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Master Art Plan

for

West 10th Avenue in

La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Denver, CO


Š2016 Friends of Arts Street (dba Arts Street). All rights reserved. This document was created by Arts Street, a small, Denver-based non-profit that cultivates low-income and under-served youth into a creative and culturally competent workforce. Arts Street uses the power of the arts and arts professionals to nurture leadership and engage youth in learning. With the endorsement of Mayor Micheal B. Hancock and the City and County of Denver, this project is supported in part by the Our Town award from the National Endowment for the Arts and in part by the Innovate for Good award from Rose Community Foundation. **NOTICE** This document and the individual contributions contained in it are protected under copyright by Arts Street. This document does not constitute a representation, warranty or covenant by Arts Street regarding the accuracy or completeness of the information presented herein. To the fullest extent of the law, Arts Street assumes no liability for any loss, damage and/ or injury to persons or property from any action inspired by information contained in this document.

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"A Place to Connect Physically, Socially, & Spiritually" 3


Acknowledgments We’d like to sincerely thank the community that contributed to make this project a reality:

Left: Lisa Gedgaudas and Brendan Picker-Mahoney from Denver Arts & Venues, Right: Roger Martin-Pressman (10th Ave resident)

FUNDERS: Rose Community Foundation: Innovate for Good Award National Endowment for the Arts: Our Town Award Denver Arts and Venues: Imagine 2020 Fund Award MAIN PARTNERS: Denver Housing Authority (DHA) La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association (LPNA) City and County of Denver: Mayor’s Office, Denver Arts & Venues, Denver Public Works CONTRIBUTING ORGANIZATIONS: Colorado High School Charter (CHSC), Regional Transportation District (RTD), Art District on Santa Fe (ADSF), Santa Fe Business Improvement District (BID), Newsed, Youth on Record, Metropolitan State University of Denver Center for Visual Arts (CVA), I Have a Dream Foundation (IHAD), Denver Open Media (DOM), Colorado Creative Industries (CCI), Sheila Fortune Foundation, Scientific and Cultural Facilities District (SCFD), City and County of Denver: Office of Children’s Affairs 2A Boost, and Office of Economic Development’s Community Development Block Grant (CDBG).

Above: La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood meeting Below: Arts Street staff and student interns painting an alley in downtown Denver

SPEAKERS: David Stauffer, Historian of La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association Karen Good, Policy, Planning, & Sustainability Project Manager @ Denver Public Works Brendan Picker-Mahoney, Public Art Administrator @ Denver Arts & Venues Lisa Gedgaudas, Create Denver Program Administrator @ Denver Arts & Venues Andrea Barela, NEWSED Development Director, Santa Fe Business Improvement District President Michelle Jacobson, Art District on Santa Fe Board Member, Realtor Broker Associate Katy Flaccavento & Zach Gillerlain, Sound & Light Artists @ Knowmad.Colab Roger Martin-Pressman, Physical Therapist, Yoga Teacher, 10th Ave. Resident Rita Jaramilo, La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Resident Thomas Evans, Artist, Muralist INSTRUCTORS & STAFF: Katy Gevargis, Program Manager, Architecture & Urban Design Instructor @ Arts Street Chelsea Romaniello, Youth Coordinator & Fine Arts Instructor @ Arts Street Seth Adcock, Community Outreach, Tech Manager, & Video Instructor @ Arts Street

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Samantha Oehlerking, Grant Writer @ Arts Street (previous) JC Futrell, Instructor & Job Developer @ Youth Employment Academy Stella Yu, Executive Director @ Arts Street Amy Banker, Senior Lead Coordinator @ Youth Employment Academy (YEA) of DHA Lynne Picard, Director Workforce Development and Community Initiatives @ YEA of DHA Ed Vigil, GIS Developer @ Weston Solutions, Inc., GIS Instructor, Digital Artist Jade Baranski, Business Owner @ JoyLab, Inc., Social Media Developer and Teacher STUDENTS: Core Group: Goretti Martinez-Murguia, Brittany Tolmich, Autumn Martinez-Mercado, Gabe Winegarner, Rebecca (RJ) Goerner, Shawn McGraw, Kenny Diaz, Kori Martinez, Abraham Pantoja, Natalie Sanchez, Takara Leyba, & Sierra Lopez Angel Martinez-Murguia, Eli Buzzell, Jennifer Castorena-Casillas, Angel Talamantes, Dejah Ervin, Nicholas Gamez-Ramos, Bryan Mejia, Sheldon Gonzalez, Nichelle Hayes, Gabrielle James, Victor Martinez, Alfredo “Freddie� Padilla-Ruiz, Tyana Higgs, Stephanie Wilson, Mumina Hussein, Abdikadiv Hussein, Kandia Diallo, Taneya Middleton-Cunningham, Nimely Warloh, Edgar Escobedo, Leslie Gutierrez, Janae Valerio, Diamond Duran, Freya Cerny, Luis Diego Diaz, Yesenia Ortiz, Dorian Rendon, Jaquayla Douglas, Iridian Vasquez, Brian Meja-Nunez, Ashley McCord, Austin Jeffies, Nikole Misagawe, Kivon Gorman, Tony McCall, Nathaniel Williams, Asharah Majeed, Israel Ruiz, Briana Mestas, Autumn Naranjo, Blanca Flores, Sessally Sanchez, Mezly Azila, Katelyn Ficker, Katia Ancho-Gomez, Shanna Rivera, Kevin Jaramillo, Isaiah Anderson, Dakota Angel, Mirna Estrada, Maria Hernandeez, Zephanie Hernandez, Corina Romero, Ariana Romero, Jasmin Macedo, Monique Lane, Aaliyah Harper, Abel Ocampo, Adama Bamba, Albert Ortega, Alejandro Beltram, Alfredo Saldiver, Chelsey Marin, Luis Urbina, Madison Pickett, Micole Terry, Saul Garcia, Martin Soto, Alex Shukuru, Destino Murad, Evette Anchondo, Gabriel Roybal, Imani Manley, James Barnes, Janette Warren, Julliana Aguirre, Kei-Ondre Palmer, Kirayle Gorman, Marlan Garner, Miguel Luevano, Ameyah Allen

Above: Arts Street receiving Innovate for Good Award from the Rose Community Foundation Below: Arts Street youth installing fence art

INTERNS: Daphne-Fleur Newman, Hannah Toole, Desire Lawrence, Brittany Tolmich, Ruth Blakley, Yasmine McNeil, Jaime Zapata 10TH AVENUE RESIDENTS & PROPERTY OWNERS: Roger Martin-Pressman, Orench Lagman, Joseph Gomez, Sarah Scalise, Sharon Devine, Jeffery McCann

Left: Dave Stauffer (La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association Historian) Right: Karen Good from Denver Public Works

10TH AVENUE BUSINESS OWNERS/EXECUTIVES: Jami Duffy, Executive Director @ Youth on Record Bill Dutton, General Manager @ Buckhorn Exchange Aaron Lobato, Owner @ Interstate Kitchen and Bar 5


Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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PAST

APPENDIX

FUTURE

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Precedents

Creative Youth Take Flight: LA ALMA CONNECTION

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY At its core, Arts Street seeks to show underserved youth the potential of their creative talents through real-world, client based projects. When these projects have a significant impact on a community and illuminate the full scale and power of creative thought, then Arts Street is able to accomplish something truly special. CREATIVE YOUTH TAKE FLIGHT: LA ALMA CONNECTION encompassed both of these elements. Over the course of year, we found youth fully engaged in a community challenge, using their talents and new skills to impact the area around them. Arts Street identified challenges to the La Alma neighborhood and invited over 100 high school age youth to develop creative solutions to these issues. The challenges identified were the issue of parking congestion on Santa Fe Drive during the Art District on Santa Fe’s First Friday art events and the lack of public transportation or pedestrian use in the La Alma neighborhood. Through multiple out of school workshops, inschool classes, guest speakers and tours, the solution the youth envisioned was to develop W. 10th Ave from Osage St. to Santa Fe Drive into a creative, pedestrian friendly corridor between one of Denver’s largest art districts and an underutilized light rail station. With goals of increasing the use of RTD light rail and creatively upgrading the streetscape of W. 10th Ave., youth focused on three components to complete throughout the year. These included creating a Master Art Plan, creating a public art series for 10th Ave. and planning a large community arts celebration to activate the 10th Ave. corridor. Besides fulfilling these components, youth also built connections in the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood between youth, residents, property and business owners and public agencies. Youth engaged in programs based on topics such as urban design, public art, creative placemaking, data collection & mapping, social media marketing, photography, videography, 3D digital modeling, graphic design, document layout design, and event planning and saw how these creative fields fit into a large scale project. For the future, this plan has the potential to transform a 5-block area into a fun, safe, and beautiful pedestrian gateway leading to the Art District on Santa Fe, significantly alleviating traffic & parking issues. This plan does not intend to put forth all the answers, but serves to compile the research and catalyze the transformation of 10th Ave. by putting forth creative suggestions and ideas developed by youth under the guidance of Arts Street staff from a year of creative exploration and career and community connections. 7


Welcome to La alma connection 10th Avenue from the 10th & Osage Light Rail Station to the Art District on Santa Fe Downtown

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LA ALMA CONNECTION La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood is located in central Denver, bounded by Colfax Ave. to the north, 6th Ave. to the south, Speer Blvd. to the east and South Platte River Dr. to the west. West 10th Avenue, simply known as 10th Ave., runs east-west in the center. At the west end of the street is the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station. Five blocks to the east is Santa Fe Dr. running north-south. Here, from Alameda to 12th Ave., is Denver’s Art District on Santa Fe. Given this location , 10th Ave. is an ideal street to become a primary pedestrian corridor.


INTRODUCTION WHO ARE WE? Arts Street is a Denver-based non-profit that cultivates visual art and creative technology job skills in underserved youth by building curriculum around real-life design problems. We empower students to produce inspired, creative solutions while working with professional artists and earning either school credit toward graduation or getting paid a stipend.

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WHY DID WE CREATE THIS PLAN? Arts Street is located in La Alma Lincoln Park one block away from the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station. We regularly attend, and bring our youth, to First Friday Art Walks at the Art District on Santa Fe. While there, we noticed the horrible traffic and parking situation and wondered why more people don’t take the light rail to access the district since it’s only a few blocks away. We then started paying more attention to our walk down 10th Ave. to and from Santa Fe Dr. and realized it could be so much better. Looking into

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it more, we found that previous plans for the neighborhood had a similar idea and called for 10th Ave. to become a main street promenade, acting as a pedestrian gateway to the art district. We decided to take it on using our most developed tool - art - and engaging our most beloved group of people - youth.

WHAT IS THE MASTER ART PLAN? The main goal of this plan is to use art and engage underserved youth to make 10th Ave. a safe, fun, and beautiful pedestrian corridor so more people will take the light rail to First Friday Art Walks instead of driving. The process of creating this plan has empowered many underserved youth with the knowledge and confidence that they can have a positive physical and social impact on their environment through creation and community interaction. We use the honeycomb imagery throughout because we believe the creation of this plan is akin to the process of building a beehive. The worker bees went out into the La Alma Lincoln Park community to gather nectar from the flowers and spread their pollen. The various types of nectar were brought back to the hive and melded together to make delicious honey. Our CREATIVE YOUTH TOOK FLIGHT and pollinated the community with the master art plan concept, generated excitement and support, and brought back information to the hive, to inspire ideas and activate space through art. These efforts became the interconnected foo dt honeycomb vision of ruc ks LA ALMA CONNECTION. 9


Funders

City and County of Denver Michael B. Hancock Mayor

OFFICE OF THE MAYOR CITY AND COUNTY BUILDING DENVER, CO 80202-5390 TELEPHONE: (720) 865-9090 • FAX: (720) 865-8787 TTY/ TTD: (720) 865-9010

December 15, 2014 Dear National Endowment for the Arts: Friends of Arts Street (Arts Street) is a Denver-based nonprofit and a 2004 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program award recipient. The organization has been teaching underserved youth hands-on, pre-professional creative skills since 1999. Arts Street exemplifies how artists and arts programs can improve the lives of youth in Denver by harnessing their creativity and channeling it into various artistic vocations. I wholeheartedly endorse their application for your "Our Town: Arts Engagement, Cultural Planning and Design Projects" 2015 grant. This grant will use creative placemaking to help alleviate traffic congestion in one of the city’s most promising art districts, Denver’s Art District on Santa Fe. Located within the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood, the area has grown and evolved from the blight of a few years ago and was chosen this year by the American Planning Association as one of the nation’s great American neighborhoods. Every First Friday, the Art District has an art walk that attracts up to 5,000 visitors, resulting in huge parking issues despite its proximity and convenient access to the th Light Rail Station at 10 & Osage. Arts Street, headquartered half a block from the Osage Light Rail Station, offers a solution to encourage pedestrian travel to the Art District: the design of a safe, beautiful, and interactive pathway to and from the light rail station. Their project, "Creative Youth Take Flight – La Alma Connection," would leverage the energy and creativity of underserved youth and engage community in partnership. Arts Street proposes to activate the five-block connection between the light rail station and the Art District with a Master Art Plan document and the first of several design/build public art installations. This kind of effort is what Denver needs to connect youth with the community – and a great example of the essence of Denver’s “Imagine 2020 Cultural Plan,” the city’s first community driven cultural plan in 25 years, which was released this year. Over the next five years, Denver will focus on:  Magnifying the role that art plays in every person’s daily life;  Driving our economic engine through local creative businesses;  Engaging children in cultural learning and self-discovery; and  Promoting our national standing for delivering world-class cultural experiences. I thank you kindly for your consideration of this project proposed by Arts Street. Respectfully,

Michael B. Hancock Mayor

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With the endorsement of Mayor Micheal B. Hancock and the City and County of Denver, this Master Art Plan was funded in part by the Our Town award from the National Endowment for the Arts and in part by the Innovate for Good award from Rose Community Foundation. The plan is one of three main components to the overall CREATIVE YOUTH TAKE FLIGHT: LA ALMA CONNECTION PROJECT: 1. Youth-created Master Art Plan for 10th Avenue. 2. Youth-created Public Art Series on 10th Avenue (as a catalyst project to kick-off plan implementation). 3. Celebratory event on 10th Ave. to release the Master Art Plan and unveil the catalyst Public Art Series. Arts Street also received an award from the Denver Imagine 2020 Fund from Denver Arts & Venues to create and broadcast a video documentary of the process. This video will be released in the fall of 2016.


partners LA ALMA LINCOLN PARK NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION (LPNA) This determined and influential neighborhood group has provided their opinions and support throughout the development of the La Alma Connection project. LPNA is made up of area residents who volunteer their time and resources. Their mission is to “provide a community forum for residents, businesses and property owners to express ideas, thoughts and concerns. [They] act as a conduit to city officials….bring residents and businesses together to share in neighborhood events and projects [and] build partnerships between residents, businesses and the city.” By working with LPNA, Arts Street was able to find out what the community needed and wanted. They participated in art surveys, helped promote events and gave feedback on projects and ideas. Their excitement and enthusiasm for art also encouraged the continuing development of this project. DENVER HOUSING AUTHORITY (DHA) Not only is DHA a key player along 10th Ave., administering mixed income housing and opportunities throughout the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood, but they also worked closely with Arts Street providing resources and partnering on major events. Their mission to serve the residents of Denver by developing, owning and operating safe, decent and affordable housing in a manner that promotes thriving communities embodied the La Alma Connection

goal to improve space through involvement, in this case, triggered by art. In the past DHA frequently worked with Arts Street youth, hiring them to create signage for apartments, indoor murals or public art for plazas and gardens. Their partnership in this project added an essential community element and proved the value of art in successful placemaking.

CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER After the original endorsement to the National Endowment for the Arts from the Mayor’s Office to begin this project, the City and County of Denver continued to play a huge role in the overall progress of the LA ALMA CONNECTION project. Denver Department of Public Works “provides for the delivery of high quality, cost-effective,

efficient, safe services involving public infrastructure and facilities to enhance the quality of life in Denver.” Karen Good, the Policy, Planning, & Sustainability Project Manager has a vested interest in the success of this project as one of the main authors of the most recent La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan. She has worked closely with Arts Street along the way, sharing the vision for the neighborhood with the youth and helping them to understand aspects of urban design and the necessary parts and pieces of a master plan. The involvement and support of Denver Arts & Venues was also critical to this project. Their mission is to “enhance the quality of life and economic vitality of its citizens through premier public venues, arts, and entertainment opportunities” They operate some of the region’s most renowned facilities, including Red Rocks Amphitheater and the Denver Performing Arts Complex and also oversee the Denver Public Art program. As students began to research what public art means and learn to develop their own ideas, they were lucky enough to work directly with two key members of this agency. Brendan Picker-Mahoney, Public Art Project Coordinator, and Lisa Gedgaudas, Program Administrator, not only talked to various classes about what they do for the city, but took students on public art tours, helped give feedback on their projects and encouraged next steps for LA ALMA CONNECTION as a whole. In 2014, Denver Arts & Venues led the community in creating IMAGINE 2020, Denver’s first cultural plan in 25 years. The plan guides the strategic direction for cultural growth and development, including integrating art into daily life in Denver’s diverse neighborhoods. By working so closely with us on this project, they imparted this value and the importance of art onto the students involved. 11


Left: Students walking and observing 10th Ave. Right: Social media class at Arts Street

Above: CHSC students in a LA ALMA CONNECTION video class at Arts Street Below: Youth art proposals displayed at LPNA meeting for feedback

Process

Parts

PROGRAMS For this project Arts Street ran 15 creative workshops with over 100 high school age youth on topics such as urban design, public art, creative placemaking, data collection & mapping, social media marketing, photography, videography, 3D digital modeling, graphic design, document layout design, and event planning. Some of the workshops were intensives offered either during the weekend, over spring break, or during the summer for which the students got paid a stipend upon completion. Other workshops were offered after school and the rest were in-school classes working with Colorado High School Charter (CHSC) students who received credit towards graduation. In all of these workshops, students gathered information about the neighborhood through observation, surveys, interviews, industry expert speakers, library and web searches and learned the skills necessary to contribute to the project. More details about each of the programs can be found in the appendix.

PAST Understanding the history of the neighborhood is essential to planning for the future and to ensure we pay homage to the roots of the area. This section looks at the colorful past of the La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood, previous master plans, and how the area became what it is today.

COMMUNITY OUTREACH Community outreach was, and will continue to be, a major component to the success of this plan. Much of the community outreach has been done in the information gathering portions of the classes. Other efforts included a community survey, canvasing the 10th Ave. homes, apartments, and businesses, putting on small First Friday events on 10th Ave., and hosting and attending community meetings with groups such as the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association, the Art District on Santa Fe, and the Santa Fe Business Improvement District.

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PRESENT The current state of 10th Ave. is truly unique. This section will reflect on the demographics of the neighborhood, the characteristics of the Art District on Santa Fe, the current land uses on 10th Ave., the importance of RTD, existing positive qualities of the built environment, and areas of opportunity that could be improved with public art. FUTURE This project has the potential to grow and progress over the next few years. This section will show the best student public art proposals, talk about events like Walk-N-Roll-About and LA ALMA CONNECTION Art Celebration Block Party and Parade that could become regular gatherings. IMPLEMENTATION PLAN In this section we’ll break this Master Art Plan down into action steps, suggested partners, and potential funding sources for anyone who may want to become a part of creating LA ALMA CONNECTION. APPENDIX This section provides a bibliography, details about classes, contacts, our community outreach survey and various other resources.


GUIDING PRINCIPleS

"A Place to Connect Physically, Socially, & Spiritually" There is a well-known proverb that states, “It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey.” We wholeheartedly embraced this sentiment and believe that 10th Ave. needs to be an enticing part of the journey to get to Denver’s Art District on Santa Fe and encourage the use of the light rail. The students used the “Place Game” worksheet from Project for Public Spaces (see appendix) to observe and make conclusions about the space. Based on this, the students identified 3 guiding principles specific to 10th Ave. that would make it an enticing journey: safety, fun, and beauty. With this in mind we came up with the catch phrase, ”LA ALMA CONNECTION: A Place to Connect Physically, Socially, & Spiritually.” SAFETY (PHYSICAL CONNECTIVITY) La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood has had a turbulent history including gang activity and vandalism. While this aspect has changed dramatically over the past several years, 10th Ave. still presents various safety concerns that make it less appealing to pedestrian traffic. First, the lack of sufficient streetlights and dark sidewalks can make the pathway seem more threatening in the evenings, which is when First Fridays occur. There is also no signage that directs people from the station to the Art District, which can be intimidating for people who have never visited the neighborhood before. Pedestrians also need to cross Kalamath, an arterial street with no signal, no crosswalk and very little light where cars often drive over 40 miles an hour. Lastly, 10th Ave. residents do not typically spend time on their porches nor in their front yards. A few families can be seen entering and leaving their house, but in most

cases, there is very little appeal to spend time outside. Encouraging residents to participate in the public space to add “eyes on the street,” are all essential to safety and creating the physical connection on 10th Ave. FUN (SOCIAL CONNECTIVITY) As we began to take a close look at 10th Ave., students noticed that there wasn’t anything to do nor much to stimulate the mind or senses beyond the two, newly redeveloped Mariposa blocks right by the station. Even there, most of the new ground floor retail spaces are still vacant, so there’s no services yet to draw people. There is a shuttle that runs from the station to the Art District on First Fridays, but the more people walking the street, the more potential costumers to draw innovative businesses. Plus, there is a greater likelihood of chance encounters which may build into relationships if people make the 5-block trek on foot. We believe we can encourage this through interesting public art and activities in the streetscape. BEAUTY (SPIRITUAL CONNECTIVITY) In Spanish, alma means “soul” or “spirit.” The Chicano heritage of the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood is deeply reflected in this name. When we began to consider the history and the neighborhood in which 10th Ave. is located, the name alone suggested that it needed beautiful elements that would connect to the soul. At Arts Street, we do what we do because we know making and experiencing art can be spiritually uplifting. The master art plan addresses solutions that can beautify the neighborhood in this context.

Above: Traffic safety signage in the neighborhood Below: Arts Street’s Executive Director, Stella Yu, having fun at Walk-N-Roll-About event

Left: Graffiti murals in alley off of 10th Ave. just west of Santa Fe Dr. Right: Students installing temporary fence art for First Friday

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8 185 ver en ing int Pa .H A.C US Marshall and 4th Territorial Governor Alexander Cameron Hunt was a prominent figure in the early years, and his home, “Cloverside,” was located in today’s La Alma-Lincoln Park itself. Hunt brought the Denver and Rio Grande Rail Road here in 1870. In the mid 1880’s he left to build the Mexican Central Railway, and the old homestead was formally established as a city park and named after President Lincoln.

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1858-1885

The neighborhood’s residential lots were inhabited by working families that came with the boom of the railroad and industry in the late 1800’s. Much of La Alma Lincoln Park’s housing stock dates from this period of development in the Victorian style. Following traditional patterns, industries such as milling, brewing and smelting ended up locating in close proximity to Denver’s South Platte River, the neighborhood’s western edge.

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West Denver was home to waves of immigrants, initially from Europe and Russia, followed by Mexicans fleeing the revolution of 1910. These generations and their descendants not only addressed the labor shortage but flourished in the visual and performing arts, literature, architecture, education, and entrepreneurship of Colorado. (Image: Santa Fe Drive 1913 from Denver Municipal Facts 1913 November 8. Courtesy DPL Western History Collection C352.078883 D4373muX2)

Denver’s Art District on Santa Fe, created in 2003, is a unique, nationally known art and cultural district with over 60 galleries, restaurants and shops located a few short blocks from downtown Denver. The Art District opens its doors freely to lively crowds for popular events such as the First Friday Art Walk, held every first Friday of the month, and Preview Night, a more intimate gathering held every third Friday of the month.

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late 1800's

Fe

of D

1925

In 1925 West High School was built at the east end of 10th Ave. It was designed in the English Gothic style and executed in light brick with buff terracotta trimmings. It was intentionally located adjacent to Sunken Gardens Park, a result of Mayor Speer’s “City Beautiful” movement. (Image: Courtesy of Denver Public Library, Western History Collection, X-29321)

nta

In 1893 the Buckhorn Exchange restaurant was founded. It catered to cattlemen, miners, railroad builders, silver barons, Indian chiefs, roustabouts, gamblers, and businessmen. The Buckhorn is still in business at what is present day 10th Ave. and Osage St. and is on the National Register of Historic Landmarks.

2003

Sa

Pla

1893

Past

1973

The American Chicano movement in the 1960’s & 1970’s had a significant presence in this neighborhood. Residents fought for, and still work towards, fair treatment and an equal voice for economic opportunity and cultural awareness. (Image: Courtesy of DPL)

ss

1887

Old Robinson Atlas Plates show that 10th Ave. used to be called “Moose St.” (Image: From DPL Western History Collection C978.81 R562at)

1940-1954

The impact of the Great Depression was devastating to this community. Middle class flight from city centers accelerated this decline. Public housing north of the park was first built in the 1940’s and South Lincoln homes were built by 1954. (Image: Denver Planning, Urban Renewal, Lincoln Park project 1940, DPL Western History Collection X-29034)

Ho me

1858

The area south of the confluence of Cherry Creek and the South Platte River was once a buffalo migration route where tribes including Cheyenne and Arapaho hunted and camped freely. The first settlers began arriving in 1858, initially seeking gold and then built a new city. By 1860 the first settlements of Auraria and Denver united, and the area west of the Cherry Creek was thereafter known as “West Denver.”

1928

The Aztlan Theater at the southeast corner of 10th Ave. and Santa Fe Dr. was originally built as a movie theater in 1928 and still displays the original ornate design. In the ‘80s, it was transformed into a bar and venue, hosting artists such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

In the late 1950’s the area to the north of La Alma Lincoln Park, now known as the Auraria Higher Education Center, was deemed “blighted” by the Denver Urban Renewal Authority and in 1966 was slated for redevelopment. By 1973, all the residents of the largely Latino community were forced to relocate, with many resettling in nearby La Alma Lincoln Park. This bitter legacy informs long-time residents’ fears of gentrification and displacement.

The 10th & Osage Station opened in October of 1994. It is located along the Central Corridor Light Rail Line, the first line that Regional Transportation District installed in the Denver Metro area, which runs from 30th Avenue and Downing through the Five Points Business District and downtown Denver to I-25 & Broadway (along the railroad right-of-way). The station has direct access to 5 light rail lines including the C, D, E, F and H Lines. This station is a huge asset to the La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood linking it to the rest of the city and making it very pedestrian-friendly.

2012-Present

The old “South Lincoln Homes” are being redeveloped by DHA as “Mariposa,” a vibrant mixedincome, mixed-use, transit and pedestrian-oriented community. All phases on 10th Ave. are complete and construction on final phases in the surrounding area will finish within the next couple of years. This community has a commitment to maintaining affordable housing options to avoid gentrification.


PREVIOUS PLANS: There have been several assessments and plans put forth recently that pertain to La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood. Many of them call out 10th Ave. as an important area that needs attention. This plan is Arts Street’s response to these calls for action. 1. Lincoln Park Neighborhood Assessment by Blueprint Denver, 2006 This assessment of the neighborhood calls out the need for redevelopment around the 10th & Osage Station, which DHA is carrying out beautifully with the Mariposa Transit Oriented Development (see South Lincoln Redevelopment Master Plan). The other main issue that needs to be addressed is the ability of pedestrians to get around safely and reach the transit station given the many arterial streets such as Kalamath St. and Santa Fe Dr.. 2. South Lincoln Redevelopment Master Plan commissioned by Denver Housing Authority and created by Mithun, 2010 This master plan puts forth the vision for the DHA Transit Oriented Development at the 10th & Osage Light Rail Station. It is “focused around 10th Avenue, where the non-residential uses will make it an active street. It creates a promenade for a direct view to the light rail station, with art and sculpture to help with wayfinding. A public plaza provides flexible space for neighbors and visitors to gather, and could be closed to traffic for special occasions or festivals.” This vision has been achieved beautifully with the new Mariposa development that was completed along 10th in 2015, but stops abruptly at Mariposa St. 3. La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan by the City of Denver, 2010 A key recommendation by this neighborhood

master plan is to create and improve connections “from the station to the Santa Fe Arts & Business Corridor along the 10th Avenue Promenade.” The plan suggests to accomplish this by constructing 10th Ave. as a Signature Street from the light rail station to Mariposa St. in the short term as a catalyst project (which has since been done by DHA) and then continuing the Signature Street to Santa Fe Dr. in a later phase. The plan also calls out 10th Ave. and the station plaza as priority locations for public art. 4. Art District on Santa Fe Master Plan by Hangar 41, 2012 This is a plan put forth by a local architecture and planning firm that addresses pedestrian and vehicle issues which occur in the Art District on Santa Fe, particularly at high volume times like First Fridays. The sidewalks are too small and there is not enough parking to accommodate all the visitors. The plan states “the 10th Avenue corridor is destined to become a major pedestrian and bike thoroughfare linking the greater Denver metropolitan area to the Art District via mass transit. It will also connect the higher density of housing inhabitants with the amenities to be found on Santa Fe Drive. As such it should be given careful consideration and developed with sensitivity to the arts since it will become a gateway to the Art District.” 5. Imagine 2020: Denver’s Cultural Plan by Denver Arts & Venues, 2014 IMAGINE 2020 provides a strategic plan to elevate arts, culture and creativity in Denver. It makes a call to action to city agencies, cultural institutions, businesses, civic leaders, neighborhood- and community-based organizations, and residents to make its seven main visions a reality. This Master Art Plan fits into all seven visions. 15


PRESENT

In 2014, La Alma Lincoln Park was named one of the nation’s Ten Great Neighborhoods by the American Planning Association. It has retained its Latino roots, while growing into an artsy, transit-friendly, mixed use community with several different housing options. Though the neighborhood is undergoing positive transformations with the growing popularity of the Art District on Santa Fe and the redevelopment of South Lincoln Homes by Denver Housing Authority, it still faces many challenges. According to Westword, in May of 2015

La Alma Lincoln Park was ranked 9th for the neighborhoods in Denver with the most crime per square mile. There is an unfortunate amount of illegal tagging and trash-dumping in the alleys, and a prevalence of loiters and drug users who hang-out in the park and wander the streets. DEMOGRAPHICS: According to the 2010 census, La Alma Lincoln Park has approximately 6,119 residents: 41% are Hispanic, 41% white, 11% African American, 3% Asian, 1% American Indian or Alaskan Native, and 3% are two or more races. 51% are male and 49% are female, and most of the residents are between the ages of 25-34 at 23% and ages 15-24 following behind in a close second at 20%.

Races in La Alma Lincoln Park (2010 Census) http://data.denvergov.org/dataset/city-and-county-of-denver-census-neighborhood-demographics-2010

Tw o or more races : 2.53 % Some other race : 0.34 % Tw o or more races : 2.53 % Nativ e Haw aiian or Pacific Islander : 0.02 % Some other race : 0.34 % American Indian or Alaskan Nativ e : 1 % Nativ e Haw aiian or Pacific Islander : 0.02 % Asian : 2.66 % American Indian or Alaskan Nativ e : 1 % African American : 11.33 % Asian : 2.66 % African American : 11.33 %

Hispanic : 40.97 % Hispanic : 40.97 %

White : 41.15 % White : 41.15 %

Hispanic White African American Asian American Indian or Alaskan Native Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Some other race Two or more races meta-chart.com

16

The median income of La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood is $35,600, which is 25% below that of Denver as a whole. DENVER’S ART DISTRICT ON SANTA FE: La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood is best known for the Art District on Santa Fe. With 130 Colorado creative organizations in the district, it has the highest concentration of creatives in the city and the state. Every First Friday of the month, there is an Art Walk where the creative organizations host receptions to the public showing off their newest works of art. Voted the critic’s choice and people’s choice awards for Westword’s “Best Art District” in 2015, these events are very popular and people come from all over the Denver Metro area to partake in the festivities. In 2015 the art district had approximately 172,200 visitors. On its most successful First Friday in August, more than 12,000 people came to check out the dance studios, glass art workshops, woodworking, craft beer and whiskey, theater, martial arts, ethnic restaurants, eclectic food trucks, live music, creative writing, and of course the traditional and non-traditional visual artworks in every imaginable medium. These events bring lots of economic and social activity to the area, but they also present some potential problems. Most people drive to the First Fridays, which causes traffic issues on Santa Fe Dr. where thousands of pedestrians are navigating the narrow sidewalks and crossing Santa Fe Dr., with no signals or crosswalks. There is also a serious lack of parking to support the huge influx of vehicles which disrupts the surrounding residential areas.


VISITOR TRAVEL TO ART WALK: On the First Friday of October 2015, Arts Street youth posted up at the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station and on the corner of 10th Ave. and Santa Fe Dr. to survey 92 Art Walk patrons about where they came from and how they got there. The following day, they learned how to use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software and created maps from the data collected. The map below shows how many people surveyed came from which zip code to the event. Interestingly, people come to the First Friday Art Walks on Santa Fe Drive from as far south as Castle Rock, as far west as Genesee, as far north as Broomfield and Northglenn, and as far east as Aurora.

TRAVEL BY CAR: The map below shows how many people surveyed drove to the October 2015 First Friday event and from where they came. As mentioned previously, the Art District is a commercial strip within residential surroundings and parking is basically limited to parallel parking on the streets. As a result, the huge influx of vehicle traffic every First Friday evening is frustrating for visitors looking for spots, dangerous for pedestrians trying to cross the streets without crosswalks, disruptive to residents who cannot find parking near their home, and troublesome for the vehicles that use Santa Fe Dr. as a thoroughfare to get across town.

80233

80021

80031

80233

80021

80031

80229

80005

80211 80202 80204

80033

80202

80215

80011

80206

80223

80012

80204

80113

80231

80223

80110 80465

80121 80120

80012

Total Travelled to Artwalk

80113

80231

80121

80012 80222

80113

80231

1

6-8

2 Number of People

80013

80014

80237 80015

80123

80121

80126

80134

80104

4-5

Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri (Thailand), MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community

80223

80134

0

80011

80206

80120

80126

3

Map created by Ed Vigil and Takara Leyba

80219

80110 80465

80238

80203

80210

80015

80123

80205

_ Artwalk on Santa Fe ^

80013

80014

Car Transport

2

80204

80226

80237

80104

1

80202

80228

80222

80134

Number of People

80401

80120

80126

80211

80215

80011

80206

80210

80015

80123

80219

80237

80239

80033

80238

80203

80013

80014

80205

_ Artwalk on Santa Fe ^

80226 80228

80222 80210

80110

80401

80221

80211

80203

80219

80030

80239

80238

_ Artwalk on Santa Fe ^

80226 80228

80205

80229

80005

80221

80239

80215

80465

80031

80229

80030 80221

80033

80233

80021

80005 80030

80401

TRAVEL BY LIGHT RAIL: The map below shows how many people surveyed took the light rail to the October 2015 First Friday event and from where they came. Clearly, significantly less First Friday patrons took the light rail than drove, even though many people came to the event from locations that have easy access to one of the light rail stations. It is our hope that upon implementation of this Master Art Plan, the results of a similar, future survey will be reversed and more people will take the light rail to the First Friday events than drive.

80104

Light Rail Use 0 1 2

Map created by Ed Vigil and Angel Talamantes Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri (Thailand), MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community

3 Number of People

Map created by Ed Vigil and Deja Ervin Sources: Esri, HERE, DeLorme, USGS, Intermap, increment P Corp., NRCAN, Esri Japan, METI, Esri China (Hong Kong), Esri (Thailand), MapmyIndia, © OpenStreetMap contributors, and the GIS User Community

17


Map from www.rtd-denver.com

10th & Osage Light Rail Station

18

As this light rail map shows, the 10th & Osage Light Rail Station is centrally located within the system and can be directly accessed by 5 lines. Many of the stations have parking available for those that are not in walking distance of a light rail station.


ELATI

Q

DELAWARE ST

12TH AVE

CHEROKEE ST

10TH AVE

BANNOCK ST

NAVAJO ST

TEJON ST

9TH AVE

7TH AVE

T

ES

OL

MIN

SE

MARIPOSA ST

8TH AVE

ELATI ST

BROADWAY

ACOMA ST

BANNOCK ST

CHEROKEE ST

FOX ST

GALAPAGO ST

INCA ST

SANTA FE DR

KALAMATH ST

LIPAN ST

6TH AVE

OSAGE ST

QUIVAS ST

RARITAN WAY

6TH AVENUE FWY

DELAWARE ST

VALLEJO ST

VALLEJO ST

UMATILLA ST

WYANDOT ST

MULBERRY PL

BANNOCK ST

CHEROKEE ST BANNOCK ST

FOX ST

ELATI ST

Designated Character Areas

CHEROKEE ST

Existing Light Rail

DELAWARE ST

Light Rail Station

GALAPAGO ST

OSAGE ST

Lincoln Park Neighborhood Boundary

DELAWARE ST

11TH AVE

OSAGE ST

Residential Area Transit Oriented Development

ELATI ST

FOX ST

GALAPAGO ST

QUIVAS ST

PECOS ST

10TH AVE

Institutional

"

This map comes from the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood 6TH AVE Plan and is shown for the purpose of context. The scope of this plan only includes 10th Ave. from the light rail station to Santa Fe Dr. and, though important to consider, does not include 10th Ave. east of Santa Fe Dr. As the map shows, the first two blocks east of the light rail station on 10th Ave. are Transit Oriented Development, the next two and a half blocks are Residential, then the half blocks on either side of Santa Fe Dr. are Main Street Corridor. There is a Residential area again for the next one and a half blocks until 10th Ave. hits the Institutional area of the West High School campus. The following page shows photographic elevations of the character areas that exist on 10th Ave created by Arts Street youth. INCA ST

R

FE D

RARITAN WAY

RIO CT QUIVAS ST

SHOSHONE ST

UMATILLA ST

13TH AVE

12TH AVE

XINCA CT

YUMA ST

ZUNI ST

D LV

12TH AVE

14TH AVE

RB

12TH PL

EE

MYRTLE PL

SP

I-25

13TH AVE

Industrial

ST

Y 6TH AVENUE FW

West High School

7TH AVE

Main Street Corridor

LE

SANTA

NO

COLFAX AVE

14TH AVE

Mixed-Use

MI

ST

Character Areas

KALAMATH ST

Feet

SANTA FE DR

1,000

SE

IS

RT

CU

COLFAX AVE

500

LIPAN ST

0

I N

MARIPOSA ST

NAVAJO ST

TEJON ST

VALLEJO ST

UMATILLA ST

VALLEJO ST

WYANDOT ST

OSAGE ST

XINCA CT

ZUNI ST

YUMA ST

CHARACTER AREAS OF 10TH AVE. In La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood, 10th 11TH AVE Ave. runs east-west from the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station on the west end to West High School on the east end. Five blocks east 10TH AVE of the light rail station, 10th Ave. crosses 10TH AVE the Art District on Santa Fe. Because 10th MULBERRY PL Ave. is blocked by train tracks on one end and a large school campus on the 9TH AVE other, it is not an ideal street for nonlocal vehicle traffic going in and out of the neighborhood. it is an La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood However, Plan – Vision and Goals ideal pedestrian entry- and exit-way AVEDistrict 10th & Osage Art Boundary of site for 8TH for those using the transit system, Light Rail Station on Santa Fe this Master Art Plan particularly for those visiting the art district. Map from La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan

19

ACOMA ST

S

UM

12TH AVE


Mariposa: apartments with ground floor retail, new Transit Oriented Development by Denver Housing Authority NAVAJO ST.

Photocollage by Abraham Pantoja

Photocollage by Goretti Martinez-Murguia

South Side of 10th Ave.:

Photocollage by Autumn Martinez-Mercado

West End of 10th Ave.: View of the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station from 10th Ave. (looking west):

Image from Google Streetview

20

Photocollage by Kori Martinez

Residential Zone: single family homes & converted multi-units built in late 1800’s & early 1900’s, & newer rowhouses

Historic Engineers No. 9 Building

KALAMATH ST.

SANTA FE DR.

Villa TOD Apartments with ground floor retail

Empty lot owned by Denver Housing Authority

Photocollage by Natalie Sanchez

View of 10th Ave. from the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station (looking east):

Photocollage by Kori Martinez

LIPAN ST.

OSAGE ST.

Historic Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant

MARIPOSA ST.

North Side of 10th Ave.:

Photocollage by Katy Gevargis

PRESENT CONDITION OF 10TH AVE. From the light rail station heading east on 10th Ave., the first building on the north side of Osage St. is the historical Buckhorn Exchange restaurant and a large dirt lot owned by DHA on the south side. On the next 2 blocks, up to Mariposa St., sits the Mariposa Transit-Oriented Development, which are new, 4-story mixed-use buildings with apartments and above ground-floor retail built by DHA. The apartments are integrated low-income, affordable, and market-rate units. The retail spaces are currently occupied by Youth on Record (formerly Flobots.org), a small community gym, Christian Charities daycare, and a Denver Community Credit Union ATM. The rest of the retail spaces are empty, though they are beautiful and hold a lot of potential for future businesses who chose to move into the area. The following two blocks to the east are zoned residential with another empty lot owned by


Photocollage by Dorian Rendon

La Villa de Barela: apartments & ground floor retail space developed by NEWSED

Photocollage by Victor Martinez

Photocollage by Abraham Pantoja

DHA that is for sale on the northwest corner of Mariposa and 10th Ave., a mix of older 1-2 story single-family homes, converted duplexes/ triplexes and carriage houses, with a block of newer row houses. At Kalamath St., the busy, one-way, southrunning sister street to Santa Fe Dr., there is unfortunately no signal or crosswalk, but the intersection is currently being evaluated for future installation of these safety measures by Denver Public Works. On the northeast corner of Kalamath St. is another empty lot for sale and on the south side is the Engineers No. 9

Empty lot owned by Denver Housing Authority OSAGE ST.

NAVAJO ST.

MARIPOSA ST.

Mariposa: apartments with ground floor retail, new Transit Oriented Development by Denver Housing Authority

SANTA FE DR.

Empty lot owned by private owner: Jeff McCann KALAMATH ST.

LIPAN ST.

Single family homes: mostly built in late 1800’s and early 1900’s

Photocollage by Jaquayla Douglas

building. At the alley between Kalamath St. and Santa Fe Dr., the Main Street Corridor of the art district clearly begins as indicated by the bright, graffiti-style murals on the backs of the buildings in the alley. On the northwest corner of Santa Fe Dr. and 10th Ave. is a newer mixed-use building developed by NEWSED with Interstate Bar and Restaurant on the main floor and La Villa de Barela apartments in the upper 3 floors. On the south side of 10th Ave. starting at the alley is a tie shop, the Knotty Tie Co., in an old auto body warehouse, an older apartment building with a courtyard entrance off of 10th Ave., and a fabric

store, Fabric Bliss, on the corner. Santa Fe Dr. is one-way running north and does not have a signal nor a crosswalk at 10th Ave., but is also under evaluation for the possibility. Across Santa Fe Dr., on the northeast corner, is an auto body shop and on the southeast corner is the Aztlan Theater, which was a destination in its heyday, but has since fallen into disrepair. Though not included in the scope of this Master Art Plan, the 2 blocks to the east of Santa Fe Dr. are again older residential until 10th Ave. ends at the West High School campus on Galapago St. 21


existing beauty found on 10th ave.: “Mestizaje” sculpture by Emanuel Martinez @ 10th & Osage Light Rail Station

Mariposa: new Transit Oriented Development near light rail station

Yard art in residential zone along 10th Ave.

Graffiti murals in alley on 10th between Santa Fe Dr. & Kalamath St. Unique paving at 10th & Santa Fe Dr. intersection

Mural on historic Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant

Mariposa: new Transit Oriented Development near light rail station

Green car that is always parked on 10th Ave.

Painted utility meter on the Aztlan Theater @ 10th & Santa Fe Dr.

“Flor De La Alma” sculpture by Emanuel Martinez @ 10th & Navajo

Yard art in residential zone along 10th Ave.

Interstate Kitchen & Bar @ 10th and Santa Fe Dr.

Photos by Arts Street Students: Abraham Pantoja, Goretti Murguia, Kori Martinez, Victor Martinez, Dorian Rendon, Natalie Sanchez, Autumn Martinez-Mercado, Iridian Vasquez, Brittany Tolmich, RJ Goerner, & Shawn McGraw

22


LOCAL ARTIST: EMANUEL MARTINEZ

Article by Goretti Murguia, Arts Street Student, Grade 11 Emanuel Martinez grew up in the La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood in the old South Lincoln homes. He has created three community, public art projects in the area such as Mestizaje, a sculpture at the 10th and Osage light rail station. Flor De La Alma, another sculpture, is located at West 10th Avenue and Navajo Street. La Alma,a mural on the recreation center is located at 1325 West 11th Avenue. Emanuel’s favorite mural is La Alma. “La Alma is my favorite mural because it was community-generated and-painted and has become iconic to the west Denver area,” Martinez says. “It is the epitome of what a community mural should be.” Mestizaje, the light rail sculpture, represents the Mestizo, a mixture of Spanish and the peoples indigenous to Mexico. Martinez said, “The idea for Mestizaje came from my past involvement in the civil rights movement. In 1966, I worked with Cesar Chavez in Delano, California; at the United Farm Workers union I was exposed to the symbol of the Aztec eagle, which I used in the design. The stylized eagle with extended wings recalls a pre-Columbian pyramid turned upside down. The spirit of the eagle emerges from the mind and eyes of a tripartite head that I designed to represent the Mestizo, a mixture of Spanish and the peoples indigenous to Mexico. This image has become an icon and symbol of La Raza: The Mexican American.” Emanuel Martinez’s favorite piece of public art is Flor De La Alma. He said, “My favorite piece of public art is a 33 foot-high sculpture, Flor de La Alma, that I installed one block away from Mestizaje at Tenth and Navajo.”

“Mestizaje” by Emanuel Martinez @ 10th & Osage Light Rail Station

“Flor De La Alma” by Emanuel Martinez @ 10th & Navajo

“La Alma” by Emanuel Martinez @ La Alma Recreation Center, Denver Public Art Collection

Learn more at: www.emanuelmartinez.com

23


existing OPPORTUNITIES found on 10th ave.:

A key element to this project was identifying potential areas for public art opportunities. Here are the main locations Arts Street students identified. Empty lot #3 owned

Violet lines show buildings with large blank spaces that may be available for murals upon property owner’s approval

SANTA FE DR.

KALAMATH ST.

10TH AVE.

by private owner (Arts Street given permission to decorate fence after design approved by owner)

LIPAN ST.

Empty lot #2 for sale by DHA (Arts Street given permission to decorate fence)

MARIPOSA ST.

NAVAJO ST.

OSAGE ST.

10th & Osage Light Rail Station: plaza has 6 empty grates where trees were removed that could house art (with permission from RTD) and serve as “art district stop” landmark to passengers

Satellite image from Google Earth

Empty lot #1 for sale by DHA (Arts Street given permission to decorate chain link fence) 24

Violet shapes show new retail spaces owned by DHA that are available to be leased (creative retail window displays)

Green strips show landscaped areas in Right-of-Way where property owners may allow art to be installed upon approval of design

Violet lines show buildings with large blank spaces that may be available for murals upon property owner’s approval

Orange lines show wooden and chain link fences where owners may allow them to be decorated (painted, yarnbombed, etc.) with approval of design


Legend:

MAGENTA - EMPTY LOTS ORANGE - FENCES YELLOW - MISC. GREEN - LANDSCAPED AREAS CYAN - SIDEWALKS VIOLET - BUILDINGS

Wire fence around empty lot owned by DHA @ 1006 Mariposa St. - DHA has given Arts Street verbal permission to decorate fence upon approval of design.

Empty lot owned by DHA @ 1006 Mariposa St. - DHA has given Arts Street verbal permission to paint blank sign upon approval of design.

Landscaped right-of-way corner typical on residential blocks - opportunities for creative landscaping, sculptural, functional, or interactive art with adjacent property owner’s approval and maintenance agreement. Wooden fence @ 977 Kalamath St. - permission denied by property owner to paint mural, but perhaps in the future

10th and Osage Light Rail Station plaza opportunity for statement public art piece as a landmark to notify passengers that this is the Art District on Santa Fe stop

Empty lot with chain link fence @ 1010 Kalamath St., owned by private owner. Old, renegade string art exists on Kalamath side of fence currently. Property owner has given Arts Street permission to decorate fence, but does not want anything on the lot for liability reasons. A youth-created art piece made out of upcycled plastic lids will be installed on 10th Ave. side of fence June of 2016.

Carriage house & barn doors @ 1018 10th Ave., same property owner as 977 Kalamath St. - building is obviously tagged so perhaps owner can be convinced to allow a mural in the future

Dumpsters in alley between Santa Fe Dr. and Kalamath St. - opportunities for murals that would attract positive attention and encourage users of the site to throw away trash instead of littering the area

Aztlan Theater @ 964 Santa Fe Dr. - opportunity for mural on large, white, brick wall along 10th Ave. The theater has huge potential to be an anchor on Santa Fe Dr. that draws more people along 10th Ave. to the Art District. The venue was originally built as a movie theater in 1928 and still displays the original ornate design. In the ‘80s, it was transformed into a bar and venue, hosting artists such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers. It currently hosts First Friday happy hours, but the venue has fallen into disrepair. There has been recent interest in reviving the old theater, but efforts have stalled.

Concrete planters at DHA property 1290 W. 10th Ave. - paint or mosaic?

Concrete benches at DHA property 1000 W. 10th Ave. - paint or mosaic in partnership with Youth on Record and permission by DHA

Vacant storefront at DHA property 1290 W. 10th Ave. - opportunity to put on First Friday art shows with DHA permission until tenantoccupied

Chain link fence around empty lot owned by DHA @ 944 Osage St. (currently used as parking lot) - DHA has given Arts Street verbal permission to decorate fence upon approval of design.

Typical concrete sidewalk in residential zone could be painted Dead zones in right-of-way between street and sidewalk - opportunities for creative landscaping, sculptural, functional, or interactive art with adjacent property owner’s approval and maintenance agreement.

Old tires @ Strictly Automotive, 804 W 10th Ave. - could be salvaged for upcycled art

Wooden fence @ 978 Lipan St. - written permission given to Arts Street to paint mural by property owner New wooden fence @ 979 Lipan St. - written permission and Urban Arts Fund award secured to paint mural Summer of 2016

Garage door @ 979 Lipan St. opportunity for future mural

West-facing side of La Villa de Barela in the alley between Kalamath St. and Santa Fe Dr., very visible from 10th and clearly gets tagged opportunity to paint a mural with owner’s permission.

A few stretches of sidewalk are old flagstone - many residents love the historic look and want them to remain, but the city would prefer them replaced with new concrete since most are cracked and a tripping hazard as well as an impediment for ADA access. If the sidewalks are painted as one of the art installations, the areas with the flagstone should be avoided. If the flagstone sidewalks are ever replaced with new concrete, the flagstone should be salvaged and used as decorative pavers in the ROW

*Images are shown generally left to right as they appear on the site from east to west. Photos taken by Arts Street Students Abraham Pantoja, Goretti Murguia, Kori Martinez, Victor Martinez, Dorian Rendon, Natalie Sanchez, Autumn Martinez-Mercado, Iridian Vasquez, & Brittany Tolmich

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FUTURE

At this point, we know about the history of the La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood with a focus on 10th Ave. and we know what the site is like currently, but the future of the site is what this plan is all about. For this plan to be successful, we must build strong community by listening to and respecting the input of all stakeholders including local business owners, residents, members of community groups, and users of the site like students and patrons of the local businesses. During the past year, Arts Street surveyed these stakeholders to find out what kind of public art people would want to see in their community and what kind they don’t like so this information could be incorporated into the vision for future 10th Ave. COMMUNITY SURVEY RESULTS A total of 66 people took the community survey, 35% of whom live in the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood. This percentage is low because many of those surveyed were Arts Street students in the LA ALMA CONNECTION programs who come from all over Denver, but attended school in 26

“I See What You Mean” by Lawrence Argent, Denver Public Art Collection (5 likes, 1 dislike) “Utility Box Geometry Nature Mural” by Arts Street EntrepreMural Team (1 like) “Mustang” by Luis Jimenez, Denver Public Art Collection (3 likes, 2 dislikes) “National Velvet” by John McEnroe, Denver Public Art Collection (1 dislike) “Seven Sisters” by David Griggs, Denver Public Art Collection (1 like) Graffiti mural in Art District on Santa Fe alley (2 likes, 2 dislikes of graffiti art in general) “Dancers” by Jonathan Borofsky, Denver Public Art Collection (1 like, 1 dislike) “Big Sweep” by Coosje van Bruggen, Denver Public Art Collection (1 dislike) “Flor De La Alma” by Emanuel Martinez (1 like, 2 dislikes, 9 likes of sculptures in general) Pianos on 16th St. Mall (1 like,3 likes of interactive art) photo by Paul Labbe “Cowboy Pajamas” by Sean O’Meallie, Denver Public Art Collection (1 like) “La Alma” by Emanuel Martinez (1 like, 10 likes of murals in general)

See full Community Survey results in the appendix

the neighborhood. Of those surveyed, 75% have walked the 5 blocks of the Master Art Plan site and 18% live on 10th Ave. within the site. Out of the 66 total, 45 people said they attend First Friday Art Walks, 21 of those sometimes drive and 31 sometimes walk. Most notably, however, 11 said they sometimes take the train which only makes up 17% of the total surveyed. 77% of the people surveyed have noticed art in public places in Denver, mostly in parks and public plazas. I See What You Mean, the big blue bear looking into the Denver Convention Center, was written in 5 times as the public art piece participants notice and like the most. Coming in second, was Mustang, the big blue horse at the airport, at 3 write-ins. Many people mentioned that they like murals and sculptures in general. More descriptive terms people used for public art preference includes “whimsical,” “colorful,” “speaks to the history of the area”, ”in unexpected places”, ”graffiti look,” and ”temporary art.” Interestingly, I See What You Mean and Mustang were also mentioned as pieces that people don’t like at one and two, respectively. Descriptive terms people used to describe public art they don’t like included “graffiti” and “dark and brooding.” 61% agree that public art is “very important” and many would enjoy seeing more art on sidewalks, fences, streets, garages, and in the landscaped areas between the street and sidewalk. When asked what type of art participants would like in their community, 82% said murals, 77% sculptures, 56% collaborative, 55% neighborhood market, 43% temporary art, 35% parades, and others wrote in “professional, high quality,” ”lights combined with art,” “interactive,” “old construction,” “food trucks,” and “street painting.”


YOUTH PUBLIC ART PROPOSALS:

Art Park in empty lot proposed by Yesenia Ortiz

SketchUp workshop at Arts Street

One of the youth workshops Arts Street facilitated for this project was a weekend intensive wherein high school age youth were recruited and paid a stipend to learn how to use the free 3D modeling program SketchUp (architecture and urban design industry standard software) and Google Earth to model the existing site. The model included the streets, sidewalks, landscaped areas, the transit station, residential buildings, mixed use buildings, commercial buildings, utilities, signage, and existing art. Once the digital model was complete, the students used it to quickly dream up an idea for a public art project on the site. A few of the ideas are shown on the right. View from digital model created in SketchUp of existing 10th Ave.

Urban Farm with muraled planters in empty lot proposed by Edgar Escobedo

Playground, fountain plaza, and giant checkers board in empty lot proposed by Sierra Cruz Aquarium in empty lot proposed by Leslie Gutierrez

The following pages show more developed public art proposals created by Arts Street youth. All of them show evidence of design research with precedent images that inspired their idea. One of the later classes inherited the SketchUp model of the existing 10th Ave. and modeled their ideas within the context of the site, then put all this info into a nicely designed layout. The proposals were briefly reviewed by the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association and more thoroughly by three employees of the City and County of Denver that have been working closely with Arts Street on the project. These are the city reviewers: Karen Good, Policy, Planning, & Sustainability Project Manager @ Denver Department of Public Works, worked on the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan released in 2010 and was also instrumental in getting the neighborhood awarded as one of the nation’s Ten Great Neighborhoods by the American Planning Association in 2014. She came to Arts Street twice to speak to 2 of the La Alma Connection classes about Urban Design and Planning. Lisa Gedgaudas, Create Denver Program Administrator @ Denver Arts & Venues, worked on Denver’s Imagine 2020 Cultural Plan and continues to support Denver creatives through the Imagine 2020 Fund and P.S. You are Here programs. She and Brendan Picker-Mahoney came to Arts Street to talk to 3 of the La Alma Connection classes about the these programs, the Cultural Plan, and Denver Public Art. Brendan Picker-Mahoney, Public Art Administrator @ Denver Arts & Venues, creates the call-for-entries, reviews artist applications, and works with artists to create and maintain the Denver Public Art projects that are funded by Denver’s 1% for art program. He guided a La Alma Connection class on a custom public art walking tour of downtown in 2015. 27


the mural would line up with the actual Buckhorn and the actual 10th Ave. Beauty: The piece celebrates the history of the site along with the modern, transformed state. PARTNERS Required: RTD Potential: Buckhorn Exchange, local muralist(s), Colorado Construction Institute (to construct and install billboard), Art District on Santa Fe

“BUCKHORN TRANSFORMATION” By Kori Martinez This proposal is for a mural located in the 10th & Osage Light Rail Station plaza that celebrates the history of the site by illustrating the Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant and 10th Ave. as it existed in the past in relationship to how it exists today. A responder to the community survey mentioned they’d like to see art in the community that relates to the history of the site. The mural would be painted on a new, billboard28

type structure built in the light rail plaza using the old grates where trees used to be planted as the post locations. GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: This large art piece would be a landmark for passengers on the train to know that they have arrived at the stop for the Buckhorn Exchange and the Art District on Santa Fe. It could also contain informational signage. Fun: From certain angles, the perspective of

COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS The City reviewed an older version of the proposal. The location of the mural was not clear and the reviewers thought the proposed location was on the Buckhorn building, but this is not allowed since it is a historic structure. With that in mind, since the Buckhorn has not really changed much in over a century, perhaps this proposal could be strengthened by changing the subject matter to the Art District on Santa Fe since that would illustrate a much greater contrast of old and new. In addition, it would really help to visually cue the light rail passengers that 10th & Osage is the stop for the Art District on Santa Fe.


“THE RETRO GAME WALK” By Dorian Rendon Several of the community survey respondents requested “interactive” art. This proposal is for transforming 10th Ave. into an interactive 8-bit video game by installing 3D, lit, retro characters on walls and landscaped areas and 2D elements on the sidewalks. It would also include screens, consoles, and controllers where actual games could be played. All electrical components would be solar powered. GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: The 3D lit characters would provide much needed extra light on the site and the interactive part would cause more “eyes on the street” to naturally prevent unsavory behavior. Fun: The interactive aspect would help to connect strangers through the power of play (like the OhHeckYeah project). Beauty: This project would bring lots of bright colors to the street and basically transform it into another world, as well as provide a cohesive theme for all future art on 10th Ave. The idea does not have much tie to the existing site, except for a small toadstool sculpture

in the landscaped area of the right-of-way (ROW) in front of one of the houses which looks like it came out of an old Super Mario Brothers video game. PARTNERS Required: DHA, 10th Ave. property owners (permission) Potential: RTD, Colorado Construction Institute (CCI), Art District on Santa Fe, Sparkfun, Knowmad.Colab (light art), OhHeckYeah, Modeset (programming), plastic sculpture (sculpt parts), Youth on Record (sound) COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS City reviewers said to be aware of ADA issues and not to place any 3D elements on the sidewalks. They are also concerned about vandalism/ theft and how elements will be secured to walls and the ground. They also do not see enough connection to the area as site context is very important. When voted on by attendees of La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association this proposal did not have any votes for it, but it also did not have any votes against it. 29


“MOOSE TRACKS” By Eli Buzzell & Takara Leyba This proposal is based off of late 1800’s maps of the area which show that 10th Ave. used to be called Moose St.. The idea is that moose tracks would be stenciled onto the sidewalk all the way from the light rail station to Santa Fe Dr., most likely using spray paint, which is somewhat permanent, but will have to be redone periodically. This is the most likely candidate for the catalyst public art project and was temporarily installed with chalk for a community event.

GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: This piece encourages visitors to follow the tracks from the light rail station to the art district. It creates a sense of security for new visitors. Fun: Because of the easy installation method, it could be a community event to bring people together in the creation of art. This idea is also nostalgic of childhood games like hopscotch. Beauty: Finding moose tracks in an urban setting is whimsical way to reconnect people to the

natural and the man-made history of the site. PARTNERS Required: Denver Public Works (permission) Potential: Buckhorn Exchange, 10th Ave. residents & businesses COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS Reviewers said to include interpretive signage showing the old maps and explaining the project. Another suggested idea was to do similar projects for the neighboring streets. For instance, 11th Ave. used to be called “Deer St.” so we could but deer tracks along there, as well, in a future phase of the project. Most of the sidewalks along 10th are concrete. A resident at a neighborhood association meeting mentioned that we should try and avoid painting the few sidewalks along 10th that are still the historic flagstone. At this same meeting, the proposal received 7 votes for it and no votes against it. Several reviewers mentioned that this project could pair well with the Big Blue Moose project shown on the next page. Moreover, the Buckhorn Exchange was identified as a strong potential partner for sponsorship of both. They have a large moose head in their bar area and a large moose painted on the exterior 10th Ave. side of Moose head inside Buckhorn Exchange

Moose painting on exterior of Buckhorn Exchange

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“BIG BLUE MOOSE” By Abraham Pantoja This proposal is also based off of the old street name and is inspired by two iconic Denver Public Art pieces: I See What You Mean, the big blue bear at the convention center and Mustang, the big blue horse at the airport. These were both identified as favorite Denver Public Art pieces by several of the community survey responders. GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: This large sculpture would be a landmark for passengers on the train to know that they have arrived to the stop for the Buckhorn Exchange and the Art District on Santa Fe. If it is installed as a later phase of the “Moose Tracks” then these would safely guide pedestrians to the art district once they get off the train. The proposal also suggests that the moose has white glowing eyes to provide more light at the light rail station. Fun: Anyone who knows Denver is familiar with the big blue bear and the big blue horse sculptures. This big blue moose almost pokes fun at those iconic pieces while at the same time establishing himself as part of the “Denver Big Blue Animal Club.” Beauty: This moose would not only pay homage to the history of the site, but also tie it to the spirit of the city as a whole. PARTNERS Required: RTD (or DHA depending on exact placement) Potential: Buckhorn Exchange, Colorado Construction Institute, Emily Griffith Technical College (welding for artists program, if it is to be made out of metal) COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS City reviewers are concerned with placement, getting permission from RTD or DHA and making sure not to impede ADA access. They also worry about the durability of materials in terms of vandalism and theft. Overall, this idea was received very well by the city reviewers. They love how it ties to iconic Denver public art pieces and the history of the neighborhood. They suggested that Arts Street use this proposal to apply for the next P.S. You Are Here grant. The neighborhood association also liked this proposal. Five people voted for and zero voted against it. 31


GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: The lighting added to the pathway would increase safety for pedestrians. Fun: Because of the easy installation method of painting the sidewalks, it could be a community event to bring people together in the creation of art. Like “Moose Tracks,” this idea is also nostalgic of childhood games like hopscotch. The programmed or sensored lights would also make a fun and interactive journey. Beauty: The bright colors and the inspirational quotes would undoubtedly lift anyone’s spirit and help connect visitors to the soul of the community. PARTNERS Required: Denver Public Works & property owners (permission) Potential: La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association, Art District on Santa Fe, Sparkfun, Knowmad.Colab (light art)

“RAINBOW ROAD” By Brittany Tolmich This proposal is inspired by the board game Candy Land, but is also reminiscent of the Rainbow Road race track in the Super Mario Cart video game. The idea is to paint the sidewalk on 10th Ave. in rainbow colors from the light rail to 32

the art district and have the community come up with inspiring quotes that could be added to each square. Then, solar-powered, LED globe lights would be added to the landscaped areas between the sidewalk and the street. These could be programmed, or even have sensors that turn on when someone walks by.

COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS City reviewers said to make sure globe lights do not impede ADA access. They also asked that the painted text relate to the history of the site more. Lastly they suggested considering glow-in-the-dark paint, which could perhaps be used instead of installing the globe lights. At the neighborhood association meeting this proposal received 4 votes for it and 1 vote against it.


“TIRE PLANT GARDEN” By Iridian Vasquez Iridian interviewed a long-time residents of the neighborhood:

“I interviewed Rita, a resident at Tapiz on 11th and Osage. Rita said she has lived in the neighborhood all her life. What brought Rita to the neighborhood was the low income housing. She doesn’t know where else she would move besides her neighborhood where she grew up and has lived all her life. When Rita was growing up in the neighborhood she always had someone to play with. The changes she has seen in the neighborhood are high-rises, nice apartments being built and the diversity of the neighborhood. Rita said she loves the landscapes of the new vegetable and flower gardens and that’s her favorite type of art: seeing different flowers and vegetables being grown. The cons of the neighborhood she shared were the young gangbangers that are trying to take the neighborhood’s peace and the graffiti. She rescues cats that she sees on the streets and makes sure they have a home. Rita would love to see more art around like the vegetable and flower gardens.”

generations. Fun: This project would encourage more interaction between residents tending to their gardens and visitors walking by. Beauty: The bright colors and the new variety of tended plants would bring much needed visual interest to the residential area of 10th Ave. PARTNERS Required: Denver Public Works & property owners (permission & maintenance agreements) Potential: Strictly Automotive (tires), Colorado

State University Denver Extension (gardening classes) COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS City reviewers love the upcycling idea. Water and maintenance are a big concern and wonder if the dirt and plants can also be donated to encourage participation. They also said the color palette would need to be considered. At the neighborhood association meeting this proposal received 4 votes for it and 1 vote against it.

This proposal to install tire planters in the landscaped areas between the street and the sidewalks in the residential area is partly inspired by the interview and partly by a pile of old tires that the student found at an automotive shop near the site. GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: This project would encourage residents to spend more time in front of their houses tending to their tire plant gardens, thereby adding “eyes on the street.” It would also help to keep tires from the trash dump, protecting future

Pile of old tires at Strictly Automotive, 804 W. 10th Ave.

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“NATURE LIGHTS” By Goretti Murguia This student proposes color-changing, solar-powered light box pedestals that hold brightly painted sculptures of different flowers and insects like ants, butterflies, etc. These would be installed in the landscaped areas between the street and the sidewalks. One of the community survey respondents said they’d like to see “lights combined with art” on 10th Ave. GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: The lighting added adjacent to the pathway would increase safety for pedestrians. Fun: These pieces provide lighting to the site in a much more unique and stimulating way than typical light posts. Beauty: Each nature-themed sculpture on top of the light boxes will be commissioned from a different local artist to celebrate and showcase the local talent, connecting visitors to the collective spirit of the community. PARTNERS Required: Denver Public Works & property owners (permission), local artists Potential: LPNA, Art District on Santa Fe, Sparkfun, Knowmad. Colab (light art), CCI, Emily Griffith Technical College COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS City reviewers are concerned with vandalism and theft, they want to know how many are proposed, where they will be placed in relationship to existing lighting, how they are fabricated, what they cost, and what the exact animals and insects are that are being proposed and why. The City reviewers would prefer a stronger connection to the context of the site than just the street names. Perhaps to strengthen the proposal idea, the sculptures could all be of insects and animals that either previously or currently live on the site to celebrate the natural history and the urban wildlife. Each sculpture could be accompanied by a plaque that talks about the rendered creature and the local artist who created it. At the neighborhood association meeting this proposal received 5 votes for it and zero votes against it. 34


talent, connecting visitors to the collective spirit of the community. PARTNERS Required: Property owners (permission) Potential: Ladies Fancywork Society & Fabric Bliss (to create a yarn bomb installation), other local artists, Blue Star Recycling, RAFT COMMENTS FROM REVIEWERS City reviewers are concerned about vandalism and theft, but they like the low-cost, easy to maintain project. The message could change over time and they like the idea of getting the community involved to help determine the message(s). At the neighborhood association meeting this proposal received 2 votes for it and zero votes against it.

“Creative Color Fence Art” By Natalie Sanchez There are many chain link fences along 10th Ave. This is a proposal to create art or signage on these fences using upcycled materials. This idea fits with some replies to the community survey which said they like public art that is “whimsical,” “colorful,” and ”in unexpected places.” GUIDING PRINCIPALS Safety: If the art created on the fences includes directional signage to the art district or to the light rail, it decreases a visitor’s chance of getting

lost. Using upcycled materials also protects future generations. Fun: Stumbling upon art on a chain link fence can be a pleasant surprise and a welcome relief from the plain, prison-like character of the fence. Beauty: Because there are so many chain link fences on 10th, this is huge opportunity to showcase the many local voices. Each installation can be unique and created by the property owner with the help of project partners or by a different local artist to celebrate and showcase the local

*FENCE ART PROJECT INSTALLED The summer 2016 class installed a fence art project made out of spray painted, plastic yogurt lids, at the empty lot on the northeast corner of 10th Ave. & Kalamath St.

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activities & events

ACTIVATING SPACE Since the nature of a master plan is that it takes time to develop and more time to implement, we wanted to do something to immediately begin activating the public space of 10th Ave. So, on the First Friday of September 2015, we created an activity called the Walk-NRoll-About and invited anyone and everyone to take the light rail to 10th and Osage, bring their non-motorized wheels of any kind, dress up in a costume and become “art on wheels� (or on foot) while parading up and down 10th Ave. between the light rail station and the Art District on Santa Fe. Our students created temporary public art for the event including chalk art at both ends of 10th Ave. announcing the event and welcoming people to join, as well as fence art on 36

a couple of the empty lots of 10th Ave. using colored paper. We hosted the Walk-N-Roll-Abouts for the First Fridays of September, October, and November of 2015 and then the Denver weather became too cold to continue. Most of the turn-out for the events was our staff and students, but a few other community members participated and we convinced a few Art Walk patrons to join us for a lap while we explained to them the project objectives. Though they started out small, we see these events as something that could and should continue each First Friday, at least in the warmer months, and that will gradually build in momentum with greater and greater turnouts from the local community and Art Walk patrons. If nothing else, it is a creative, wholesome activity for underserved youth to do on a Friday night. It gives them the opportunity to be physically active, be art on wheels, help build community, and to experience new art at the Art Walk afterwards.

ART SHOW The First Friday of November 2015, Arts Street youth were invited to show and sell their art at Center Mass Media, a marketing company and art gallery on Santa Fe Dr. This group of students learned about photography, took photos of 10th Ave. and Santa Fe Dr. that caught their eye, and used Adobe Photoshop to compose a photo-collage of their favorite images. These were then turned into Photography student/ 3D collages and framed in a intern Brittany Tolmich shadow box made out of upcycled wood. The students hung them in the gallery along with marketing material to spread the word about the LA ALMA CONNECTION project. Top: LA ALMA CONNECTION Photo collages hung in gallery Bottom: Photo collage by Autumn Martinez (sold)


LA ALMA CONNECTION ART CELEBRATION BLOCK PARTY & PARADE To further the creative placemaking endeavors of this project and enhance livability in the neighborhood, on July 1, 2016, Arts Street and Denver Housing Authority shut down part of 10th

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marshal for the event, Emanuel Martinez. Over 600 people participated in this vibrant evening! Many of the Arts Street students worked on this event. A weekend graphic design intensive taught students principles of design and how to use Adobe Illustrator to turn their sketches into professional-looking graphics. The result was a flier advertising the event (Appendix p.45) Another was an after school upcycled parade float class in partnership with the I Have a Dream Foundation. Students learned the history of the neighborhood, and designed and built a float to enter into the competition based on their research. It was made completely from salvaged materials. Arts Street also conducted an intensive y n Ina workshop to create a mo video-based ug ere ura C commercial advertising the event and the lE ng ven ssi e parade float competition. The final l tN nB ati a c i product can be seen at this link: ve er Am https://vimeo.com/168134210. There was also a 6 week summer internship in which students helped to finalize plans for the event, create marketing materials, conduct a huge social media campaign Up Co promoting the project and mm cy cle e installed public art r dp cia ara lw pieces along 10th ork de sho flo at p Ave..

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IMPLEMENTATION PLAN The following pages show the Implementation Plan which breaks down this Master Art Plan into smaller goals with associated tasks, a suggested timeline, the lead players, recommended partners, relative cost, and ideas for funders. CATEGORIES The goals stated in this Implementation Plan are divided into four categories: 1. Public Art Installation These goals are based off of the youth art proposals in the FUTURE section. 2. Event/Activity These goals are based off of the activities and events described in the FUTURE section. 3. Infrastructure These goals are based off of ideas mentioned in the beginning of the document under “Guiding Principles” and mostly address the issue of safety. 4. Evaluation These goals are based off the need to evaluate the effectiveness of the plan to see if the main goal is being met. GOALS The goals in this Implementation Plan are recommendations that Arts Street youth and staff have created to in order to achieve the main goal: to use art and engage underserved youth to make 10th Ave. a safe, fun, and beautiful pedestrian corridor so more people will take the light rail to First Friday Art Walks instead of driving. However, these smaller goals do not have to 38

be the only ways in which to achieve the main goal. Arts Street is always open to new and improved ideas and new partners that are not stated herein. TASKS The stated tasks are meant to be carried out mostly by the “Lead Players” with the help of secured partners.

LEAD PLAYERS Arts Street is named as the lead player for most of the goals, but the plan was created so anyone could take the lead on helping to make the vision

happen. This is why for many of the goals, “and/or other interested group(s)” is included. TIMELINE The overall time frame of this Master Art Plan is ongoing, though ideally many of these goals will be achieved by the summer of 2019. There are some stated dates like “summer of 2017” which are meant to be the dates for that goal to be completed. POTENTIAL PARTNERS Some of the listed potential partners will actually be required, others are just suggestions. Most of the listed potential partners have contact information listed in the “Contacts” portion of the Appendix. COST Estimated costs for each goal is indicated with 1, 2, or 3 dollar signs. These are vague and relative indications of cost and have no actual dollar values associated with them. They are intended as very preliminary ways of understanding if a project will be cost intensive or not and from where funding should be obtained. POTENTIAL FUNDERS There is more information on most of the potential funders listed in the Appendix section titled “Funding Opportunities.” It is not to say that this is an exhaustive list of funders, but a starting point of recommendations. Also, though not necessarily listed, in some cases it might be appropriate to ask partners for partial or full sponsorship of specific projects.


LEAD PLAYERS

POTENTIAL PARTNERS

Summer of 2017

•Arts Street

•Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant •RTD •Emily Griffith Technical College (Welding for Artists Program) •CHSC (youth) •LPNA •ADSF •Santa Fe BID

$$

•identify chain link fences available to beautify by getting permission from property owner (possible locations marked in PRESENT section called “Existing Opportunities Found on 10th Ave.,” mostly located on north side of 10th Ave. on the residential blocks between Mariposa St. & Kalamath St.) •secure partner(s) (i.e. Ladies Fancywork Society & Fabric Bliss) •secure funding •create workshop/class curriculum with partner(s) to design and install fence art (i.e. Yarn Bombing 101!) •procure upcycled materials (i.e. yarn scraps from Fabric Bliss) •recruit youth (or other community members) for workshop/class, run workshop/class, design & install art

ongoing

•Arts Street and/or •Other interested group(s)

•Property owners •CHSC (youth) •Ladies Fancywork Society •Fabric Bliss •Blue Star Recycling •RAFT •Local Artists (i.e. Deborah Jang,Teresa Castaneda, etc.)

$

•P.S. You are Here Grant (Denver Arts & Venues) •Imagine 2020 Fund (Denver Arts & Venues) •Strengthening Neighborhoods (Denver Foundation) •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation)

•identify walls, garages, and wooden fences available to beautify by getting permission from property owner (possible locations marked in PRESENT section called “Existing Opportunities Found on 10th Ave.,” mostly located on south side of 10th Ave. on the residential blocks between Mariposa St. & Kalamath St.) •secure partner(s) •secure funding •create workshop/class curriculum with partner(s) to design and install mural •procure materials •recruit youth (or other community members) for workshop/class, run workshop/class, design & install mural

ongoing

•Arts Street and/or •Other interested group(s)

•Property owners •CHSC (youth) •Local Artists/ Muralists (i.e. Jolt, Emanuel Martinez, Thomas Evans, Carlos Fresquez, Jesse Van Horne, etc.)

$

•Urban Arts Fund (Denver Arts & Venues) •Strengthening Neighborhoods (Denver Foundation) •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation)

•analyze current lighting situation on 10th Ave. and identify locations where additional lighting is needed (most likely on residential blocks from Mariposa St. to Kalamath St.) •secure partner(s) (lighting designer, lighting fabricator, local artists) •secure funding •create a new lighting plan with lighting designer •secure permit from Denver Public Works •if pursuing something similar to “Nature Lights,” have lighting designer design lightbox pedestal and have local artists each design and build a “Nature” or other themed sculpture to go on lightbox pedestal (can find artists by invitation or call for entry) •have lighting fabricator fabricate lightbox pedestals, securely attach sculptures, and install on-site with solar collector

Summer 2018

•Arts Street and/or •Other interested group(s) (i.e. Santa Fe BID, ADSF)

•Property owners •Denver Public Works •Knowmad.Colab (local light artists) •Local Artists •Michelle Jacobson (ADSF, spearheaded installation of blue lights on Santa Fe Dr.)

$$$

•Santa Fe BID •National Creative Placemaking Fund (ArtPlace America) •Strengthening Neighborhoods (Denver Foundation) •Our Town (National Endowment for the Arts) •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation) •Bonfils-Stanton Foundation

CATEGORY

GOALS

TASKS

TIMELINE

PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

“BIG BLUE MOOSE AND HIS TRACKS”

•secure partners for project •secure funding for project •get permission from Denver Public Works, RTD, & property owners •create workshop/class curriculum with partners to design and install art •recruit youth for workshop/class, run workshop/class, design moose sculpture & install moose tracks on sidewalks •commission sculptor for Big Blue Moose (students in Welding for Artists program @ EGTC, possible artists) •install Big Blue Moose

Install “Big Blue Moose,” “Moose Tracks,” and informational plaques

PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

“CREATIVE COLORS: FENCE ART” Install art on chain link fences using upcycled materials (i.e. plastic lids, CD’s, old electronics, old bike tubes, yarn scraps, etc.)

PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

“A WORLD OF MURALS” Install Murals on walls, garages, and wooden fences along 10th Ave. that have a tie to the history of the site

PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

“LIGHT IT UP!” Install artistic, solar-powered lighting (like youth proposal “Nature Lights” or LED globe lights in “Rainbow Road”) in landscaped areas between the street and sidewalk

COST

POTENTIAL FUNDERS •P.S. You are Here Grant (Denver Arts & Venues) •Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant •RTD

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LEAD PLAYERS

POTENTIAL PARTNERS

Spring 2017 for first installation, ongoing

•Arts Street and/or •Other interested group(s)

•Property owners •CHSC (youth) •Merrill Kingsbury (Colorado State University Denver Extension Colorado Master Gardeners Program has volunteer garden design teachers) •Strictly Automotive (has piles of old tires) •Local garden store (to donate dirt and plants) •Denver Botanic Gardens

$

•P.S. You are Here Grant (Denver Arts & Venues) •Imagine 2020 Fund (Denver Arts & Venues) •Strengthening Neighborhoods (Denver Foundation) •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation)

•identify locations available to install screens and video game consuls by getting permission from property owner (probable location is plaza on northwest corner of 10th Ave. and Navajo St. in Install front of Youth On Record) interactive, retro •secure partner(s) video game along •secure funding with matching •create workshop/class curriculum with partner(s) to design and 2D & 3D artistic install video game elements •procure materials •recruit youth (or other community members) for workshop/class, run workshop/class, design & install

Summer 2019

•Arts Street and/or •Other interested group(s)

•CHSC (youth) •Brian Corrigan from OhHeckYeah (as consultant who has done something similar downtown) •Modeset (programmers) •Youth on Record (to create music)

$$$

•National Creative Placemaking Fund (ArtPlace America) •Strengthening Neighborhoods (Denver Foundation) •Our Town (National Endowment for the Arts) •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation) •Bonfils-Stanton Foundation

“WALK-N-ROLL ABOUT”

•recruit local youth •advertise on social media •advertise on local newsletters (Denver365, ADSF, Denver Arts & Venues, Confluence, etc.) •advertise on local media outlets (CPR, Denver Open Media, etc.) •handout flyers •bring wheels, put on costume, parade up and down 10th Ave.

ongoing

•Arts Street

•CHSC (youth) •Local residents •Local business owners •Local Artists

$

•Denver Housing Authority’s Youth Employment Academy •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation)

•set date for a First Friday in the summer •obtain street closure permit •recruit local youth •put call out for upcycled floats for parade •secure partners •advertise on social media •advertise on local newsletters (Denver365, ADSF, Denver Arts & Venues, Confluence, etc.) •advertise on local media outlets (CPR, Denver Open Media, etc.) •handout flyers

ongoing

•Arts Street •Denver Housing Authority

•LPNA •ADSF •CHSC (youth) •Youth on Record •Local artists •Local businesses •Local residents

$$

•National Creative Placemaking Fund (ArtPlace America) •Strengthening Neighborhoods (Denver Foundation) •Our Town (National Endowment for the Arts) •Activating Places and Spaces Together (Colorado Health Foundation) •Bonfils-Stanton Foundation

CATEGORY

GOALS

TASKS

TIMELINE

PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

“RECYCLED GARDEN”

•identify landscaped areas available to install garden planters by getting permission & maintenance agreement from property owners (residential blocks located between Mariposa St. & Kalamath St.) •secure partner(s) •secure funding •create workshop/class curriculum with partner(s) to design and install planter gardens •procure materials •recruit youth (or other community members) for workshop/class, run workshop/class, design & install planters and plant gardens

Install upcycled garden planters in landscaped areas in ROW between street and sidewalk of residential blocks

PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

EVENT/ACTIVITY

“PLAY ALONG 10TH”

Make parades a monthly First Friday activity in the summer months EVENT/ACTIVITY

“LA ALMA CONNECTION ART CELEBRATION, BLOCK PARTY AND PARADE” Continue as an annual event

40

COST

POTENTIAL FUNDERS


CATEGORY

GOALS

TASKS

TIMELINE

LEAD PLAYERS

POTENTIAL PARTNERS

INFRASTRUCTURE

“SAFE CROSSING”

•conduct a feasibility study of pedestrian crossings along 10th Ave. @ Kalamath St. & Santa Fe Dr. •secure funding •install signals & crosswalks

Summer of 2017?

•Denver Public Works

•LPNA •ADSF •Santa Fe BID

•contact RTD and ask about process for making this happen

Summer of 2017

•Arts Street •Denver Housing Authority •ADSF •Santa Fe BID

•RTD •NEWSED

Install signals and crosswalks on 10th Ave. at Kalamath St. & Santa Fe Dr. INFRASTRUCTURE

“NEXT STOP: ART” Get RTD to announce 10th & Osage as the stop for the Art District on Santa Fe

COST $$$

POTENTIAL FUNDERS •City and County of Denver taxes

$

•ADSF •Santa Fe BID

•ADSF •Santa Fe BID

INFRASTRUCTURE/ PUBLIC ART INSTALLATION

“WHERE AM I?”

•evaluate best place for signage locations •secure partner(s) Install wayfinding •secure funding signage at 10th •secure signage permit from Denver Planning Department & Osage Light •create workshop/class curriculum with partner(s) to design and Rail station to install wayfinding signage get to the Art •recruit youth (or other community members) for workshop/class, District on Santa run workshop/class, design signage, procure materials, fabricate Fe & install signage, install signage signage on Santa Fe with light rail location.

Fall 2017

•Arts Street and/or •Other interested group(s) (i.e. Santa Fe BID, ADSF)

•RTD •ADSF •Santa Fe BID •Signage Designer •CHSC (youth)

$$

EVALUATION

“FIND YOURSELF MAPPING”

•secure funding •hire GIS teacher •recruit youth (or other community members) for workshop •conduct survey at light rail station and at Santa Fe Dr. & 10th Ave. •use collected data to create new GIS maps and analyze change in data •advertise on social media that the plan is working (if it is indeed working ;o)

First Friday of October 2017 (10/6/2017)

•Arts Street

•Denver Housing Authority’s Youth Employment Academy •Ed Vigil (GIS teacher & local artist) •CHSC (youth)

$

•Denver Housing Authority’s Youth Employment Academy •ADSF •Santa Fe BID

•contact RTD and get info •analyze info •advertise on social media that the plan is working (if it is indeed working ;o)

Summer of 2017, 2018, & 2019

•Arts Street •Denver Housing Authority

•RTD

$

•Denver Housing Authority’s Youth Employment Academy •ADSF •Santa Fe BID

Repeat GIS surveying and maps class after art installations to gauge success of project. EVALUATION

“HELLO? RTD?” Get ridership info from RTD to see if more people take the train to 10th & Osage and First Fri days from last year to future years.

41


APPENDIX BIBLIOGRAPHY

American Planning Association. La Alma/Lincoln Park: Denver, Colorado. <https://www.planning. org/greatplaces/neighborhoods/2014/laalma. htm>. Art District on Santa Fe. <http://www.artdistrictonsantafe.com/>. Asmar, Melanie. “Why Denver’s La Alma/Lincoln Park Neighborhood Deserves to Be a “Great Place”.” 3 October 2014. Westword. <http:// www.westword.com/arts/why-denvers-la-almalincoln-park-neighborhood-deserves-to-be-agreat-place-6050243>. Blueprint Denver. “Lincoln Park Neighborhood Assessment.” June 2006. City and County of Denver. <https://www.denvergov.org/Portals/646/documents/planning/Plans/plans_ pre_2013/lalp/LaAlmaLincolnParkAssessment. pdf>. Borrup, Tom. The Creative Community Builder’s Handbook: How to Transform Using Local Assets, Art, and Culture. Ed. Vincent Hyman. Nashville: Fieldstone Alliance, 2011. City & County of Denver. 2010 Neighborhood Census Data. <http://data.denvergov.org/dataset/city-and-county-of-denver-census-neighborhood-demographics-2010>. City and County of Denver. “La Alma/ Lincoln Park Neighborhood Plan.” 2010. www.denvergov. org. <https://www.denvergov.org/Portals/646/ documents/planning/Plans/plans_pre_2013/ lalp/FINAL_LALP_Plan_WEB.pdf>. 42

Denver Arts & Venues. <http://artsandvenuesdenver.com/>. Denver Arts & Venues. “Imagine 2020: Denver’s Cultural Plan.” 2014. artsandvenuesdenver.com. <http://artsandvenuesdenver.com/images/files/ AV-1401-Imagine2020-FullPlan-FINAL-PROOF-2. pdf>. Denver Real Property. <http://www.denvergov. org/maps/map/property>. Hangar 41. “Destination Santa Fe: Art District as Catalyst.” 2012. <http://www.hangar41.com/ Projects/HANGAR%2041_SANTA%20FE%20VISION%20PLAN%202012.pdf>. La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association. <http://www.lincolnparkneighborhood.org/>. Mithun. “Mariposa Redevelopment.” 2010. Denver Housing Authority. Mithun. <http://www. denverhousing.org/development/Mariposa/Pages/default.aspx>. Nicholson, Kieran. “Denver neighborhood cited as “great” by national association.” 1 October 2014. Denver Post. <http://www.denverpost. com/2014/10/01/denver-neighborhood-cited-as-great-by-national-association/>. Open Data Catalog. <http://data.denvergov. org/>. Peterson, Eric. “Rethinking Public Housing: Mariposa and the Transformation of La Alma/ Lincoln Park.” 12 June 2013. Confluence Denver. <http://www.confluence-denver.com/features/

mariposa_061213.aspx>. Project for Public Spaces. <http://www.pps. org/>. Project for Public Spaces, Inc. How to Turn a Place Around: A Hnadbook for Creating Successful Public Spaces. New York: Project for Public Spaces, Inc., 2008. Stauffer, David. Across the Creek: Rediscovering Lost Tales of Denver’s Historic La Alma-Lincoln Park Neighborhood. <https://lincolnparkhistory. wordpress.com/>. Street Plans Collaborative. “Tactical Urbanism: Short-Term Action, Long Term Change.” Tactical Urbanism Guide. <https://issuu.com/ streetplanscollaborative/docs/tactical_urbanism_vol_2_final?backgroundColor=>. Workshop 8. Mariposa. <http://www.mariposadenver.com/>.


COMMUNITY SURVEY

SURVEY RESULTS

www.arts-street.org 1079 Osage St., Denver, CO 80204 303-825-1334

Creative Youth Take Flight - La Alma Connection Master Art Plan Survey Arts Street, a local nonprofit, is working with Denver youth to create a Master Art Plan that will activate the 5-block stretch between the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station and Santa Fe Drive as an inviting and imaginative pedestrian walkway. This will encourage more people to take the light rail to the First Friday Art Walks and help to alleviate vehicle congestion. We ask that you please fill out this survey to help us collect data and get a range of input and ideas. Thank you! Do you live in La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood?

YES

NO

If yes, do you live on 10th Ave. between the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station and Santa Fe Drive?

YES

NO

What is your zip code where you live? ________________ YES NO Have you ever walked the 5 blocks on 10th Avenue between 10th and Osage and Santa Fe Drive? If yes, why? If no, why not? ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Do you attend Art Walks on Santa Fe Drive? If so, how do you get there? Car_____ Light Rail____ Walk____ Other_____

YES

NO

Bus______ Shuttle_____ Bike_____

Where have you noticed art in public spaces in the City of Denver? (Please check all that apply.) Streets________ Alleys________ Parks________ Medians___________ Public Plazas_______ Other (e.g. station, airport) _____________ Which art pieces have you noticed in public spaces that you like?________________________________________________________________ Which art pieces have you noticed in public spaces that you disike?_______________________________________________________________ Please rate the importance of public art for its contribution to the livability of a neighborhood? VERY IMPORTANT

IMPORTANT

NOT VERY IMPORTANT

NOT AT ALL IMPORTANT

Where would you enjoy seeing additional artwork on 10th Avenue between 10th and Osage and Santa Fe Drive? (Please check all that apply.) On Sidewalks______ On Fences_____ On Streets_____ On Garages_____ In landscaped area between street and sidewalk_____ Integrated into new construction_____ Other_________________________________________________________________________________________________ What other types of art would you like to experience in your community? (Please check all that apply.) Murals_____ Sculptures_____ Temporary art projects _____ Parades_____ Collaborative projects that engage kids and adults_____ Neighborhood Market______ Other_________________________________________________________________________________________________ Would you welcome a mural on your fence or garage if you had input and final approval of the design?

YES

NO

Would you welcome and be willing to maintain 2D or 3D art installed in the Right-of-Way landscaped area between the street and the sidewalk if you had input and final approval of the design? YES NO We would like to keep you informed about this project. If you are interested, please give us your contact information. Name___________________________

Phone___________________________

E-mail address_____________________

☐ I would like to help. Please contact me.

•66 Total people surveyed •26 (40%) Want to help •23 (35%) Live in La Alma Lincoln Park (low because many of the people surveyed were students who come from all over Denver) •12 (18%) live on 10th Ave. between LR and Santa Fe Dr. •50 (75%) have walked the 5 blocks along 10th (survey answers give many reasons why or why not) •45 (68%) attend First Friday Art Walks ->21 sometimes drive ->2 sometimes take the bus ->11 sometimes take the light rail ->0 take the shuttle ->31 sometimes walk ->8 sometimes bike ->1 sometimes other •51 (77%) have noticed art in public places in the city ->34 in alleys ->58 in parks ->26 in medians ->48 in public plazas ->15 in other places (airport, buildings, downtown) PUBLIC ART PIECES IN DENVER THAT PARTICIPANTS LIKE: •5 mentioned “I See What You Mean” big blue bear sculpture at Convention Center downtown •3 mentioned “Mustang” at DIA •Other pieces named: “Seven Sisters” (Pepsi Center stop), “Cowboy Pajamas” (1725 Champa), “Flor de La Alma” (10th and Navajo), “La Alma” (mural on rec center), “pianos on 16th St. Mall,” “sound on Curtis,” “Dancers,” “16th St. Cows,” “art on electric boxes,” “alley art along Santa Fe Dr.” •10 mentioned “murals” in general •9 mentioned “sculptures” •5 are not picky at all and said they like all of it •3 mentioned “interactive art” •Other descriptive terms: “whimsical,” “colorful,” “speak to the history of the area, ”art in unexpected places, ”graffiti look, ”temporary art”

•Of the 58 that provided an answer for public art they like, 35 either didn’t answer or said there were no pieces they didn’t like IMPORTANCE OF PUBLIC ART •40 (61%) very important •24 (36%) important •1 (2%) not very important •0% not important at all WHERE WOULD YOU ENJOY SEEING MORE ART •48 (73%) sidewalks •36 (55%) fences •36 (55%) streets •35 (53%) garages •47 (71%) landscaped areas between street and sidewalks •39 (59%) integrated into new construction •Other: flagpoles, lots, homes, light posts, side of buildings, artsy crosswalks, more trees & natural vegetation, bike racks, other functional city structures WHAT TYPE OF ART WOULD PARTICIPANTS LIKE IN THEIR COMMUNITY •54 (82%) murals •51 (77%) sculptures •29 (43%) temporary art •23 (35%) parades •37 (56%) collaborative projects that engage kids and adults •36 (55%) neighborhood market •Other: “professional, high quality,” ”lights combined with art,” “interactive,” “old construction,” “food trucks,” “street painting” WELCOME MURAL ON PROPERTY? •50 (76%) yes WELCOME 2D OR 3D ART IN LANDSCAPED AREA OF RIGHT OF WAY (BETWEEN STREET AND SIDEWALK)? •51 (77%) yes

PUBLIC ART PIECES IN DENVER THAT PARTICIPANTS DON’T LIKE: •1 mentioned “I See What You Mean” big blue bear sculpture at Convention Center downtown •2 mentioned “Mustang” at DIA •1 mentioned “National Velvet” downtown •1 mentioned “Dancers” at DCPA •2 mentioned “Flor de La Alma” •1 mentioned bike rack that looks like a dinosaur •1 mentioned “denim sculptures between Speer and DICP” •1 mentioned “Faces in City Park Golf Course” •Other descriptive terms: “statues,” “dark and brooding,” “graffiti,”

43


FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

This is list of local and national organizations that are interested in funding creative placemaking, public art, and neighborhood projects. Applying for these funds will be key in implementing this Master Art Plan: FUNDING OPPORTUNITY

ORGANIZATION

DESCRIPTION

AMOUNTS

DEADLINES

LINK

National Creative Placemaking Fund

ArtPlace America

Exists to position art and culture as a core sector of comprehensive community planning and development in order to help strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities, focuses its work on creative placemaking

$50,000$500,000

Mid February: Registration Deadline Early March: Submission Deadline

http://www.artplaceamerica.org/loi/

Colorado Art Tank

The Denver Foundation

A funding initiative of the Arts Affinity Group, a giving circle of The Denver Foundation. Its purpose is to make strategic investments in Colorado’s best, new, and unique arts-based ventures.

$10,000$30,000

Early October

http://www.denverfoundation.org/ Community/Impact-Areas/ArtsCulture/Arts-Affinity-Group

Strengthening Neighborhoods

The Denver Foundation

This program focuses on the power of neighborhood residents to make a difference in their communities. We believe that residents themselves often have the greatest knowledge of how to improve life in their communities, and we also believe that all communities have existing assets – including their people, institutions, and public resources. We believe in helping more residents work together to build on those assets to strengthen their communities.

Average: $2,500, but up to $5,000

Rolling

http://www.denverfoundation.org/ Nonprofits/Grants-What-We-Fund/ Neighborhood-Development

Strengthening Neighborhoods is open to working with residents from low-income communities throughout the seven counties of Metro Denver, particularly low-income communities of color. Our Town

National Endowment for the Arts

Arts Engagement, Cultural Planning, and Design Projects that represent the distinct character and quality of their communities & Projects that Build Knowledge About Creative Placemaking.

$25,000$200,000

Mid September

https://www.arts.gov/national/ourtown

Imagine 2020 Fund

Denver Arts and Venues

Denver Arts & Venues and the Denver Commission on Cultural Affairs launched the IMAGINE 2020 Fund inviting city agencies, cultural institutions, businesses, entrepreneurs, civic leaders, neighborhood and community-based organizations and individuals to make this collective vision a reality. The fund will provide up to $5,000 in funding support for new, creative and innovative programs inspired by one or more of the seven vision elements outlined in IMAGINE 2020 that further develops Denver’s creative landscape.

up to $5,000

Mid June

http://artsandvenuesdenver.com/ imagine-2020-creating-a-futurefor-denvers-culture/denversimagine2020-fund/

PS You are Here

Denver Arts and Venues

Denver Arts and Venues placemaking Initiative.

$5,000$10,000

End of April

http://artsandvenuesdenver.com/ imagine-2020-creating-a-future-fordenvers-culture/psyah/

Urban Arts Fund

Denver Arts and Venues

In the Spirit of IMAGINE 2020. The Urban Arts Fund (UAF) is a graffiti prevention and youth development program which facilitates the creation of new murals in perpetually vandalized areas throughout the City and County of Denver. The UAF provides access to positive, creative experiences for youth and transforms dilapidated areas into well-tended and active community gathering spaces. As of 2016, with the help of over 2,000 youth, 500 community participants, the program has facilitated approximately 115 new murals and abated over 200,000 square feet of walls from vandalism.

up to $6,000

Yearly mid-March

http://artsandvenuesdenver.com/ public-art/urban-arts-fund/

crowdfunding

ioby

crowdfunding

open

rolling

http://ioby.org/

crowdfunding

indiegogo

crowdfunding, get all funds even if goal not reached

open

rolling

www.indiegogo.com

crowdfunding

Kickstarter

crowdfunding, only get funds if goal reached, must give rewards to backers

open

rolling

https://www.kickstarter.com/

Innovate for Good

Rose Community Foundation

A PHILANTHROPIC CHALLENGE to find and fund new ideas

$5,000$25,000

Yearly end of May

http://www.rcfdenver.org/ InnovateForGood

Activating Places and Spaces Together

The Colorado Health Foundation

Supports locally-defined, place-specific efforts to get people outdoors and actively engaged in their neighborhoods – together. The goal of the funding opportunity is to help activate existing infrastructure in public places that contributes to a community’s overall health through residential usage and positive experiences. Foundation grant funds will support costs associated with project/ program planning and/or implementation for up to one year.

$15,000$100,000

Yearly: June 15th & October 15th

http://www.coloradohealth.org/yellow. aspx?id=8101

Denver visual & performing arts organizations

Bonfils-Stanton Foundation

The Bonfils-Stanton Foundation makes grants to visual and performing arts organizations and projects that help enrich Denver’s cultural life and landscape. We consider requests that demonstrate commitment to: artistic excellence, innovation, visionary leadership, increasing cultural participation, connecting art and community, and enhancing the profile of Denver’s art scene.

(Must call them to discuss first)

Quarterly end of month January, April, July, October

http://bonfils-stantonfoundation.org/ grants/

44


contract for mural on private property

FLYER FOR EVENT DESIGNED BY GRAPHIC DESIGN CLASS

1079 Osage St. Denver CO, 80204 Phone: 303-825-1334 E-mail: katy.gevargis@arts-street.org

Contract for Mural Permission:

Property Owner (Full Name):_____________________________________________________________ Location Address: _______________________________________ Date of Request: ________________ Location of Mural: _____________________________________________________________________ I, __________________________________ (OWNER), homeowner of the property at _______________________, give Arts Street permission to paint a mural on the agreed location. The completion of the mural will fall within the following agreements: 1. The OWNER has final approval of design. 2. Arts Street will provide all materials. 3. The mural will be done at no cost to the OWNER. 4. OWNER will notify Arts Street in the case of damage or vandalism to the mural, and/or if they decide to paint over or alter the mural. 5. OWNER maintains all rights to change, alter or remove the mural.

Permission Signatures:

OWNER Signature: ____________________________________________________________ Date:________ OWNER phone number:_____________________ OWNER email address: ____________________________ Current Resident Signature: (if applicable): ________________________________________ Date:________ Resident phone number:____________________ Resident email address: ____________________________ Arts Street: __________________________________________________________________Date:________

Mural Concept Ideas from Property Owner and/or Resident: _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

45


workshops & classes GRAD CREDITS OR STIPEND PAID/STUDENT

# STUDENTS

# UNDUPLICATED

INSTRUCTOR

CHSC InSchool Class

6 credits

9

9

Katy Gevargis

Sept. 22 - Oct. 23, 2015 Monday - Friday @ 9:00-10:32am

CHSC InSchool Class

6 credits + $30 if photo collage sold

9

3

Katy Gevargis

Global Information Systems (GIS) is a mapping program that can visually tell a story using data and location coordinates. Students surveyed people in the community on a First Friday and learned how to use GIS software to transform this collected data into maps showing where visitors came from and what mode of transportation they used.

Oct. 2, 3, 2015:Â Oct. 2 @ 5:00-7:00pm Oct. 3 @ 9:30am-1:30pm

Weekend Intensive Workshop

$35

3

1

Ed Vigil

Spread the word: Social Media

Youth worked with a social media expert to get the Arts Street social media presences up to date, helped to advertise the Walk-N-Roll-Abouts and spread the word about the LA ALMA CONNECTION project. By the end of the weekend intensive, students were familiar with Arts Streets current social media, added some new channels for marketing and created an extensive plan for future posts and announcements - all skills transferable to any modern business in need of social media marketing.

Oct. 22, 24, 2015: Oct. 22nd @ 4:30-6:3pm Oct. 24 @ 9:30am-4:00pm

Weekend Intensive Workshop

$35

3

3

Jade Baranski

La Alma Connection Video 1

Students learned film documentary terminology and techniques to capture the process of the Master Art Plan creation. They filmed the 10th Ave. site, interviewed community members, and learned Adobe Premier software to edit together their own mini documentaries about neighborhood revitalization.

Nov. 3 - Dec. 18, 2015: Monday - Friday @ 12:38-2:13pm

CHSC InSchool Class

6 credits

7

1

Seth Adcock

La Alma Connection Video 2

Students learned film documentary terminology and techniques to capture the process of the Master Art Plan creation. They filmed the 10th Ave. site, interviewed community members, and learned Adobe Premier software to edit together their own mini documentaries about neighborhood revitalization.

Jan 5 - Feb 12, 2016: Monday - Friday @ 12:38-2:13pm

CHSC InSchool Class

6 credits

10

6

Seth Adcock

The La Alma Parade: Building a Vibrant Neighborhood

The I Have a Dream Foundation (IHAD) has a location in the La Alma Lincoln Park neighborhood. Their youth currently live all over Denver, but all originated from this neighborhood. The IHAD youth designed and built a float out of upcycled materials based on what they learned about the history of their neighborhood. This float was entered in the parade float competition at the July 1st event.

Jan. 12 - June 7, 2016: 10 Tuesdays total @ 4:15-5:45pm

After School Class

Free entry into float competition

7

7

Katy Gevargis, Seth Adcock, Chelsea Romaniello

Place Invaders: 3D Modeling

Students learned how to use free software called SketchUp, a 3D digital modeling program that is used by many architecture and urban design firms. Students modeled the project site of 10th Ave. and used the remaining workshop time to quickly dream up a public art project for the space.

Feb. 11, 13, 14, 2016: Thursday, Feb. 11 @ 4:30-6:30pm Saturday, Feb. 13 @ 9:30am-4:00pm Sunday, Feb. 14 @ 9:30am-4:00pm

Weekend Intensive Workshop

$50

9

9

Katy Gevargis

La Alma Connection 3

Photography, photo collage elevations, examine site for beauty and opportunities, public art research & proposals, 3D modeling, template design and content for Master Art Plan

Feb. 16 - April 8, 2016: Monday - Friday @ 12:38-2:13pm

CHSC InSchool Class

6 credits

9

4

Katy Gevargis

NAME

DESCRIPTION

DATES/SCHEDULE

TYPE

La Alma Connection 1

Students learned about urban design, creative placemaking, public art, design research, studied the physical site and history, intro to 3D modeling in SketchUp software, created temporary public art pieces (chalk art and fence art), designed and distributed marketing material for Walk-N-Roll-About.

Aug. 17 - Sept. 18, 2015 Monday - Friday @ 9:00-10:32am

La Alma Connection 2

Students studied previous neighborhood plans, learned about composition, photography (intro to Adobe Photoshop), typography, layout design (intro to InDesign), created temporary public art pieces (interactive, inspirational, or educational posters), created 3D photo collages for art show at Center Mass Media gallery on Santa Fe Dr.

Tell it with Mapping: GIS

46


GRAD CREDITS OR STIPEND PAID/STUDENT

# STUDENTS

# UNDUPLICATED

INSTRUCTOR

Spring Break Intensive Workshop

$50

11

9

Katy Gevargis, Seth Adcock, Chelsea Romaniello

April 14, 16, 17, 2016 Thursday, April 14 @ 4:30-6:30pm Saturday, April 16 @ 9:30am-4:00pm Sunday, April 17 @ 9:30am-4:00pm

Weekend Intensive Workshop

$50

8

8

Chelsea Romaniello

Students learned basic fine art skills and created a piece of public fence art to be installed on 10th Ave.

April 12 - May 27, 2016 Monday - Friday @ 10:34am-12:06pm

CHSC InSchool Class

6 credits

8

6

Chelsea Romaniello

Environmental Industries Internship

Students learned about recycling, upcycling and creative environmental industry careers. They installed recycled art on the chain-link fence of the empty lot at 10th Ave. and Kalamath St. and they developed their own upcylced products that were sold at the July 1st event. Students created a photographic tutorial using Instructables and online publishing as well as a environmental zine showing what they learned through Adobe Illustrator.

June 13 - July 21, 2016 Monday - Thursday @ 9:00am12:00pm

Summer Internship Class

$200

20

17

Chelsea Romaniello, Seth Adcock, JC Futrell

Creative Community Connections and July 1 Art Celebration Block Party and Parade

Students learned about event planning and finalized the LA ALMA CONNECTION Art Celebration Block Party and Parade. They worked with the client (Denver Arts & Venues) to organize volunteer tasks, create promotional signs, promote the event on social media and answered participants questions the day of the event. Students also installed a mural on a 10th Ave. residential wooden fence. They worked with the client/homeowner to develop the design and presented he with their concept. Students learned video skills using previous footage, an interview and a film style to create a documentary about the LA ALMA CONNECTION neighborhood and event. This will be broadcast on the Denver Open Media TV channel fall 2016.

June 13 - July 21, 2016 Monday - Thursday @ 1:00-4:00pm July 1, 2016 5:30-9:00pm

Summer Internship Class

$600 (paid by DPS)

19

16

Chelsea Romaniello, Seth Adcock, JC Futrell

Interns

Throughout the year, Arts Street takes on underserved youth interns who are paid hourly rates from different government-run programs. Interns help Arts Street staff with day-to-day office tasks like data entry, recruitment, and creating marketing material. They also help as teaching assistants in classes and workshops.

Varied

Internship

Hourly rates from $8.51 - $10.00/hr

8

7

Chelsea Romaniello

Walk-N-RollAbouts

Arts Street created a First Friday activity called the Walk-N-Roll-About and invited anyone and everyone to take the light rail to 10th and Osage, bring their non-motorized wheels of any kind, dress up in a costume and become â&#x20AC;&#x153;art on wheelsâ&#x20AC;? (or on foot) while parading up and down 10th Ave. between the light rail station and the Art District on Santa Fe.

Sept. 4, Oct. 2, Nov. 6 6:30-7:30pm

Afterschool activity

Volunteer

11

2

Katy Gevargis, Chelsea Romaniello, Seth Adcock

151

108

NAME

DESCRIPTION

DATES/SCHEDULE

TYPE

Parade Float Commercial

Students learned about marketing and different types of advertising, then came up with a basic storyline to advertise the LA ALMA CONNECTION parade float competition. The group was then split into 4 teams: 1. Writers/Directors; 2. Props, Sets, & Costume;, 3. Film Crew; 4. Actors. With each team doing their part, the footage was captured. The group reassembled to learn basics of video editing in Adobe Premier to put together the final commercial.

Mar. 24 - 31, 2016: Thursday, March 24 @ 4:30-6:30pm Monday, March 28 @ 9:00am12:00pm Tuesday, March 29 @ 9:00am12:00pm Wednesday, March 30 @ 9:00am12:00pm Thursday, March 31 @ 9:00am1:00pm

Graphic Design Workshop

Students learned principals of graphic design and how to translate hand sketches into digital graphics with Adobe Illustrator using graphic pads. The class worked together to create the marketing poster for the July 1st event.

La Alma Connection 4

TOTAL

47


contacts

One of the outcomes of this Master Art Plan is community-building through art. This is a list of contacts that Arts Street either made along the way, or plan on making for future implementation, of local businesses, artists, residents, partners, and potential partners that can help transform 10th Ave. into a safe, fun, and beautiful pedestrian corridor. It’s also a resource for anyone else who wants to become involved in helping to make it a reality. However, it IS NOT a list that should be used for any kind of solicitation that is not related to this project. NAME

CATEGORY

Roger MartinPressman

10th Ave. resident

Orench Lagman

10th Ave. resident, Local business

Bobby Magee Lopez

TITLE

PHONE

EMAIL

ADDRESS

Physical Therapist/ Yoga Teacher

301-233-1215

roger@longevity-wellness. com

1015 W. 10TH Ave.

Awaken

Personal Trainer

970-430-1630

Orenchlagman@gmail.com

1122 W. 10th Ave.

Local artist

Bobby Magee Lopez

Fine artist, muralist, & body-painter

808.359.9142

BobbyMaGeeLopez@gmail. com

Carlos Frésquez

Local artist

Metro State University

Painter, muralist, educator

720.313.5941

fresquez@msudenver.edu carlos fresquez@gmail.com

Deborah Jang

Local artist

self-employed artist

Sculpture Artist (upcycled materials)

303-668-7508

dmjang@comcast.net

Emanuel Martinez

Local artist

Emanuel Artist Studio

Artist - sculptor, muralist

303-668-0579 303-697-0445

arts@emanuelmartinez. com

Evan Siegel

Local artist

Artist, Architect, Teacher

303-388-3068

evanarthursiegel@gmail. com

Jesse Van Horne

Local artist

Skullflower Design

Painter, muralist,sculpter, designer

720-939-4215

jesmes27@ skullflowerdesignstudios. com

Jolt

Local artist

GuerillaGarden. com

Fine artist, muralist, designer

303-472-7364

coco@guerillagarden.com

Karma Leigh

Local artist

Katy Flaccavento & Zach Gillerlain

Local artist

48

COMPANY/ ORGANIZATION

Knowmad.Colab.

Painter

karmaleighta@gmail.com

Sounds & Light Artists

knowmadcolab@gmail.com

LINK

NOTES Would welcome art in landscaped area in front of house and willing to help work with adjacent neighbors, really thinks lit art would be the best for safety and aesthetics, was client for Space Invaders class

http://www. awakenadultgymnastics. com/

Requested yard art with flower arrangements/ boxes with a bike lock

http://www. bobbymageelopez.com/

Bobby has painted many murals around Denver and has worked with high school age underserved youth.

http://carlosfresquez.com/

Carlos is a celebrated Chicano artist who show work nationally and internationally, He has also painted many murals around Denver and teaches art at Metro State University.

deborahjang.com

Won a P.S. You are Here grant from Denver Arts and Venues: doing 3 sculptures in 3 neighborhoods, kinetic, community created Tibetan prayer wheels. Looking to do it on Santa Fe Dr., but Lisa Gedgaudas directed her to us to see about maybe putting it on 10th, but either way perhaps getting our kids involved in the community engagement part of the creation.

17331 Highway 8 Morrison, Colorado 80465 U.S.A.

http://www. emanuelmartinez.com/

Acting as parade marshal for block party

2955 Inca Street, 1F Denver, CO 80202

www.evansiegel.com

Evan designed and built the Arts Street sign. He also came to one of the Walk-N-RollAbouts. He is very interested in teaching at Arts Street.

http://www. skullflowerdesignstudios. com/

Jesse is a multifaceted Denver artist who has done community art projects before. He worked at the Lakewood MuralFest the same summer as Arts Street.

http://www.guerillagarden. com/

Jolt painted the mural that is on the side of the Tapiz building at 1099 Osage St.

http://www.rawartists.org/ karmaleigh

Karma worked with us during Comic Con at Arts Street’s booth.

http://www.knomadcolab. com

Husband and wife artists who came and spoke to youth on March 10, 2016 about their work and other light art and installations have a studio in 910 Arts on Santa Fe Drive (Knowmad.Colab)

P.O.Box 36392 Denver, CO 80236

3501 Brighton Blvd, Denver, CO

910 Santa Fe Dr Loft 103 Denver, CO 80204


NAME

CATEGORY

COMPANY/ ORGANIZATION

TITLE

PHONE

EMAIL

Lori Owicz

Local artist

Owicz Art

Painter, Illustrator, Sculptor

720-373-1963

owicz@mac.com

Macy Dorf

Local artist

Artists on Santa Fe Gallery

Ceramic Artist

303-573-5903

macy80204@gmail.com

Teresa Castaneda

Local artist

Rearranging Denver

Trash Artist

Thomas Evans

Local artist

I am Detour

Painter/Muralist

Thomas Scharfenberg

Local artist

LINK

NOTES

www.owiczart.com

Lori makes amazing sculptures out of salvaged metal parts.

http://www.macydorf.com/ http://artistsonsantafe. com/

Macy has a ceramic public art piece on Santa Fe Dr., he worked with Arts Street youth and taught them how to make ceramic plates

paintbrush30@hotmail.com

https://sites.google.com/ site/teresaspaintbrush/ home

Teresa is an artist who lives in La Alma Lincoln Park who creates upcycled art and came in to Arts Street to work with the students in the green academy.

http://iamdetour.com/ contact-me/

http://iamdetour.com/

Thomas gave a presentation to Creative Community Connections summer class on how to create a public mural.

http://thomasscharfenberg. blogspot.com/

Thomas paints on founds objects big and small including old construction debris and big, empty walls (murals). He creates vibrant patterns and textures that transcend any cultural association.

Travis Gillan

Local artist

http://travisgillan.com/

Travis has a very bold, graphic style.

Adam Ramirez

Artist

303-524-5438

tscharfenberg@hotmail. com

Travis Gillan Art

Illustrator, Muralist

616-745-3606

travisgillan@gmail.com

Local artist, educator

Escuela de Guadalupe Elementary School

Art & Music Teacher

720-280-3331

Ed Vigil

Local artist, educator, partner

Weston Solutions, Inc.

GIS Developer, GIS Instructor, Digital Artist

303-619-8500

Elizabeth Kaplan

Local artist, organizational partner

Smoky Hill High School

Art Teacher

David Griggs

Local artist, partner

David Griggs Design

Public Artist

Local artist, Potential Partner

Ladies Fancywork Society

Yarn Bombers

Local artist, Potential Partner

OhHeckYeah

Founder, Creative Placemaker

Brian Corrigan

ADDRESS

757 Santa Fe Drive Denver, CO 80204

3501 Wazee St. Denver, CO 80216

Adam was a client for a weekend intensive video workshop at Arts Street. edvigil@gmail.com

www.behance.net/edvigil

kaplanev@hotmail.com

303-446-3030

720-244-5503

griggs@artsoup.com

Ed taught the GIS mapping weekend intensive for this project. He is also a talented, selftaught digital artist. He makes geometric, modern style art using GIS mapping software. Liz has taught several classes at Arts Street as a guest artist educator

715 Galapago St.

www.artsoup.com

David is a local and national public artist that lives in La Alma Lincoln Park. He was also the president of the La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association during the creation of this master art plan.

info@ ladiesfancyworksociety.com

http://www. ladiesfancyworksociety. com/

The Ladies Fancywork Society (LFS)Â has been bringing a feminine touch to the tough world of street art since 2007 by tagging street signs, seedy corners, and sunny benches with a little bit of ladylike crochet. What began as an underground society of crocheter artists bent on spreading fiber art throughout Denver has grown into an artist collective capable of putting together large-scale projects, international art shows, and installations. The LFS could be brought in to teach Arts Street youth how to crochet to create a yarn bomb project on one of the many chain link fences on 10th Ave.

brian@ohheckyeah.com

http://ohheckyeah.com/

OhHeckYeah is a public benefit corporation that uses the power of play to strengthen the social, physical and economic fabric of place. Brian, the founder, started OhHeckYeah on the giant screens in downtown Denver. He could be a potential partner to help make the video game art proposal a reality on 10th Ave.

49


NAME

CATEGORY

COMPANY/ ORGANIZATION

TITLE

PHONE

Tony Garcia

Local business

Su Teatro Cultural and Performing Arts Center

Artistic Director

303-296-0219

Adriana Abarca

Local business, Mexican/ Chicano art & culture expert/ collector

Marco’s Foods

Co-owner

720-353-2233

aabarca@readyfoods.biz

2705 W. Colfax, Denver, CO 80204

John Ramsay

Local business, organizational partner

Center Mass Media

CEO, Wordpress Master

720-336-9266

john@centermassmedia. com

735 Kalamath St.Denver, CO 80204

www.centermassmedia.com

Rebuilt Arts Street’s website at huge discount, held First Friday show for Arts Street youth’s 3D photo collages

Andrea Barela

Local business, Partner

NEWSED

NEWSED Development Director, Santa Fe Business Improvement District (BID) President

303-534-8342 Ext. 110

abarela@newsed.org

901 West 10th Avenue Suite 2A Denver, CO 80204

newsed.org

Came and spoke with the youth on March 7, 2016 about Newsed, history of Santa Fe Drive & economic development of the neighborhood, and gave kids feedback on their proposals for 10th ave public art. NEWSED promotes and develops economic and community programs and projects that raise the income, educational, and political levels of West Denver residents.

Bill Dutton

Local business, Partner

Buckhorn Exchange

Manager

303-534-9505

info@buckhorn.com

1000 Osage St. Denver, CO 80204

http://www.buckhorn.com/

Buckhorn Exchange is the historical restaurant right across the street from the 10th and Osage Light Rail Station. This National Historic Landmark and Western Museum has been serving the finest in Old West fare since 1893. Their interior is covered in stuffed game. They could be a potential partner on one or both of the Moose project proposals.

Buddy Poppit

Local business, Partner

Hangar 41

Architect, Principal

303.954.0933

bpoppitt@hangar-41.com

825 Santa Fe Dr.

http://www.hangar41.com/

Hangar 41 is the architecture firm located in the Art District on Santa Fe that created the most recent master plan for the area. They built a huge model of their vision for the art district, which hangs on the wall inside their firm. The youth did a field trip there to see the model and hear about the master plan. Hangar 41 also hosted a First Friday art show for the Arts Street interns.

Jami Duffy

Local business, Partner

Youth on Record

Executive Director

303-993-5226

jami@youthonrecord.org

1301 W 10th Ave. Denver, CO

www.youthonrecord.org

Youth on Record brings in professional musicians to work with underserved youth. Arts Street worked with Youth on Record in video classes and is part of the Alliance for Creative Youth. Also like Arts Street, they were donated a space by DHA in one of the ground floor retail spaces of the new 10th and Osage Light Rail Station TOD - they are in the space that has the large plaza out front with the flower sculpture (10th & Navajo), they also do community events so in the future Arts Street should combine resources with them on a large event

50

EMAIL

ADDRESS

LINK

NOTES

721 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, CO 80204

http://suteatro.org/

Su Teatro’s mission is to promote, produce, develop and preserve the cultural arts, heritage, and traditions of the Chicano/Latino community; to advance mutual respect for other cultures; and to establish avenues where all cultures may come together. Creating a Mexican Cultural Heritage Center from her father’s extensive collection of Mexican art, can have visitors on Fridays by appointment


NAME

CATEGORY

COMPANY/ ORGANIZATION

TITLE

Bobby LeFebre

Local business, potential partner

Café Cultura

Chair

Damon McLeese

Local business, potential partner

Access Gallery

Executive Director

Maruca Salazar

Local business, potential partner

Museo de Las Americas

Executive Director

Local business, potential partner

EMAIL

ADDRESS

LINK

NOTES

Bobby.lefebre@gmail.com

910 Galapago St. Denver, CO 80204

www.cafecultura.org

Café Cultura promotes unity and healing among Indigenous peoples through creative expression while empowering youth to find their voice, reclaim oral and written traditions, and become leaders in their communities. They host an event the 2nd Friday of every month at the La Alma/Lincoln Park Amphitheater in the park: Art in the Park.

303-777-0797

damon@accessgallery.org

909 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, CO 80204

http://accessgallery.org/

VSA Colorado/Access Gallery is an inclusive nonprofit organization that engages the community by opening doors to creative, educational and economical opportunities for people with disabilities to access, experience and benefit from the arts.

303-571-4401 ext. 22

director@museo.org

861 Santa Fe Dr. Denver, CO 80204

museo.org

Museo de las Americas educates our community about the diversity of Latino Americano art and culture from ancient to contemporary through innovative exhibitions and programs. With the Latino population growing exponentially in Denver and wider communities, Museo plays an important role in building pride in the Latino community’s heritage and promoting understanding among cultures.

Chicano Humanities and Arts Council

303-571-0440

Info@chacweb.org

772 Santa Fe Dr, Denver, CO 80204

http://www.chacweb.org/

A product of the ’70s Chicano movement, CHAC continues to host gallery shows by local Latino artists while preserving cultural traditions.

Local business, potential partner

Knotty Tie Company

303-954-9470

926 W 10th Ave, Denver, CO 80204

www.knottytie.com

Makes custom neckties, bow ties, pocket squares and scarves. Knotty Tie partners with the African Community Center’s We Made This program, which teaches recently resettled refugee women how to sew, and provides assessment and certification for those with preexisting skills.

Local business, potential partner

Fabric Bliss

303-893-7922

hello@fabricblissdenver. com

989 Santa Fe Dr, Denver, CO 80204

www.fabricblissdenver.com

This fabric shop, sewing studio & knit lounge offers designer fabric & yarn, plus sewing classes. Fabric Bliss could be a potential partner to donate old yarn or scraps for yarnbombing on the 10th Ave. chain link fences.

Office: 720423-8978  Mobile: 303704-6467

chuck.sugent@emilygriffith. edu

1205 Osage St. Denver, CO 80204

http://www.emilygriffith. edu/

Emily Griffith has a welding course and a metalworking for artists course. A partnership could be formed where the students in these classes help to build art designed for 10th Ave. by Arts Street students (for example: Big Blue Moose).

Chuck Sugent

Local educator, Potential partner

Jeff McCann

Local property owner

Manager - Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory & Customized Training

PHONE

650-996-2161

jeffmccann@sbcglobal.net

Jeff owns the empty lot at NE corner of 10th and Kalamath, lives in CA. Gave Arts Street permission to decorate chain link fence around property, but he would like to approve what we are doing before installation and make sure we are not impeding sight lines of traffic at the corner.

51


NAME

CATEGORY

COMPANY/ ORGANIZATION

TITLE

PHONE

Rita Jaramilo

Local resident

Neighborhood cat rescue

Neighborhood cat rescuer

720-275-0780

Brendan PickerMahoney

Main partner

Denver Arts & Venues

Public Art Administrator

505-453-4835

brendan.picker@denvergov. org

144 W. Colfax Ave. Denver, Co 80202

http:// artsandvenuesdenver.com/ public-art

Spoke to CHSC students about Public Art and took on downtown public art tour

Karen Good

Main partner

City of Denver

Policy, Planning, & Sustainability Project Manager

w:720-8653162 c:303-5792815

karen.good@denvergov.org

Webb building

https://www.denvergov. org/content/denvergov/ en/denver-department-ofpublic-works/contact-us. html

Spoke to CHSC students about Public Works and planning

Lisa Gedgaudas

Main partner

Denver Arts & Venues

Create Denver Program Administrator

720-865-4260

lisa.gedgaudas@denvergov. org

144 W. Colfax Ave. Denver, Co 80202

http:// artsandvenuesdenver.com/ create-denver

Spoke to CHSC students about Public Art

Stella Madrid

Main partner

Denver Housing Authority

Public Relations

w:720-9323000 c:720-2199059

smadri@denverhousing.org

http://www.denverhousing. org/

Helps with connections to RTD and getting street closure permit for block party

David Stauffer

Main partner, local resident

La Alma Lincoln Park Neighborhood Association

Neighborhood Historian

303-667-3983

dave.stauffer.denver@ gmail.com

http://lincolnparkhistory. wordpress.com/

Spoke to CHSC students about history of neighborhood

Amy Banker

Master Art Plan facilitator

Denver Housing Authority - Youth Employment Academy

Senior Lead Coordinator @ Youth Employment Academy (YEA) of Denver Housing Authority

720-956-3833

abanke@denverhousing.org

1401 Mariposa St. Denver, CO 80204

http://www.denverhousing. org/residents/ JobDevelopment/ YouthJobAcademy/Pages/ default.aspx

Chelsea Romaniello

Master Art Plan facilitator, local artist

Arts Street

Youth Coordinator & Fine Arts Instructor

303-824-1334

c.romaniello@arts-street. org

1079 Osage St. Denver, CO 80204

www.arts-street.org www.behance.net/ chelsearomaniello

JC Futrell

Master Art Plan facilitator, local artist

Denver Housing Authority - Youth Employment Academy

Instructor & Job Developer @ Youth Employment Academy

jfutre@denverhousing.org

1401 Mariposa St. Denver, CO 80204

http://www.denverhousing. org/residents/ JobDevelopment/ YouthJobAcademy/Pages/ default.aspx

Katy Gevargis

Master Art Plan facilitator, local artist

Arts Street

Program Manager, Architecture & Urban Design Instructor

720-275-7632

katy.gevargis@arts-street. org

1079 Osage St. Denver, CO 80204

www.arts-street.org www.behance.net/ katycasper

Seth Adcock

Master Art Plan facilitator, local artist

Arts Street

Community Outreach, Tech Manager, & Video Instructor

303-824-1334

seth.adcock@arts-street. org

1079 Osage St. Denver, CO 80204

www.arts-street.org

Erika Righter

Organizational partner

Hope Tank

Owner

720-837-1565

erika@hopetank.org

64 Broadway Denver, CO 80203

http://hopetank.org/

Hope Tank is a gift store. They partner with people who/have a commitment to giving back. EVERY item sold at Hope Tank goes to support a different cause. They exist to educate and inspire people to create REAL change in communities.

Zachary Abote

Organizational partner

Bella Glass Production

Owner

303-462-4221

zach@bellaglasspro.com

3950 Wynkoop St. Denver, CO 80216

www.BellaGlassProduction. com

Worked with Zach on 10th Ave. Wayfinding Butterfly sign for DHA

52

EMAIL

ADDRESS

LINK

NOTES Rita, a long-time resident of La Alma Lincoln Park, came in to be interviewed by one of the CHSC LA ALMA CONNECTION classes.

Main author of this Master Art Plan.


NAME

CATEGORY

COMPANY/ ORGANIZATION

TITLE

PHONE

EMAIL

ADDRESS

LINK

NOTES

Kaleen Barnette

Organizational partner, Project partner

Colorado High School Charter

Concurrent Enrollment & Partnership Counselor

(303) 8928475

kbarnett@chscharter.org

1175 Osage Street, Suite #100, Denver, CO 80204

coloradohighschoolcharter. com

Colorado High School Charter is transforming the alternative education experience by igniting the potential within each of the diverse young people we serve. CHSC ensures students’ personal and academic growth by creating tailored curricula, a supportive school environment, and community partnerships. They empower their students to succeed in life and positively contribute to their families and communities by offering them the freedom and resources to pursue a post-secondary path aligned with their individualized goals. Arts Street became a partner of CHSC in 2015 and continues to provide the art classes for CHSC students.

Jade Baranski

Partner

Joylab

President

(916) 2081939

jade@joylabco.com

1368 E 26th Ave. Denver, CO 80205

http://www.joylabco.com/

JoyLab supports nonprofits, small businesses and social enterprises with branding services tailored for good. Jade came into Arts Street and taught the social media weekend intensive workshop.

Michelle Jacobson

Partner

Art Distrit on Santa Fe, Cherry Creek Properties, Inc.

ADSF Secretary, REALTOR Broker Associate

303-503-5009

michellejacobson@me.com

5655 S. Yosemite St., Suite 109 Greenwood Village, CO 80111

artdistrictonsantafe.com

Came and spoke to youth on March 10, 2016 about getting lighting installed on 10th Ave., brought sound and light artists that have a studio in 910 Arts on Santa Fe Drive (Knowmad.Colab)

Talya Dornbush, M.Ed

Partner

Metro State University (Center for Visual Arts)

Education Director (High School Programs)

303-294-5207 x115

tdornbus@msudenver.edu

965 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO 80204

www.msudenver.edu/cva

She runs similar service-learning programs at CVA as Arts Street - cannot attend event, but would like to be involved somehow.

Benjamin Wind

Potential partner

Colorado Construction Institute

Development Associate

303-997-0453

Benjamin.Wind@ CCIDenver.org

3532 Franklin St., Suite J Denver, CO 80205

www.CCIDenver.org

CCI is a nonprofit training organization providing innovative 21st century preapprentice and apprentice programs where people learn the soft and hard skills necessary to bridge the middle-skills gap. They offer a federally-funded YouthBuild program focused on serving high school dropouts, and several industry-supported construction training classes for unemployed and underemployed adults that lead to careers in residential construction. Arts Street partnered with CHSC and CCI on an ArtPlace America creative placemaking grant application. It was not granted, but there are opportunities for future partnerships - CCI youth could build 3D art that Arts Street youth designs for 10th Ave.

Cheryl Spector

Potential partner

Santa Fe BID, Spector Associates

Architect, Principal

303-333-3274

caspector@ SpectorAssociates.com

910 Santa Fe Dr., Studio 12

www.SpectorAssociates. com

Developed sustainable artist live/work spaces, 910 Arts on Santa Fe Dr., also on the Santa Fe BID board

Merrill Kingsbury

Potential partner

Colorado State University Denver Extension

Master Gardener Program Assistant

720-913-5272

merrill.kingsbury@ denvergov.edu

888 E. Iliff Ave. Denver, CO 80210

www.denverext.colostate. edu

Merrill can find a Master Gardener to teach a class to Arts Street youth about garden design. The final project could be a demonstration garden planted in the landscaped area of the right-of-way between the 10th Ave sidewalk and the street. One of the 10th Ave. residents, Orench Lagman, requested to have a garden in planters in front of his house at 1122 W. !0th Ave.

53


10TH AVE. PROPERTIES

This is a list of all the properties that line 10th Ave. within the project site from the 10th & Osage Light Rail Station to Santa Fe Dr. Arts Street youth and staff walked the site many times to make observations and discover opportunities. They also canvased a few times and made personal contact with a lot of the residents, tenants, and businesses. The notes from these activities about each property are included. Properties are listed in order as they exist on the north side from west to east and then as they exist on the south side west to east. ADDRESS

1000 OSAGE ST

1301 W 10TH AVE

1299 W 10TH AVE

PROPERTY TYPE

COMMERCIAL RESTAURANT

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL RESTAURANT

YEAR BUILT

1911

2012

2012

OWNER

BUCKHORN ASSOCIATESÂ

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

CONTACT INFO

NOTES (I.E. EXISTING BEAUTY, OPPORTUNITIES, ETC.)

NORTH OR SOUTH SIDE

General Manager: Bill Dutton www.buckhorn.com

Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant, manager has given Arts Street permission to paint the north side of the wooden fence around parking lot (this is not visible from 10th Ave., but could serve as a practice/rotating mural location for Arts Street youth), potential for partnership on with Moose-related public art projects. There are beautiful, old, faded, historic murals of native Americans and animals on the 10th Ave. side of the building. Info about the original artist could not be found, but eventually the right artist could be hired to restore the murals.

North

Youth on Record

Jami Duffy - Executive Director jami@youthonrecord.org

Youth on Record is similar to Arts Street in that they work with underserved youth, but music is their art form. Arts Street has worked with them in classes in the past and desires to forge a stronger partnership in the future. They hold community events in their plaza (with the Flor de La Alma sculpture by Emanuel Martinez). Youth on Record recently painted nice murals in the plaza outside their space. Arts Street and Youth on Record should combine efforts into a larger event next year.

North

Vacant

Joey Gargotto Broker @ Shames Makovsky jgargotto@shamesmakovsky.com 720-881-7540 Lease Brochure: https://s3.amazonaws.com/buildout-production/ documents/336924/ea445e2e87eec80476c99cf1885de48a0ff6804a/ upload.pdf?1458069416

New empty retail space on ground floor (2,750+/- RSF), NE corner of 10th & Navajo. DHA is looking for restaurant to occupy space and will help pay for tenant finish for the right business.

North

North

North

OCCUPANT

Buckhorn Exchange Restaurant

1295 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL MIX USE

2012

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Mariposa Apartments

Mariposa Leasing Office: (303) 893-6595

The public space outside this building is nice and new. There are concrete block benches between the sidewalk and the street - these could be painted or tiled with a mosaic design with permission from DHA. There is also something that looks like a utility box with a solar panel on it, which could be beautified with a mural.

1249 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL

2012

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Mariposa Fitness Center (for residents only)

Mariposa Leasing Office: (303) 893-6595

Nice new sidewalk & landscaping

1239 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL

2012

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant

Joey Gargotto Broker @ Shames Makovsky jgargotto@shamesmakovsky.com 720-881-7540

54

North


ADDRESS

PROPERTY TYPE

YEAR BUILT

OWNER

OCCUPANT

CONTACT INFO

1229 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL

2012

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant

Joey Gargotto Broker @ Shames Makovsky jgargotto@shamesmakovsky.com 720-881-7540

1209 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL

2012

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant

Joey Gargotto Broker @ Shames Makovsky jgargotto@shamesmakovsky.com 720-881-7540

1006 MARIPOSA ST

VACANT LAND

n/a

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

1129 W 10TH AVE

VACANT LAND

n/a

1125 W 10TH AVE

VACANT LAND

1123 W 10TH AVE

NOTES (I.E. EXISTING BEAUTY, OPPORTUNITIES, ETC.)

NORTH OR SOUTH SIDE North

New empty retail space on ground floor, NW corner of 10th & Mariposa

North

Vacant Land

Chain link fence, large empty lot - art park? DHA (Amy Banker says OK)

North

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant Land

Chain link fence, large empty lot - art park? DHA (Amy Banker says OK)

North

n/a

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant Land

Chain link fence, large empty lot - art park? DHA (Amy Banker says OK)

North

RESIDENTIAL

1884

CORDOVA,GEORGE M & FLORENCE I

?

Chain link Fence, ROW landscape

North

1117 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1900

ZAMORA,JULIA JOSEPHINE

?

Chain link Fence, ROW landscape

North

1115 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1886

SHOLES,CHRISTINE M

?

ROW Landscape, No fence

North

1103 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL TRIPLEX

1900

HOUSING AUTHORITYÂ

?

Already have toadstool in ROW, no fence, paint pavers in ROW?

North

1045 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1890

CANDELARIA,PETER A III

?

Broken chain link fence, ROW

North

1043 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1890

VINYARD,PEGGY

?

No fence, ROW

North

Nicest house on the block, spoke w owner and son, Dad is a wood carving artist (showed us his work on side-yard porch), son is also an artist, the daughter, Briana Mestas was in the parade float commercial spring break class, she goes to West High School

North

Chain link fence in front, solid wood fence on 10th Ave. side, ROW

North

1037 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1880

MESTAS,CLARA JEAN & RALPH MAX

MESTAS,CLARA JEAN & RALPH MAX

1027 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1914

GOMEZ,JOSEPH A & VIRGINIA M

?

1021 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1890

KAZUKAWA,JUNKO

?

Chain link fence, ROW

North

Chain link fence - ok to take down or beautify, ROW, ok with art in landscaped area in front of house (probably neighbors), really thinks lit art would be the best for safety and aesthetics, do not paint historic red slate sidewalks

North

Joe: 720-809-6123

1015 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1888

PRESSMAN,ROGER MARTIN

PRESSMAN,ROGER MARTIN

301-233-1215 roger@longevity-wellness.com

1011 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL ROWHOUSE

1895

CROWSER,DAMIANA

?

786 TRAILSIDE PL SAN MARCOS , CA 92078-6901

1009 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL ROWHOUSE

1895

EGIDIO,CARMEN

?

1005 KALAMATH ST

RESIDENTIAL DUPLEX

1923

CRUZ,JOE C

?

North North Upcycled fence (handmade w/ wood, pipes, etc)

North

55


ADDRESS

PROPERTY TYPE

YEAR BUILT

OWNER

OCCUPANT

CONTACT INFO

NOTES (I.E. EXISTING BEAUTY, OPPORTUNITIES, ETC.)

NORTH OR SOUTH SIDE

1010 KALAMATH ST UNIT VCNT

VACANT LAND

n/a

MCCANN,JEFFREY R

Vacant Land

phone: 650-996-2161, Denny Thompson (Cleans site) 720-445-1915

Chain link fence - Arts Street given permission to decorate fence. An upcycled eye made out of old yogurt lids was installed early summer of 2016.

North

2005

NEWSED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

NEWSED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Andrea Barela: 303-534-8342 Ext. 110 abarela@newsed.org

Andrea Barela is the president of the Santa Fe Business Improvement District. She came to a LA ALMA CONNECTION class at Arts Street and spoke to the students. She is an advocate for preserving Chicano/Latino culture in the neighborhood.

North

North

901 W 10TH AVE UNIT #COMM

COMMERCIAL RETAIL

901 W 10TH AVE UNIT #RESD

RESIDENTIAL MULTI UNIT APTS

2005

WEST 10TH AVENUE RESIDENCES LLP

LA VILLA DE BARELA CONDOS

Andrea Barela: 303-534-8342 Ext. 110 abarela@newsed.org

Andrea Barela is the president of the Santa Fe Business Improvement District. She came to a LA ALMA CONNECTION class at Arts Street and spoke to the students. She is an advocate for preserving Chicano/Latino culture in the neighborhood.

1001 #9A SANTA FE DR

INTERSTATE RESTAURANT

2005

Aaron Lobato, owner of restaurant

INTERSTATE RESTAURANT

www.interstaterestaurant.com/

Corner unit, ground floor of La Villa de Barela

North

1010 SANTA FE DR

INDUSTRIAL, AUTO SERVICE GARAG

1983

JJJ PARTNERSHIP LLP

Bud’s Muffler & Performance Exhaust Systems

http://www.budsmuffler.com/

Bud’s Muffler & Performance Exhaust Systems

North

Vacant Land

https://s3.amazonaws.com/buildout-production/ documents/377719/200a3b692a3568fb66b3495b11509b7d9fad370d/ upload.pdf?1465257577

Currently for sale and used as a dirt parking lot for DHA employees and construction crewman. Surrounded by a chain link fence which DHA has given permission to Arts Street to decorate

South

944 OSAGE ST

VACANT LAND

n/a

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

1322 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL MIX USE

2015

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Apartment residents

Mariposa Leasing Office: (303) 893-6595

South

1292 W 10TH AVE

COMMERCIAL MIX USE

2015

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant

https://s3.amazonaws.com/buildout-production/documents/336924/ ea445e2e87eec80476c99cf1885de48a0ff6804a/upload. pdf?1458069415

South

989 NAVAJO ST

COMMERCIAL MIX USE

2015

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Apartment residents

Mariposa Leasing Office: (303) 893-6595

New empty retail space on ground floor, SE corner of 10th & Navajo

South

998 NAVAJO ST

COMMERCIAL MIX USE

2015

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER

Vacant

https://s3.amazonaws.com/buildout-production/documents/336924/ ea445e2e87eec80476c99cf1885de48a0ff6804a/upload. pdf?1458069416

New empty retail space on ground floor, SE corner of 10th & Navajo

South

1130 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL ROWHOUSE

2003

RITTER,TERRI

?

White picket fence, ROW (currently vacant?)

South

1126 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL ROWHOUSE

2003

DUTTON,WILLIAM & GLORIA

?

White picket fence, ROW (is this owned by Bill Dutton, Manager of the Buckhorn Exchange?)

South

1122 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL ROWHOUSE

2003

LAGMAN,GLADWYN A & ORENCH

LAGMAN,GLADWYN A & ORENCH

Orenchlagman@gmail.com

White picket fence, ROW, owner has requested yard art with flower arrangements/ boxes with a bike lock in ROW

South

DEVINE,SHARON J

Sharon Devine sharon.devine@ucdenver.edu 303-570-5747

Iron fence on Lipan, ROW, nice new wood fence on 10th, cute pink house, garage door, allowing Arts Street to paint mural on new wood fence summer of 2016, partially funded by Urban Arts Fund

South

979 LIPAN ST

56

RESIDENTIAL

1890

DEVINE,SHARON J


ADDRESS

PROPERTY TYPE

YEAR BUILT

OWNER

OCCUPANT

CONTACT INFO

NOTES (I.E. EXISTING BEAUTY, OPPORTUNITIES, ETC.)

NORTH OR SOUTH SIDE

978 LIPAN ST

RESIDENTIAL

1924

GOMEZ,JOSEPH A & VIRGINIA

GOMEZ,JOSEPH A & VIRGINIA

Joe: 720-809-6123

Wood & chain link fence, barn door on garage,given Arts Street permission to paint on fence when future funding Is available

South

1026 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL

1890

QUINTANA,JOSEPHINE G

?

Chain link fence, ROW

South

PATRICK,JAMES A

Renter: Sarah Scalise 720-778-1086 sarah. scalise@gscolorado. org (lives behind the gate in the big red fence, would love a portal painted on the fence so it is obvious)

Owner: lives at 975 Kalamath

Chain link fence along Kalamath, red painted wooden fence on 10th Ave., ROW, white classical statue on porch, several apartments within house and another in carriage house on back, renters are interested, but owner not interested in mural on fence at this time

South

Owner: lives at 975 Kalamath

Chain link fence along Kalamath, red painted wooden fence on 10th Ave., ROW, white classical statue on porch, several apartments within house and another in carriage house on back, renters are interested, but owner not interested in mural on fence at this time

South

Owner: lives at 975 Kalamath

Carriage house used as a separate apartment, clearly gets tagged, has cool old barn door - could paint mural here, parcel shown on property records to be the same as 977 Kalamath

South

ROW, chain link fence, person that we spoke to at front desk likes classical/ancient art, but in general doesn’t seem to be interested in our cause

South

https://www.knottytie.com/ www.fabricblissdenver.com http://www.apartments.com/villa-tod-apartments-denver-co/mfjzkbh/

New company to the neighborhood: Knotty Tie Co. Custom Handmade Ties & Scarves

South

http://theazatlantheatre.wix.com/aztlantheatre

Potential opportunity for mural on large, white, brick wall along 10th Ave. with owner’s permission. The theater has huge potential to be an anchor on Santa Fe Dr. that draws more people along 10th to the Art District. The venue was originally built as a movie theater in 1920 and still displays the original ornate design. In the ‘80s, it was transformed into a bar and venue, hosting artists such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers. It currently hosts First Friday happy hours and is available to rent for events, but the venue has fallen into disrepair. There has been recent interest in reviving the old theater, but efforts have stalled.

South

977 KALAMATH ST

RESIDENTIAL

1010 W 10TH AVE & 1009 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL (apartments in 977 Kalamath St.)

1018 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL (carriage house of 977 Kalamath St.)

?

PATRICK,JAMES A

?

990 KALAMATH ST

COMMERCIAL - OFFICE BUILDING

1951

LOCAL NUMBER NINE BLDG ASSN

LOCAL NUMBER NINE BLDG ASSN (non-profit organization)

926 W 10TH AVE

RESIDENTIAL APARTMENT UNITS

1924

VILLA TOD LLC

Knotty Tie Co., Fabric Bliss, & residents in apartments

964 SANTA FE DR UNIT -976

COMMERCIAL THEATER

1890

1890

1928

PATRICK,JAMES A

CORREA,TIM V

?

Aztlan Theater

57


What Makes a Great Place?

Place Game Place Performance Evaluation PPS is a nonprofit organization dedicated to creating and sustaining public places that build communities. We provide technical assistance, education, and research through programs in parks, plazas and central squares; buildings and civic architecture; transportation; and public markets. Since our founding in 1975, we have worked in over 2,500 communities in the United States and around the world, helping people to grow their public spaces into vital community places.

58

A Tool for Initiating the Placemaking Process

www.pps.org

Š2011 Project for Public Spaces, Inc. The 'Placegame' cannot be used without formal, written permission from PPS. If permission is granted, full credit must be given to PPS on all written materials and in any verbal descriptions of the game.


!

ComfoRT & ImAgE

!

Rate the Place: PooR

good

overall attractiveness

1

2

3

4

feeling of safety

1

2

3

4

Cleanliness/Quality of maintenance

1

2

3

4

Comfort of places to sit

1

2

3

4

Comments/Notes:

ACCESS & LINkAgES

1. What do you like best about this place?

2. List things that you would do to improve this place that could be done right away and that wouldn’t cost a lot: PooR

good

Visibility from a distance

1

2

3

4

Ease in walking to the place

1

2

3

4

Transit access

1

2

3

4

Clarity of information/signage

1

2

3

4

Comments/Notes:

USES & ACTIVITIES

Identify Opportunities

PlacE GaME

SITE #:________________ Date:_____________

PooR

3. What changes would you make in the long term that would have the biggest impact?

good

mix of stores/services

1

2

3

4

frequency of community events/activities

1

2

3

4

overall busy-ness of area

1

2

3

4

Economic vitality

1

2

3

4

4. Ask someone who is in the “place” what they like about it and what they would do to improve it. Their answer:

Comments/Notes:

SoCIAbILITy

PooR

good

Number of people in groups

1

2

3

4

Evidence of volunteerism

1

2

3

4

Sense of pride and ownership

1

2

3

4

Presence of children and seniors

1

2

3

4

5. What local partnerships or local talent can you identify that could help implement some of your proposed improvements? Please be as specific as possible.

Comments/Notes:

59


THANK YOU!!!

60

Creative Youth Take Flight: La Alma Connection Master Art Plan  

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