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F R O M T H E A R T S F O U N DA T I O N O F N E W Z E A L A N D

Issue #13 August | 2007

~ Don Peebles (Icon 2007), Circular Motif No. 2, Collection Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu; purchased 1988~

IN THIS ISSUE

Grand Celebration of Icons Five new Icons were honoured at a ceremony on Tuesday 8 August at Sky City Theatre, Auckland, attended by over 600 guests. Dr Raymond Boyce, Don Peebles, Don Selwyn, Ans Westra and Arnold Manaaki Wilson join previously awarded Icons bringing the total honoured to 21. The Arts Foundation of New Zealand Icon Awards Whakamana Hiranga honour New Zealand’s finest artists for a lifetime of significant achievement. Limited to a living circle of twenty, the artists honoured are icons, each celebrated for demonstrating the highest standard of artistic excellence.

Icon Awards

Featured Icon – Milan Mrkusich

Award for Patronage

New Generation Awards Featured Artist – Taika Waititi

Laureate Awards Featured Laureate – Derek Lardelli

~ 2007 Icon Awards recipients Don Peebles, Arnold Manaaki Wilson, Ans Westra and Dr Raymond Boyce. Photo by Ken Baker ~

Each Icon is presented with a specially commissioned medallion and pounamu pin designed by stone sculptor John Edgar. The pin is a gift, while the medallions are returned at the end of the artist’s life, and presented to a successor. As the medallions are passed down through generations of our finest artists, the mana of the Award grows. For instance, the Icon Award which was first presented to Janet Frame in 2003 was this year passed to Ans Westra.

Welcome Trustee Elizabeth Ellis

Congratulations Rodney Wilson

Forsyth Barr – Dunedin Office

Welcome Webb’s

Patron Turns Sponsor

“The Icon Awards give New Zealanders the opportunity to identify those artists who have excelled as contributors to this country’s cultural identity. The Awards ceremony enables us to thank the Icon artists for their contributions and to celebrate their achievements with them,” said Arts Foundation Chairman Ros Burdon. The Icon Award ceremony opened with Margaret Mahy reciting her well known poem, Down the Back of the Chair. The fantastic tale of a magic chair that harbours secrets, dreams and treasures provided an entertaining start to an evening of celebration, honour and learning. As part of the ceremony each Icon was interviewed about their life as an artist. The Awards were broadcast live over the Internet and are available for view via the Arts Foundation website – www.artsfoundation.org.nz.

~ Margaret Mahy (2005 Icon) reads her poem Down the Back of the Chair at the 2007 Icon Award ceremony. Photo by Ken Baker ~

Applause is the biannual newsletter of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand. It provides news information on artists supported by the Arts Foundation, announcements about Awards and reports on other activities. If you would like Applause to be mailed to you, visit www.artsfoundation.org.nz: and submit your mailing address or call +64 4 382 9691.

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FIVE NEW ICONS DR RAYMOND BOYCE

DON PEEBLES

Theatre Designer

Painter

New Zealand’s most significant designer for theatre and ballet, Raymond Boyce is also a puppeteer, puppet designer and builder. Born in 1928 in London, it was Raymond’s early study in England, working for the John Wright Marionette Theatre as a puppeteer and designing for the University College Drama Society in London, which led to his career in New Zealand. He came on the invitation of Richard Campion, joining the New Zealand Players in Wellington in 1953. Raymond worked with the newly formed Opera Company and Paul Gnatt’s Ballet Company. He then formed a puppet company that toured New Zealand. Raymond also designed and directed for the Australian Opera Company. He was appointed to the Design Committee for Expo ‘70 in Japan and as design consultant to the architects of the new Hannah Playhouse in Wellington, becoming resident designer there. In his many years at Downstage, Raymond designed over 100 productions. He also designed for the Wellington City Opera and for the New Zealand Ballet into the 1990s. Raymond tutored and mentored at the New Zealand Theatre Federation Schools, Wellington Polytechnic, Victoria University and Toi Whakaari: New Zealand Drama School. He was Executive Designer for the Globe Hangings presented to the newly rebuilt Shakespeare’s Globe in London. Raymond was made a Member of the Order the British Empire (MBE) in 1977 and awarded an honorary Doctorate in Literature from Victoria University. Raymond Boyce lives in Wellington. His classical training ensures that, whether he is working in opera or straight drama, he can design in a vast range of styles from the baroque to the most spare and simple. Phillip Mann, freelance theatre director and writer.

A key figure in the emergence and evolution of New Zealand abstract art, Don Peebles is known as a leading force in contemporary New Zealand painting and is one of New Zealand’s most senior and respected practitioners. Don was born in 1922 in Taneatua near Whakatane. He studied art in Florence briefly at the war’s end, before returning to New Zealand to work for the Wellington Post Office and to attend classes at the Wellington Technical College Art School. He studied at the Julian Ashton Art School in Sydney, and travelled to London where he met the Constructionist artist Victor Pasmore whose works, together with those of other Constructionists, influenced Don to explore constructionist abstraction. He was the first New Zealand artist to do so. He became known for painted relief constructions, usually framed in shallow trays. In the 1970s he began to work with looser elements, in particular un-stretched, unframed canvases. In the 1990s he returned to works on a smaller scale. Don was appointed to the staff of the University of Canterbury - School of Fine Arts, becoming Head of the Painting Department in 1980. Don retired in 1986 and returned to painting full time. His work has been acquired by both public and private collecters in New Zealand and internationally. He was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for his services to New Zealand art and given an Honorary Doctorate in Literature by the University of Canterbury. Don Peebles lives in Christchurch. The art world is always hungry for new things. And the tradition of modern painting that Don Peebles is part of is often about the pleasurable shocks that new things can deliver. But it’s always struck me as strange that we measure an artist’s newness not by what’s happening in their studio but the date stamped on their birth certificate. Don is one of our veteran visual artists, but the artworks he has made would be remarkable no matter what age their maker. This is a great moment to recognise an artist who is now, as he has been for most of his six-decade career, one of the best new artists around. Justin Paton, art critic, Dunedin Public Art Gallery Curator of Contemporary Art and Arts Foundation Govenor

~Possible second witch, [Hansel & Gretel costume design, 1995]. Ink and watercolour drawing on tracing paper. Photo courtesy of the Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington~ ~Relief Construction: Yellow and Black, 1966, painted wood on panel, Photo courtesy of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki~

MY WORK IS ONLY REALISED IN A LIVE PERFORMANCE BEFORE AN AUDIENCE FOR JUST TWO AND A HALF HOURS OR SO. IT HAS TO BE FLEXIBLE ENOUGH TO REFLECT AUDIENCE REACTION AND THE DEVELOPMENT BY THE PERFORMER. 2

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THERE IS AN ARRAY OF DIFFERENT INFORMATION CHALLENGING US ALL THE TIME. MY JOB AS I SEE IT AS AN ARTIST IS TO RECOGNISE THOSE THINGS AND FIND THE INNER HARMONY WITHIN THEM.


FIVE NEW ICONS ANS WESTRA

ARNOLD MANAAKI WILSON,

Photographer

Ngāi Tuhoe and Te Arawa

One of New Zealand’s most esteemed photographers, Ans Westra’s career spans almost 50 years. She is known particularly for her photographs of Māori, the 1970s counterculture and protest action in general. Born in 1936 in Leiden, Holland, it was Ans’ stepfather’s camera that sparked an early interest in photography, while a visit to the international exhibition The Family of Man in Amsterdam, and a book by Joan van der Keukens, Wij Zijn 17 (We Are Seventeen), inspired her first photographic documentation. Ans travelled to New Zealand in 1957, joining the Wellington Camera Club and working in various local photographic studios. Ans’ first international recognition came in 1960 when she won a prize from the UK Photography magazine for her work entitled Assignment No. 2. Her professional career as a fulltime freelance documentary photographer began while working for the School Publications Branch of the Department of Education and Te Ao Hou, a Māori magazine published by the Department of Internal Affairs. Ans received a Certificate of Excellence from the New York World’s Fair The World and Its People held in 1964-65. She has received several Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council grants for the practice and publication of her work focussing on New Zealand and its society. Ans’ book The New Zealanders was published in 1971, followed in 1972 by Notes on the Country I Live In with essays by Tim Shadbolt and James K Baxter. She was the Pacific regional winner of the Commonwealth Photography Award competition, has been artist-in-residence at the Dowse Art Gallery and is a former president of PhotoForum. In the 1990s she taught and tutored, had several exhibitions and residencies and travelled extensively. In 2004 the exhibition Handboek: Ans Westra Photographs opened at the National Library and is on show at the Christchurch Art Gallery until 4 November 2007. Another exhibition of her work on reflection is currently showing at the Mc Namara Gallery, Wanganui, to 29 August 2007.

Sculptor

Arnold Manaaki Wilson has been a major presence on the contemporary Māori art scene for half a century. Born in 1928, Arnold’s father was one of the renowned Ngāti Tarawhai sculptors and carvers of Te Arawa, a tradition passed down to Arnold Wilson. Arnold won a scholarship to attend Wesley College in Paerata. He studied art at the University of Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Arts graduating in 1955, and was the first Māori to gain a Diploma in Fine Arts, with first-class honours in sculpture. A long and successful career in art education followed his time at Teachers Training College. Arnold led a cultural revival of Māori art in schools and in the community. Along with other contemporary artists such as Ralph Hotere (2005 Icon), Marilyn Webb and Sandy Adsett, he questioned orthodoxies and practices of both Māori and Pākehā art traditions, drawing upon his bicultural background to produce his work. As a sculptor he has experimented with many traditional and non-traditional materials, working with metal, vivid paint and wood in various forms. He has been one of the most important mentors of a Modernist Māori art movement within New Zealand. Arnold has exhibited extensively in New Zealand and overseas. Since his retirement from the position of Director of the Cross-Cultural Community Involvement Art Programme in the Department of Education, he has continued his educational role as kaumatua and advisor to a number of public art programmes. He worked for many years to establish the Awataha urban marae complex in Auckland. Arnold Wilson lives in Auckland.

Ans was awarded the Companion of the Order of New Zealand Merit (CNZM) for services to photography in 1998. Ans Westra lives in Wellington. The given demand on the photographer is to be there (wherever ‘there’ may be). The demand, less easy to define, is to see. Westra decided to be there and she saw. Her seeing is inevitably a questioning, questioning on the part of both the photographer and resultant audience. That demands engagement and concern, if not a healthy dose of persistence. Luit Bieringa, Handboek Ans Westra Photographs 2004

~He Tangata, He Tangata, 1956, totara. Photo courtesy of the Auckland Art Gallery~

~Early Settlers Museum, Dunedin 1971. Photo courtesy of Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki~

MY RECENT WORK HAS BEEN INVOLVED WITH THE LAND ITSELF, WITH THE WAY PEOPLE HAVE FORMED THIS COUNTRY FOR THEIR OWN USE... THERE IS ALSO A BODY OF WORK CELEBRATING THE BEAUTY OF THE WORLD AROUND US. THIS IS WHERE I HAVE ARRIVED NOW. THE SHEER PLEASURE OF SEEING.

I TRY TO WORK ROUND A PIECE OF WOOD, FOR CARVING WORKS ARE GOVERNED BY THE CHARACTER OF THE WOOD - ITS GRAIN, KNOTS AND SO ON. AR TS FO U NDATIO N O F NE W ZE A LA ND | PR INC IPA L SPO NSO R FO R SY TH B A R R

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FIVE NEW ICONS DON SELWYN, Ngāti Kuri and Te Aupouri

1936—2007

Actor/Director, stage and screen

It’s not about you, it’s about the kaupapa. If you keep the kaupapa, the philosophical position [of ] the value in front, then you will never become more important than the value. The philosophy, the kaupapa is in front of us and we have to support it. We support the philosophy that is going to uplift our people. Don Selwyn, from The Don, Mercury Lane, Greenstone Pictures, 2001

Don’s family take this opportunity to formally thank the Arts Foundation of New Zealand for bestowing this honour on Don in recognition of the body of work he created on film.

~Photo by APN/New Zealand Herald~

Don Selwyn was selected for an Icon Award in February 2007. The Arts Foundation was grateful that Foundation Governor Gaylene Preston, visited Don Selwyn and his family at North Shore Hospital a few weeks before his death with news that he had been selected. Shirley Selwyn announced the Award to Don and conveyed his acceptance to the Foundation. With a longstanding and distinguished career in the New Zealand film, television and theatre industry as an actor, producer and director, Don Selwyn was a champion of Māori drama. He performed in both Māori and English, and was a prime mover in establishing respect for Māori representations and culture in mainstream New Zealand film and television. Born in 1936, Don grew up in Taumarunui. Originally a rugby-playing English teacher, his acting career was initiated by a dare which led him to play Oberon in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He toured with the Nola Millar Shakespeare Company and appeared in the musical Porgy and Bess, the film Sleeping Dogs and in television series such as The Governor and Pukemanu. Don was a founding member of the New Zealand Māori Theatre Trust. He ran the film and

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television course He Taonga i Tawhiti, and with producer Ruth Kaupua Panapa formed He Taonga Films. He produced and directed Māori language dramas and several Māori dramas in English. Don was Executive Producer of the 2000 New Zealand Media Peace Award winning feature The Feathers of Peace, and produced the first full length feature film to be made in Māori: Te Tangata Whai Rawa o Weniti, the Māori Merchant of Venice. Don received the Companion of the Order of New Zealand Merit (CNZM) as well as an honorary performing arts degree from Unitec, and Te Tohu Tiketike a Te Waka Toi, an award presented annually by Te Waka Toi for outstanding contribution to the development of Māori arts. [Don] devoted more than four decades to probing enquiries into concepts of a shared vision of achieving excellence and creating a critical mass of knowledge, relationships, experience and expertise of a Māori …community inside theatre and film. As an actor, director and filmmaker Selwyn sought to show and explain Māori experiences in the world of theatre, drama, television and film. Professor Taiarahia Black, Honorary Doctorate of Literature from Massey University, citation (2002).

Our matua Don Selwyn is forever imprinted upon the hearts of all who knew him. He is emblazoned within the minds of many. He made his creative spirit soar despite the demons that come with understanding. He truly showed us a vision of the way that the dramatic arts could be: a proud amalgam of the very best of all performance traditions and tikanga. He brought nobility to his craft. He carved a wide swathe through the bullshit that conspires against those who aspire to something greater than what is permitted. He was the most humble of modern Māori warriors. His triumphs before and behind the camera leave us a legacy matched by no other. He was the embodiment of the dreams of forebears. He made real the essence of their deepest teachings. We looked to him for definition. He made sure we never forgot. Don was both doer and nurturer. He scaled the heights. He cared and he loved. He re-fashioned and passed on our manifest destiny. Kua hinga te totara nui o te wao tapu. Kua paku noa tōna rongo, he rongo kino nei. Haere rā e Don, e te whakaruruhau o te wā. Moe mai rā. Tainui Stephens, freelance TV producer, director and film director

~Don Selwyn (right) as Cray in Came a Hot Friday (1985). Frame enlargement.

~Don Selwyn a a Kaitaia policeman in Goodbye Pork Pie (1981), Frame enlargement.

Stills Collection, New Zealand Film Archive / Ngā Kaitiaki O Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua~

Stills Collection, New Zealand Film Archive/Ngā Kaitiaki O Ngā Taonga Whitiāhua~

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FEATURED ICON ARTIST MILAN MRKUSICH

COLOUR, THAT’S THE MOST IMPORTANT THING IN ART, TO USE THE FULL GAMUT OF COLOUR. BECAUSE OF THIS I USE IT ALWAYS RIGHT FROM THE START.

~Photo by Dominion Post~

Milan Mrkusich was one of ten artists honoured in 2003 as an inaugural Arts Foundation of New Zealand Icon. Now 82, Milan is acknowledged as one of the country’s leading Modernist painters. Of Dalmatian decent, Milan was born in Dargaville in 1925. He took up an apprenticeship in Writing and Pictorial Arts with Neuline Studios in 1942, while also attending night courses at Seddon Technical and taking life drawing classes. Over this period, Milan spent two years painting full time, laying the groundwork of his geometric Expressionist painting style. Milan became a partner in the architectural design firm Brenner Associates in 1949, working as a colour consultant, architectural designer and on exhibition and display designs. After Brenners closed in 1958, he obtained various architectural commissions, including many stained glass windows and mosaics. Using geometric forms, and influenced by developments in international abstract art, Milan’s paintings in the early sixties were based partly on the squared circle or mandala motif. In 1968 he embarked on the painting of his first monochromes, which proliferated up to 1976. In 1972 he was recognised with his first retrospective exhibition at the Auckland Art Gallery, Milan Mrkusich Paintings 19461972. Following this, he continued to develop the idea of monochromes which expanded into Zone and Area works in the late 70s and into the 80s. This style continued in 1982 and 1983 by his own interpretation of Constructivism, the Segmented Arcs. In 1982 Milan participated in the 48th Carnegie International in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. There was a second retrospective show at Auckland Art Gallery came in 1985, Milan Mrkusich – a decade further on 1974 – 1983. After this a new direction surfaced producing the Journey paintings. Six further categories of new work followed dealing primarily with different approaches to the use of colour - colour as symbol and colour as a material fact made un-material by the viewer. Milan made the large plates of coloured glass on the street side of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington, a commission he won in 1994 amidst fierce competition.

Since receiving his Icon Award Milan has had five shows of new works with the Hamish McKay Gallery in Wellington and Sue Crockford Gallery in Auckland, as well as major works being included in significant shows in foremost public galleries. The most recent exhibition of Milan’s work, with John Nixon, opened at the Sue Crockford Gallery on 24 July 2007. Milan was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) in 1997 for his services to painting.

For me Milan Mrkusich represents qualities of rigour that have never wavered. His concentrated attention to detail and the large vision that contains it I find immensely sustaining. As a very young man I had a choice once of buying a work by Milan or travelling. I chose to travel, but did so with a sense that the work’s affirmation of integrity travelled with me. It gave me a sense of something to live up to. Ian Wedde (2006 Laureate, Poet and Writer)

Milan lives and works in Auckland in the house he designed and built when at Brenner Associates in the early 1950s. He has several projects currently under way including exhibitions at Hamish McKay and Sue Crockford Galleries.

Milan Mrkusich’s contribution to the arts in New Zealand is enormous. Initially in the 1940s and 1950s as a lone exponent and representative of abstract art, and often at odds with the prevailing and accepted practices of the time, he single-mindedly determined to work within the principles and practices of international abstraction. In this quest he worked both persistently and consistently to establish the language of abstraction in New Zealand as a significant form of expression. Throughout a long career spanning over 60 years he remains faithful to this ideal and has become instrumental in opening up the horizons for a large number of younger artists who were tired of the restrictive or confining conventions imposed upon them by critical and public expectations. His work represents a challenge to the common assumption that an abstract art is one that is without content or meaning, an art with its “head in the clouds”. On the contrary all of his work originates from a sense of social responsibility to ‘”affect” or educate his audience to other levels of consciousness, and is informed by a set of firmly held philosophical beliefs. For Mrkusich art is a vehicle for revealing a “truth” and these truths can only be successfully expressed through the language of abstraction. The forthcoming monograph will provide a greater understanding of his work in both a local and international context.

61-48, 1961, watercolour on paper, Milan Mrkusich, (2003 Icon) courtesy Hamish McKay Gallery. (Above) Milan Mrkusich Paintings 2003-2004, 21 June – 16 July 2005, Sue Crockford Gallery installation view. (Below)

Alan Wright is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Art History at the University of Auckland, specialising in twentieth century modernist painting. He is currently co-authoring a monograph on Milan which will be available in 2008.

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AWARD FOR PATRONAGE PRESENTED BY WEBB’S – FINE ART AUCTIONEERS

Congratulations to Jenny Gibbs, the 2007 recipient of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand Award for Patronage, presented by Webb’s – Fine Art Auctioneers. To demonstrate patronage in action, the Arts Foundation gave Jenny $20,000 to distribute to artists or arts projects of her choice. With the same generosity as the inaugural recipients Denis and Verna Adam, Jenny chose to match this amount, so $40,000 could be distributed to the arts.

~Donald Trott (New Zealand Opera School), Gretchen Albrecht (visual artist), Michael Moynahan (Auckland Writers and Readers Festival), Jenny Gibbs (Award for Patronage 2007 recipient) and Brian Butler (ARTSPACE). Photo by Scott Venning~

Without the financial generosity of a small handful of patrons probably most creative projects in New Zealand over the past 25 years would have remained pie-in-the-sky dreams. Jenny has always been in the forefront of that handful of folk who continually put their hands in their pockets to support various publications, productions, exhibitions, performances... the list is endless. Gretchen Albrecht, 2007 Award for Patronage donation recipient

According to close friend Witi Ihimaera, Jenny is “definitely a formidable force to be reckoned with in New Zealand’s art world.” She has raised the profile of New Zealand art nationally and internationally through her ambitious personal undertaking such as the establishment of the New Gallery for Auckland City Art Gallery and her support for New Zealand’s exhibits at the Venice Biennale. Jenny is a Founding Patron and significant donor to many arts organisations, including Founder and Chair of the Patrons of the Auckland Art Gallery and the Auckland Contemporary Arts Trust, Founding Trustee of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand, Foundation Donor and Board Member of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and long time member of the prestigious International Council of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She is also a generous patron of individual artists and is widely recognised as one of this country’s most consummate private art collectors.

charitable causes, were recognised when Jenny received the second Auckland City Distinguished Citizen Award.

Jenny Gibbs has set a brilliant example to our captains of industry of what can be achieved for the community that is of real and lasting value. Without the foresight and generosity of people like Jenny Gibbs, we as a community would be very much PRESENTED BY the poorer. Peter Webb, Director, Webb’s

WEBB’S – FINE AR AUCTIONEERS

I am hugely honoured to accept this Award. The Arts Foundation has made a real difference to the profiling of all art forms and I am proud to be associated with them. Jenny Gibbs, 2007 Award for Patronage recipient

In order to raise money for the arts, Jenny generously permits the use of her home in Auckland for advocacy and social functions. Her contributions to the region, which include many

Patronage in Action To celebrate the Award for Patronage Jenny distributed four amounts of $10,000 to artist Gretchen Albrecht and to art projects ARTSPACE, the Auckland Writers and Readers Festival and the New Zealand Opera School.

As patrons make their own choice to support the arts, Jenny’s selection of the four of us can be seen as a vote of confidence, a belief in the value of what we do. That is a gift in itself. Sometimes patrons build enduring relationships with the artists they support. Sometimes they prefer to remain anonymous or benignly passive. But all support is an agent for change and can give the patron a sense of participation in “the bringing into being” of the project, or what I call “making the invisible, visible”. The leap of faith that is always required from the artist when making art is also necessary for the patron. Gretchen Albrecht, 2007 Award for Patronage donation recipient

Gretchen Albrecht, abstract artist, has been exhibiting in New Zealand and internationally for more than forty years. Albrecht’s work has evolved from the use of rectangular stained canvases in the 1970s to a pair of signature formats, the hemisphere (half circle) and the oval, shapes that she associates with particular meanings and states of mind. The resulting works resonant combinations of colour and geometry create images with a clear poetic theme in which references to landscape, family and the cosmos act are evoked.

~Gretchen Albrecht, StudyforFloe~

ARTSPACE is a key New Zealand contemporary art institution with an innovative, world-class exhibition programme running from Karangahape Road in Auckland. Over the years ARTSPACE has helped launch and sustain the practice of many significant New Zealand artists. It has been instrumental in creating global dialogue and presenting significant figures from New Zealand in the international art scene. It is involved in the cutting edge of local contemporary art.

~Former Opera School attendees Derek Hill, tenor, and Morag Atchison, soprano, entertain guests at the 2007 Award for Patronage~

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A R TS F OUNDAT I ON OF NEW Z EAL AND | PR INCIPAL SPO NSO R FO R SYTH B A R R

The New Zealand Opera School is the country’s only dedicated residential summer school for aspiring young opera singers. The opportunity to work closely with and learn from top opera professionals encourages excellence from New Zealand’s burgeoning opera talents. The School offers a ten-day course of masterclasses, one-on-one classes and workshops with top vocal tutors, coaches and repetiteurs. Along with tuition on vocal technique, repertoire, languages, movement and stagecraft, tutors offer support and advice on developing performance and on professional career opportunities. The school is held annually in January at Wanganui Collegiate School. The Auckland Writers and Readers Festival is now a highlight of Auckland City’s cultural calendar. It brings together acclaimed international and local writers, cultural commentators, and thousands of readers for events on a variety of topics and genres. The Festival has an increasingly high international profile, which includes a collaborative relationship with the Sydney Writers Festival and enjoys strong local support. Around 500 New Zealand writers and almost 100 international guests have appeared in festival events since 1999.


NEW GENERATION AWARDS

PRESENTED BY FREEMASONS NEW ZEALAND

FEATURED ARTIST – TAIKA WAITITI – Te-Whānau-a-Apanui The biggest challenge I had making the film [Eagle vs Shark] was making the film. The whole thing was a challenge... As told to Indiewire.com on the eve of Eagle Vs. Shark’s world premiere at the Sundance Film Festival February 2007.

Taika Waititi/Cohen is a true hori/ jew/kiwi hybrid. I’m not calling him a car... he’s a pop-culture mutant-rebel artist. His genius is capturing our home-grown human nature on film, with humour and a huge heart.

T

Cliff Curtis, Actor/Producer

New Generation Artists ~Taika Waititi at 2007 Sundance premiere of Eagle Vs Shark. Photo by Fred Hayes, Courtesy Wireimage~

Following the release of his first feature film Eagle vs Shark Taika Waititi was named by the influential United States entertainment magazine Variety as one of ten new international talents to watch. Taika had already been recognised on the global stage in 2005 when his short film Two Cars, One Night earned an Oscar nomination and Tama Tu, his second short film, won recognition in festivals in Sweden and the United States. Eagle vs Shark portrays the quirky romance of two misfits. It premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival, before winning the prize for best screenplay at the 13th Annual US Comedy Arts Festival. It opened in the US for general release on 1 June. The film has also been selected for the Berlin and Rotterdam Film Festivals, and had its New Zealand premiere at the 2007 Telecom International Film Festivals in July. Taika was selected by Curator Jon Bywater as one of the five recipients of the Inaugural New Generation Awards, presented by Freemasons New Zealand in Wellington at the end of 2006. Taika joined four other artists who are at an early stage in their career, but also gaining attention both in New Zealand and abroad for their artistic outputs.

Taika has been involved in the arts for several years as a visual artist, actor, writer and director, and has been involved in some of New Zealand’s most innovative and successful productions as a performer and comedian. His strong background in comedy writing and performing (with fellow comedian Jemaine Clement), has seen Taika win New Zealand’s top comedy award, the Billy T Award, and also the Spirit of the Fringe Award in Edinburgh. He has regularly done stand-up gigs, launched a solo production Taika’s Incredible Show in 2004, and has been critically acclaimed for his dramatic abilities, including being nominated for Best Actor at the 2000 Nokia Film Awards for his role in the Sarkies Brothers’ film Scarfies.

Arrangement: Gush (detail) 2007, Cardboard, packing tape, plastic bags, foam, furniture, carpet, lino, found objects, Eve Armstrong (New Generation Artist 2006). Photo courtesy the artist and Michael Lett, Auckland

Eve Armstrong will exhibit with Darryn George, Sarah Jane Parton and Areta Wilkinson at the City Gallery Wellington, in Contemporary Projects, 11 August – 4 November 2007. Presenting new and recent work, the projects are not linked thematically, but have been selected by curator Sarah Farrar to respond to, and spark off, one another. Warren Maxwell’s album The Onus of Sand, with band the Little Bushman, became number two on the IMNZ Independent Album Chart for March 2007. Warren wrote the song Little Fish, dedicated to Toi Maori’s Waka Te ika a Maui (the Fish of Maui) that appeared at the opening ceremony for the America’s Cup. Tze Ming Mok was an invited speaker/reader at the Shanghai International Literary Festival, in March. Tze Ming was selected with Bill Manhire (Arts Foundation Laureate 2005) as recipients of the International Writers’ Programme for 2007, designed to assist New Zealand writers in attending high-profile literary festivals

~Jarrod (Jemaine Clement) and Lily (Loren Horsley) in a scene from Eagle Vs Shark. Photo by Matt Grace, Courtesy Whenua Films & NZ Film Commission~

Joe Sheehan features in an exhibition at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, until 2 September. New Nature shows the work of twelve artists/collectives from the Pacific Rim. Joe has recently launched his blog site www.greentones.blogspot.com

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LAUREATE AWARDS

PRESENTED BY FORSYTH BARR

Readers of Applause who receive the Arts Foundation’s email update service will be well aware of the many activities taking place around the country involving artists who have been acknowledged by the Arts Foundation. If you would like to receive up-to-date information on the artists the Arts Foundation has honoured, please provide your email details to admin@artsfoundation.org.nz. The Arts Foundation offers its congratulations to: • Barry Barclary (Laureate 2004) who became a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for his services to film, announced in the 2007 Queen’s birthday honours list • Phil Dadson (Laureate 2001) who has been offered a Sanskriti Foundation Artist Residency, (near to Delhi in India), starting 30 September for 3 months • Shona McCullagh (Laureate 2002) who was awarded a Choreography Media Honour by the Directors Guild of America for her short dance film break at a ceremony in Sunset Boulevard, Hollywood, in June • Don McGlashan (Laureate 2002) and Douglas Wright (Laureate 2000) who have both received Living Legend Awards from the Auckland City Council

Look out for Briar Grace-Smith’s (Laureate 2000) Script The Strength of Water, has been adapted to film and is due to be shot around the Hokianga starting in August. The film, about twin children living on a Northland chicken farm, is due for completion midway through 2008. Elizabeth Knox (Laureate 2000). Filming will begin on the movie of Elizabeth’s novel The Vintner’s Luck, at the end of the year. The film will be directed by Niki Caro. Simon O’Neill (Laureate 2005) and Helen Medlyn (Laureate 2002) join Dame Kiri te Kanawa and Jonathan Lemalu early next year for a one-off performance at Nelson’s Sealord Opera in the Park as part of the Nelson City Council’s Summer Festival. Full details at: www.nelsonfestivals.co.nz John Psathas (Laureate 2003) NZSO Commission for Timpani and Orchestra Wellington, Friday, 19 October, 6.30pm (Michael Fowler Centre) Napier, Thursday, 25 October, 8pm (Municipal Theatre – pre-concert talk 7.15pm) Auckland, Friday, (Auckland Town Hall) 26 October, 6.30pm Christchurch, Tuesday, 30 October 6.30pm (Town Hall – pre-concert talk 5.45pm) Dunedin, Wednesday, 31 October 6.30pm (Town Hall – pre-concert talk 5.45pm)

• Ronnie van Hout (Laureate 2005) a recipient of this year’s Artists to Antarctica programme. Ronnie will travel to Antarctica in October or November 2007 • Gillian Whitehead (Laureate 2000) who was awarded the CANZ (Composers Association of New Zealand) Citation for Services to New Zealand Music in March.

Mrs Winter’s Jump, by Jenny Bornholdt Jenny Bornholdt’s most recent book of poetry Mrs Winter’s Jump was launched on 28 June. The fifth publication in the series of poetry from New Zealand’s Te Mata Estate Poet Laureates (including work by 2005 Laureate Bill Manhire, and 2003 Icon Hone Tuwhare), the launch of Mrs Winter’s Jump coincided with the official handing over of the Poet Laureate scheme from Te Mata Estate to the National Library.

We’re coming out from under dismal. The sun is up and so are the children, mucking about with skateboards. He’s out the back playing ‘Mrs. Winter’s

Jenny says “Mrs Winter’s Jump is the last poem in my new book and comes at the end of a group of poems about illness and recovery. The title is the name of a piece of music written by 16th century English composer, John Downland”. Publisher Nicola Legat says Jenny’s work is, “distinguished by its delicacy, accessibility and engaging quality.”

Jump’. And jump she does. She gathers up

Mrs Winter’s Jump is published by Random House, in a limited numbered edition, and is available for $36.99.

her rusty skirts and crosses all the crooked space between us.

Have Laureates will travel Planning is under way for another series of Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage events this year. The events feature Laureates presenting elements of their work and then discussing life as an artist. Forsyth Barr and the Arts Foundation intend to present Laureates On-Stage in various locations around the country towards the end of 2007. After the success of the mini tour the two nights following the Laureate Awards 2006, Forsyth Barr and the Foundation intend to take the 2007 Laureates to Nelson and Queenstown in November. The 2007 Laureate Awards, presented by Forsyth Barr, are pencil booked for Wellington on November 20th.

Nationally recognised as a key sponsor of the arts, Forsyth Barr was the Overall Winner of the NBR Awards for Sponsorship of the Arts - 2006, for its sponsorship of Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage

~Neil Dawson, 2003 Laureate, Satellite Globe 1990 ~

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FEATURED LAUREATE ARTIST DEREK LARDELLI Ngāti Porou, Rongowhakaata, Ngāti Kanohi (Ngāi Te Riwai), Ngāti Kaipoho (Ngāi Te Aweawe) The works of Derek Lardelli can be found from the heights of Mount Hikurangi (where an installation of his six, ten metre high carvings stand) to his home in the tiny coastal settlement of Whangara on the East Coast of the North Island, to the airways and on the rugby fields of the world. Derek Lardelli (2004 awarded Laureate) is one of this country’s finest tā moko artists. He is widely celebrated for his role in the revival of this art-form. Tā Moko is only one of Derek’s many skills. He is a visual artist, carver, kapa haka performer, composer, graphic designer, researcher of whakapapa, keeper of tribal history, and kaikorero. Derek is well known in Māoridom but has also come to national prominence with his millennium carvings, his designs used on the uniform for the 2006 Commonwealth Games, creation of the Air New Zealand uniform and designs that will be incorporated in the corporate branding and livery of the Air New Zealand fleet, and for the composition of the new All Blacks haka. Derek has a background in teaching, fine arts and classical Māori literature. He is principal tutor of Toihoukura at Tairawhiti Polytechnic, Gisborne, Chairperson of Tā moko Arts CollectiveTe Uhi, a Trustee of Toi Māori Aotearoa and he recently completed his Masters at Canterbury University Ilam School of Fine Arts. His research topic was Tā Moko – Traditional Pathways Contemporary Connections. In his recent Masters degree work at the School of Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury… Derek Lardelli undoubtedly set a new benchmark for creative excellence. His graduating exhibition and presentation in March at the School of Fine Arts Gallery at the Arts Centre in Christchurch set a standard of achievement that not only reflected his status as one of New Zealand’s leading artists, but one which all post-graduate students should aspire to achieving. Dr.Desmond Rochfort, Professor. Head of the School of Fine Arts, University of Canterbury. In 2006, Creative New Zealand acknowledged Derek by naming him the first recipient of an artistin-residence programme, hosted by Canakkale University, based near the Gallipoli Peninsula in Turkey. Derek took up this residency in August 2006 where he composed items, sketched and wrote prose and poetry, based around his and his family’s experiences there. The horror of the campaign and the lives wasted at Gallipoli greatly influenced Derek’s kapa haka compositions, performed by Whangara Mai Tawhiti at the National Kapa Haka Festival 2007, where Derek’s group won best action song and was named the supreme winner of the competition for the first time. Derek said he found it particularly moivng to meet descendents of the Turkish troops and to hear their histories and learn of their total commitment to their land. He is now reflecting back on his time in Gallipoli, revisiting his ideas of the past ten years and incorporating some of these new influences into future work.

~Derek Lardelli, Whangara-Mai-Tawhiti, Te Matatini 2007, winning group. Photo by Aaron Smale~

Aotearoa is fortunate to have such an inspirational person in its midst. A leader, and fast becoming a scholar in his own right, Derek has a deep knowledge of matauranga Māori me nga tikanga. He is highly respected in Māoridom for his skills and expertise, receiving his accolades with humility and always paying tribute to his whanau, hapu, iwi and Māori. He Rangatira tenei Tangata. Waana Davis, Chairman, Toi Māori Aotearoa

I am grateful to the Arts Foundation for their support, generosity and dedication to the arts. They provide a springboard for artists like me to tell the stories of our land, our people, our histories.

~Tā Moko detail, Derek Lardelli~

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Caps Off The Arts Foundation of New Zealand welcomes the 2007 budget announcement to remove the tax rebate threshold for donations to charity, which is supported by all the major political parties. Effective from April 1, 2008, the changes will align New Zealand tax relief provisions for charitable donations with those offered in other OECD countries such as Australia, Ireland and the United Kingdom. “As an organisation that encourages private giving to the arts, the Arts Foundation welcomes the reduction in the cost of donating” said Ros Burdon, Chairman. “The Foundation hopes that the removal of the rebate threshold will encourage more New Zealanders to consider giving to the arts and that a culture of giving will become more embedded in our society.”

The law changes allow a donor to claim 33.3% of their total donations to charity as a tax rebate up to the level of their annual income. So if a person earned $100,000 and gave half to charity, they would get a rebate of $16,650 ($50,000 x 33.3%). The Arts Foundation of New Zealand Award for Patronage celebrates the achievements of some of New Zealand’s most generous patrons to inspire others to consider giving to the arts, at any level. Inaugural recipients of the Award, Denis and Verna Adam have been calling for more favourable tax incentives for giving for many years. I am confident that the removal of the “cap” will be beneficial for all charities, and particularly for charities in the field of fostering the arts.

specialising in wills. The booklet is also available from Public Trust offices throughout New Zealand, from the Foundation office and www.artsfoundation.org.nz. In addition to the general information regarding legacies that is available in the booklet, the Foundation has produced a Guide for Solicitors, which is also available from the Foundation website, or from the Foundation office. The guide includes information about tax effective giving, and details how donors can provide donations for specific regions, arts forms or projects of their choosing. A small advertising campaign is to be implemented over the next few years positioning the Foundation alongside other charitable causes as a regular recipient of legacies.

Denis Adam, Inaugural Award for Patronage Recipient. Doners may also wish to consider leaving a legacy with the Arts Foundation. A newly published legacy booklet has recently been distributed to over 1,500 lawyers,

It Started in Dunedin On March 22 this year the Arts Foundation and Forsyth Barr presented their 43rd Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage, back in Dunedin for the fourth time. Arts Foundation Trustee Sir Ronald Scott had the responsibility of chairing the occasion. In his opening address, Sir Ronald said that there were three reasons why the Foundation was pleased to be back in Dunedin. “Everyone accepts that Waitangi is New Zealand’s birth place. Dunedin however was the cradle in which many of the dynamics of a modern nation were nurtured. I refer to commerce, education and the arts. They were and are Dunedin’s legacies to our country”, he said. He went on to say, “Second, it was in Dunedin that the Arts Foundation and Forsyth Barr launched Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage in 2002 and since then the unique road show has been taken around the country”. The final reason was that, “Dunedin is founding home of the Foundation’s Principal Sponsor Forsyth Barr, which has made it the envy of many arts organisation in the country. Forsyth Barr have been superb and, now a nation-wide commercial entity, has proved yet again Dunedin is a national nursery”. ~Phil Dadson, Kate De Goldi, Gillian Whitehead and Warwick Freeman appear at the inaugural Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage held in Dunedin in November 2002. Photo by Otago Daily Times~

From the very first event hosted by our office I was impressed with the Arts Foundation’s respect for artists and audience. Arts Foundation events have provided me with a unique insight into the working minds of artists, something that has inspired a deeper interest in and understanding of the arts.

The Dunedin office of Forsyth Barr has been a major supporter of Arts Foundation events. In addition to hosting four Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage, they contribute time and energy to Foundation events through collating and sending invitations, producing marketing material and providing strategic advice for events.

John Gallaher, Dunedin Manager and Arts Foundation Patron.

New Trustee Appointment Elizabeth Ellis CNZM, JP, Ngāpuhi, Ngāti Porou Elizabeth is no stranger to the arts. She was on the Council of Creative New Zealand for 12 years, was Chair of Te Waka Toi, the Māori Arts Board, for seven years and New Zealand representative on the Pacifc Arts Council for 12 years. During her time with Creative New Zealand, Te Waka Toi established significant annual Māori arts awards; the Toi Ake programme (support for whanau, hapu and iwi); Te Matakura (the Association of Māori Educators, researchers, curators and historians); and Toi Iho, (the Māori made trademark of authenticity and quality). She led the Aotearoa New Zealand delegations of more than 100 Māori artists to Pacific arts festivals in Samoa, New Caledonia and the Republic of Palau. Elizabeth is a visual artist with a high profile in Māori arts, the education sector and the community. She is currently Area Manager of The Education Review Office for Auckland and Te Tai Tokerau. Elizabeth is also on the register of the Academic Audit Unit for the Universities of New Zealand, a member of the Enterprise Board, Auckland Art Gallery, Toi o Tāmaki and the Chair of Haerewa, The Māori Arts Board of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki. Ngā mihi mahana e te mana wahine, Irihapeti, nau mai, haere mai ki Te Poari o Te Tumu Mahi Toi

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Rodney Wilson (CNZM) Congratulations to Dr Rodney Wilson (Arts Foundation Governor) for his appointment as a Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit (CNZM) for services to museum and art gallery administration. Rodney is presently Director of the Auckland Museum, a position he has held for the past 13 years. In this time he has steered the Museum through two stages of its $113million refurbishment. Rodney and his partner Hilly will be retiring to live in Akaroa on the Banks Peninsula, where he plans writing a book on the life and work of architect Sir Miles Warren (2003 Icon).

From the Office Rosie Hole completed a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Film Studies at Victoria University of Wellington in 2006. Now gaining work experience at the Arts Foundation on a part-time basis, she is maintaining our systems and working through copyright issues. She has also been tutoring first year film students at Victoria University.

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Webb’s Celebrates Patronage In April of this year, the Arts Foundation was proud to announce a partnership with Webb’s - Fine Art Auctioneers. Webb’s became the Presenting Sponsor of the Arts Foundation of New Zealand Award for Patronage. The 2007 recipient, Jenny Gibbs, was announced on 8 May.

As a company with an in-depth understanding of the quality of New Zealand art, the Arts Foundation is proud to be associated with Webb’s. We are grateful for Webb’s generous support of the Arts Foundation and their contribution to recognising our leading arts patrons. Ros Burdon, Chairman, Arts Foundation of New Zealand It probably came as no surprise when Webb’s accepted an invitation from the Art Foundation to sponsor the Foundation’s 2007 Award for Patronage [the second to be awarded and the first to be sponsored]. Webb’s is fully aware of the vital role the patron and donor plays in the world of the arts, and this year’s recipient of the Award [ Jenny Gibbs] is one of New Zealand’s truly outstanding Patrons.

Established in 1976 to bring to the New Zealand market a higher level of professionalism in the selling of works of art in all categories by auction, Webb’s has grown to become a leader of sales under the hammer. Webb’s works in the specialist fields of fine and decorative arts, jewellery, estate, household effects and wine. Webb’s auctions are a great place to learn about the markets for art, antiques and collectables. They conduct more than 150 sales annually from their salerooms in Newmarket, Auckland, with sales attracting art, antique dealers and collectors from all over New Zealand and abroad. Webb’s provide an open market for both sellers and buyers. Forthcoming 2007 sales are: a collectable art auction, A2 (August 28), Decorative Arts (30 August), Contemporary Art (16 October), and 20th Century Design (17 October). Further information on Webb’s can be found on www.webbs.co.nz

Peter Webb, Director, Webb’s – Fine Art Auctioneers

Webb’s produce eight catalogues a year. These catalogues have become collectors’ items in their own right, providing an historical review of the art market with artwork pricings and commentary from art academics and other writers. Pine Without Singing (pictured below), an artwork by Icon artist Ralph Hotere, is reproduced in Webb’s September 2006 catalogue. This artwork realised $260,000 at auction. The same catalogue includes artworks for sale by Laureate artists John Pule, Peter Peryer, Michael Parekowhai, Neil Dawson and Ann Robinson. You can register for Webb’s catalogues on www.webbs.co.nz/about/catalogue.asp

~Ralph Hotere (Icon 2003), Pine Without Singing Photo courtesy Webb’s ~

Patron Turns Sponsor Henrietta Hall has recently joined the Arts Foundation as a supporting sponsor, assisting at a strategic level with information technology (IT) and management systems. With a diverse background in large public and private organisations, Henrietta has recently chosen to work with smaller organisations to help them make the most of IT within tight budgets. Already Arts Foundation management has been effectively assisted by Henrietta with its strategic planning, and she is now preparing a three year IT plan and helping with an image management system. The Arts Foundation appreciates Henrietta’s sponsorship as well as support from her and her partner Kim Chamberlain, as Bronze Patrons.

I have been impressed with the sense of purpose, vision and commitment demonstrated by the Arts Foundation and I look forward to helping them achieve their goals.

~Peter Webb, with Ralph Hotere’s (Icon 2003), Towards Aramoana: Alumin Politik, included in Webb’s July auction~

Team Foundation Whilst there are three and a half people busily working in the Wellington office of the Arts Foundation, the number of people involved with the Foundation is many more. In addition to thousands of volunteer hours from Trustees, Governors and Patrons, the Foundation also has the benefit and skills of many individuals through sponsorship arrangements. Forsyth Barr offices throughout New Zealand host Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage and their staff are regular contributors to Foundation business. Freemason New Zealand staff work on events and publications for the New Generation Artists and Webb’s provides advice for the Award for Patronage. The Foundation office is in regular contact with the team at Chrometoaster for all design work, including AV displays and publications. All publications and invitations are printed by DSP Print. When the computers go on the blink, Testroom is not far away and we now have the benefit of strategic advice from Henrietta Hall. Getting the mix of red, white, brown and bubbly just right is the subject of important conversations with Lion Nathan prior to any event and Ricoh make sure everyone with a role gets a copy of the event plan. Ensuring people are in the know is Acumen Group, providing strategic public relations advice and managing publicity. So, who are all the people behind the Foundation? From the next issue of Applause there will be a series introducing the hard working people that make up “Team Foundation”.

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DIRECTORY Vice-Regal Patron His Excellency The Hon Anand Satyanand, PCNZM, GovernorGeneral of New Zealand

Pamela & Brian Stevenson Dame Catherine Tizard Caroline & Henry van Asch Walker & Hall Trust Haydn Wong

Trustees Ros Burdon CNZM (Chair), Richard Cathie MNZM, Leigh Davis, Eion Edgar DCNZM, CNZM, Elizabeth Ellis CNZM, Karyn Fenton-Ellis, Fran Ricketts, Sir Ronald Scott, Brian Stevenson and Sir Miles Warren ONZ, KBE.

Silver Laureate Donors Richard & Trish Barnes John & Mary Marshall Jolyon & Georgina Ralston Faith Taylor Colin Post & Brenda Young

Bronze Patrons Honorary Vice Patrons Sir Michael & Lady Hardie Boys

Governors John McCormack (Chair), David Carson-Parker, Dr Robin Congreve, Briar Grace-Smith, Roger Hall QSO, CNZM, Elizabeth Knox ONZM, Jonathan Mane-Wheoki, Helen Medlyn, Justin Paton, Gaylene Preston ONZM, Hon Georgina te Heuheu QSO, Marilynn Webb ONZM, Gillian Whitehead MNZM, Lloyd Williams & Rodney Wilson CNZM.

Founding Patrons Roderick & Gillian Deane Eion & Jan Edgar Jenny Gibbs Fran & Geoff Ricketts John Todd James H. Wallace

Platinum Lifetime Patrons Nancy & Spencer Radford

Platinum Patron Peter Tatham

Gold Lifetime Patrons Ros & Philip Burdon David Carson-Parker Connells Bay Sculpture Trust Lady Isaac Peter & Joanna Masfen Fay Pankhurst Deborah Sellar

Gold Corporate Patron National Business Review

Gold Patrons Gus & Irene Fisher Noel & Sue Robinson Lady Tait Sir Miles Warren David Wilton Anonymous (2)

Gold Laureate Donors Donald & Susan Best John & Rose Dunn John & Merrill Holdsworth Don & Jannie Hunn Prue & Denver Olde Dot Paykel Lesley & Michael Shanahan Jenny & Andrew Smith

Silver Patrons Trish Clark Wayne Boyd & Ann Clarke Diana & Bob Fenwick Laurie Greig Margot Hutchison Jillian & Dick Jardine Constance Kirkcaldie Ronald Sang & Margaret Parker Ron & Margaret Saunders Mary Smit

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Charlotte Anderson Michael & Gaye Andrews Arts Waikato Graham Atkinson John Barnett Liz Bowen-Clewley & Greg Clewley Bill Brien & Frances Russell Chris & Lyn Brocket Bill & Meg Busby Julie & Robert Bryden Diana Cable Bruce & Margaret Carson Brecon & Jessica Carter Suzanne Carter Andrew Cathie & Niki Pennington Richard & Frances Cathie Kim Chamberlain & Henrietta Hall Helen Chambers Rick & Lorraine Christie Bruce & Jo Connor Dinah & Robert Dobson Rocky & Jeanie Douche Robyn & Christopher Evans Karyn Fenton-Ellis Helen & Keith Ferguson Charlotte & Robert Fisher Marc & Cecilia Fitz-Gerald Rie Fletcher Mr & Mrs E M Friedlander John & Marelda Gallaher Jim Geddes Sue Gifford & Simon Skinner John & Trish Gribben Helen & Don Hagan Sir Michael & Lady Hardie Boys Philip & Leone Harkness Alister Harlow John & Barbara Heslop Willi Hill Ken & Jennifer Horner Joan Imrie Chris & Sue Ineson Hugo Judd & Sue Morgan The Kauri Trust Peter Keenan Grant Kerr Roger King & Liffy Roberts Michael & Monica Laney Hilary Langer Annie K. H. Lee Ken Lister & Barbara Bridger Eugenie Loomans Mary Lynskey Sue & John Maasland Janice Macleod Eileen McGrath-Hadwen Sir Roy McKenzie Joy Mebus Pauline Mitchell Alexandra Morley-Hall Barbara & Roger Moses Douglas Myers Robert & Freda Narev Mike Nicolaidi Rob & Jacqui Nicoll Mervyn & Francoise Norrish Trish & Roger Oakley Neil & Phillipa Paviour-Smith Sam Perry Joe & Jackie Pope

AUGUST 2007 James & Rachel Porteous Michael Prentice Chris & Sue Prowse Professor Hilary Radner Don & Moira Rennie Andrew Robertson & Niina Suhonen Lyn & Bruce Robertson Rita Salmon Greg & Rosie Schneiderman Sir Ronald & Lady Scott Lindsay Shelton Max & Laraine Shepherd Jan Spary John & Robyn Spooner Roger Steele Ross Steele Scott & Vicki St John Kathleen Tipler & Michael Cole Turnovsky Endowment Trust Gerrit & Marianne van der Lingen Philip van Dyk Kerrin & Noel Vautier The Waimarama Trust Fredricka E. M. Walker-Murray James L. D. & Eve Wallace Margaret Wheeler Helen & Geoff Whitcher Gillian Whitehead Edna Williams Les & Marie Williams John & Rosemary Worley Helen Young Peter T. Young Anonymous (7)

THE ARTS FOUNDATION OF NEW ZEALAND OWES ITS EXISTENCE AND PROJECT FUNDING TO A NUMBER OF ORGANISATIONS WITH VISION AND A PASSION FOR THE ARTS:

Forsyth Barr – Principal Sponsor A New Zealand-owned company and Principal Sponsor of the Arts Foundation, Forsyth Barr is proud to be investing in New Zealand’s cultural heritage. Presenting Sponsor – Laureate Awards Ceremony Forsyth Barr enables the annual celebration and honouring of five of New Zealand’s highest achieving artists. Naming Sponsor – Forsyth Barr Laureates On-Stage Forsyth Barr’s support provides a unique opportunity to experience some of the finest, most exciting, working artists in New Zealand.

Presenting Sponsor – Award for Patronage Webb’s – Fine Arts Auctioneers, enable a significant Patron to be honoured for their contributions to the arts in New Zealand. Presenting Sponsor – New Generation Awards As funder of both the awards and event, Freemasons New Zealand is providing significant support to artists in the early stages of their careers.

Bronze Laureate Donors

Supporting providers

Margaret & Warren Austad Dorothy Gentry Ann Mallinson Terence and Elizabeth O’Brien Judy & Roscoe Turner Lindsay & Kees Weststrate Kirsty Wood & family

The following companies provide generous support through the provision of high quality services.

Notified Legacies Alistair Stuart Betts Anne Coney Jenny Gibbs Lorraine Isaacs Helen Lloyd Pamela & Brian Stevenson John Todd Anonymous (7)

Marketing Advisors Designers

Print Suppliers

Strategic ICT and management-systems support Many individuals and organisations have supported the Arts Foundation through patronage donations, gifts and bequests since our emergence in 1999. This support is extremely important to the Foundation. Patrons’ continued loyalty and contribution to the cause is most gratefully acknowledged. Special thanks to the following for their assistance with the preparation of audio visual and images for the 2007 Icon Awards: Alexander Turnbull Library, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tamaki, Jan & Luit Bieringa, Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna O Waiwhetu, Peter Coates, Ruth Kaupua, He Taonga Films, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, the New Zealand Film Commission, Radio New Zealand, Television New Zealand, The New Zealand Film Archive.

Office Equipment suppliers

Beverage Suppliers

IT suppliers

Donors Philanthropic trusts provide valuable donations to support infrastructure and events.

Photographers: Ken Baker, Matt Grace, Neil MacKenzie and Scott Venning Executive Director: Simon Bowden Project Co-ordinator: Angela Busby Administrator: Bryna O’Brien Arts Foundation of New Zealand PO Box 11-352, Manners Street, Wellington

Foundation Organisation

Tel: 04 382 9691, Fax: 04 382 9692

The New Zealand Lottery Grants

Email: admin@artsfoundation.org.nz Website: www.artsfoundation.org.nz

A R TS F OUNDAT I ON OF NEW Z EAL AND | PR INCIPAL SPO NSO R FO R SYTH B A R R

Board provided a capital base of $5 million to establish the Arts Foundation Endowment Fund.

Applause - Issue 13  

In this issue: Icon Awards; Milan Mrkusich; Award for Patronage; New Generation Awards; Taika Waititi; • Laureate Awards; Derek Lardelli;...

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