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Fall 2012 | Issue 4 | Nov 13-Dec 2, 2012 A3 NC STATE JAZZ COMBOS

A16

RALEIGH CIVIC SYMPHONY

A20

LADIES IN RED

A21

NC STATE WIND ENSEMBLE

A22

GRAINS OF TIME

A23

A QUASQUICENTENNAL CELEBRATION

A26

DONOR SPOTLIGHT: PATRICIA AND JOHN TECTOR

fall 2012 | issue 4

A4 ALICE IN WONDERLAND A8 HOLIDAY CRAFTS FAIR AND SALE A13 CONNECTING CROSSROADS IN NORTH CAROLINA

contents

ARTS NC STATE


Music @ NC State presents the

p r o g r am n o t e s

nc state jazz combos Tuesday, November 13, 2012 at 7pm | Stewart Theatre Dr. Wes Parker, Director Mr. Jason Foureman, Coach

featuring Jazz Studio Combo Mr. Jason Foureman, coach

| nc state jazz combos

Jazz Lab Combo Dr. Wes Parker, coach Upstairs Jazz Combo Mr. Jason Foureman, coach brief intermission NC State Combo Dr. Wes Parker, coach All selections to be announced from the stage

jazz combo roster Jazz Studio Combo

Upstairs Jazz Combo

Shohei Sato (tenor), Economics Alex Mangot (piano)*, Civil Engineering Taylor Rosenfeld (guitar), Biomedical Engineering Brandon Felts (bass), Mechanical Engineering Collin Frank (drums), Communications/Public Relations

Nick Berglund (tenor), Electrical Engineering Kenan Ezzard (alto), Civil Engineering Daniel Salo* (piano), Biomedical Engineering Nick Murphy (guitar), Chemical Engineering Kevin Quick (bass), Sociology/Philosophy Jared Robertson (drums), Computer Engineering

Jazz Lab Combo Robert Benson (alto), Computer Science Steven Hall (alto), Business Stephen Friedman (tenor), Industrial Engineering/ Furniture Manufacturing Colin Greatwood (trumpet), Mechanical Engineering Miles Hicklen (trumpet), Civil Engineering Lucas Frye (guitar), International Studies Joey Pilot (piano), Arts Applications in Music Samuel Shaw (bass), Forestry Sean McClain (drums), Psychology

NC State Jazz Combo Carter Harris (tenor), Electrical Engineering Ric Chapman (trumpet), Aerospace Engineering Joey Pilot (piano), Arts Applications in Music Steven Ray (guitar), Chemical Engineering Andy Powell (bass), Nuclear Engineering Chad Mangum (drums), Mathematics *Indicates Music Minor

Please during the performance:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting Thank You! Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A3


university theatre presents

alice in wonderland Adapted for the stage by Jayme Mellema From Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass DirectoR Jayme Mellema Scenic Design Jayme Mellema Costume Design Em Rossi, Laura J. Parker, John C. McIlwee*, Maggie Briggs* Technical Direction David Jensen Lighting & Sound Design Joshua Reaves Puppetry Consultant Tori Ralston

PROFESSIONAL STAFF Costume Shop Manager Em Rossi COSTUME TECHNICIAN Laura J. Parker Assistant Technical Director Aaron Bridgman Projections Engineer Joshua Reaves Sound Engineer Kevin Wright

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, November 14-17, 2012 at 7:30pm Sunday, November 18 and December 2, 2012 at 2pm WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY, November 28-29, 2012 at 7:30pm Saturday, December 1, 2012 at 2pm and 7:30pm Titmus Theatre SETTING: Alice’s home and Wonderland There will be one fifteen-minute intermission

CAST (in order of appearance) ALICE.........................................................................................................................Tianna F. Soto MOTHER/QUEEN OF HEARTS..........................................................................Morgan Piner* MRS. WHITE/WHITE QUEEN/THREE OF HEARTS...................................... Diana Quetti* FATHER/WHITE RABBIT............................................................................ Nathaniel D. Conti* MOUSE/CHESHIRE CAT.................................................................................. Alexander Smith DODO/HATTER/TWO OF HEARTS....................................................... Andrew Haze Enloe* LORY/MARCH HARE/TEN OF HEARTS..........................................................Michael Taylor EAGLET/DUCHESS/DORMOUSE.....................................................................Brett Williams* DUCK/FISH FOOTMAN/KING OF HEARTS.................................................Matthew Hogan TIGER-LILY/SEVEN OF SPADES....................................................................... Megan Bridges* ROSE/TWO OF SPADES...............................................................................................Erica Abed VIOLET/FIVE OF SPADES...................................................................................Jordan Necamp CATERPILLAR/TWEEDLEDEE/NINE OF HEARTS.....................................William Stewart FROG FOOTMAN/TWEEDLEDUM/SEVEN OF HEARTS..................... Anthony Scialabba HUMPTY DUMPTY/KNAVE OF HEARTS................................................. Philip Lindemann PUPPETEER...........................................................................................................Chris Bradsher* PUPPETEER........................................................................................................TeShima Brennen PUPPETEER.......................................................................................................Brittney Dockery* PUPPETEER................................................................................................................. Blair Downs PUPPETEER.....................................................................................................Melissa Richardson PUPPETEER.......................................................................................................... Matthew Tucker *Member of Alpha Psi Omega Honorary Theatre Fraternity

Marketing Nancy Breeding Marketing, Graphics & Photography Ronald A. Foreman* ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Duke University Theater Studies Department, John C. McIlwee*, Allison Bergman Scenic elements sponsored by the students of Alpha Psi Omega Honorary Theatre Fraternity

A4 « ncsu.edu/arts

Please during the performance:

 Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting Thank You!


p r o g r am n o t e s

Assistant Director.............................................................................................................................................................................................. Antrone Burke* Assistant to the Playwright.................................................................................................................................................................................... Dayne Smith Stage Manager...................................................................................................................................................................................................... Nicholas Peaks Assistant Stage Managers............................................................................................................................................... Kimberlin Torain, Paige Broadaway Assistant Lighting Designer............................................................................................................................................................................ Kenny Hertling* Production Assistants........................................................................................................................................................Sarah Thornton, Meghan Leonard Projections Designers..............................................................................................................................................................Lauren Caddick, Richard Sater Master Carpenters....................................................................................................................................................................... Sarah Scott, Chris Bradsher* Scenic Carpenter........................................................................................................................................................................................ Nathaniel D. Conti* Set Crew.............................................................................................................................. Autumn Stephens, Paige Harrelson, Casey Reep, Art Norman, ....................Megan Juda, Tara Collins, Mardel Gabriel, Michael Avelar, Ian McAreavy, Paul Tyrlik, Brandon Mooney, Jeff Mohr, Brandon Barnes Properties Master.......................................................................................................................................................................................... Brittney Dockery* Properties Crew....................................................................................................................................................................... Jeffrey Moh, Elizabeth Lemons Master Electrician............................................................................................................................................................................................ Kenny Hertling* Light Board Operator.........................................................................................................................................................................................Rhett Brodford Followspot Operators........................................................................................................................................................................Lauren Davis, Sagar Patel Projections Operator.................................................................................................................................................................................................. Paul Tyrlik Soundboard Operators.........................................................................................................................................................................Rachel Hall, Zeb Farrel Run Crew...............................................................................................................................................................................................................Catie McEntee Wardrobe Supervisor................................................................................................................................................................................................Talia Barlaz Dresser......................................................................................................................................................................................................Katherine Wilberding Makeup Crew Chief......................................................................................................................................................................................................... Nhi Vu Makeup Crew.......................................................................................................................................................................... Shelby Carson, Jasmine Morere Wig Crew............................................................................................................................................................................................................... Yamila Monge Puppetry Fabrication.............................................................................Tori Ralston, Em Rossi, Laura J. Parker, Kimberlin Torain, Brittney Dockery*, ..............................Glenn Billups, Cassandra Brinkman, Elizabeth Lemmons, Maggie Miller, Joyska Nunez Medina, Chris Bradsher*, Talia Barlaz House Manager....................................................................................................................................................................... University Theatre House Crew Ushers............................................................................................................................................... University Theatre House Crew and THE 103 students *Member of Alpha Psi Omega Honorary Theatre Fraternity

Fall 2012 Âť Issue 4 Âť A5

| alice in wonderland

PRODUCTION CREW


ALICE IN WONDERLAND CAST BIOS Erica Abed, Rose/Two of Spades, is a senior in psychology, criminology, and English. Half American and half Lebanese, she has travelled extensively throughout Europe and the Middle East. Erica is passionate about human rights and aspires to work to improve prison conditions in Lebanon. She is thrilled to take part in this production of Alice in Wonderland, and is extremely grateful to be working with such talented individuals. Erica’s previous acting credits at University Theatre include The Arabian Nights. Chris Bradsher, Puppeteer, is a senior in electrical engineering. Chris is making his stage debut with University Theatre. He has previously worked various crew positions for such shows as The Philadelphia Story, Garden District, and The Arabian Nights. He also helps out in the scene shop every week. Chris is excited to help in this show. TeShima Brennen, Puppeteer, is a senior in communication media. TeShima attended Rutgers University, majoring in biology, before relocating to the Raleigh area. She was a dancer at Miss Kim's School of Dance for 15 years and is currently vice president of public relations for an on-campus club called Campus Toastmasters. After graduation, she hopes to pursue a career in film. TeShima is making her stage debut in Alice in Wonderland. Megan Bridges, Tiger-lily/Seven of Spades, is a senior in international studies. Previously she has been seen at NCSU in Amadeus, Into the Woods, Macbeth and The Philadelphia Story. She has also served on crew for A Piece of My Heart, Dr. Horrible's Sing-a-long Blog, and Twelfth Night and been involved in local film projects with credits including Ipseity, Bryan, and Remember. She is a founding board member of the newly established Entrepreneurs Marketing the Arts Organization, and an Alpha Psi Omega member. She is currently an applicant for the Fulbright Scholarship Program and, if awarded, will be conducting independent research in the Czech Republic after her graduation. She would like to thank tonight's audience, the crew, her parents, and most of all her Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. “Thank you and enjoy the show.” Nathaniel D. Conti, Father/White Rabbit, is a junior in biomedical engineering. “As a person who prefers riding around campus on a unicycle, the craziness of Alice in Wonderland is right up my alley. Working with Jayme has been a blast and I thoroughly enjoyed his directing style. This is my eighth show at NCSU, most recently portraying Lawrence Jameson in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.” Brittney Dockery, Puppeteer, is a senior in zoology with a minor in microbiology. This is her first onstage performance with University Theatre. In the past she has worked backstage for Into the Woods, Twelfth Night, and The Philadelphia Story among other shows. She also works as a properties artisan for many of the University Theatre shows. She is extremely excited to be part of a wonderful production and to work with some amazing people. She would like to thank her family, friends and University Theatre for supporting her and providing her with some wonderful opportunities. Blair Downs, Puppeteer, is a sophomore in zoology. Making her University Theatre debut in Alice in Wonderland, Blair has been involved in theatre since middle school. Some of her biggest roles were Mrs. Veneble in Suddenly, Last Summer, Jessie Cates in 'night, Mother, and the Spirit of Christmas Present in Scrooge: The Musical. Blair is thankful for her supportive family and to University Theatre for this wonderful opportunity! Andrew Haze Enloe, Dodo/Hatter/Two of Hearts, is a junior in communication media and video production. “I have played many diverse roles on a few different media including television, film, and stage. A few of my more enjoyable experiences were the roles of Kenickie in Grease, Antonio in Twelfth Night, Captain Hammer in Dr. Horrible's A6 « ncsu.edu/arts

Sing-Along-Blog, Mark Cohen in Rent, and Freddy Benson in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. I also enjoyed working on screen in productions such as Lizard Lick Towing, a Doritos Commercial, and The Hunger Games. All of these experiences have helped shape me as a person and an actor and I hope that I can keep doing this for the rest of my life.” Matthew Hogan, Duck/Fish Footman/King of Hearts, is a senior in English. “I could not be happier about being a part of this show. I want to thank my parents, my three brothers, and my three sisters who have always supported me. I want to give a shout out to my niece, Hadley, and a special thanks to my Phi Delta Theta fraternity brothers who always have my back. Last but not least, I want to thank the cast and crew for sharing this adventure into Wonderland. Enjoy the show!” Philipp Lindemann, Humpty Dumpty/Knave of Hearts, is a freshman in political science. Philipp is making his stage debut with University Theatre, last serving on deck crew for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Other acting credits include Burning Coal Theatre Company's KidsWrite 2012, Hugo/Frederic in Ring Round the Moon, Duke Frederick in As You Like It, Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream, and Buddy Layman in The Diviners. Aside from acting, Philipp enjoys film photography, writing scenes and plays that he plans to produce someday, and being German. Jordan Necamp, Violet/Five of Spades, is a sophomore in fashion and textile management. Jordan is so excited to be a part of this incredibly talented cast! Previous credits with University Theatre include Beth in Little Women, a member of the ensemble of Rent, and a monologue performance from the novel Speak in NCSU Libraries' “Red, White, and Banned” event. She would like to thank her friends, family, and Kappa Delta sisters for their endless love and support through everything. Morgan Piner, Mother/Queen of Hearts, is a junior in coastal and marine natural sciences. Morgan is more than happy to be back at University Theatre, participating in such a well-known piece of literature, playing a character that has been adapted for film and stage multiple times. Previous UT roles include Mrs. Jefferson in Rent and Martha in A Piece of My Heart. Additional roles include Dolly in Three Penny Opera. In the meantime, Morgan does not mind “rolling around in the dirt or striking up a song and dance number. I want to give a special thanks to family and friends for being patient and [for] enduring the sassiness of the Queen of Hearts.” Diana Quetti, Mrs. White/White Queen/Three of Hearts, is a junior in communication media. “I am so excited to be a part of the cast of Alice in Wonderland!” Past credits include Urinetown ensemble, Arabian Nights, performer in "Red, White & Banned" (2011 & 2012), and Renee in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. “Many thanks to Dad, Mom, Rachel, Jackie, and the rest of my incredibly supportive family and friends!” Melissa Richardson, Puppeteer, is a freshman in art+design. Melissa began working in the theater as tech for her Forestview High School production of Roger and Hammerstein’s Cinderella. She worked on many of her high school’s theater productions and pageants and was a member of the FHS National Thespian Society. Melissa is making her University Theatre debut in Alice in Wonderland, her first “onstage” production. Tony Scialabba, Frog Footman/Tweedledum/Seven of Hearts, is a sophomore in nuclear engineering. This is the first show he has acted in with University Theatre, previously serving as an assistant stage manager for both Rent and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Tony would like to thank his parents, friends, and his fellow cast and crew members for their friendship, love and support. “Go Pack!” Alexander Smith, Mouse/Cheshire Cat, is a sophomore in computer science. Alex is excited to be in his first show while attending North Carolina State University. He has been in several productions such as The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged and The Lesson. Alex is thrilled to be a part of Alice in Wonderland.


PRODUCTION BIOS

Tianna F. Soto, Alice, is a freshman in psychology and Spanish. This is Tianna’s first production with University Theatre, and she is thrilled to be a part of such a wonderful cast! She has appeared as Chiffon in Little Shop of Horrors, Cinderella’s Mother in Into the Woods, and as a member of the ensemble in Fiddler on the Roof. She loves to sing and has been a member of her high school honors choir as well as the NC Honors Chorus. Tianna enjoys playing the piano, alto saxophone, writing, and all things Broadway. She would like to thank her incredible teachers, friends, and family for their endless love and support!

Jayme Mellema, Director, is a graduate of the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, with his M.F.A. in Scenic Design (’07). He has also designed productions for the Princeton Festival in Princeton, NJ (A Midsummer Nights Dream opera), Duke University (Sweeney Todd, Exit the King), The Children’s Theatre of Charlotte (The Wizard of Oz, Peter Pan, Surviving the Applewhites), the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (The Women of Lockerbie, Three Sisters, Sundown Beach), Calvin College in Grand Rapids, MI (Translations, My Dearest Sister, The Tempest), The Summer Performance Festival at Festival Park, in Manteo, NC (A Midsummer Nights Dream and You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown) and The A. J. Fletcher Opera Institute in Winston-Salem, Raleigh (the southeast premier of Our Town, the new opera by Ned Rorem.) He is the winner of The Metrolina Theater Associations Award for Outstanding Scenic Design 2007, for The Wizard of Oz. Prior to becoming a designer he was a professional scenic artist, painting for the North Shore Music Theater in Beverly, MA. Jayme is also a collage artist. See some of his design and artwork at www.jaymemellema.com.

Michael Taylor, Lory/March Hare/Ten of Hearts, is a sophomore in animal science. Michael has been performing for audiences since he was five years old, and finds the challenge of a live show thrilling. He made his NC State theatrical debut in University Theatre's production of RENT last spring. He is excited to be a part of the whimsical world of Alice in Wonderland, and would like to thank family and friends for their support. “LET THE MADNESS BEGIN!” Matthew Tucker, Puppeteer, is a sophomore in biology. Matthew is very excited to be a part of this play. He has loved theatre for a long time and is excited to return to it after a year of absence. Matthew is making his debut at University Theatre in Alice in Wonderland. Brett Williams, Eaglet/Duchess/Dormouse, is a senior in zoology. Brett is back for her umpteenth performance with University Theatre. Most recently she played Christine in Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. She admits that she has never been in a show quite like this. Brett is beyond excited to work with puppets – “they're so nifty!” “I have to thank my friends and family and boyfriend again for their support and love. And the moral of this bio is, keep your inner child close, and your imagination closer... or something like that.”

Tori Ralston, Puppetry Consultant, is an artist and performer with expertise in puppetry, installation art, and spatial design. She learned puppetry performance on the streets of Southern France. For the last 16 years, Tori has taught sculpture and puppetry at numerous art centers and universities, including Yale University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Elon University, and Duke University. She is the founder of The Theater of Performing Objects. Antrone Burke, Assistant Director, is a senior in religious studies with a minor in theatre. Antrone is president of Alpha Psi Omega, NC State's Honorary Theatre Fraternity. Past credits include Macbeth and Twelfth Night. "I have found a love in backstage work though. I recently directed this past year's Hammy's and took the directing class here with Allison [Bergman]. I just love how this has all come together and it is only through the great work and collaboration we have all put forth. Thanks to all who support me – family, friends, amazing cast and crew. Break a leg!" Nicholas Peaks, Stage Manager, is a sophomore in secondary science education with a concentration in chemistry and a minor in theatre. Nicholas performed in University Theatre’s productions of The Arabian Nights and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. He was stage manager for Little Women, production assistant for Rent, and a member of the crew for The Philadelphia Story. “This show has been so much fun to work on. The energy is amazing and it really pushes our imaginations to explore our own wonderlands. I hope the audience enjoys watching this dream come to life.” He would like to thank the cast, crew, designers, his parents, Teaching Fellows, his theatre family, friends, and Simba Jacobs for all the love and support they give him. Kimberlin Torain, Assistant Stage Manager, is a sophomore in biochemistry and anthropology. Kimberlin looks forward to a career in forensics. Her previous theatre credits include stage managing University Theatre’s The Arabian Nights, and other productions, Fatal Attraction and The Laramie Project. “Thank you to all of my loved ones and supporters and I hope you enjoy the show!” Paige Broadaway, Assistant Stage Manager, is a junior in criminology. This is Paige's second production with University Theatre. Her previous credits at NC State include deck crew for Dirty Rotten Scoundrels. Though she is new to this stage, she has been involved in theatre since her freshman year in high school, including roles such as Rizzo in Grease. Paige would like to thank her family, friends, and boyfriend for all their support throughout the years.

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A7

| alice in wonderland

William Stewart, Caterpillar/Tweedledee/Nine of Hearts, is a freshman in electrical engineering (intended). William is making his University Theatre stage debut in Alice in Wonderland. "I am very excited for the production and grateful to UT for giving me this amazing opportunity." He enjoys long walks on the beach and holding hands, as well as performance poetry, having spent last summer at Brave New Voices, an international youth poetry competition. William also plays guitar, bass, and sings.

p r o g r am n o t e s

CAST BIOS (cont)


the crafts center presents the

28th annual holiday crafts fair and sale saturday, november 17, 2012, 10am-5pm

Totem by Julie Olson

A8 « ncsu.edu/arts

Artist Media

Location

Cynthia Aldrich Laura Azzi Edge Barnes Wendy Bierwirth Wanda Borrelli Marina Bosetti Jean Cheely Dylan Cruse Alice DeLisle Steve Driggers Samantha Faber John Fetvedt Barbara Gautreaux Danene Groenke Anthony Hathaway Al Headen, Jr. Karen Hoffman John Hyder Bridget Jones Lillian Jones Donna Kanich Alan Leland Preston “Prep” Maynard Gary McCutchen Barbara McGeachy Deborah McGuinn Barbara McKenzie Cynthia Mollenkopf Neal O’Briant Julie Olson Mary O’Neill George Pemberton Shannon Plummer-White Charlene Poisel Naomi Profesorsky Bob Reuss Heather Rhymes Dianne Russell Nancy Schecter Mary Ann Scherr Jennifer Siegel Martin Stankus Elise Stiles Wanda Wells John Wilk

Room 127 Room 127 Room 101 Room 101 Room 101 Room 101 Room 121 Room 139 Room 127 Room 100 Room 127 Room 125 Room 101 Room 139 Room 131 Room 101 Room 101 Room 121 Room 127 Room 100 Room 121 Room 125 Room 101 Room 100 Room 131 Room 123 Room 100 Room 101 Room 101 Room 100 Room 139 Room 127 Room 121 Room 123 Room 123 Room 123 Room 125 Room 131 Room 139 Room 100 Room 121 Room 100 Room 101 Room 131 Room 101

pottery watercolor paintings & cards pottery glass, jewelry silk scarves, felting, small quilts ceramic tile jewelry, glass pottery pottery wood pottery jewelry jewelry glass, jewelry pottery pottery jewelry pottery fiber art, quilts jewelry pottery wood jewelry, wood jewelry baskets fused glass pottery felting pottery pottery, hand made books pottery pottery pottery, jewelry pottery beaded jewelry wood pottery jewelry pottery titanium jewelry pottery pottery pottery fiber, glass, mixed media wood


28th annual holiday crafts fair and sale

Laura Azzi

Dylan Cruse (NC State Student)

Edge Barnes

Alice DeLisle

As a painter, I am committed to painting plein air, the act of painting outdoors in nature/natural light. As a teacher, I have a sincere desire to demystify the challenge of the varied technical behavior of watercolor. It gives me great joy to watch someone discover the joys of this medium and invent their own new approach to watercolor. www.lauraazzifinearts.com My work encompasses many extremes including those of surface texture, firing temperature, firing method and decorating technique. Within reason, clay allows these extremes, and its nature allows it to be manipulated, formed and surfaced in a multitude of ways. It often responds with surprising results to the variables and nuances of the fire and sends me in pursuit of new colors and effects. Every firing is an adventure leading to new designs and techniques. I appreciate that clay only hints at what may be, leaving it to me, the potter, to discover the keys that will unlock the secrets that it holds. It is this process of observation, experimentation and discovery that makes working in this medium so exciting. www.edgebarnes.net

Wendy Bierwirth

I make lampwork glass beads over a torch and put them together to form unique jewelry. I particularly like to make whimsical beads that cause people to smile.

Wanda Borrelli

As a fiber artist I enjoy working with a variety of materials. My hand-dyed silk scarves reflect my love for color. I may dye a scarf several times before I am happy with the result. I like to experiment using different techniques. Some designs are made using a specific technique like Shibori and others just take on a design of their own as the colors are added. I also make hats and bags that are knitted, and then felted.

Marina Bosetti

I fell in love with clay in kindergarten. I still find it irresistible. Even now, after 20 years of working professionally with clay, I’m still fascinated by it. When I draw I look for subtleties in attitude, expression, or mood. These subtleties are drawn with either pressure or lift at the beginning or the end of the line. When a customer is choosing between two pieces of work I encourage him/her to select the attitude or the feeling of the work that most attracts them. My stoneware ceramic tile is suitable for both hanging and installation in kitchen backsplashes, bathrooms, fireplaces, floors and the outdoors.

Glass is a dynamic medium. It is fragile and temperamental, and even the most careful plans often yield surprises. Exploring the scope of what you can create with glass and a kiln has been fascinating. I use many glass components in my jewelry; I also create art panels and vessels in glass. I am an instructor at the Crafts Center and a member of Cary Gallery of Artists. As a growing potter, I enjoy letting the clay take its form as well as trying out new shapes. My work reflects an array of ideas that are still taking form. I am a mechanical engineering student in my junior year. Throwing provides a method of expression and discovery along with taking a break from my studies. As a clay artist, I am inspired and frequently surprised by clay’s versatility. I enjoy making use of texture, contrast, color and multiple elements to make forms from teapots to birdhouses that are esthetically pleasing. Sometimes my art stops just short of kitsch, sometimes not, and it frequently leaves the observer wondering if the object is really made of clay. www.etsy.com/shop/IslandTextures

Steve Driggers

I make pieces that look good on kitchen counters and dining room tables – bowls, platters and similar, useful items. I also make decorative pieces that are pleasing in themselves. Among these are my thin-walled, pierced pieces and my oversized, natural-edged wall turnings. My largest pieces are a record of the growth and decay of the wood that comes to my lathe.

Samantha Faber (NC State Student)

I am an environmental studies major also pursuing a minor in agroecology. I have been working with clay since the beginning of the summer of 2012. I fell in love with it immediately and haven’t spent more than a week away from the studio since then. This is my first year in the NC State Crafts Fair and I am very excited to be a part of it. I look forward to seeing everyone there!

John Fetvedt

John works primarily with silver, gold, and titanium. Although he uses various techniques for working metal and setting stones, he finds chains and chain mail particularly interesting because they combine art, mathematics, and construction techniques into each different chain pattern. The techniques needed to properly construct a pattern are like solving a jigsaw puzzle. John teaches for the NCSU Crafts Center, the William Holland School of Lapidary Arts, the Bead and Button Show, the Interweave Bead Fests, and others. www.bijoux-de-terre.com

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A9

| 28th annual holiday crafts fair and sale

Jean Cheely

Cynthia Aldrich has been working in clay for over 35 years. Early in her career she designed a pattern of functional stoneware with blue and cream glazes and flowing floral motifs. She has produced this pattern continuously over the years while exploring other techniques, glazes, styles and forming methods. Her newest line of functional pottery is pale green, contemporary in design, made from porcelain and incorporates stamping, carving and texturing.

p r o g r am n o t e s

Cynthia Aldrich


28th annual holiday crafts fair and sale (cont) Barbara Gautreaux

My love of jewelry began as a child and I have fond memories of admiring my mother’s jewelry. I wasn’t interested in playing dress-up as I preferred studying the details and mechanics of each piece of jewelry. The curiosity and creativity that evolved from my childhood experiences have been further nurtured in the numerous classes I’ve enrolled in at the Crafts Center. As I learn new techniques, I incorporate the old with the new – sometimes unique pieces of jewelry are produced and sometimes it’s just a learning experience! This year, I have incorporated sea glass, cabochons, metal forming and wood into my jewelry, and to add to the glitz and spirit of the holidays, copper ornaments will sparkle on a red fur tree.

Danene Groenke

In college, I took pottery classes to counter balance my engineering classes at NCSU. Got my degree in electrical engineering and started work for a telecommunication company. Few years later, my stress and need for a creative outlet led me back to the NCSU Crafts Center, where I explored many mediums, most of which relate to either glass or jewelry. My work gives me an outlet where I’m able to blend technical with creative, patterns with chaos. www.danenkejewelry.blogspot.com

Anthony Hathaway (NC State Student)

I’m a senior studying for my undergrad in chemical engineering. My main focus in pottery is decorative “alternative firing” work. Most of my pieces are pit fired, although I am trying to expand and get into the reduction gas firing process. I aspire to share my work with the world, and continue doing pottery all my life. I believe that is the goal of all artists. Pit firing was first introduced to me in high school. Since then I have been obsessed. I’ve always loved nature, and pit firing depends on a strong connection with the natural forces. I am just mesmerized when I see a piece being dug up from the ashes, revealing the stunning (when we get lucky) work done by the flames.

Al Headen, Jr.

A professor in the Department of Economics here at NCSU, Al has been involved with the Crafts Center for over a decade. He is also a long-standing active member of the Triangle Potters Guild. He does not own a wheel or personal studio, but works at the Crafts Center and other public studios. Al feels these settings provide an all-important social context in which his art and craft are refined through the inspiration from the outstanding collection of people – fellow potters, teachers and mentors – associated with these studios.

Karen Hoffman

I create jewelry using sterling silver and other precious metals. Many of my pieces are accented with semi-precious gems and freshwater pearls. I have been studying jewelry making for over 10 years. I’ve taken numerous classes at the NCSU Crafts Center, Meredith College, the Carrboro ArtsCenter, and Pullen Arts Center. A computer programmer by day, making jewelry allows me to exercise the other half of my brain and fulfills my need to be able to touch and feel the things I’ve created.

A10 « ncsu.edu/arts

John Hyder

John Hyder is a local Rakuist by the way of FuquayVarina, NC and San Diego, CA. Specializing in traditional Raku, Naked Raku, and a Saggar firing process. John studied and trained at the Moorestown Art Center, Moorestown, NJ, and San Diego State University with Richard Barlett, a prominent glaze expert. John has been a working potter for over 30 years. He and fellow Rakuists in California have developed numerous Raku techniques that make their final product unique and collectible. The Raku process is an ancient Japanese firing technique where the glazed pots are removed from the kiln while glowing hot and then sealed in a special prepared container filled with combustible material. The resulting smoke causes exposed clay to turn black, copper glazes to turn metallic, and the white glazes to crackle, giving Raku pottery its distinctive appearance. Variations in time, weather, and the materials used ensure that each Raku piece is one-of-a kind work of art.

Bridget Jones

I have been sewing for almost 40 years and specialize in memory quilts and bears. These quilts and bears are made from clothing that belongs to someone special, anything from t-shirts to tuxedos. I also create helpful travel organizers such as Tea Totes, What Not Bags, Jewelry Organizers and Purse Organizers. I love working with fabric and enjoy creating items that are both functional and beautiful.

Lillian Jones

Lillian Jones received a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, followed by a two year scholarship in metals at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, MA. She also earned a Masters Degree in Industrial Design at North Carolina State University. She has almost 40 years experience as a jewelry fabricator, as well as having worked as a product designer for Cooper Tools. Included in her resume are apprenticeships under talented metalsmiths and designers Mary Ann Scherr and Ben Dyer. Since 1990 she has worked on her own, winning numerous awards in shows and exhibitions. Today she teaches and experiments in jewelry arts in Raleigh. www.enamellist.com

Donna Kanich

I have been a clay artist for 14 years. I appreciate the versatility that clay allows. I make horse hair and pit fired pieces, as well as bowls, mugs, totems and lamps. I work at home and fire in my own kiln.

Alan Leland

Alan is a member of the Woodturners Guild of NC. He has been actively involved with the guild and woodturning since 1994 and has been a demonstrator at numerous state and national meetings, including the American Association of Woodturners Annual Symposium. He enjoys teaching and sharing his knowledge, skills and techniques with his students. He has taught at the Crafts Center at NCSU, the John C. Campbell Folk School, and a number of other venues as well as at his own studio. Alan likes working with clients to develop custom designs especially suited to their needs. He also enjoys collecting and working with many different woods and says that he could spend a lifetime working with wood and still not explore all of the ideas that fill his creative visions. www.alanleland.com


Preston “Prep” Maynard

Gary McCutchen

Barbara McGeachy

I’ve been making baskets since 1997 and teaching basket weaving since 2000. I love to share the joy of basket weaving – I find it infinitely creative and fun. We laugh a lot in my classes! I’ve found teaching to be a real learning experience. My students constantly challenge me to explain why we use certain techniques and to come up with easier, faster techniques. I encourage students to make their baskets their own, not just copy what I’ve done.

Deborah McGuinn

I graduated from NCSU in December 2006 with a B.S. in horticultural landscape design and a minor in art studies. Since taking a class in fused glass in early 2010, I have been exploring that fascinating and very surprising medium. I frequently find myself painting small abstract landscapes with glass. Some are wearable, others decorative and intermittently useful. I have been exhibiting and selling at the Midtown Farmers Market at North Hills these past six months. Many people seem to really like them, perhaps you will as well.

Barbara McKenzie

Shaping clay on the potter’s wheel, cutting and joining slabs, rolling coils. These fundamental acts connect me with the earth. I admire pottery that reveals its beginnings in the earth and the process of its making in the finished piece. I believe pottery that shows the hand of the potter shows something of the soul, too.

Cynthia Mollenkopf

The manipulation of wool into felt is a tactile process that appears magical and yet is very physical. In addition to standard design elements, the characteristics of the fiber to be used including thickness, volume and frequency of curl, scaliness, and length are all factors that need to be considered in the process of planning felted artworks or wearables. Cynthia enjoys any opportunity to demonstrate or teach felt making and believes increasing public awareness of the process and sharing the potential of this medium are ongoing opportunities.

My pottery is primarily functional and intended for everyday use. Shape interests me more than embellishment. Many of my pieces are glazed with single glazes, without any extraneous decoration. When I break from this idea, it is usually with rhythmic designs carved into the clay or brushed on in slips or contrasting glazes.

Julie Olson

In honing my skills as a craftsman, I strive to make order out of chaos, explorers out of spectators, and to create appreciation through understanding. The lidded form represents the unknown, something that can spark the curious to become involved. The object must be touched and handled: shape, color, texture, weight, and size are all artistic decisions which are my tools. When an observer becomes a participant and recognizes my efforts, I have accomplished my goal. www.whiteoakartworks.com

Mary O’Neill

Pottery is no longer a hobby – it’s a self-supporting addiction. I’ve been “playing in the mud” for almost 15 years but I am still amazed at all the textures, shapes and styles of pots. I love experimenting with new techniques, clays and glazes and find there is still so much to learn. Because of this I don’t have a single style of potting but enjoy experimenting and mixing traditional pot styles with less traditional glaze patterns and colors.

George Pemberton

Making functional stoneware and porcelain pottery has been a hobby of mine for the past 40 years because of the enduring and enchanting properties of clay. I enjoy using functional stoneware and hope others do as well.

Shannon Plummer-White

Shannon Plummer-White is an NC Native. She comes from a long line of craftswomen and doit-yourselfers. She started crafting at an early age with her mother and grandmother. Most of her inspiration comes from her 4 fur children, who are all rescue cats. It only took one pottery class in high school for her to be hooked and she has been playing in the mud ever since. Although she dabbles in many forms of art, she specializes in unique whimsical pottery. She loves to incorporate cats, fairies, Renaissance, Celtic, and nature themes. She experiments with different glazing techniques and uses both hand building and wheel. She also makes fun jewelry utilizing the graphic prints of recycled cans. You can view some of her work at www.facebook.com/prisskatkreations.

Charlene Poisel

I have always been drawn to the quiet beauty of a well-formed pot. Working primarily on the wheel, I concentrate on pots that are used and enjoyed daily. Pick it up, feel its shape and purpose, and see if it makes you smile. I smiled when I made it for you.

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A11

| 28th annual holiday crafts fair and sale

I make cabochons (such as turquoise), facet gemstones, and design/create jewelry, both sterling silver and gold pieces. I particularly enjoy incorporating unusual stones (such as astrophyllite from Russia, which has copper-colored metallic inclusions) into the jewelry and focus on clean, often geometric, designs. I enjoy teaching basic silversmithing at the Crafts Center and am always amazed at the beauty and variety of work created by students during the workshops.

Neal O’Briant

p r o g r am n o t e s

A retired engineer, I took stained glass here at the Crafts Center in the early 70s and later taught at William Holland in Georgia. After retiring, to stay busy, I took courses in gold and silver-smithing, cabochons, faceting, chain maille, wire wrap, opals, gem identification, flame work, channel work, intarsia and clay. Retirement should be fun and full of activities! I hope to display each craft at my booth.


28th annual holiday crafts fair and sale (cont) Naomi Profesorsky

Soon after learning to bead I knew that I had found my creative medium; there is something about taking tiny beads and creating pieces inspired by nature’s colors and life cycles that gives me true joy; I even call it my meditation. Recently I have started incorporating Soutache ribbons in my jewelry design. The versatility and the WOW affect are very satisfying to the eye. I work as an analyst during the day and it is the same qualities that allow me to appreciate harmony and symmetry in a creative way through beading. Several years ago I was fortunate enough to become one of NCSU Crafts Center’s instructors. I enjoy teaching bead weaving here, sharing my knowledge (and learning, myself) with the great students and staff of the Crafts Center. It is rewarding to get more people to appreciate the art of bead weaving, and the benefits of being immersed in art – especially art that you can wear.

Bob Reuss

I have had a lifelong interest in design, form and the creative use of local materials in creating artistic work. Living in North Carolina, a major center of American woodcraft, since 1998; I am focusing on wood turning. I use simple, graceful shapes to showcase the beauty of Native American woods like box elder, birch, cherry, apple, pecan, maple, walnut, cedar, heart pine, chestnut and pear. I have studied with Dick Sing at the John C. Campbell Folk Art School; Christian Burchard at Arrowmont; Trent Bosch; Bjorn Berger; Al Stirt; and other well known wood turners. I attended the NC Woodturners Symposium in 2003, 2005, 2007 and 2009 as well as the National Symposium of the AAW in 2008 and 2011. I am a member of the American Association of Woodturners and the Woodturners Guild of North Carolina. www.bobreuss-woodturner.com

Clay Studio Manager for the Crafts Center at NC State. I am a full time potter, whether working in my home studio, throwing production, or instructing a class – clay is life! After almost 10 years, I find that I am constantly challenging my personal balance between form and function. Aesthetics, visual texture, and negative space are three key factors to my grind, firing style aside. Inspiration flows through sketches from my life, love, and humor.

Martin Stankus

Raku pottery is a ceramic firing process that originated in 16th century Japan to produce tea ceremony vessels. Contemporary Raku has evolved through extensive experimentation with glazes and firing techniques to produce a variety of decorative surface effects. The technique I use involves removing the glazed pottery from the kiln at a temperature of 1850 degrees Fahrenheit and placing it in a container with straw which instantly ignites. The container is then sealed with a lid. As the fire consumes the oxygen in the container (a process called reduction), carbon from the burned straw is pulled through the clay body turning unglazed areas on the pot black in color. Clear or white glazes accent the crackle effect caused by the rapid cooling. Glazes with copper and other components create color flashings in response to flames and the reduction atmosphere. This firing process results in an endless variation of surface effects unique to each vessel. I especially enjoy the experimental aspect of creating different surface effects and the hands-on spontaneity of the firing process. www.tinroofpottery.com

Heather Rhymes (NC State Student)

Elise Stiles

Dianne Russell

Wanda Wells

Heather is currently a graduate student at NCSU studying Landscape Architecture. She has worked with clay for several years and enjoys making functional pottery. In addition to pottery in her spare time, she makes small books, craft jewelry, and takes photographs. When people view my work, I’d like them to feel the architectural spirit I put into the piece, and to appreciate the clean design and value in American handcrafts. I am represented by many of the top galleries in America including: New Morning Gallery in Asheville, The Real Mother Goose in Portland, Oregon and the Frank Lloyd Wright Museum at Falling Water.

Nancy Schecter

I love making functional pots from clay, and playing with design. With luck, the glaze adds beauty, mood and energy.

Mary Ann Scherr

“Find pleasure in color. Wear Titanium jewelry that matches your mood or your dress.” Mary Ann Scherr’s career ranges from automobile to toy design; from fashion design to book illustration. As a goldsmith, Scherr pioneered the use of exotic metals as media for the making of personal adornment and small scale objects. She is internationally recognized for her unique works. In Raleigh she continues to design one-of-a-kind jewelry and small scale sculptures. She is currently a metals instructor for the NCSU Crafts Center and also has taught at Duke University, Meredith College, and the Penland School of Crafts. www.maryannscherr.com A12 « ncsu.edu/arts

Jennifer Siegel

The clay must be in my blood by now. I have been a Crafts Center participant since moving here in 1993. There is a joy for me in making objects that can be useful in my life or in someone else’s life. Therefore, most of my work is utilitarian, and, hopefully, connects the user to the maker. I have explored many mediums through the years as an ornament crafter and appreciate the learning opportunities provided through the great classes offered at the Crafts Center. Currently I am spending time in the “glass zone” and find it fascinating and challenging. Crafting is therapeutic!

John Wilk

Woodcarving has been one of my leisure activities for many years and I carve animals, figures, decorative spoons, crosses, etc. I also enjoy woodturning and learning new techniques to make a variety of useful objects such as bowls, pens, ornaments, stoppers, etc. The Crafts Center facility, with its equipment and classes has been an important part of my learning process in improving my skill. If my carvings and turnings do not meet my satisfaction they still have a useful purpose as fuel for the fireplace.


NCSU Center Stage presents

Saturday, November 17, 2012 at 8pm | Stewart Theatre

The Collide

| connecting crossroads in north carolina

with Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) & Laurelyn Dossett

Featuring

Jason Sypher, bass Scott Manring, banjo/guitar Eddie Walker, drums

The evening will also feature: Spoken Word & Hip-Hop Artists Photo by Carolyn de Berry

Thomas “RaShad” Easley Norm Johnson Brian Jackson

Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra musicians

Please during the performance:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting

Thank You!

James Nance, violin 1 Eric Burns, violin 2 Brant Johnson, viola Taylor Threatt, cello

Connecting Crossroads is a two-year collaboration between composer/violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR), NC singer/songwriter Laurelyn Dossett, and seven performing arts presenters to reflect, record and present musical stories of North Carolina. Traveling to each partners’ community for inspiration, DBR and Dossett have created a collection of new musical works on their recording, The Collide. The artists have participated in a multi-day residency in each community, including workshops, masterclasses, and events that have led up to this evening’s performance. Learn more about Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina and The Collide at ConnectingCrossroads.com. The compositions created for THE COLLIDE – Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina are commissioned by NCSU Center Stage, Davidson College Friends of the Arts and Smith Artist Series, UNCW Presents, East Carolina University’s S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series, and The Performing Arts Series at Appalachian State University. Additional support is provided by the N.C. Arts Council, a division of the Department of Cultural Resources; and by South Arts, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts and the N.C. Arts Council.

PineCone presents

The Gathering: A Holiday Concert featuring Rhiannon Giddens, Laurelyn Dossett, Mike Compton, Joe Newberry and Jason Sypher

hotel sponsor

media sponsor

p r o g r am n o t e s

connecting crossroads in north carolina

promo sponsor

Saturday, December 15 at 8pm Fletcher Opera Theater Tickets: 919-664-8302 or pinecone.org

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A13


Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina (cont) Artist Statements Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) I’ve been working with Sharon Moore, Lori Jones, Mark Tulbert (NCSU, Raleigh) for over seven years. From the band DBR & THE MISSION, to evening-length works like Darwin’s Meditation for the People of Lincoln, my fearless friends in North Carolina have consistently supported all aspects of my work, regardless of the size or scope. In some ways, we had run out of things to do! After another invitation, this time to consider a statewide project, I had an idea: as a composer, I would collaborate with a North Carolina-based singer-songwriter, and together, we would co-compose a collection of songs, record them, and tour them, all of these efforts supporting local public radio, television, and community performers at every stop. My model for the projects varied from the work of Philip Glass and Patti Smith, to John Tavener and BjÖrk – composers working with poets, singer-songwriters, and other wordsmiths to forge new ways of creating and composing music. I was introduced to the brilliant singer-songwriter Laurelyn Dossett two years ago, as a possible collaborator, and as our friendship has developed and deepened, I realize she remains an inspired choice. She has worked with the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Levon Helm, and even the North Carolina Symphony, and I have found her to be a very gentle, approachable, and hardworking collaborator in all that we have done. The idea was simple enough: we would meet, write songs with one another, put together a band of musicians, and record and tour an album. The songs would be a musical portrait of North Carolina, visiting different cities and communities throughout the state, as a point of inspiration. I soon became overwhelmed. The history, the places, the stories, the myths, the folklore, and of course the people themselves, all gave me so much more than I could ever hope to handle, and then express, in one album’s worth of music. Laurelyn and I talked, and decided to take all of the material we had from our initial travels, and simple respond to them, one-by-one, as a type of diary, or journal, of what we saw, said, and hoped to do. Given our careers, meeting so we could collaborate proved difficult at first. So, we began weekly Skype sessions of our conversations, that quickly turned into online recording sessions; we emailed constantly; we spoke on the phone and texted; we emailed one other musical drafts and sketches; we argued and disagreed, too. Finally, Laurelyn decided it best we spend a week together, in real and not virtual space, and drove to my home in Norwood, Massachusetts to create many of the songs that eventually became The Collide. That week, as a culmination of our process, proved to be just the right tonic for moving us both towards the end of writing and the beginning of recording. We decided to record at the legendary Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, and we spent seven, 14-hour days there recording, editing, mixing, and pre-mastering the album. It was long, hard work, but we ate well, laughed everyday, and had a wonderful time cooking, caring, and creating with one another. I’ll never forget it. I think this project, in this state, at this time, is somehow reflective of those ever elusive moments where faith trumps fear, we look and listen, and we all take a deep breath and decide to find new ways of doing very old things. I’m a composer because I was more afraid not to be, but that doesn’t mean I don’t have an obligation towards change, and its inevitability in all of our work and lives. It seems to me the seas of change, like waves, come and go and have always, and will always, remain. The Collide, as a point of departure and change for me, echoes the many hard changes that are happening, right now, in North Carolina. I’m not afraid to change; I’m afraid we won’t want to. A14 « ncsu.edu/arts

At this moment, I’m in Pittsburgh, at a dear friend’s home. I’m just a few feet away from a piano that the song “Fall to the Sea” was composed on. The album is about to be released and it looks – and actually and literally – feels great. We are about to return to North Carolina, to every city that we visited before, this time in performance with members of the band, and an army of community performers and local artists. We will all take to the stage and express those things that are most dear to us. We can’t all possibly agree on everything, and on some things, there truly will be a collision of ideas. But together, we will be, and together, you will see us, and I think beyond collisions or conversations, this project is a rare opportunity to be part of, and take part in, one shared vision of hope. Bob Marley was right: Let’s get together and feel alright! –DBR

Laurelyn Dossett Other than a brief meeting and a few phone calls, our collaboration began in January 2012 with our 10-day trip across North Carolina, mountains to sea. We visited the presenting communities and heard their rich and varied stories. As we drove, Daniel and I told stories of our own rich and varied backgrounds, musical paths and families. While we heard many North Carolina stories of grace and beauty, we were also aware of the state’s history of conflict and current tendency toward polarization. A recurring theme emerged: the dichotomies of rich and poor, black and white, native and immigrant, male and female, educated and uneducated, urban and rural, gay and straight. Superimpose on these stories the writing of two composer/songwriters with different training, sensibility, history, gender, generation, ethnicity and temperament. There can be no grace without conflict; The Collide is a reflection of both. Imagine the churning of sand and water when waves crash the shore – it is powerful, beautiful, transformative and a little bit scary. The land and the sea collide at the coast, and the coastline changes with every storm. The work of the collaboration is at the collision point. It’s difficult and messy and necessary, and shapes the musical landscape. –Laurelyn Dossett

the story behind the concert In January 2012, composer and violinist Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) and singer/songwriter Laurelyn Dossett traveled across the state to take a snapshot of our rich cultural history; to see the sights; to reflect; to share; to listen; and then collaborate on an album based on those experiences. It’s in our nature to share stories and to pass along the history of the places we know and the people we love. Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina is a celebration of stories. It’s the story of an artist wanting to push boundaries in his own compositions and work with an artist that at first glance would seem a total opposite; it’s the story of being able to experience the work of renowned artists whether you travel on winding back roads or live in our state’s capital; and it’s the story of people in communities throughout our state wanting to share a piece of who they are and what their community means to them. And what better way to share stories than through song? DBR asked this exact question as he began considering his latest project. What happens to music when you add lyrics and create a story? Fortunately, DBR found an amazing partner in one of North Carolina’s premier singer/songwriters – Laurelyn Dossett. Though on paper they seemed quite different, they immediately bonded over the things that anyone might – being a parent, important relationships in their lives, an interest in social issues, and of course, music.


Artist Bios (cont)

Artist Bios Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) Having carved a reputation for himself as an innovative composer, performer, violinist, and band leader, Haitian-American artist Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) melds his classical music roots with his own cultural references and vibrant musical imagination. Proving that he’s “about as omnivorous as a contemporary artist gets” (New York Times), DBR is perhaps the only composer who has collaborated and performed with Philip Glass, Cassandra Wilson, Bill T. Jones, and Lady Gaga. He’s received commissions from Carnegie Hall, the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), the Library of Congress, and the sports channel ESPN. He’s appeared on American Idol (FOX), America’s Assignment (CBS Evening News), E:60 (ESPN) and been voted one of the “Top 100 New Yorkers” (New York Resident), “Top 40 Under 40 business people” (Crain’s New York Business), “Top 5 Tomorrow’s Newsmakers” (1010 WINS Radio), and spotlighted as a “New Face of Classical Music” (Esquire Magazine). Most recently DBR has created a new evening-length work, Symphony for the Dance Floor, for the 2011 BAM Next Wave Festival and ASU Gammage, and composed music for the Atlanta Ballet, Home in 7, with the choreographer Amy Seiwert and the poet Marc Bamuthi Joseph. More at www.dbrmusic.com

Laurelyn Dossett Singer/songwriter Laurelyn Dossett lives and writes in the piedmont of North Carolina, and her songs tend to reflect the stories of the region, both traditional and contemporary. Laurelyn’s songs have been covered by many bands, including Grammy-winning artists Levon Helm and the Carolina Chocolate Drops. One of the most sought-after voices in creative collaborations, she co-founded Polecat Creek with singing partner Kari Sickenberger in 1997. She has partnered with playwright Preston Lane, writing the music for four plays that premiered at Triad Stage and continue to be performed around the country. Laurelyn is a frequent performer at regional music festivals such as Merlefest and has been a guest on the radio show Prairie Home Companion. She has toured with folk legend Alice Gerrard and songwriter Diana Jones; premiered composer Kenneth Frazelle’s song cycle, Songs in the Rear View Mirror, in 2010; and has toured with the North Carolina Symphony in 2009 and 2011.

Guest Artists Thomas “RaShad” Easley, administrator and instructor for the NC State College of Natural Resources – RaShad uses his music to educate others about real life. He enjoys being an academic that can be academic musically without compromising the quality of hip hop. He can be found at: Rashadmusiq.com, facebook.com/rashadmusiq, and at Twitter: @Rashadmusiq Norm Johnson, NC State student, Africana Studies – Norm is a member of The Pack’s Pack. Norm has been writing poems since elementary school and never thought about stopping. He currently performs at any open mic night he can get to. Brian Jackson, An alumnus of NC State University – Brian has conducted undergraduate research as well as work in multiple labs here on campus. Brian noted: “Every day is a new opportunity. Every day I have a soundtrack of my life. Born in the south but traveling worldwide is the mission.” Student musicians from the Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra: James Nance, Graduate Studies in Mathematics – violin 1 Eric Burns, Chemistry – violin 2 Brant Johnson, Graduate Studies in Biochemistry – viola Taylor Threatt, Computer & Electrical Engineering – cello

Special Thanks Mark, Lori and I want to express a heartfelt thank you to our amazing friends and colleagues across the state who took a leap of faith and joined this journey of discovery and creation. I tip my hat to all of them and the profound work they are doing on their campuses and in their communities to engage and inspire all of us through the work of passionate and dedicated artists. Here’s to our presenting partners. – Sharon Moore Sherry Archibald with the Paramount Theatre in Goldsboro Sarah Merritt with the Arts Council of Wayne County Jane Lonon with the Ashe County Arts Council Michael Crane with East Carolina University’s S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series Shane Fernando with UNCW Presents Sherry Malushizky with Davidson College Friends of the Arts and Ashley Owen with Davidson College Smith Artist Series Denise Ringler and Sali Gill-Johnson with The Performing Arts Series at Appalachian State University

Special thanks also goes to: Vicki Vitiello Dr. Randolph Foy Mark West Bill Donovan NCSU Women’s Center NCSU GLBT Center Multicultural Student Affairs at NC State University African American Cultural Center at NC State University Quail Ridge Books & Music Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A15

| connecting crossroads in north carolina

For each presenter involved in this project, it has been an honor to hear the stories of our communities and to work with DBR and Laurelyn Dossett to create the Connecting Crossroads in North Carolina project. Not only were we proud to support the commissioning of this recording that documents the work of these artists, we also treasure the many memories of working with people from throughout our communities that have challenged us and enriched this experience for all involved. We ask you to continue sharing your stories and more importantly, to take the time to listen to others as they share a piece of who they are with you.

Commissioned by the North Carolina Symphony, Dossett and the symphony premiered her new song cycle, The Gathering: A Winter’s Tale in Six Songs, in November 2011. The accompanying CD, The Gathering, was released to critical acclaim, including top holiday picks from the Wall Street Journal, LA Times, and USA Today. More at www.laurelyndossett.com

p r o g r am n o t e s

As they drove through the state of North Carolina and then began the writing process for The Collide, they thought about the people they met and the stories shared. People of all ages and diverse backgrounds were quick to offer stories of pride, love, grief, and tradition. As artists, DBR and Laurelyn took on the challenge of listening to what each community had to share and then making it their own – finely crafting songs that ask you to take the time to listen in return and find what makes a song relevant to you. Whether it’s a song you immediately recognize as a wellknown traditional folk tune with a twist, or the song that reminds you of a person or place you love, The Collide shares stories we can relate to through the lens of two artists coming together in celebration of music and storytelling.


Music @ NC State in conjunction with the Raleigh Civic Symphony Association presents

symphony 125 orchestral music from the founding years in celebration of the 125th anniversary of nc state university Sunday, November 18, 2012 at 4pm | Stewart Theatre

Please during the performance:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting

Thank You!

Randolph Foy, conductor Karyn Friedman, mezzo-soprano

Raleigh Civic Symphony Festive Overture on an American Air: The Star-Spangled Banner, op 23 (1868)........................................................................................ Dudley Buck ..................................................................................................................................(1839-1909) Songs of a Wayfarer (Lieder Eines Fahrenden Gesellen)(c. 1883)...................................................... Gustav Mahler ..................................................................................................................................(1860-1911) 1. When my sweetheart has her wedding (Wenn mei Schatz) 2. I went out this morning (Ging heut’ Morgens) 3. I have a glowing knife (Ich hab’ ein gluehend Messer) 4. The two blue eyes of my sweetheart (Die zwei blauen Augen)

Karyn Feiedman, mezzo-soprano

intermission Scheherazade, op. 35 (1888).................................................................................................Nicholai Rimski-Korsakov ..................................................................................................................................(1844-1908) 1. The sea and Sinbad’s ship 2. The story of the prince-kalandar 3. The young price and princess 4. Festival in Baghdad. The sea. The ship breaks up against a cliff surrounded by bronze horseman. Conclusion.

notes Dudley Buck: Festival Overture

Gustav Mahler: Songs of a Wayfarer

Born in Hartford, Connecticut, Buck was one of the first American composers recognized for his religious music, primarily for organ. He also composed orchestral works including a symphonic poem “Light of Asia” (1885) and the “Marmion Overture” (1880). The Festival Overture began as an organ work, Variations on The Star Spangled Banner, and falls in a line of virtuoso works for organ on familiar, patriotic themes.

Songs of a Wayfarer are Mahler’s first song cycle, inspired by the composer’s unhappy love affair with soprano Johanna Richter while the young Mahler was at a posting as opera conductor in Kassel, Germany. Later, Maher incorporated the parts (the second and the fourth songs) in has Symphony no. 1 (1887-88).

It begins with a bright, spirited theme with a triple meter propelling the music forward. The Star-Spangled Banner theme is then introduced interestingly as the second theme, fitting well into the continuing line. A development section then leads us to a rousing repeat of the counterpoint and the full Star-Spangled Banner at the end, beautifully orchestrated with rhythmic propulsion.

A16 « ncsu.edu/arts

The four songs represent a full cycle of emotions. The first movement is bittersweet, alternating between hope and despair, joy and grief. The second song is more universally happy, and is the composer’s earliest portrayal of the joys to be found in nature (“Is this not a lovely world?”). However, the Wayfarer is reminded that even this happiness will not remain now that his love is gone. The third song is filled with despair, agony, and obsession as a blade has pierced his heart. The unrelenting music is intense and driving, matching the obsession. Finally, in the fourth song, a subdued and gentle resolution comes over the traveler, who strays again into nature (this time a linden tree), and finds the whole affair ‘as if a dream’ and is at peace.


notes

Original German In English Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht, When my darling has her wedding-day, Fröhliche Hochzeit macht, her joyous wedding-day, Hab’ ich meinen traurigen Tag! I will have my day of mourning! Geh’ ich in mein Kämmerlein, I will go to my little room, Dunkles Kämmerlein, my dark little room, Weine, wein’ um meinen Schatz, and weep, weep for my darling, Um meinen lieben Schatz! for my dear darling! Blümlein blau! Verdorre nicht! Blue flower! Do not wither! Vöglein süß! Sweet little bird Du singst auf grüner Heide. you sing on the green heath! Ach, wie ist die Welt so schön! Alas, how can the world be so fair? Ziküth! Ziküth! Chirp! Chirp! Singet nicht! Blühet nicht! Do not sing; do not bloom! Lenz ist ja vorbei! Spring is over. Alles Singen ist nun aus! All singing must now be done. Des Abends, wenn ich schlafen geh’, At night when I go to sleep, Denk’ich an mein Leide! I think of my sorrow, An mein Leide! of my sorrow!

Original German In English Ich hab’ein glühend Messer, I have a red-hot knife, Ein Messer in meiner Brust, a knife in my breast. O weh! Das schneid’t so tief O woe! It cuts so deeply in jede Freud’ und jede Lust. into every joy and delight. Ach, was ist das für ein böser Gast! Alas, what an evil guest it is! Nimmer hält er Ruh’, Never does it rest, nimmer hält er Rast, never does it relax, Nicht bei Tag, noch bei Nacht, not by day, not by night, wenn ich schlief! when I would sleep. O weh! O woe! Wenn ich den Himmel seh’, When I gaze up into the sky, Seh’ich zwei blaue Augen stehn! I see two blue eyes there. O weh! Wenn ich im gelben woe! When I walk in the Felde geh’, yellow field, Seh’ich von fern das blonde Haar I see from afar her blond hair Im Winde weh’n! waving in the wind. O weh! O woe! Wenn ich aus dem Traum auffahr’ When I start from a dream Und höre klingen ihr silbern Lachen, and hear the tinkle of her silvery laugh, O weh! O woe! Ich wollt’, ich läg auf der I wish I could lay down on my Schwarzen Bahr’, black bier Könnt’ nimmer die Would that my eyes never Augen aufmachen! open again!

II. “Ging heut Morgen übers Feld” (“I Went This Morning over the Field”) Original German In English Ging heut Morgen übers Feld, I walked across the fields this morning; Tau noch auf den Gräsern hing; dew still hung on the blades of grass. Sprach zu mir der lust’ge Fink: The merry finch spoke to me: “Ei du! Gelt? Guten Morgen! Ei gelt? “Hey! Isn’t it? Good morning! Isn’t it? Du! Wird’s nicht eine schöne Welt? You! Isn’t it becoming a fine world? Zink! Zink! Schön und flink! Chirp! Chirp! Fair and sharp! Wie mir doch die Welt gefällt!” How the world delights me!” Auch die Glockenblum’ am Feld Also, the bluebells in the field Hat mir lustig, guter Ding’, merrily with good spirits Mit den Glöckchen, klinge, kling, tolled out to me with bells (ding, ding) Ihren Morgengruß geschellt: their morning greeting: “Wird’s nicht eine schöne Welt? “Isn’t it becoming a fine world? Kling, kling! Schönes Ding! Ding, ding! Fair thing! Wie mir doch die Welt gefällt! Heia!” How the world delights me!” Und da fing im Sonnenschein And then, in the sunshine, Gleich die Welt zu funkeln an; the world suddenly began to glitter; Alles Ton und Farbe gewann everything gained sound and color Im Sonnenschein! in the sunshine! Blum’ und Vogel, groß und Klein! Flower and bird, great and small! “Guten Tag, “Good day, ist’s nicht eine schöne Welt? Is it not a fine world? Ei du, gelt? Schöne Welt!” Hey, isn’t it? A fair world?” Nun fängt auch mein Glück wohl an? Now will my happiness also begin? Nein, nein, das ich mein’, No, no - the happiness I mean Mir nimmer blühen kann! can never bloom!

IV. “Die zwei blauen Augen von meinem Schatz” (“The Two Blue Eyes of my Beloved”) Original German In English Die zwei blauen Augen The two blue eyes von meinem Schatz, of my darling Die haben mich in die they sent me into the weite Welt geschickt. wide world. Da mußt ich Abschied nehmen vom I had to take my leave of this allerliebsten Platz! most-beloved place! O Augen blau, O blue eyes, warum habt ihr mich angeblickt? why did you gaze on me? Nun hab’ ich ewig Leid und Grämen! Now I have eternal sorrow and grief! Ich bin ausgegangen in stiller Nacht I went out into the quiet night wohl über die dunkle Heide. well across the dark heath. Hat mir niemand Ade gesagt To me no one bade farewell. Ade! Farewell! Mein Gesell’ war Lieb und Leide! My companions are love and sorrow! Auf der Straße steht ein Lindenbaum, By the road stood a linden tree, Da hab’ ich zum ersten Mal Where, for the first time, im Schlaf geruht! I found rest in sleep! Unter dem Lindenbaum, Under the linden tree Der hat seine Blüten that snowed its blossoms über mich geschneit, over me, Da wußt’ ich nicht, wie das Leben tut, I did not know how life went on, War alles, alles wieder gut! and all was well again! Alles! Alles, Lieb und Leid All! All, love and sorrow Und Welt und Traum! and world and dream!

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A17

| symphony 125

III. “Ich hab’ein glühend Messer” (“I Have a Gleaming Knife”)

p r o g r am n o t e s

I. “Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht” (“When My Sweetheart is Married”)


symphony 125 notes Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade Bedtime stories were very important to Scheherazade to be sure. Her husband to be, the Sultan, had the nasty habit of marrying a woman at night and beheading her the next morning. So Scheherazade made a plan. Every night she would tell him a good story and leave it incomplete. 1001 captivating stories later, he decided to marry her. These Tales, now known as One Thousand and one Nights, inspired Russian composer Nikolai RimskyKorsakov to compose a symphonic suite called Scheherazade in 1888. Scheherazade clearly had perused the works of the poets and knew them by heart; she had studied philosophy and the sciences, arts and accomplishments; and she was pleasant and polite, wise and witty, well read and well bred. Musically, Rimsky-Korsakov’s work is an orchestral showpiece falling in the Russian orientalist flood of works in the 1880s by composers such as Glinka, Balakirev, Borodin, Mussorgsky, and Rimsky-Korsakov. Imitations of Islamic drumming patterns abound, although the patterns are not really “authentic.” The “artistic truth” always won over authenticity. Stravinsky’s Firebird and even The Rite of Spring follow from this tradition. The piece opens with the Sultan theme for full-orchestra filled with gravitas and ego, Scheherazade responds in the voice of the solo violin, weaving effortlessly up and down the instrument, like the mesmerizing sounds of a snake charmer. The harp offers three chords, sending us from consciousness to an altered state. In “The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship” we hear the waves retreating and growing in intensity and every modulation represents an unexpected turn in the story. The second movement opens with Scheherazade’s voice again, but each time, it’s more elaborate and more ornamented. This movement is called “The Tale of the Kalender Prince,” and Rimsky-Korsakov uses exotic, melodic solos on the woodwind instruments. The main love story in Scheherazade is found in the third movement, called “The Young Prince and the Young Princess.” Scheherazade shows her true genius in the final movement, “The Festival at Baghdad; The Sea; Shipwreck on a Rock; Conclusion.” The music begins with an impatient Sultan, his theme hurriedly coaxing Scheherazade to finish the story. He can barely contain himself by this point, in his excitement to hear what happens next. Notes by Dr. Randolph Foy

Karyn Friedman, Mezzo Soprano Mezzo-soprano Karyn Friedman has performed extensively on opera and concert stages across the United States, from Seattle Opera to the Kennedy Center. Following a performance of Mahler’s Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen, she was hailed by The Washington Post as having a “solid, resonant voice that emotes naturally.” Recent orchestral performances include being a soloist in the Mozart Requiem with The Washington Chorus, led by Robert Shafer; singing the part of Second Fairy in the New York City Ballet’s production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream; and singing the mezzo solos in the Messiah, Parts II and III, led by J. Reilly Lewis. An avid vocal chamber musician, Ms. Friedman participated in a program of chamber music arrangements of Mozart and Handel arias and duets with Washington Musica Viva, and performed Lori Laitman’s Living in the Body and Laura Karpman’s Matisse and Jazz on a recital with saxophonist Gary Louie. Ms. Friedman

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has been heard frequently in concerts at the Embassy of the Czech Republic in Washington DC, and recently had the honor of singing for Czech President Vaclav Klaus. A strong proponent of new music, Ms. Friedman has been sought after by contemporary composers to perform their works. She was asked to sing Libby Larsen’s Love After 1950 on a concert honoring the composer, and premiered Two Japanese Songs by Masatoshi Mitsumoto, One or Two Things by Lori Laitman, and Mourning Songs by Gregg Wramage. Ms. Friedman was a Regional Finalist in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions and a Grand Prize Winner in the Ellen Faull Gordon Vocal Competition. She appeared with the Raleigh Civic Symphony in 2010 in John Corigliano’s Mr. Tambourine Man: Seven Songs of Bob Dylan.

Raleigh Civic Symphony Association Randolph Foy, Music Director Mary Sherk, Executive Director Adam Burke, President www.raleighcivicsymphony.org

WE THANK OUR SPONSORS

The Raleigh Civic Symphony and Chamber Orchestra are sponsored jointly by ARTS NC STATE, through Music @ NC State and the Raleigh Civic Symphony Association (RCSA), a nonprofit organization. RCSA is supported by the United Arts Council of Raleigh and Wake County, with funds from the United Arts Campaign and the Grassroots Arts Program of the North Carolina Arts Council, and agency funded by the State of North Carolina and the National Endowment for the Arts. RCSA is funded in part by the City of Raleigh, based upon the recommendations of the Raleigh Arts Commission.

THANKS ALSO TO:

Annabelle Lundy Fetterman Concertmaster Endowment Matching Employee Contributions from: Art Tech, Hewlett-Packard, IBM Corporation, and Wachovia


Raleigh Civic Symphony Association Raleigh Civic Symphony Association Donors CONDUCTOR $500 PLUS

CONCERTMASTER $300-499 Lauren Elmore John & Nancy Lambert

SECTION LEADER $100-299

Anonymous (3) Dr. Nancy Atkins

Mara Shea Mary & Eric Sherk Kathy Silbiger Triangle United Way Deborah & Theodore Wagner Claus Wolf

Michael Ruggiero Lewis Stocks Erick Waterworth Nichole Wehbie Sean Wells Jackie Valett

Keena Mullen Kristen Larsen Taylor Threatt Joe Tai

MUSICIAN Under $100 Anonymous Sarah Biddle Cindy Chastang Samuel Cox Denise Franz

Rashi Grewal Sue Hughes Robert Lavin Deanne Leierzapf Julie Mayberry Mary E. Mitchell Richard & Ellen Onofrio Janet Shurtleff Joan Tolley Robert Upchurch Marilyn VanderLugt Robert & Catherine Williams

Raleigh Civic Symphony Violin I Lindi Wang, Annabelle Lundy Fetterman Concertmaster chair Nancy Atkins Sarah Biddle Anna Esubio Nicholas Freeman Andrew Jeon Tim Leimer Melissa McLeod Angelina Song James Tang Divya Tangella

Violin II Meera Venkataraman, principal Will Ballard Allison Fluitt Christina De Francesco Madeline Foster Francine Hunter Andrew Kocha Julie Mayberry Michael Mugrage Minori Ohashi Will Payne Molly Puente

Bass

Viola Jonathan Simonson, principal Lydia Allen Steven Berger Kara Bedoya Christine Casoria Morgan Elfelt Alex James Lillie Myers Jennifer Stanley Andre Waschka Laura Weiser Kenny Yi

Cello David Oh, principal Michael Bridgers Ethan Clark Ann Grigg

Adam Burke, principal Jessie Birchead

Flute Erin Munnelly, principal Cindy Chastang Rashi Grewal, piccolo

Oboe

Horn Clarissa Nameth, principal Laura Alexander Edward Walaski Sherrell Riley

Trumpet Byron Yount, principal Kathy Silbiger

Trombone Brandon Cashion, principal Stephen Anderson Peter Lin

Maggie Rahmoeller, principal Ryan Cinoman

Tuba

English horn

Timpani

Ryan Cinoman

Clarinet Joan Blazich, principal Merida Negrete

Bassoon Russ Hill, principal Cyndy Martens

Sean Myers Candy Pahl

Percussion Matt Vooris, principal Patrick Litterst Leah Shull

Harp Winifred Garrett

NC State Students and Majors Lydia Allen, Mathematics Education Eric Burns, Chemistry Brandon Casion, Accounting Ryan Cinoman, Mathematics Ethan Clark, Engineering First Year Christina Defrancesco, Environmental Engineering Morgan Elfelt, Graduate Studies in Fisheries &Wildlife Science Madeleine Foster, Engineering First Year Nicholas Freeman, Computer/Aerospace Engineering Philip James, Engineering First Year Andrew Jeon, Engineering First Year Andrew Kocha, Business Management Timothy Leimer*, Natural Resources Cheng-Hsun Lin*, Industrial Engineering Melisa McLeod*, Biological Sciences Michael Mugrage, Marine Sciences Lillie Myers, Textile Engineering William Payne, Criminology

Maggie Ramoeller, Graduate Studies in Mathematics Rashi Grewal, Graduate Studies in Fiber & Polymer Science Michael Ruggiero, Aerospace Engineering Angelina Song, Biological Sciences Lewis Stocks, Business Jennifer Stanley, Graduate Studies in Plant Biology James Tang, Chemical Engineering Divya Tangella, Biological Sciences Joseph Thai, Engineering First Year Taylor Threatt, Computer/Electrical Engineering Jacqueline Valett, Environmental Sciences MeeraVenkataraman*, Statistics Andre Waschka, Applied Mathematics Nicole Wehbie, Biological Sciences Sean Wells, Computer Engineering Laura Weiser, Graduate Studies in Chemical Engineering Kenny Yi, Communication *denotes Music Minor

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A19

| symphony 125

Joan Blazich & Brian Flatley Michael & Kimberly Bridgers Adam Burke Jeff Cates Ho Jun Chung Deborah Danzeiser Bree Kalb Patricia Kirkpatrick Patrick Liu Melanie McIlvaine Kay Mowery Qualcomm Incorporated Maggie Rahmoeller Ghazala Sadiq

p r o g r am n o t e s

IBM Corporation – Community Grant Ann Wheeler Grigg J. Russell & Linda Hill


Music @ NC State presents the

ladies in red Monday, November 19, 2012 at 7pm | Stewart Theatre

Celebrating their 20th anniversary this year, NC State’s Ladies in Red began in 1993. The Ladies produce a unique, ear-dazzling sound with genres from jazz to hip-hop and alternative. They are the university’s premier all-female a cappella group, and the only one associated with the Music Department. The Ladies are primarily a student run organization with guidance from Andy Beck, who serves as the faculty advisor and vocal coach. Throughout the year, the group performs at a number of NCSU events, and presents on-campus concerts at NC State’s Stewart Theatre each semester. The Ladies also perform at a wide variety of off-campus functions ranging from social events at the Governor’s Mansion, to the State Fair, and even Ram Roast! Songs for tonight’s program will be selected from their most popular repertoire, and will be announced from the stage. Ashley Oskardmay, Biochemistry (Music Director) Krystal Rodas, Human Biology (President) Trish Artim, Construction Engineering (Public Relations) Erin Jones, Criminology Priya Jayara, Microbiology Jessie Halpbern, Public Relations/Psychology Noel Buck, Entrepreneurship/Economics Laura Poag, Mathematics Heather Powell, Biology Alexis Carson, Computer Science Georgina Ishak, Human Biology Sarah Catherine Lucas, FYC Cailin Moore, Biology Please check out Ladies in Red on the internet: www.ncsuladiesinred.com www.facebook.com/ncsuladiesinred twitter.com/LadiesInRed

Please during the performance:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting Thank You!

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Music @ NC State presents

 Silence your cell phone

Dr. Paul Garcia, director

Please

 No photography  No texting

Equus.......................................................................................................................................................... Eric Whitacre Excerpts from the opera Andrea Chénier.....................................................................................Umberto Giordano ....................................................................................................................................................arr. Giuseppe Vaninetti Angels We Have Heard On High............................................................................................................Franz Gruber Greensleeves............................................................................................................................................arr. Chip Davis Stille Nacht..............................................................................................................................................arr. Chip Davis Twas the Night Before Christmas.......................................................................................................Newell H. Long Sleigh Ride............................................................................................................................................. Leroy Anderson

Wind Ensemble Flutes

Trumpets

Amy Bradshaw, Animal Science Rebecca Burton*, Chemical Engineering Luke Hansen*, Engineering Connor Reed (Piccolo), Computer Science

Stephon Beaufort, Mathematics Julie Bernstorf*, Biological Engineering Alex Craft, First Year College Trey Gene Miller, First Year College Travis Rivord, Aerospace Engineering Katie Stanton, Psychology & Design Studies

Oboe Autumn Lyell, Animal Science Katy Shawkey (English Horn), Meteorology and Oceanography

Clarinets Savanna Baxter, Computer Science Laurie Cuffney, Applied Math (Graduate Student) Megan Dunton, Genetics and English Elizabeth Goins*, Human Biology Annie Lassiter, Applied Nutrition Darlene Lopez, Civil Engineering Ben Markoch, Graphic Design Steven Nugent, Biological/Biomedical Engineering Faye Pasley, Mathematics

Bass Clarinet Joshua Holder, Biomedical Engineering Joshua Wheeler, Biochemistry Angela White, Zoology (Graduate Student)

Bassoon Paul Archer, Engineering Matthew Zalesak, Industrial Engineering

Saxophones Nathan Misenheimer (Alto), Civil Engineering Anisa Traish (Alto), Zoology Cameron Faulconer (Tenor), Environmental Technology and Management Zachary Verbos (Tenor)*, Aerospace Engineering Chase McLamb (Baritone), Engineering

French Horn Katie Charron, Biological Sciences Drew Farkas, Engineering Nancy Lamb, Business Management Adrian McNeil, Transition Program Michael Scanlan, Meteorology

Trombone Peter Lin*, Industrial Engineering Nick Sheeran, Engineering Sawyer Walters, Chemical Engineering

Euphonium Dani Dix, Business Evan Schwartz, Biological Sciences

Tuba Mark D’Ermes, Aerospace Engineering Charles Jennings, Mechanical Engineering

String Bass Kevin Quick, Sociology and Philosophy

Percussion Megan Daughtridge, Chemical Engineering Christine Guseman, Civil Engineering Steven Hamilton, Civil Engineering Thomas Markham, Mechanical Engineering Aaron Shaw, Accounting *Indicates music minor Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A21

| the nc state wind ensemble

Thank You!

tuesday, NOVEMber 27, 2012 at 7pM | Stewart Theatre

p r o g r am n o t e s

during the performance:

the nc state wind ensemble


Music @ NC State presents

grains of time Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at 7pm | Stewart Theatre For more than four decades, the Grains of Time have been part of NC State’s campus life. Performing a wide variety of music with the use of just seven to fourteen men’s voices, the group remains one of a kind when compared to most collegiate a cappella groups. Bridging contemporary collegiate a cappella with that of professional groups, they create a performance style that lends itself to both excellent musicianship and showmanship. Though part of the Music Department, they are primarily student run, with guidance from Andy Beck, who serves as the faculty adviser and vocal coach. While officially styled as NC State University’s premier men’s a cappella group, to their loyal fans they are known simply as “the Grains.”

Please during the performance:  Silence your cell phone  No photography  No texting

Thank You!

Tonight’s program will be announced from the stage, and will include some of the Grains most popular and new repertoire. Enjoy! Ian Peterson, Public Relations Trevon Nelson, Chemical Engineering Joshua Apke, Computer Engineering Stephen Williams, Business and Public Relations Jeffrey Kochuk, Computer Science Jonathan Wall, Construction Engineering and Management Brennan Clark, Mathematics Education Ken Akiyama, Business Administration Cole Pellatt, Aerospace Engineering Brooks Jordan, Genetics Justin Mauney, Civil Engineering Cameron Reaves, Biological Sciences Bob Nelson, Biology Ben Millhouse, Business Management For more information visit: grainsoftime.com facebook.com/grainsoftime twitter.com/NCSUgrains

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ARTS NC STATE presents

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR Mette CJ Schladweiler+

Technical Direction David Jensen Sound Design Kevin Wright Lighting & Projection Design/ PRODUCTION MANAGER Joshua Reaves Concert Coordinator Randall Rehfuss+ ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, MUSIC DEPARTMENT Dr. Thomas Koch DIRECTOR OF CHORAL ACTIVITIES Dr. Nathan Leaf DIRECTOR OF JAZZ STUDIES Dr. Wes Parker DIRECTOR OF PIPES AND DRUMS Dr. John Sprague FACULTY ADVISOR & VOCAL COACH TO GRAINS OF TIME AND LADIES IN RED Andy Beck

aCT 1 Written and directed by John C. McIlwee Music direction by Jay Wright, Piano Peter Kimosh, Bass | Brevan Hampden, Drums Narrator: Dr. Mike Mullen

NC State Pipes and Drums O Come, O Come Emmanuel

Medley of Carols Carol of the Bagpipers – Italian Carol Christ Child’s Lullaby – Hebrides Carol Patapan – French Carol

University Theatre

NC State Jazz Combo

Selections will be announced from the stage

University Theatre

White Christmas Memories: A Medley Arranged by Jay Wright I’m dreaming of a white Christmas Just like the ones I used to know Where the treetops glisten, and children listen To hear sleigh bells in the snow I’m dreaming of a white Christmas With every Christmas card I write May your dreams be merry and bright And may all your Christmases be white

Ring Christmas Bells!: A Medley Arranged by Jay Wright

intermission

The Grains of Time

aCT 2

This Christmas, by Donny Hathaway Oh Holy Night, version by NSYNC All I want for Christmas is You, by Mariah Carey

Rutter Gloria Conducted by Dr. Nathan Leaf

University Theatre

Home For the Holidays: A Medley Arranged by Jay Wright A Holiday Tale This performance is generously supported in part by the George Smedes Poyner Foundation, Inc. through the James M. Poyner Visiting Artist Endowment.

The audience is invited to join us in the lobby for a holiday reception during our extended intermission of 20 minutes. Interlude music provided by Daniel Salo*, Biomedical Engineering.

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A23

| a quasquicentennial celebration

Costumes Prepared by Em Rossi, Laura Parker

Friday, November 30, 2012 at 7pm | Stewart Theatre

p r o g r am n o t e s

Director John C. McIlwee+

a quasquicentennial celebration 125 years of holidays at nc state


A quasquicentennial celebration

performers

Rutter Gloria – Text and translation

NC State Pipes and Drums

GLORIA Gloria in excelsis Deo. Et in terra pax hominibus bonæ voluntatis.

Glory to God in the highest. And on earth peace to people of good will.

Laudamus te; benedicimus te; adoramus te; glorificamus te. Gratias agimus tibi propter magnam gloriam tuam.

We praise Thee; we bless Thee; we worship Thee; we glorify Thee. We give thanks to Thee for Thy great glory.

Domine Deus, Rex coelestis, Deus Pater omnipotens. Domine Fili unigenite Jesu Christe. Domine Deus, Agnus Dei, Filius Patris.

O Lord God, Heavenly King, God the Father Almighty. O Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son. Lord God, Lamb of God, Son of the Father.

Pipers Nixon Alexander Matt Carroll, Mechanical Engineering Ken Hanson Evelyn Judson Howard Sanford Emily Sprague Chris Turlington, Chemistry Conrad Worley, Sports Management Bruce Wright

Qui tollis peccata mundi, miserere nobis. Qui tollis peccata mundi, suscipe deprecationem nostram.

Thou that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us. Thou that takest away the sins of the world, receive our prayer.

Qui sedes ad dextram Patris, O miserere nobis.

Thou that sittest at the right hand of the Father, have mercy upon us.

Quoniam tu solus Sanctus, tu solus Dominus, tu solus Altissimus, Jesu Christe.

For thou only art holy, thou only art the Lord, thou only art the most high, Jesus Christ.

Cum Sancto Spiritu in gloria Dei Patris. Amen.

Together with the Holy Ghost in the glory of God the Father. Amen

Drummers Terese Camp William Felker Colin Lee, Computer Science Patrick Madigan, Industrial Design Julie Southwick John Sprague

University Theatre MEDLEY Jill Varner+, Economics w/minors in Journalism & Theatre /Graduate Linh Schladweiler+, Accounting/Graduate Lela Johnston, Political Science w/minor in Non-Profits Calvin Ferguson, Electrical Engineering Michael Brews, Chemical Engineering Maggie Briggs+, Design Studies, Non-Profits & Theatre Destiny Diamond McNeill, Communication w/Media concentration & Theatre minor Yolanda Rabun Mary Katherine Walston Ken Griggs John C. McIlwee+ N. Alexander Miller III

Grains of Time Ian Peterson, Public Relations Trevon Nelson, Chemical Engineering Joshua Apke, Computer Engineering Stephen Williams, Business and Public Relations Jeffrey Kochuk, Computer Science Jonathan Wall, Construction Engineering and Management Brennan Clark, Mathematics Education Ken Akiyama, Business Administration Cole Pellatt, Aerospace Engineering Brooks Jordan, Genetics Justin Mauney, Civil Engineering Cameron Reaves, Biological Sciences Bob Nelson, Biology Ben Millhouse, Business Management

NC State Jazz Combo Carter Harris (tenor), Electrical Engineering Ric Chapman (trumpet), Aerospace Engineering Joey Pilot (piano), Arts Applications in Music Steven Ray (guitar), Chemical Engineering Andy Powell (bass), Nuclear Engineering Chad Mangum (drums), Mathematics

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Vox Accalia

Ben Al-Abdalli, Arts Studies-Music Arthur Calloway, Biology Andrew Dowdy, Business Administration & International Studies Josh Johnstone, Mechanical Engineering Bobby Keefe, Textile Technology & Polymer Chemistry Daniel Kim*, Nuclear Engineering & Biological Engineering Stephen Lai, Engineering Daniel Liederbach, Mechanical Engineering Jack McGuinn, Mechanical Engineering Matthew McFarlin, Arts Studies-Music John Millsaps*, Computer Science Jeffrey NesbitΨ, Animal Sciences Stephen Odom, Environmental Technology Robert Perry, PT Studies Nathan Schnoor*, Computer Science

The North Carolina State University Chorale SOPRANO Stephanie Doss, Middle Grades Education Rebekah Givens^, Environmental Science Kathryn Hornaday*^, Biological Sciences Kallie McNamara, Spanish Education Ashley Oskardmay^, Biochemistry Laura Poag, Mathematics Paulina Ragunas*, French

ALTO Kasey Anderson, Poultry Science Stefanie Borrelli, Social Work Lauren Frederick, Industrial Engineering Kristin Gavin, Industrial Engineering Amanda Gross^, Animal Science Georgina Ishak, Human Biology Jeanne Lunsford^, Engineering Laura McCusker^Ψ, History Cailin Moore, Biology Kayla Noble, Zoology Maree Pascall, Zoology Zoë Symon, Graphic Design Jasmin TelferΨ, Animal Science

| a quasquicentennial celebration

The Singing Statesmen

Amy Stewart, Chemical Engineering Nicole Stoudt, Communications-Public Relations Beth Ann Tidemann-Miller, Statistics Kate Volandt, Nutrition Science

p r o g r am n o t e s

Cara Adrian^, Biology Cassandra Backman, Zoology Charlie Belk, International Studies Stefanie Borrelli, Social Work Kaley Brown, Animal Science Amanda Burns, Biochemistry Olivia Chen, First Year College Melissa Clason, Geology Katy Costigan, Psychology Blair Downs, Zoology Emily Finch, Psychology Paola Gonzalez, Architecture Kerry Hancock, Chemical Engineering Kamaria Hardy, Computer Science Lexi Hergeth, Business Administration Amanda Holton, Education Divya Lakshminarayanan*, Statistics Lucia Malaver, Transition Program Rachel Mann, Business Administration/Spanish Laura McCusker^Ψ, History Candace McKoy, MS Lang. Arts and Social Studies Angie Rodriguez, First Year College Tiana Salas-Ali, Engineering Kristie Soliman, Engineering Anna Solini, Physics & Nuclear Engineering Katie Stanton, Psychology & Design Studies Jasmin Telfer^Ψ, Animal Science Clare Vestal+, History Brooke Wages, Mechanical Engineering Ashleigh Wayland, Animal Science Haley Wells, Polymer and Color Chemistry Emily WhiteΨ, Zoology Grace Williamson, Communication

TENOR Dixon Crews*^, Computer Science Zach English, Mathematics Aaron Ferguson, Paper Science Wilson Harris^, Criminology Alexander Herndon, Biomedical Engineering Aaron Martin, Electrical Engineering Jeffrey NesbitΨ, Animal Sciences Kevin Quick, Sociology & Philosophy Stephen West, Aerospace Engineering Eric Wilbanks+^, Spanish Education BASS Michael Brews^, Chemical Engineering Joshua Cates, Environmental Technology Tyler Clayton, Computer Engineering Scott Clouse, Electrical Engineering Thomas Grimes, Tech. Eng. & Design Ed. Nicolai Gritta, First Year College Teylor Jenkins, Computer Engineering Matthew McEntire^, Human Biology John Millsaps*^, Computer Science Marshall Newberry, Computer Engineering Christopher Nowlan, Computer Engineering John Nurney, Mechanical Engineering Joshua Poteat, Political Science

Musicians for the Rutter Gloria Kent Foss (trumpet) Gary Martin (trumpet), Aerospace Engineering Robert McCraw* (trumpet), Computer Science Rick Chapman (trumpet), Aerospace Engineering Dr. Wes Parker (trombone) Michael Murr (trombone), Industrial Engineering Aaron Winesett* (bass trombone), Mechanical Engineering Charles Jennings (tuba), Mechanical Engineering John Antonelli (timpani) Keeshan Ganatra (percussion) Josh Dumbleton (organ) * indicates music minor | ^ indicates section leader Ψ indicates member of Mu Beta Psi National Musical Fraternity + indicates member of Alpha Psi Omega Honorary Theatre Fraternity

Fall 2012 » Issue 4 » A25


patricia and john tector

Founding Friends of the Gregg usher the museum toward the future with a major gift to the Gregg Museum Campaign as the Crafts Center and Friends of the College, they yearned for a place to experience the visual arts on campus. So when they learned about the possibility of creating the Visual Arts Center (a predecessor to the Gregg), they immediately became involved. In the years since, Patricia and John have continued to support the Gregg “in whatever way we could.” Patricia believes that “the more opportunities people have to train their eyes, the better prepared they’ll be to see and make art around them – from something as simple as a crayon drawing with their children to something as complex as architecture.” Art is present throughout our environment, Patricia explains, and people aren’t aware enough of how much art affects their lives. The Gregg celebrates the idea that art surrounds us through its collections of fiber arts, pottery, glass, furniture, and clothing. Patricia admires the Gregg’s collections as well as its collaborations with contemporary artists. When artists visit the museum for installations, openings, and programs, they interact with students, faculty, and the community, providing visitors with rare and wonderful opportunities to learn about art from the artists themselves. Patricia Tector, former Friends of the Gregg president and current FRIENDS of ARTS NC STATE board member, explains why she and her husband, John, chose to contribute to the Gregg Museum Campaign. She and John began supporting the Gregg long before it was a museum, or even a program, when John was a young faculty member in NC State’s College of Design. Patricia was a founding member of the Friends of the Gregg, and she and a core group of supporters helped usher the Gregg from its beginnings as the small Visual Arts Program to become the Gregg Museum of Art & Design. Patricia and John have been a part of the Gregg’s many transformations, including making the future Gregg possible with a major gift to the Gregg Campaign. The Tectors are a family of artists. Patricia is a lifelong stitcher and needle artist, and John is the associate dean emeritus of NC State’s College of Design. Patricia and John’s son, Chris, ’91, is a video game architect for Microsoft in Seattle, WA. Their daughters, Sarah and Cathy, are both jewelry designers. Cathy focuses on beading, and Sarah is a metal designer and owner of S. Tector Metals in Raleigh, NC. Patricia, John, and their children moved to Cary, NC in 1975 from State College, PA. John had accepted a faculty position in the School of Architecture in NC State’s College of Design. He and Patricia began visiting and volunteering for museums throughout the area, but they missed being involved in a campus art museum, as they were at Penn State. While they participated in NC State’s existing arts programs, such

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Patricia and John chose to name the Patricia M. and John O. Tector Foyer in the historic chancellor’s residence, because they feel that the foyer represents the gateway from the Gregg’s past to the Gregg’s present. The future Gregg Museum will encompass the historic residence and an adjacent contemporary addition, which is being designed by architects at the Freelon Group in Durham, NC (some of whom, including Phil Freelon, were students in the College of Design). Patricia is excited for the future Gregg to better serve the campus and local communities and collaborate with the city and its neighboring properties, Pullen Park and Theatre in the Park. She adds that the new Gregg will be accessible and will have ampler visitor parking, so she and others may easily visit the museum during the day. When Patricia first became involved in the NC State community as a volunteer for the university’s Panhellenic Association, she met some NC State students who had never experienced art or visited a museum. Patricia recalls this memory to underscore what an important resource the Gregg Museum is, for it grants students the essential opportunity to see, touch, and examine art. The ability to make these experiences possible for students is, Patricia states, “priceless!” ARTS NC STATE is grateful to Patricia and John Tector for their generous advocacy and support for the Gregg Museum Campaign. To learn more about the Campaign for the Gregg, visit newgregg.ncsu.edu or contact Nicole Peterson, Director of Development, at 919-513-1337 or napeters@ ncsu.edu.


ARTS NC State | Fall 2012 insert #4