, water, soils, biota, landforms along with flows of energy, water and matter and their effects on the subsystems of the natural environment.

GEOG 165 LAB,LEC 0.50 Computer Cartography: Principles and Design Focus is on the compilation and cartographic display of spatially referenced data. Topics covered include geographic coordinate systems, map projections, mapping quantitative data, terrain representation, compiling data from a variety of sources, and the production of effective maps based on established principles of cartographic design.

A continuation of GER 101. [Note: GER 102 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Prereq: GER 101. Antireq: OAC German or 4U German Also offered by Distance Education

GER 201 LAB,LEC 0.50 Intermediate German I This course continues the work of GER 101/102, completing the first-year textbook. It offers practice in speaking, reading and writing, with vocabulary building, grammar, and exercises in comprehension. [Note: Students intending to major in German or preparing for work or study terms in German-speaking Europe are encouraged to take GER 201 and 203 concurrently. Students who wish to take only one German language course in a semester are encouraged to start with GER 201 if they feel a need to review basic concepts, and GER 203 if they wish to focus on their written skills. GER 201 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Prereq: GER 102 or OAC German or 4U German Also offered by Distance Education |9|

GRK 101 LEC,TUT 0.50 Introductory Ancient Greek 1 A course designed for students beginning the study of ancient Greek or who have not yet reached the level expected in GRK 201/202. The teaching approach emphasizes exposure to simple texts as soon as possible, but students desiring minimal competence in reading should go on to do GRK 102. Antireq: RS 106A, GRK/RS 133

HISTORY HIST 104 DIS,LEC 0.50 An Introduction to Western Intellectual History Since the Renaissance An exploration of some of the questions and answers posed by thinkers on the human predicament from Renaissance and Reformation times to the modern period. Readings range from Luther to J.P. Sartre, Shakespeare to Marx and Freud.


HIST 106 DIS,LEC 0.50 Canada and War in the Twentieth Century

HIST 232 LEC 0.50 A History of Peace Movements

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

This course will introduce students to the ways in which historians have examined Canada’s military experience in this century. Beginning with the Boer War, and continuing through the two World Wars and the post-war era, students will examine the political, social, as well as military effects of war on Canada.

A survey of individuals and groups that have created popular movements for peace globally and locally throughout history. The scope will be international, with a particular focus on the nineteenth and twentieth century movements. The choice of peace movements will allow for a contrast in comparison of ideology, strategy and impact. (Cross-listed with PACS 203)

INTST 101 LEC 0.50 Introduction to International Studies

HIST 110 DIS,LEC 0.50 A History of the Western World I This course will survey the emergence and development of the western world, from prehistory to 1715. Complementing the chronological and narrative overview of western culture and civilization will be thematic surveys of developments in the arts and humanities, science and sociopolitical structures.

HIST 113 DIS,LEC 0.50 Canadian Business History: Innovators and Entrepreneurs This course examines the role of individuals in the growth of business in Canada. While there will be general examination of Canadian economic development, the principal focus will fall upon leading Canadian business persons and their interests and innovations. The relationship to the state of business, the place of education, and the impact of immigration are other topics that the course will consider.

HIST 114 DIS,LEC 0.50 A Comparative History of Empires

HUMAN SCIENCES HUMSC 101 LEC,SEM 0.50 Great Dialogues: Reflection and Action What is the relationship between thinking and action? Do they pull us in different directions? Can they be integrated? This course investigates how our own dialogue with core texts, from antiquity (e.g., Homer, Plato, Christian Scriptures) to the present (e.g., Joyce, Arendt), offers ways of understanding the dilemmas and issues raised by these texts and present in our culture.

“International studies” includes many fields, and this course will offer a comprehensive introduction to them. The goal is to develop within students a fundamental literacy about international subjects like: international law; diplomacy; globalization; war; trade and tourism; development and foreign aid; comparative culture and religion; and the impact of ideas and the environment on the international world. Also offered by Distance Education

ITALIAN ITAL 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Introduction to Italian Language 1 An intensive study of the fundamentals of grammar and conversation. The language laboratory will be used.

JAPANESE INTERDISCIPINARY SOCIAL SCIENCE ISS 150R LEC 0.50 Lifespan Processes: The Normal Events An examination of the significant psychosocial events during the lifespan with consideration of the impact of crises. Topics may include attachment, loss, stress, identity crisis, role change, mid-life transition. Also offered by Distance Education

This course examines the role of empires in modern history. It will examine how empires were formed, how they functioned, how they were resisted, and how they collapsed. While the focus will be on the European empires, we will also assess other examples, including the empires of the Ottomans, the Japanese, the Chinese, and the United States.

JAPAN 101R LAB,LEC,TUT 0.50 First-Year Japanese 1 An introductory course for students who have little or no knowledge of Japanese to develop basic listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Practical oral and written exercises incorporating the Hiragana Writing System are used to provide a firm grammatical foundation for further study. [Note: JAPAN 101R is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Antireq: JAPAN 111R

JAPAN 102R LAB,LEC,TUT 0.50 First-Year Japanese 2 Listening, speaking, reading and writing skills acquired in JAPAN 101R are further developed. Practical oral and written exercises incorporating the Katakana Writing System will be used to develop a more solid grammatical base. Prereq: JAPAN 101R or 111R. Antireq: JAPAN 112R

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JAPAN 111R LAB,LEC,TUT 0.50 Japanese for Business 1

KOREA 102R LAB, LEC 0.50 First-Year Korean 2

MUSIC 116 ENS 0.25 Music Ensemble

An introductory course to develop basic comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills specifically related to the Japanese business culture. This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Japanese. [Note: JAPAN 111R is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Antireq: JAPAN 101R

Students will deepen their understanding of basic grammatical (particularly verb, noun and adverb) forms and sentence construction and enlarge their general vocabulary. Reading ability will be expanded and more attention will be given to idiomatic expressions and the use of the language in actual contexts. Prereq: KOREA 101R

The study of selected music literature through rehearsals and performance in one of the Music Department’s ensembles: University Choir, Chapel Choir, Chamber Choir, Chamber Ensembles, Stage Band. Regular attendance at rehearsals and performances is required. Offered on a credit/fail basis. [Note: For musical reasons, admission to any particular ensemble is at the discretion of the director. Audition required. Contact music department prior to first day of class.]

LATIN JEWISH STUDIES JS 211 LEC 0.50 Kabbalah: Jewish Mysticism This course will survey the roots, history, and symbolism of the Jewish mystical tradition known as Kabbalah. Students will be introduced to the major texts, charismatic mystical masters, and schools of Kabbalah, beginning with the ancient Rabbis through to contemporary exponents such as Hasidim and messianic groups. Particular attention will be focused on the Zohar (Book of Splendour) and popular appeals to the mystical tradition. [Note: Knowledge of Hebrew is not required. This course fulfills an Area 1B requirement for Religious Studies majors.] (Cross-listed with RS 213)

KOREAN KOREA 101R LAB,LEC 0.50 First-Year Korean 1 An introductory course for students who have no or little knowledge of Korean to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills along with a sound basis of grammar. The distinctive features of the Korean language and writing system will be introduced. Practical oral, reading and writing exercises will develop the students’ grammatical skills. Particular emphasis is placed on the acquisition of a basic working vocabulary. [Note: KOREA 101R is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.]

LAT 101 LEC,TUT 0.50 Introductory Latin 1 A course designed for students beginning the study of Latin or who have not yet reached the level expected in LAT 201/202. Although the teaching approach emphasizes exposure to simple texts as soon as possible, students desiring minimal competence in reading should go on to do LAT 102.

MUSIC 140 LEC 0.50 Popular Music and Culture An examination of the styles, forms and development of 20th-century popular music. The social, commercial and technological aspects of popular music are considered.

MUSIC 226 STU 0.50 Music Studio

LEGAL STUDIES LS 101 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Legal Studies An introduction to the study of law, its structure, and legal institutions from a cross-cultural and historical perspective. This interdisciplinary course examines the origins of legal systems and their impact on society. Included is an analysis of the diverse historical, political, economic, and cultural conditions under which law arises and functions within society. Also offered by Distance Education

MUSIC MUSIC 100 LEC 0.50 Understanding Music The styles, forms, techniques and terminology of Western music through lectures and listening, as exemplified by great works from all eras of music history.

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Individual instruction in Voice, Piano, Organ, Classical Guitar and orchestral instruments. [Note: Royal Conservatory Grade 8 Level. Audition required. Contact music department prior to first day of class. Studio Fee.] Department Consent Required Coreq: Any of MUSIC 116, 117, 216, 217, 316 or 317

MUSIC 227 STU 0.50 Music Studio Individual instruction in Voice, Piano, Organ, Classical Guitar and orchestral instruments. [Note: Studio Fee] Department Consent Required Prereq: MUSIC 226. Coreq: MUSIC 116, 117, 216, 217, 316 or 317


MUSIC 270 LEC 0.50 Music Theory 1

PHILOSOPHY

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The study of basic melodic, harmonic and voice leading concepts including an introduction to figured bass and functional harmony. Ear-training, sight-singing and keyboard lab sessions will be integrated with written and analytical work. [Note: A basic knowledge of scales, triads, and music notation is required.]

PHIL 100 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Philosophy

PSCI 101 LEC,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Political Ideas

An introduction to central issues in metaphysics and epistemology. Questions to be considered might include: “Can we know anything?” “Does God exist?” “Is the mind just a brain?” “Do human beings have free will?” Also offered by Distance Education

In this course, students are introduced to a number of concepts which have a bearing on how we respond to our political environment, including liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, feminism, equality, liberty, rights and justice. Some of the constraints that affect the application of these concepts to public policy are also examined.

PEACE AND CONFLICT STUDIES

PHIL 100J LEC 0.50 Introduction to Philosophy

PACS 201 LEC 0.50 Roots of Conflict, Violence and Peace

This course seeks to introduce students to the nature of philosophy. This is done through the examination of core texts and figures in the history of philosophy as well as in the discussion of perennial philosophical questions

An examination of influential theories about the sources and nature of conflict, violence and peace. Contributions from the social sciences as well as the humanities will be explored, with attention to connections between interpersonal, intergroup, and international levels of analysis. Also offered by Distance Education

PACS 202 LEC 0.50 Conflict Resolution An examination of the resolution of conflicts, ranging from interpersonal to broader social and international conflicts. Students are introduced to negotiation, mediation, and nonviolent resistance, and are encouraged to develop their own theoretical understandings that aid in addressing conflict.

PACS 203 LEC 0.50 A History of Peace Movements A survey of individuals and groups that have created popular movements for peace globally and locally throughout history. The scope will be international, with a particular focus on the nineteenth and twentieth century movements. The choice of peace movements will allow for a contrast in comparison of ideology, strategy and impact. (Cross-listed with HIST 232)

PHIL 105 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Ethics and Values An introduction to central issues in ethics and value theory. Questions considered might include: “What makes actions right or wrong?” “Are there facts about what is beautiful?” “Can our social institutions be justified?” Also offered by Distance Education

PHIL 145 LEC 0.50 Critical Thinking An analysis of basic types of reasoning, structure of arguments, critical assessment of information, common fallacies, problems of clarity and meaning. Also offered by Distance Education

POLISH POLSH 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Elementary Polish I The fundamentals of Polish grammar are taught with emphasis on oral practice and pronunciation. An introduction to Polish culture is given as well. [Note: POLSH 101 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.]

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PORTUGUESE PORT 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Introduction to Portuguese 1 Intensive drill in the fundamentals of grammar, comprehension and speaking. Some reading, translation and composition. The language laboratory is used as an integral part of the course. [Note: Open to students with no prior knowledge of the Portuguese language.] Antireq: OAC Portuguese or 4U Portuguese

PSYCHOLOGY PSYCH 101 LEC 0.50 or PSYCH 121R LEC 0.50 Introductory Psychology A general survey course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the basic concepts and techniques of modern psychology as a behavioural science. [Note: PSYCH 121R is intended for students who are interested in Social Development Studies as a major]


RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RS 130 LEC 0.50 The Bible: History, Literature, and Scripture

RS 213 LEC 0.50 Kabbalah: Jewish Mysticism

RS 100 LEC 0.50 Religions of the East

This course will introduce the history, literature, and thought of the Bible. Since Jewish and Christian Bibles differ, it will also explore how various versions came to be, and consider the role the Bible has played in both religious communities. Antireq: RS 100E, 100F

This course will survey the roots, history, and symbolism of the Jewish mystical tradition known as Kabbalah. Students will be introduced to the major texts, charismatic mystical masters, and schools of Kabbalah, beginning with the ancient Rabbis through to contemporary exponents such as Hasidim and messianic groups. Particular attention will be focused on the Zohar (Book of Splendour) and popular appeals to the mystical tradition. [Note: Knowledge of Hebrew is not required.] (Cross-listed with JS 211)

An introduction to the religious traditions of the East: history, religious beliefs, and practices of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Shinto. Also offered by Distance Education

RS 110 LEC 0.50 Religions of the West Encounter with Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: the characteristics and interaction of the three major religious traditions originating in the Middle East that have shaped the image of the Western World. Also offered by Distance Education

RS 121 LEC 0.50 Evil How do the religions of the world define evil? How do they suggest it can be overcome? Classical and modern writers from Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism, and Hinduism will be considered. Also offered by Distance Education

RS 125 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Religion Using examples drawn from world religions, new religious movements, indigenous religious traditions, and popular culture, this course introduces students to religion as a human and social phenomenon. Antireq: RS 100C/120

RS 150 LEC 0.50 Christian Ethics An introduction to Christian ethical theory and practice and their implications for personal and social living. Case studies will investigate sexual morality, business and medical ethics, environmental issues, violence and non-violence, and family life.

RUSSIAN RS 152 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Theology

RUSS 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Elementary Russian I

The basics of Christian theology explored systematically and historically: theological language, revelation and truth, God and creation, sin and the fall, Christ and salvation, tradition and church, consummation and the end of history.

A study of Russian grammar and composition with emphasis on oral practice and pronunciation. [Note: RUSS 101 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.]

RS 180 LEC 0.50 Love and Friendship

SOCIAL WORK

A study of the significance of love and friendship in classical and contemporary religious writers. We will consider questions such as, “Why are friendship and love important for human living?” and “Is friendship with God a possibility?” Also offered by Distance Education

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SOCWK 120R LEC 0.50 Introduction to Social Work Presentation of the value, knowledge, and skill base, principles and purposes of the profession, and an examination of methods of practice. Traditional and innovative social work settings are discussed. Historic development of Social Work and its influence on contemporary practice are reviewed. Also offered by Distance Education


SOCIOLOGY

SPAN 102 LAB,LEC 0.50 Introduction to Spanish 2

SPEECH COMMUNICATION

SOC 101 LEC 0.50 Introduction to Sociology

A continuation of SPAN 101. [Note: SPAN 102 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Prereq: SPAN 101. Antireq: OAC Spanish or 4U Spanish Also offered by Distance Education

SPCOM 100 LEC 0.50 Interpersonal Communication

An introduction to the basic concepts and frames of reference of sociological investigation and interpretation. Topics for analysis will include communities, associations and institutions, classes and status groups, crowds and publics, social processes, and social change. Special attention is given to Canadian society. Antireq: SOC 120R Also offered by Distance Education

SOC 120R LEC 0.50 Fundamentals of Sociology An examination of the fundamental concepts of Sociology and their application in seeking to understand the changing patterns and life-styles taking place specifically in Canada, and in general, within North American society. Antireq: SOC 101

SPANISH SPAN 101 LAB,LEC 0.50 Introduction to Spanish 1 This course is for students with no previous knowledge of Spanish. The basic elements of Spanish grammar will be studied, with emphasis on group and individual oral practice. Focus will be given to the development of skills in listening/comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Multimedia exercises accompany each chapter of the textbook. Students will be expected to use them in the multimedia language centre and at home. [Note: SPAN 101 is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Antireq: OAC or 4U Spanish Also offered by Distance Education

SPAN 201A LEC,TUT 0.50 Intermediate Spanish 1 For students with some knowledge of Spanish. Seeks to reinforce the language, both oral and written, through selected texts and grammar review. Language laboratory also used to increase understanding and speaking skills. Prereq: SPAN 102 or OAC Spanish or 4U Spanish. Antireq: SPAN 210

SPAN 210 LEC 0.50 Intermediate Spanish for Native Speakers This is an intensive course designed for students of Spanish speaking background (native or near-native) who have not received formal language training. The course focuses on a comprehensive study of Spanish grammar. It includes a critical analysis of colloquial Spanish, or anglicized vocabulary, and influences of other languages on modern Spanish. A major component of the course is the acquisition and development of writing skills and oral discourse at the academic level. The course further develops listening comprehension and reading skills. [Note: Classes and written work are in Spanish.] Department Consent Required Antireq: SPAN 201A, 201B

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Focuses on the one-to-one, face-to-face communication in both the personal and professional realms. Such topics as verbal and non-verbal interactions, listening, and the better management of interpersonal communication will be studied. [Note: Formerly SPCOM 224. Must attend first class. May be subject to priority enrolment.]

SPCOM 102 LAB 0.50 Introduction to Performance Designed for majors in Drama and in Speech Communication, this workshop introduces the student to the tools of performance. Students will gain confidence through individual and group exercises in physical and emotional awareness, improvisational skills, scene study, character creation and voice. [Note: Must attend first class. May be subject to priority enrolment.] Prereq: SPCOM 100/224 or 223 (Cross-listed with DRAMA 102)

SPCOM 223 LEC 0.50 Public Speaking Theory and practice of public speaking. A workshop course involving design and delivery of various kinds of speeches, and the development of organizational, vocal, listening and critical skills. Students will be videotaped. [Note: Must attend first class. May be subject to priority enrolment.] Antireq: AFM 232


STUDIES IN ISLAM

WOMEN’S STUDIES

SI 101R LAB,LEC,TUT 0.50 Introduction to Arabic 1

WS 101 LEC,TUT 0.50 An Introduction to Women’s Studies

A course for students beginning to study and acquire skills in Modern Standard Arabic, in oral and written communication. Emphasis is on the spoken language in a conversational setting. The alphabet, basic reading and writing will be introduced. [Note: SI 101R is not open to students with native, near-native or similar advanced ability.] Instructor Consent Required

This is a survey course that provides an overview of the history of women’s rights and struggles in western countries, with a special focus on Canada. The course provides an interdisciplinary focus that includes the impacts of culture, religion, politics and societal values on women’s lives. The historical overview concludes with contemporary issues that include race/ethnicity, class, sexuality, body image, and violence. Also offered by Distance Education

SI 121R LEC 0.50 Islam in the World An introduction to the caliphates, cities, and cultures of Islam, through film and selected texts, including the experience of Islam in Canada as revealed through its writers. This course provides a foundation for Studies in Islam, establishing a context for multidisciplinary approaches to a wide variety of topics.

WS 108E LEC 0.50 Women in Literature A study of the nature and role of women in British, Canadian, and American literature. Works by both men and women will be studied in which women are seen in such forms as mothers, saints, sex objects, and witches. (Cross-listed with ENGL 108E)

WS 202 LEC 0.50 Women Across Cultures: Canadian and Global Perspectives The dynamics of gender and their intersection with race, ethnicity, class and sexuality in an increasingly globalized world are the focus of this course. Special emphasis will be given to women in developing world contexts and the lives of women in a multicultural Canada.

WS 205 LEC 0.50 Gender, Culture and Technology This course highlights the social relations that surround and define a range of technologies from household appliances to the internet. Special emphasis will be given to the different ways and contexts in which men and women understand and experience technology as designers, engineers, producers and consumers.

IMPORTANT: The information provided in this Arts Course Guide is subject to change. The final course listings for Fall 2010 are usually available in May on the Schedule of Classes at www.quest.uwaterloo.ca. Consult the Schedule of Classes, the UW Course Guide and your academic advisor before making your final course selections in July.

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Biology 2 – G4

Chemistry 2 – G3, G4

Columbia Lake Village North – B2, C1, C2

Columbia Lake Village – B2, C2, D2

CLN

CLV

William G. Davis Computer Research Centre – H3, H4

DC

Engineering 3 – H4

E3

Environment 1 – G5

Environment 2 – G5

Earth Sciences & Chemistry – G4

Federation Hall – F3

335 Gage Street – see back page

Graduate House – G4

EV1

EV2

ESC

FED

GA

GH

J.G. Hagey Hall of the Humanities – G5

Health Services – F4

Mathematics & Computer Building– G3

MC

Ira G. Needles Hall – G4

NH

Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology – G5

Photovoltaic Research Centre – G3

Tutors’ Houses – E3

University Club – F3

V1

Visitor Parking

Short-term Parking

D

Service Vehicle

Public Telephone

Information

I

K

P

E

Arts Undergraduate Office, PAS 2439

TH

MKV

S

PLAYING FIELDS

V1

BRH

P

STP

REN

J FED

F

CGR

P

I

HS

LAUREL LAKE

STJ

VILLAGE GREEN

P

CIF

T

P

PAS

EC

R

295

445

EV1

D

G

ML

B2

HH

HAGEY BOULEVARD

G

WES GRAHAM WAY

300

340

AL

LIB

B1

IN

G

UN

H

R

PRC

MC

BMH

OPT

N

SIT

D

ER

A O

IV

R

TC

ESC

Y

E

W

HV

U EN

SCH

GH

DC

ES

T

C

O

E2

E3

OV

Visitors Centre

DWE

COM

RCH

GSC

EIT

PHY

AV

C2

CSB

L

RING ROAD

X

X

UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO RESEARCH + TECHNOLOGY PARK

FRANK TOMPA DRIVE

Humanities Theatre

LHI

NH

SLC

EV2

P

PAC

M

Theatre of the Arts

MHR

UC

W

HMN

COLUMBIA STREET WEST

Warrior Field

KDC

FRANK TOMPA DRIVE

WES GRAHAM WAY

Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1

REV

V

COLUMBIA LAKE

WEATHER STATION

Call: 519-888-4567, ext. 35870 arts@uwaterloo.ca www.arts.uwaterloo.ca

I

Help Line Telephone

GO Transit

Greyhound

Grand River Transit

Construction Site and Future Site of Building

Building Codes

Accessible Entrances

SYMBOLS

P

Motorcycle Parking Permit Parking

Arts Undergraduate Office University of Waterloo

I

C

WATCARD PAYMENT Available at Lot C, N, W, X, M, UWP

SHORT-TERM PARKING Fifteen minute parking is available on the Ring Road at Environment 2, Ira G. Needles Hall, and William G. Davis Computer Research Centre. Meter parking is available, visit the Parking website for locations at: www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infopark

ACCESSIBLE PARKING Accessible parking for persons with disabilities is available in most lots. For details visit: www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infopark

MOTORCYCLES Purchase a term or day pass from Parking Services, in the COM building for use at motorcycle pads

PERMIT PARKING Faculty and Staff: A, B, H, K, L, N, O, R, T, X Resident: CL, J, S, V, UWP, T Parking in any ungated lot after 4:30 pm with valid Faculty/Staff Permit

AFTER 4 PM AND WEEKENDS A, B, EC, H (staff side), R: $3 coin entry

Meter Parking

Accessible Parking

PARKING

LEGEND

COG

F

CPH

H

A

B

B

UW Police and Parking Services

H

E

A

Student Village 1 – E3, F3

CLV

VISITOR PARKING All Day, Every Day C, N, W, X: $3 per day – pay and display Lot X is free on weekends HV: Weekdays: $2 per hour with $10 deposit on entry. Deposit reduces throughout day. After 3 pm and weekends: $3 coin entry M: $4 pay and display D: Weekdays: $2 per hour up to daily maximum of $15. After 5 pm and weekends: $3 coin entry P: $4 coin entry for St. Jerome’s University, Renison University College and St. Paul’s University College; $1 per hour up to a $4 daily maximum at Conrad Grebel University College OV: $3 coin exit J, S, V: $3 pay and display. Pay in lot S CL, UWP: $3 pay and display

PARKING INDEX

CL

CLN

275

RAC

IV

UWP University of Waterloo Place – I4, I5

William M. Tatham Centre for Co-operative Education & Career Services – G4, G5

St. Paul’s University College – F4

STP

UC

St. Jerome’s University – F4

STJ

TH

Student Life Centre – G3

SLC

TC

South Campus Hall – G4, G5, H5

SCH

REV Ron Eydt Village – E3

REN Renison University College – F4

RCH J.R. Coutts Engineering Lecture Hall – H4

RAC Research Advancement Centre – F1

PRC

PHY Physics – G4, H4

PHR School of Pharmacy – see back page

PAS

PAC Physical Activities Complex – G3

OPT School of Optometry – G2

Modern Languages – G4

ML

MKV William Lyon Mackenzie King Village – E3

B

Dana Porter Library – G4

LIB

MHR Minota Hagey Residence – F5, G5

Lyle S. Hallman Institute for Health Promotion – G3

LHI

KDC Klemmer Day Care – G2

HS

HMN Hildegard Marsden Nursery – G2

HH

GSC General Services Complex – G3, H3

Centre for Environmental & Information Technology – G4

EIT

ECH East Campus Hall – H3, H4, I3, I4

Engineering 2 – H4

E2

DWE Douglas Wright Engineering Building – H4

Central Services Building – G3

CSB

CPH Carl A. Pollock Hall – H4

COM Commissary – H3

COG Columbia Greenhouses – D2

Columbia Icefield – G2

CIF

CGR Conrad Grebel University College – F5

C2

BRH Brubacher House – F2

E

DR

92657

Biology 1 – G4

B2

BMH B.C. Matthews Hall – G3

B1

D

R AG

5

4

3

2

Arts Lecture Hall – G4

ARC School of Architecture – see back page

AL

CODE BUILDING – LOCATION

BUILDING INDEX

C

RT H NO AD RO NT OU ST M WE

1

B

NORTH ROAD OUNT WESTM

K LAUREL CREE

0

100

WILMOT COURT

University Shops Plaza

ECH

PHILLIP STREET

200

WATERLOO COURT

EBY HALL

UWP

I

300 metres

WOOLWICH COURT

UWP

Campus Court

I

BECK HALL

WELLESLEY COURT

PHILLIP STREET

A

SE AM

5

4

3

2

1

Arts Fall 2010 Course Guide  

Sample of courses offered for Fall 2010

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