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Spring 2013 | Issue 1 | Feb13-Feb 24, 2013 A3 AN INSPECTOR CALLS A5

ARTIST FEATURE: RHEA PATTERSON

A6 GREGG MUSEUM CAMPAIGN UPDATE A7 FIRE PINK TRIO A8 GREGG MUSEUM EXHIBITION: FARFETCHED A10

GREGG MUSEUM EXHIBITION: HUMANATURE

A11

STUDENT ART PURCHASE / CREATIVE ARTIST AWARD

A12

MUSIC OF THE BRITISH ISLES

A14

NC STATE JAZZ ENSEMBLE

SPRING 2013 | ISSUE 1

CONTENTS

ARTS NC STATE


UNIVERSITY THEATRE PRESENTS

an inspector calls WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13-16 & 20-23, 2013 AT 7:30PM SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 & 24, 2013 AT 2PM TITMUS THEATRE, FRANK THOMPSON HALL AN INSPECTOR CALLS is produced by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc.

DIRECTOR John C. McIlwee* w/ Rachel Klem SCENIC DESIGN David Jensen COSTUME, HAIR & MAKEUP DESIGN John C. McIlwee* LIGHTING AND SOUND DESIGN Joshua Reaves TECHNICAL DIRECTION David Jensen PROFESSIONAL STAFF Em Rossi, Costume Shop Manager Laura Parker, Costume Technician Aaron Bridgman, Assistant Technical Director Jayme Mellema, Scenic Charge Rachel Klem, Acting Coach Rachel Klem w/ Allison Bergman, Dialect Coaching Nancy Breeding, Marketing Ronald A. Foreman*, Marketing, Graphics & Photography

CAST (in order of appearance by story) MR. BIRLING (ARTHUR BIRLING).............................................................................. Kyle Bullins* GERALD CROFT.............................................................................................................. Ryan Fleming SHEILA BIRLING.........................................................................................................Rhonda Lemon* MRS. BIRLING (SYBIL BIRLING).................................................................................... Lynda Clark EDNA.................................................................................................................................. Diana Quetti* ERIC BIRLING.........................................................................................................Philipp Lindemann INSPECTOR............................................................................................................... Christian O’Neal*

PRODUCTION CREW Stage Manager.................................................................................................... Mette CJ Schladweiler* Assistant Stage Managers....................................................................Paige Broadaway*, Natalie Tita Production Assistants..................................................................... Lauren Davis*, TeShima Brennen Master Carpenter........................................................................................................... Chris Bradsher* Scenic Carpenters..................................Nathaniel D. Conti*, Brandon Mooney, Autumn Stephens Set Crew........................................Jenae Harrington, Jake Laxer, Charlotte Ballentine, Nick Fedora Properties Master.......................................................................................................Brittney Dockery* Craftsperson.............................................................................................................Elizabeth Lemmons Sound Board Operator................................................................................................. Chris Bradsher* Light Board Operator....................................................................................................... Logan Adams Wardrobe Supervisor.................................................................................................... Zachary Francis Dresser.....................................................................................................................................Kelsey Beal Costume Crew..........................Adrienne McKenzie, Talia Barlaz, Maggie Briggs, Angelika Barth, ..........................................................Kelsey Beal, Gabrielle Pittman, Glenn Billups, Mary Kneivem, .......................................................... Sarah Meany, Brittny Sanders, Hnou Bang, Kaitlyn Yarbraugh Makeup Crew........................ Natalie Breneman, Haley Spalding, Dayne Smith, Kimberlin Torain House Manager....................................................................................University Theatre House Crew Ushers............................................................University Theatre House Crew and THE 103 students ...............................................* Indicates member of Alpha Psi Omega Honorary Theatre Fraternity

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

PLEASE

We are grateful to have our Guest Artist appearance sponsored by the following donors:

DURING THE PERFORMANCE:

Lauren Deese, Ronnie Ellis, Lora Evans, Betty Goodman, Kerry Havener, Anton Jetten, George Kaiser, Knowles Parker, Elizabeth Ross, Richard Shirk, Barrett Silverstein, Irwin Stern, Phillip Stiles, Larry Stoltzenberg, Eunice Toussaint, John Weedon, Dr. Henry Zaytoun, IBM

 Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting THANK YOU!

Kristopher and Nicole Tyra | Deutsche Bank

A special thanks to Rachel Klem, Mette Schladweiler and the UT staff for being “me” when “me” wasn’t available for this production. It is the talented and committed staff that makes University Theatre an exciting place to work… – John McIlwee

Spring 2013 » Issue 1 » A3

| an inspector calls

Setting: There are three continuous acts, separated by two ten-minute intermissions, that take place in the dining room of the Birling’s house in Brumley, an industrial city in Great Britain. It is early evening in spring, 1912.

P R O G R AM N O T E S

by J. B. Priestly


CAST BIOS

PRODUCTION BIOS

Kyle Bullins, Mr. Birling (Arthur Birling), is a sophomore in communication media. Kyle is making his acting debut in a University Theatre production. Additional UT credits include assistant director for The Arabian Nights. He would like to thank his family, his friends, and all of his amazing cast mates for all of their support throughout this entire process.

John C. McIlwee, Director, has been with NCSU’s University Theatre for more than 27 years. He has worked extensively throughout the United States as an actor, director, costume designer, scenic designer, makeup artist, and playwright. He holds a master’s degree in theatre and a master of fine arts degree in theatre design. A recipient of the Raleigh Medal of Arts, John is also a national award-winning fashion designer and a twotime winner of the National Arts and Letters Council Award for children’s playwriting. Last season, John directed Lettice and Lovage, The Philadelphia Story, Garden District, and RENT. Recent directing credits include Twelfth Night and Inspecting Carol. His combined directing and costume design credits include Amadeus, Into the Woods, and Murder on the Nile; set design for It’s A Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play, and acted in Re:Design; directed and designed the sets for TheatreFest and the costumes for The Dixie Swim Club and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. He also appeared in and costumed Evan Rachel Woods’ production for Theatre in the Park’s Romeo and Juliet. He continues to lecture extensively on the history of couture and costume and enjoys working with an amazing University Theatre staff to create a varied and exciting theatrical experience that is available to all university students. “Much love to Nancy for letting me out to play all these years!”

Lynda Clark, Mrs. Birling (Sybil Birling), is a professional actor/director/ coach, with television and film credits including Crazy People, Matlock, The Perfect Crime, and I Know What You Did Last Summer. She appeared in a recurring role in the CBS series American Gothic, and the Showtime series Linc’s. Lynda has guest starred in TheatreFest in multiple roles for more than twenty years. Other highlights include Burning Coal’s productions of All The King’s Men and Macbeth; Theatre in the Park’s Dangerous Liaisons and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?; East Carolina Summer Rep’s Always, Patsy Cline and A Streetcar Named Desire. For Manbites Dog Theatre, Fit To Be Tied. For Peace College, Suddenly Last Summer and In My Sister’s House. For North Carolina Theatre, The Wizard of Oz and Grease! For Hot Summer Nights at the Kennedy, Blithe Spirit and Rumors. She starred as Queen Gertrude in Temple Theatre’s Hamlet; and co-starred with Ira David Wood III in Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet featuring Evan Rachel Wood. She portrayed Maria Callas in the Tony-award winning Master Class and Sister Aloysius in Doubt. Lynda spent last summer of 2011 at The Lost Colony Outdoor Drama in The Outer Banks, where she appeared as Queen Elizabeth I; and was last seen here at NCSU University Theatre as Mrs. Venable in Suddenly Last Summer and TheatreFest 2012, in Fallen Angels and Lettice and Lovage. Ryan Fleming, Gerald Croft, is a junior in environmental science. Ryan is making his University Theatre debut in An Inspector Calls. His previous credits include Henry V at Hampden-Sydney College. He would like to thank his family, Jacqui Brooks, Heather Snow Clark, Nan Stephenson, and everyone else who supported his acting career. Ryan’s other passions include reading and bouldering. Rhonda Lemon, Sheila Birling, is a senior in communication media. Rhonda is excited to be a part of what is sure to be another wonderful University Theatre production. She has been a part of nine shows at NCSU (on stage or back stage) and was most recently a guest and assistant stage manager for the Theatrefest production Lettice and Lovage, and an ensemble member in RENT. “I’m thrilled to be on stage again and to have the opportunity to work with some awesome cast members!” Philipp Lindemann, Eric Birling, is a sophomore in political science with a concentration in international politics. Philipp is thrilled to be in his third production with University Theatre, most recently appearing in Alice in Wonderland. Additional credits include The Diviners, As You Like It, and Ring Round the Moon. He will be in productions of Hamlet and Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead as Laertes this summer. Philipp would like to thank his friends and family for their constant support of his theatrical endeavors. Christian O’Neal, Inspector, is a senior in mechanical engineering. After a year hiatus, Christian is eager to return to the University Theatre mainstage in this exciting production of An Inspector Calls. Christian made cameo appearances during the 2012 TheatreFest season. Last seen on the mainstage as Dexter Haven in The Philadelphia Story (2011), his favorite roles include Wayne Wellacre in Inspecting Carol (2010) and Macbeth in Macbeth (2010). Diana Quetti, Edna, is a junior in communication media. Previous credits include member of the Urinetown and The Arabian Nights ensembles, Renee in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, and Mrs. White/White Queen in Alice in Wonderland. Diana also performed the NCSU Libraries “Red, White & Banned” (2011 & 2012). “I am so excited to be a part of the cast of An Inspector Calls. Many thanks to Mom, Dad, Rachel, Jackie and the rest of my family and friends for their continuous support!” A4 « ncsu.edu/arts

Mette CJ Schladweiler, Stage Manager, has been stage-managing in the Triangle area for over 25 years including TheatreFest’s Lettice and Lovage. Mette also served as assistant director for 125 Years of Holidays at NC State this past November. Most recently, she stage-managed the Raleigh Arts Commission Medal of Arts Ceremony at the Fletcher and RACE for Hot Summer Nights at the Kennedy/Theatre Raleigh. Previous University Theatre/TheatreFest credits include The Dixie Swim Club, Tennessee Williams’ Garden District, Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Nile, and too many more to mention. Mette is excited to be back working with all the creative and talented individuals at University Theatre again! Mette would like to thank her husband, Linh and sons, Jackson & Maxx, her Mom, John and Nancy for all their love and support while she does what she loves to do! Paige Broadaway, Assistant Stage Manager, is junior in criminology. This is Paige’s third production with University Theatre having served as a crew member for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and an assistant stage manager for Alice in Wonderland. She has been involved in theatre since high school, and is excited to continue her passion at State. Paige would like to thank her family and friends for their continual support. Natalie Tita, Assistant Stage Manager, is a freshman in the First Year College with designs to matriculate in international studies. “I really love theatre productions and I’m glad I get to be a part of this one.”

ON SALE

FRIDAY, APRIL 5

TheatreFest 2013 | May 30-June 30 DADDY’S DYIN’ WHO’S GOT THE WILL? by Del Shores

MURDER AT THE HOWARD JOHNSON’S by Ron Clark & Sam Bobrick

BLACK COFFEE by Agatha Christie


a wicked and inspiring choreographer This semester, the NC State Dance Program has the privilege to work with a very special guest artist, Rhea Patterson. A Virginia native, Patterson is currently performing as a featured dancer in Wicked on Broadway. As a young child, Patterson was inspired to dance when she won a performance award in her elementary school, and she has not looked back. Before her Broadway debut, she received a BFA in Dance from University of the Arts in Philadelphia, and an MA in Arts Administration from Goucher College in Baltimore. She danced with Urban Bush Women, DCDC2 (the repertorytraining ensemble of the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company), and Eleone Dance, among other companies. Not only is Rhea Patterson an accomplished performer, she is an educator and choreographer. The subject matter of her work is often very personal. Since Patterson was an adolescent, her mother has dealt with the unexpected and often frustrating ups and downs of Parkinson’s disease. Parkinson’s – a disorder of the brain that leads to shaking and difficulty with movement and coordination – is a particularly difficult condition for Rhea to witness, considering the extraordinary physical coordination and ability that she exhibits as a part of her everyday work. Motivated by her mother’s strength and struggle, Patterson teaches movement and exercise classes to people with Parkinson’s during the day. In collaboration with cinematographer Michael T. Cano, she is working on a docu-dance titled Stage 5 that creatively expresses her relationship to both her mother and the disease. “Creating this solo has been challenging (to say the least), mentally, emotionally and physically,” explained Rhea. “I have a real desire to understand my mother’s physical struggle and a need to process the emotions I experience as I witness her deterioration. There is only one mechanism I can think of to tackle both my desire to understand and my need to process... that is dance and creative expression through movement.”

Photos by Matthew Murphy, www.MurphyMade.com

On January 21, Patterson worked with the students of the NC State Dance Program’s Panoramic Dance Project to develop Stages, a group piece/docu-dance based on the movement and film from her solo project Stage 5. She spent the day manipulating the movement phrases to create a new version of the piece for Panoramic that will be premiered in their March 23 concert in Titmus Theatre. In reference to this project Patterson states, “I understand that the students will not have a personal connection to my mother or even Parkinson’s. What I hope they will help me figure out is how the body adapts to deterioration and physical limitations.” Stages will be unique to NC State University and will include video footage filmed by Michael Cano during Patterson’s residency. The depth and range of the Stages project illustrates the reach and growth of the NC State Dance Program.

PANORAMIC DANCE PROJECT SPRING CONCERT: SATURDAY, MARCH 23 For more information about upcoming performances visit www.ncsu.edu/dance. For more information about the incredible Rhea Patterson visit www.rheapatterson.com. Spring 2013 » Issue 1 » A5


THE CAMPAIGN FOR THE

Gregg Museum of Art & Design IS NEARLY HALFWAY TOWARD ITS GOAL! The campaign has raised $1.9 million of its total goal of $3.9 million. These funds will support the renovation of the historic chancellor’s residence on Hillsborough Street and construction of a 15,200 square foot contemporary addition.

FUND-RAISING PROGRESS Major Gifts

Nineteen generous individuals and foundations have chosen to make a major commitment of $25,000 or more to the Gregg Museum Campaign. Many have chosen to name spaces in the new Gregg and will be recognized with permanent donor plaques once the museum is complete. All of these major contributors believe in the future Gregg Museum of Art & Design, and we thank them for their support!

Transformational challenge grant from the Windgate Foundation

Last summer, the Windgate Charitable Foundation made a transformational challenge grant of $750,000 to the Gregg Campaign. This grant is meant to inspire and challenge others to give as well; the grant will be awarded once the Gregg Museum Campaign meets its total fund-raising goal.

More recent major gifts

Late last year, the Gregg Campaign received two major gifts of $50,000. One was an anonymous pledge, and the other came from Gilda and Norman Greenberg, who in 2011 gave the largest bequest in the history of ARTS NC STATE of their extraordinary Native American art collection. Gilda and Norm named the parlor in the historic chancellor’s residence The Drs. Norman and Gilda Greenberg Native American Arts Collection Study Room. In late November, alumnus and former university trustee, Bob Jordan, and his wife, Sarah, committed $25,000 to the campaign.

A6 « ncsu.edu/arts

Founding Friends

Last spring, the Gregg Campaign launched a Founding Friends program for contributors of $5,000 to $24,999. We already have 20 Founding Friends, who will receive prominent recognition on a comprehensive donor plaque in the new museum. The Founding Friends program is a wonderful option for those who wish to support the campaign but cannot commit to a major gift. Our goal is to recruit 200 Founding Friends and raise $1M!

In case you didn’t know…

All pledges to the Gregg Museum Campaign may be paid over a period of up to five years from the date of the original commitment. No gift is too large or small!

Check out the Gregg Campaign website! Visit the Gregg Museum Campaign website at newgregg.ncsu.edu to see design renderings, to keep up with our fund-raising progress, to read about our donors, and to learn more about the Gregg Museum of Art & Design and its 26,000+ item collection!

Questions about the Gregg Museum Campaign? Contact Nicole Peterson, Director of Development for ARTS NC STATE, at 919-513-1337 or nicole_peterson@ncsu.edu. You may also contact Virginia Yopp, Gregg Campaign Manager, at 919-812-2355 or virginia_yopp@ncsu.edu. The Campaign for the Gregg Museum of Art & Design is truly a campus and community effort, and you can be a part of it. Consider helping make the Gregg Museum’s permanent home a reality!


MUSIC @ NC STATE IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE ARTS NOW SERIES AND THE PMC LECTURE SERIES PRESENTS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2013 AT 7PM KENNEDY-MCILWEE STUDIO THEATRE

Photo by Melanie Hatton

PLEASE DURING THE PERFORMANCE:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting  THANK YOU!

Violist Sheila Browne has performed in many of the world’s major halls as soloist, chamber musician, and as an orchestral principal. Hailed by the New York Times as a “stylish player” and by Robert Mann as “one of America’s most important violists,” Ms. Browne has soloed with the Juilliard Orchestra, Kiev Philharmonic, New World Symphony, in Carnegie Hall with the New York Women’s Ensemble, South African International Viola Congress Festival Orchestra, and the Viva Vivaldi!, Reina Sofia, and German-French chamber orchestras, among others. She has recorded concerto, solo and chamber works for the Nonesuch, Sony, Albany, Centaur, and the ERM labels, and has premiered a concerto written for her at the most recent international viola congresses in Australia and South Africa. The only viola finalist in the 2004 International Pro Musicis Solo Awards at Carnegie Hall, Ms. Browne is a graduate of the Juilliard School, MusikHochschule Freiburg and Rice University. She is an Artist-Professor at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. Upcoming recording projects include Joan Tower’s Rising quintet with Carol Wincenc as well as a commission for the Fire Pink Trio by Chris Brubeck for their debut CD, and a solo recording with works of Dvořák Prokofiev, and Franck. Flutist Debra Reuter-Pivetta, a winner in the 1999 Concert Artists Guild Competition, was the first ever recipient of the Community Concerts Performance Prize. Her other honors include top prizes in numerous competitions including the Louise D. McMahon International Music Competition, the National Flute Association’s Young Artist Competition and the Flute Talk Competition. Ms. Reuter-Pivetta has performed as concerto soloist with many orchestras in the US and Europe. Dedicated to the performance of contemporary music and rarely-heard works, she has given many premieres both as soloist and chamber artist. Most recently, she gave the world premiere of a work by Dr. Thomas Clark. Other premieres include chamber works by Margaret Vardell Sandresky, Robert Dick and Lawrence Dillon. She has recorded works by Böhm, Bozza, Saint-Saëns, Guiot and Burton with her husband, pianist Federico Pivetta. Debra Reuter-Pivetta is the principal flutist with the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra and the flute instructor at Salem College. Ms. Reuter-Pivetta is a graduate of the North Carolina School of the Arts where she studied with Philip Dunigan.

Spring 2013 » Issue 1 » A7

| fire pink trio

Jacquelyn Bartlett was born in Detroit, where she began her studies with her mother, Mary Bartlett, a noted harpist. After continued studies with world renowned harpists Carlos Salzedo and Alice Chalifoux, Ms. Bartlett, at age sixteen, made her solo debut in Chicago’s Orchestra Hall in a performance of the Handel Harp Concerto, which received high critical praise. She graduated with honors from Interlochen Arts Academy and then attended Oberlin Conservatory of Music, where she majored in harp and minored in piano. Her harp teachers include Lucy Lewis, Lucille Lawrence, and Susann McDonald. She has performed with many of the world’s leading orchestras. Ms. Bartlett currently is a member of the artist faculties of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, Appalachian State University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and the Community School of the Arts at Spirit Square in Charlotte. A champion of chamber music, Ms. Bartlett has worked with such well-known composers as George Crumb, Alberto Ginastera, Dan Locklair and George Rochberg, and she continues to bring new compositions to the concert stage. She has recorded on the Albany, Capstone, and Naxos labels. Her recent world premiere recording of Dan Locklair’s Concerto for Harp and Orchestra with the Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra has just been released on NAXOS and has received high, critical praise.

P R O G R AM N O T E S

fire pink trio

Fire Pink, the beautiful North American wildflower that covers the mountains in late spring, resembles the strokes of a painter’s brush – a symbol of creativity and fresh, new ideas to the members of the Fire Pink Trio. Formed in 2008, this dynamic and poetic trio combines harp, flute and viola, to produce exciting music from the past and the present. At this concert, the Fire Pink Trio will perform music by Claude Debussy, J. Mark Scearce, Sofia Gubaidulina, and Hasan Ucarsu.


farfetched – mad science, fringe architecture and visionary engineering JANUARY 17-APRIL 26, 2013 | GREGG MUSEUM OF ART & DESIGN

Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible. – Lord Kelvin, President, Royal Society, 1895 (in 1903, the Wright brothers’ first plane proved him wrong).

There is no likelihood that man can ever tap the power of the atom. – Robert Millikan, American physicist and Nobel Prize winner, 1928

Space travel is bunk. – Sir Harold Spencer Jones, Royal Astronomer, 1957 (two weeks later, Sputnik began orbiting the Earth).

There is practically no chance communications space satellites will be used to provide better telephone, telegraph, television, or radio service inside the United States. – FCC Commissioner Tunis Craven, 1961 (the first commercial communications satellite went into service 4 years later).

There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home. – Ken Olson, founder of Digital Equipment Corporation, 1977 (within months the Apple II and TRS-80 home computers proved him wrong).

The Gregg’s spring exhibition, Farfetched – Mad Science, Fringe Architecture and Visionary Engineering, explores British mathematician Alfred North Whitehead’s famous remark that, “Every really new idea looks crazy at first,” by presenting multiple examples of ideas proposed by dozens of visionaries, most of whom would fall into the category of “outsider artists.” Some of the ideas – like inventor L.C. Spooner’s 1920s patent proposals for carpet beaters and sewing machines powered by perpetual motion, or the wooden computer that Z.B. Armstrong built in his Thomson, Georgia bedroom and hoped would predict the end of the world – may be doomed never to work. But others – like retired prizefighter Alex Maldonado’s proposal to bury air pollution underground, or Raleigh scientific illustrator Renaldo Kuhler’s scheme to convert sewage to natural gas – are already being seriously considered by mainstream scientists. Still others, such as Littleton, North Carolina florist Richard Brown’s use of expanded foam to build space ships, or Boston architect Paul Laffoley’s concept for modifying tree DNA to grow houses instead of building them, may suggest possibilities for the future. In any case, history has shown again and again that one of the quickest ways to be proved wrong is to declare something “impossible.”

A8 « ncsu.edu/arts

To make this point, Farfetched offers plenty of examples of predictions that turned out to be right, even though they may have seemed bizarre at the time they were made. In 1919, for example, when Texas visionary Charles Dellshau drew an “airship” that featured a very large propeller on the roof, his neighbors undoubtedly laughed and thought him a fool. Seventeen years later, when the first successful helicopter took off, the joke was on them. It happened again in the 1950s, when behavioral psychology was becoming popular. Behavioralists liked to debunk the old turn-of-the-previouscentury practice of phrenology, which held that different parts of the brain perform different functions and are connected to different emotions. A few decades later, neurological research began to indicate that at least some phrenological concepts were surprisingly true, even if the functions were located in the wrong places. Genetic studies began to show that these sites are largely predetermined, too. The history of science and technology is full of apparent dead ends that suddenly open up to reveal new possibilities, or long-held laws and principles that turn out to be wrong – at least for the time being. Farfetched encourages visitors and students to set aside their preconceptions and enter with an open mind... and then be astounded.


San Francisco Discopter Port by Alexander Weygers

DURING THE RUN OF THE EXHIBITION, THREE VISIONARIES WILL VISIT THE CAMPUS FOR

SPECIAL INTERACTIVE WORKSHOPS: January 28-31

Duncan Laurie works with physics, engineering, and Arts Village students to enhance the radionic Purr Generator, which induces a cat’s purr to generate happiness. What else can it do? It’s all up to the participants.

February 20-21

Architect Paul Laffoley consults with architecture, design, and horticulture students to envision truly innovative architectural concepts. His own ideas include continuous-surface structures based on Klein Bottles.

March 18-21

Peter Richards, senior artist at San Francisco’s Exploratorium science museum, works with engineering, ecology, architecture, and natural resource students to “imagineer” an outdoor sculpture for the new Gregg Museum.

Each of these workshops includes limited openings for the public at no charge. If interested in signing up, contact Zoe Starling at 919-513-7244 or zoe_starling@ncsu.edu.

Spring 2013 » Issue 1 » A9


humanature: photographs of the unnatural world by peter goin JANUARY 17-APRIL 26, 2013 | GREGG MUSEUM OF ART & DESIGN

Since the days of the pioneers, one of the great shaping influences on American life and our attitudes toward the world around us has been the idea that nature offers a wilderness of limitless possibilities as a setting in which we can pursue any activity we like. Even the language we use reveals how deeply ingrained is the concept of the boundless resources. Whenever, for example, the economy begins to experience “slower growth,” it’s cause for alarm – as if growth could continue forever. When we speak of “developing natural resources” such as oil or gas, the words make it sound like we’re expanding them, when the reality is that we’re only finding new ways of depleting them further. By this point, in fact, there may be no such thing as “nature” any more. With ozone holes over the Antarctic, acid rain in the rain forests, oceans everywhere beginning to rise as global warming picks up speed, even the most remote parts of the world are being affected by human activity. Nevada-based photographer Peter Goin pushes this realization even further by arguing that, in fact, the whole world has become a human artifact. The title of his current exhibition of color photographs at the Gregg Museum – Humanature – suggests the confusing duality this implies: 1) Our own, all-too-human need to make the make the most of things by exploring, exploiting, and altering our surroundings and 2) the resulting blurring of the boundaries between humankind and the rest of the living things with whom we share the planet. Happily, Goin employs a desert-dry sense of irony to make his point. A photograph of sprinklers watering naked sand in order to create a golf course in California is paired with an image of a boy attempting to fish in a reservoir nearly drained of water, as one form of leisure is being replaced by another. In another image, a man stands in a model of a river constructed by researchers to study the effect of returning a river to its natural channel – which is being considered in order to correct problems created when engineers attempted to “improve” the river by straightening it many decades ago. A water gauge photographed alongside a “wild and scenic river” like Georgia’s Chattooga (made famous in the film Deliverance), indicates that it is managed and monitored like everything else. Adam, you can’t go home to Eden any more. Best to clean up your act and reorder your priorities. Peter Goin will be on campus at NC State, April 10-11. On April 10 at 6pm, he will introduce his film In Search of Ritual: The Burning Man, about the famous “alternative lifestyle” event that takes place in the Nevada desert each year. On April 11 at 6pm, he will give a talk about his Humanature images and other landscape photographs. Both events take place at the Gregg Museum, 2nd floor, Talley Student Center.

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ARTS NC STATE ANNOUNCES THE 13TH ANNUAL

STUDENT ART PURCHASE THE RULES Artwork must be priced at $400 or less. Limit one entry per NC State student. FOR 2-D WORK  Artwork may be no larger than 52” x 52” (including the frame)  Needs to be ready to hang (either canvas with sturdy framing or framed with matting, wiring, etc.) FOR 3-D WORK  Artwork may be no larger than 20”H x 15”W x 15”D  3-D work may include: Ceramics, Wood, Textiles, Metals, Glass  3-D work should include mounting device so that piece can sit on horizontal surface or be mounted to a vertical surface TO ENTER YOUR WORK Bring your artwork to the Gregg Museum of Art & Design, located on the 2nd floor of Talley Student Center, on Tuesday, March 19, 2013 between 9am and 3pm. DETAILS: ncsu.edu/arts/students

CREATIVE ARTIST AWARD The Creative Artist Award will recognize original work in music, dance and theatre, created by NC State students. Each winner will receive a $500 cash prize, and the selected works will be performed in 2013-2014 by the appropriate ARTS NC STATE performing arts program. This award is open to any currently enrolled, full-time NC State University student.

DETAILS ncsu.edu/arts/students DEADLINE Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at noon

Spring 2013 » Issue 1 » A11


MUSIC @ NC STATE PRESENTS

the ncsu pipes and drums – the music of the british isles SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2013 AT 7PM CARDINAL GIBBONS HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM Ken Hanson, Pipe Major Julie Southwick, Drum Sergeant Paul Field, Business Manager

PLEASE DURING THE PERFORMANCE:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting  THANK YOU!

A12 « ncsu.edu/arts


PROGRAM 4/4 MARCHES Scotland the Brave MacRae Meadow

HORNPIPES – Stack of Barley / Red-haired Boy SLIP JIGS – Snowy Path / Foxhunter’s REELS –Miss Thornton / Miss Monahan / Dunmore Lasses

6/8 MARCH John D Burgess

Steam Train to Mallaig

P R O G R AM N O T E S

4/4 MARCH At Long Last

MARCH, STRATHSPEY AND REEL Prince Charles Welcome to Lochaber Duncan Johnstone’s Strathspey Willie Davie

MEDLEY Mary Grant of Lochgelly Mac an Irish Weary We’ve Been Morag Duncan Roses of Prince Charlie

AIR Highland Cathedral

4/4 MARCHES Lord Lovat’s Lament Loch Ruan The Intercontinental Gathering

IRISH SESSION MUSICIANS JIGS – Willie Coleman’s / Sporting Pitchfork / Rambling Pitchfork

FINALE Amazing Grace High Road to Gairloch / The Brown Haired Maiden Green Hills of Tyrol

REELS – Dan Breen’s / Over the Moor to Maggie / Sandy Mount POLKAS – Maggie in the Wood / Finnish / Jessica’s

NCSU Pipes & Drums The NCSU Pipes and Drums has been part of the Music Department since 1968. Most band members have learned to pipe or drum through beginning lessons offered each semester at NCSU (MUS 152). Band members perform about 40 times a year, on and off campus, in concerts, parades, commencement ceremonies, and other events which call for the stirring sound of the pipes. The band competes in Grade IV, traveling to Highland Games throughout the southeast and currently ranks 11th in the Southeast for bands in that grade.

As in Ireland, session musicians play tunes from memory, and learn them orally or from notation that is readily available in tune books and on the internet. The session has been running since January 2005 and is open to all NC State students, faculty, staff, and local community members who are interested in playing traditional Irish music. For further information about the Irish Session, contact Dr. Alison Arnold, aearnold@ncsu. edu. Also see the session website at https://sites.google.com/a/ncsu.edu/ irishsessionatncsu/.

The Irish Music Session at NC State is a weekly gathering of musicians who play traditional Irish and Celtic tunes on instruments such as the fiddle, flute, whistle, button accordion, mandolin, guitar, banjo, bodhran, and piano. The repertoire includes Irish dance music – reels, jigs, slip jigs, hornpipes, and polkas – as well as marches, waltzes, and slow airs.

Cardinal Gibbons High School is a college preparatory high school of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Raleigh, open to youth of all faiths. The school is graciously allowing the Pipes and Drums to use its facility while the campus music facilities are undergoing renovations.

Band Personnel PIPERS Ken Hanson Nixon Alexander Paul Field Bruce Wright Duncan Fraser Pete Currie Darrell Thompson Evelyn Judson Matt Carroll^ Ally McKinnis Chris Turlington Alex Ray^ Dudley Barnett Kelley Fringer David Magill Tony McWilliams^

Cory Moore Brent Hale John Starke^ Jesse Fulton^ Steve Tedder Connor Todd DRUMMERS Snare Julie Southwick Colin Lee Connor McKinnis Adrian McNeil^ Tenor and Bass Drum Terese Camp Joe Ryan Pat Batko

Amy McKinnis Patrick Madigan Will Felker Meredith Vertrees^ Warren Morrison IRISH SESSION MUSICIANS Alison Arnold, flute (director) Mairead Brady^, fiddle Lewis Carson, flute Paul Fackler, fiddle Julie Gorka, piano Madi Hargreaves^, fiddle Wes Henderson, mandolin, bodhran Tim Hogan, bodhran Trish Hornick, fiddle Margaret Rush, guitar ^indicates NCSU Student Spring 2013 » Issue 1 » A13

| the ncsu pipes and drums – the music of the british isles

3/4 MARCHES March du Petrie Farwell to Nigg Castle Dangerous


nc state jazz ensemble MUSIC @ NC STATE PRESENTS

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2013 AT 4PM JONES AUDITORIUM, MEREDITH COLLEGE Dr. Wes Parker, director | All selections to be announced from the stage

JAZZ ENSEMBLE ROSTER SAXES Erik Lumpkin* (lead alto), Computer Science (Graduate Student) Anisa Traish* (alto), Zoology Carter Harris (lead tenor), Electrical Engineering Zach Verbos* (tenor), Aerospace Engineering Carly Abney (bari), Chemical Engineering

TRUMPETS Robert McCraw* (split lead), Computer Science Kyle Santos (split lead), Computer Engineering Gary Martin, Aerospace Engineering Rick Chapman (jazz), Aerospace Engineering Elora Forgie, Animal Science Julie Bernstorf*, Biological Engineering

TROMBONES Austin Peterson (lead), Aerospace Engineering Michael Murr, Industrial Engineering (Graduate Student) Nick Sheeran, Materials Science and Engineering Ben Hamm, Physics Caleb Johnson (bass), Chemistry Charles Jennings (bass), Mechanical Engineering

RHYTHM SECTION Joey Pilot* (piano), Arts Applications in Music Sascha Eisenstein (guitar), Psychology Andy Powell (bass), Nuclear Engineering Collin Frank (drums), Business Administration *indicates music performance minor

PLEASE DURING THE PERFORMANCE:  Silence your cell phone  No photography

A14 « ncsu.edu/arts

Photos by Dan Jahn

 No texting 

THANK YOU!

ARTS NC State | Spring 2013 insert #1  

Spring program insert. February 13-February 24, 2013

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