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ERI AGRIOU 4

ACHRAF BAZNANI 10

RHINE BERNARDINO 16

BENJAMIN BIRD 22

JOHN BLACK 28

CHUNG CHAK 34

DUNCAN GIDNEY 40


Art Reveal Magazine

ZAINAB HASAN 46

NIDAL KHADDOUR 52

YONGJAE KIM 58

NOVAK SLUNJSKI 64

CATE SMITH 70

LANCE TURNER 76

THE UNSTITUTE 82

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ERI AGRIOU Athens, Greece

2015

A POEM, AN IMAGE, 20 CONTEMPORARY WOMEN POETS+20 CONTEMPORARY WOMEN PRINTMAKERS, G. Gounaropoulos Museum, Athens

2014

ΨΧ+4 MOMENTS, Myro Gallery, Thessaloniki

2014

WHEN IMAGES NARRATES-Tribute to Tonia Nikolaides, National Bank of Greece Cultural Foundation (MIET), Thessaloniki

2012

“A WORD AN IMAGE, AN IMAGE A WORD”, Cultural Center of Melina Merkouri, Athens

2007

Αwarded with the 1st prize on the 26th EXHIBITION OF VISUAL ARTS, Parnassos Literature Society, Athens

THE DUAL SELF (DETAIL)


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PSYCHOSTASIA

Eri Agriou was born in Piraeus in 1973. She studied Graphic Design in AKTO and worked as a graphic designer in publication companies for 13 years. She attended workshops of byzantine iconography and mosaic and she followed classes for two years in Athens School of Fine Arts as an attendant student in the class of Yiannis Psychopedis. In 2007 she won the First Prize in the 27th Visual Arts Exhibition of Parnassos Literature Society. In 2009 begun her studies in the Department of Fine and Applied Arts, university of Western Macedonia, where she won the scholarship of IKY foundation for the academic year 2010-2011. She is an active member of En Flo group since 2011. She graduated in June 2014 under the supervision of Harris Kondosphyris and Dimitra Siaterli. Her art is mainly anthropocentric. In her recent work she explores the concepts of life and death, fate and human will, and the soul. Using a variety of media she depicts the oppositions of life and the path to self-realization. She uses mostly natural materials such as paper, thread, gauze and fabric; materials that are related to the fragility of human nature. Her art has influences from Byzantine iconography and Greek mythology.


Art Reveal Magazine

CIRCLE OF EXISTENCE B

CIRCLE OF EXISTENCE C

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When, how and why you started creating? It may sound like a cliché, but I was doing this ever since I can remember. I was born in Greece with ancient ruins all around, Byzantine icons and murals in orthodox churches, small or large bits of Greek culture everywhere. I was raised in a house with lots of books. I remember I was very fascinated by the pictures, especially the illustrated ones. My family was very supportive. My grandfather would take me to the Parthenon and the museums around the area, because that was his old neighborhood and he had memories he wanted to share. When I went to high school I was a very practical kid and I thought that if I followed applied art studies it would be easier for me to find a job later. So that is what I did. My first studies were in graphic design after which I worked as a graphic designer for many years. Then I discovered that as you grow up, you owe it to yourself to take a second chance on yourself. So I left my job and I received a BA in Fine Arts. This was something in which I enjoyed every minute! Making art is more like a need to me. Creating keeps me balanced.

Who or what has had a lasting influence on your art practice? I can distinguish two things that have had a great impact in the way I practice my art. The first is my background in graphic design because of the way that the applications of design can vary greatly. In my studies, I was

introduced to many materials and techniques and it seemed to me back then that the combination of the above was very important to accomplish the best result. So when I make art I get the satisfaction mostly from the combination of materials and techniques I use and the whole process of creation than for example a certain concept behind my artwork. Secondly would have to be the variety of teachers that I have had through the years of my studies. I was blessed to have as teachers many great Greek artists. Everyone gave me a little piece of their experience and made me understand that every one of them had their own approach to creating art. That helped me to find and develop my own visual language.

like to relate my work with the space I am given and let those two things to converse.

How has your work changed in the past years?

Name three artists you’d like to be compared to.

There was a period when I could not paint anything in color. Ι used to primarily paint, but in 2010 I felt the need to express myself through more than just painting. Of course that led to another period of going back and forth, with way to much antagonizing, because it seemed there was nothing I could find and feel satisfied from the result. At the same time I was introduced to printmaking and somewhere between printmaking techniques and printing was hiding the key to unblock my creativity. I ended up combining those two in my work. I also added materials like thread, fabric, and gauze. One more thing that is different now has to do with the way I prefer to present my work. I don’t like to just hang my work on the wall on a nice spot. Framed works are not my favorite. So whenever it is possible I

Even if they are influences and similarities between artists each one has a unique way to make art. So I am not sure if I want to use the word “compare”. I can use the word “like” or “admire” or better the sentence “Oh I wish I have done this!” and tell you three artist that come to my mind. Greek artist Fotini Hamidieli for her female figures and watercolors, Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota for her installations with the threads and French artist Christian Boltanski for his way to visualize the fear of death and absence.

What are you working on right now? I am experimenting with silkscreen prints and some wood engraved mini prints. In a few days I will participate on an art festival in North Greece, where many artist will meet and work on a big vineyard to create artscarecrows. Then after that back to Athens, for the International Contemporary Art fair named Art Athina. There on their parallel program we will present with the EN FLO group a collaborative project called Short Stories.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Be honest with your art so your art will be genuine and people will feel it inside when they see.


Art Reveal Magazine

UNTITLED

HTTP://WWW.ERIAGRIOU.COM

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ACHRAF BAZNANI Marrakesh, Morocco

2015

Colour brust, PH21 Gallery, Budapest, Hungary

2015

Park Art Fair International, Triberg, Germany

2015 Gallery Globe, Adisson, Texas, USA 2015

Best of the show in Park Art Fair International 2015, Germany

2015

Featured artist in the book “Internationale Kunst Heute”

THE UNDERWATER WORLD


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ROBOT

Moroccan photographer and filmmaker Achraf Baznani (pronounced: Ashraf Baznani) carries on the traditions of Surrealism with his wild, imaginative, and wholly impractical imagery. Among his inventive scenarios, small human figures -often the artist himself- appear trapped within glass jars or the size of a camera lens; in other works, Baznani more or less dissects his body, as for example, in one, he cleanly removes his brain from his cranium, or in another, twists off his hand, much as if it were a light bulb. Imparted throughout such works are strong senses of humor and wonder, and as such, Baznani’s art offers a Surrealistic take on life experience in the digital age.


Art Reveal Magazine

THE AVIATOR

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What is your creative process like? My favorite parts are layering and image sharpening, by layering I create images and alter those using functions such as layers, edit an image by adding new layers without altering the original image or add and subtract layers as my work on an image to create the final product. In Photoshop, I use the smart tools to sharpen image to minimize every issues with photo blurring. Although I also love the end of most projects when everything comes together and it looks great and you can stand back and say “Hey, I made that!” Do you think of yourself as a photographer or as a conceptual artist? I think I am a conceptual artist. Conceptual photography makes healthy use of graphical symbols to represent ideas, movements, moods, anything and everything that the photographer might want to include in the message of their photograph. Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. On any given day you can find me behind the screen of my personal computer searching and experimenting new ideas in terms of photography and art. I was drawing a lot as a kid, and I participate in local competitions, I won many prizes, because my speed in the drawing and imagining new ideas, that contributes to the success of my artworks. The result impresses the jury. I experimented then caricature;

a number of national newspapers in Morocco published my drawings. But I stopped drawing for study. I think each photographer has his or her own inspirations, and likewise each photographer will follow different methods and use different techniques. I tend to start off with a spark of inspiration. This can practically start off from anything or anywhere. I love to meet people and learn from others. In such a way I keep my inspiration alive. I use different techniques and tools. Lightroom is ideal for correcting the images. I also like to use Photoshp for retouching. I learnt mainly by trial and error, along with plenty of experimentation. Tutorials and guidelines available on various websites also proved helpful. I believe that when one takes photography seriously, there is more than one inspiration. I have learnt from many sources and have been influenced in various ways by different photographers. If I were to mention any one in particular I would say that Robert Cappa, who is a famous Hungarian photographer, influenced me a great deal, especially with his photo titled “The Falling Soldier”. This particular photo mesmerized me when I first saw it, because it is a clear depiction of war but it is represented in a surreal way.

myself in a small world? As I said it is all about being inspired by something. So I basically use the story I heard, or the idea I had to take a photo. I then use my own portrait because after all these ideas or messages affected me and so I feel better if I use my image in the conceptual photos I create. I manage to feel more a part of them in such a way.

Describe a real-life situation that inspired you?

Professionally, what’s your goal?

When I was young I was always very obsessed with movie miniatures and movie magic and things of small scale, I used tilt-shift to create small worlds by Photoshop and then I thought to myself, why not putting

What jobs have you done other than being an artist? I worked the last 12 years as general manager of a web hosting company, it's a tiring job, and needs to work hard all day, and sometimes at night. It has no relation with my current work as an artist, but my experience in the field of IT helped me too for being the artist that I am now, because I use the same tools. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. It's hard to compare to someone, especially in the field of art, each artist has its own style, but we can say that I almost the same style as Gilbert Garcin, the French photographer, we use our own portrait in our artistic work, we are self-taught, we have our absurd universe.

I always dreamed to exhibit my work in galleries around the world, I managed to exhibit in Hungary, the United State and Germany. Now I would like to publish my third book.


Art Reveal Magazine

UNIQUENESS

WWW.BAZNANI.COM

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RHINE BERNARDINO Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam BEAUTY OVER SUFFERING


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MECHANIZED INTIMACY

2015

exhibition + Artist talk / Sao La / 2015 / Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

2014

La premiere edition du Festival international du Film de Todoroki, Tokyo, Japan

2014

Kolkata International Performance Art Festival, Kolkata, India

2013

10th Busan International Video Festival, Busan, Korea

2013

Modern Panic IV/ Apiary Studios / London, UK


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How and why started you creating? I started working in films with my ex-partner when I was a Political Science student in the university. I became more and more exposed in cinema and my interest in it grew. I eventually saw the potential of the medium to communicate, reach out to people and it’s power to give voice to marginal views. I also felt the need to express myself and produce something that isn’t just papers and papers and more papers. Along with this, I’ve always been into photography and thought, “why not shift to film”?, thinking: "how different could it be?" Haha. In film school, you just have to submit works, even if you don’t want to. hahaha. But I loved it. Even though the department was focused primarily on narrative filmmaking, there were professors who encouraged experimental works, which was what I was leaning towards and started exploring on at that time. A couple of my professors would mention now and then that my works reminded them of this and that piece or artist. This led me to learn about various contemporary art practices and one thing led to another. What is the most challenging part about working interdisciplinary? I can imagine there are varying challenges, depending on what disciplines are used. I honestly think that working interdisciplinary lessens the challenges and constraints of a particular discipline but it gets tricky when other people tend to label your practice into one of the disciplines that you are working with. I feel like I can’t just say I’m an interdisciplinary or a multimedia artist. Because people would be like:

what kind? Then it’ll be like: Oh, so you’re more of a performance artist (if they are aware that such thing exists). Somehow you still end up pigeonholing yourself in order to have a solid identity, which I really find rather ironic. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? I don’t really think so much of what kind of artist I am. If it’s beyond the technical necessity to identify me as an artist, then I honestly can’t be bothered. Besides, there are a lot of controversies and debates on what really constitute as conceptual art. I just create works, they’re energyconsuming and mentally draining enough to keep me occupied. So, I guess the answer is no. haha Tell us a little about background and how influences you as an artist.

year-long projects launched in a year and will be occupying me for a while, along with collaborations I’m planning with artist friends. I have been offered a place for my MFA at the Royal College of Art and Goldsmiths College, both in London and now in the excruciating phase of waiting for scholarship and funding results. If I’m not successful, I plan to launch a crowdfunding campaign. If crowdfunding fails, I’ll be doing art residencies in various places and after that, I plan to travel for about a year in South America to collaborate with different kinds of artists and connect the art initiative I started with art spaces there.

your that

I’m a woman from a third world country who experiences the day to day oppression of racism, sexism and discrimination in varying degrees and subtleties. The influences are quite apparent in my body of work. What are your future plans as an artist? I’m currently working on three yearlong projects --- Shellfishperhour selfie per hour for a year, How Are You? - a Facebook project wherein I message five different 'friends' everyday and maintain a conversation with them for a year and Art Race - wherein I send at least 1 application for residencies, exhibitions, collaborations,etc. everyday. I will start Ready-To-Wed in a month or two, wherein I’ll be wearing a wedding dress for a year. These are all part of 5-in-1 series of

FEMALE BODY INSIDE (DOCUMENTATION)


Art Reveal Magazine

MECHANIZED INTIMACY

WWW.RHINEBERNARDINO.COM

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BENJAMIN BIRD London, England

2015 RCA Secret, Art Dubai, UAE 2015 RCA Secret, Royal Collage of Art, Battersea, London 2009 Turner Contemporary Open, Turner contemporary project Space, Margate 2008 Stew, The Rag Factory, London 2008 BA Hons Photography University for the Creative Arts, Rochester, England

WAKE UP


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WAKE UP

My artistic practice primarily concerns cities and spaces. I examine the anatomy of particular urban environments with an interest in architecture, history and development. This comes about though the photographic process. Recently however, my practice has expanded to include language. Current work investigates the construction of housing in Britain, observed through the prism of language used in the marketing of living space set against the background of the housing crisis in the UK..


Art Reveal Magazine

DOG DAYS

DOG DAYS

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Art Reveal Magazine Briefly describe the work you do. My work tends primarily to look at the urban environment with an interest in its relationship to land, history and politics. Normally the approach is photographic, but currently I am experimenting with a combination of image and sculpture. Partly it is an attempt to have a more physical connection with the working process again. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? I’m really not sure, but perhaps something that involves being outside, in nature. Sometimes though it might good to have a job completely removed from art, almost to have 2 separate lives!

came out how they were pictured in my mind. It was never ‘real’ enough for me when painting from still life or a landscape. My efforts could not achieve what the photographs had captured. So I ended up using the camera. Or perhaps I just can’t paint! How would you describe the art scene in your area? Huge, it’s London. Sometimes it feels like a contradiction. It seems quite vast, but at the same time can feel very small. Being a capital city there is large mix of cultures and catalysts to work with, or be inspired by. A plethora of events, shows and happenings all over the city can in some ways be a downside as it can be overwhelming and leave you drained. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received?

What art do you most identify with? Predominantly, photography and imagery. Also, work that leans toward graphics. although I don’t think that’s reflected in my own practice. Work than resonates with me strongly, is visually interesting and has a strong idea behind it. It has to work on different levels, and encourage the observer to look into the idea more, raising questions. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? No. Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. I always liked to draw as a child. At secondary school I started to pick up a camera and used photographs as references for painting. It turned out the photographs where better than the painting! I was always frustrated with painting because the results never

Don’t worry too much what other people think.


Art Reveal Magazine

WAKE UP

WWW.BENBIRDPHOTO.COM

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JOHN BLACK Derry City, Ireland

BA Hons in Fine Arts (Belfast School of Art) Commissioned Work for Void Gallery, Derry, Ireland Currently studying a Masters in Fine Art (Belfast School of Art)

BARRIER


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Art Reveal Magazine Born in 1971, I grew up in the Bogside area of Derry, where I continues to live and work. I first studied Fine Art at the North West Regional College in Derry under the direction of Conor McFeely, one of Ireland’s most renowned installation and video artists. My work to date includes a variety of media in which examines power dynamics, the language of communication and the effects of creating environments primarily with installation, sculpture and performance, as well as photography, sound and video. There is a strong recurrent central theme to all my work that explores areas of class and labour, including issues surrounding that of the human condition, in which I seeks to challenge all relationships based on domination and submission, power and control. In particular the relationship between that of the state and its citizens.

I have exhibited locally with recent projects that include Cracking the Code, Barrier 14, Action/Reaction, Open All Hours and Insecurity. I have engaged in Street Theater and Performance Art since the mid 1990's whilst living and working in Galway, Belfast and again in my native Derry, where I have observed and challenged controversial themes from occupation to militarism, human rights and social justice issues surrounding emotive topics relating to areas of social change. Likewise I regularly participated in Muralist artwork on the streets highlighting both national and international themes. During the 2013 Turner Prize Exhibition in Derry he worked as an 'interpreter' for the British born artist Tino Sehgal as part of 'This is exchange' that was originally created in 2003 and recreated again for the Turner Prize Exhibition. I have completed a BA Hons Degree in Fine Art at the University of Ulster Belfast where I am currently continuing my studies into Fine Arts as well as participating in several group exhibitions

OAH


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Art Reveal Magazine When, how and why started you creating? I’m still relatively new to sculpture and installation art as I feel I am still learning and developing all the time. The type of art that I’m involved in creating is inspired mainly from the place where I grew up, the people and the strong sense of community spirit it has. It’s a place with a long history of self-organisation, mutual aid and solidarity during difficult and traumatic periods and despite that, people have rallied together and faced enormous challenges head on. As someone who also takes part in various community and social justice campaigns, I’ve always tried to find different ways to make people more aware of what’s going on through street art such as murals or performance art, just attempting to engage with people on another lever. For myself growing up you would have been conscious of art in the form of street murals around the Bogside. In many ways it was like living in an open air art gallery. Going to school, watching mural artists prepping gable walls of a terrace house while being questioned or harassed by a passing army or police patrol. Then on the way home again checking on how far they had come on in creating the mural and what it was saying. Little did I know that I would have been involved in creating murals as well on the same walls and at times with the same activists’ years later. Like the artwork I create, it’s inspired by environment, the people or community around me. It explores aspects of class, identity or issues surrounding that of the human condition. It’s continually questioning or challenging authority or relationships based on domination and submission, power and control. How has your work changed in the past years? I studied fine art at college thinking that all I wanted to do was to sketch and paint. I guess at the time I really wanted to learn how to work with all the various materials that come along with painting from the canvas itself to the oils and brushes. Basically to achieve a better understanding as to how I could do this, to move forward, mature and improve. In the process of doing that I happened to take things another stage further and ended up on a Fine Art course being taught by Conor Mcfeely, one of the main installation artists in Ireland today. Under his direction I was being introduced to and inspired by the works of artists such as Paul Tekk, Mike Kelley, Marina Abramović, Tony Oursler, Joseph Beuys and Tracey Emin. It was something that I never even thought about before. It gave me a greater understanding of other forms of art and I really enjoyed exploring and finding out more about various concepts involved and what influenced the art that they were creating.

Experiencing good sculpture and installation first hand is something else, such as with Conor McFeely’s ‘Weathermen’ series or ‘Inside His Masters Voice’. The environments he creates are really unlike other forms of art I’ve witnessed. I would describe them as menacing and strangely sinister environments mixed up with elements from the world of sci-fi. Artists like Colin Darke or Rita Duffy with their own interpretations and observations on life and politics here, art that visually provokes engagement and debate. All this has influenced my own thought process as can be seen my own work and how has developed like ‘Cracking the Code’ and the type of materials I engage with. More recently I’ve been introducing elements of video and sound, as well as performance or photography. What is your favourite experience as an artist? It has always been the process of constructing an idea right from its initial inception, its development, through to its final outcome when it’s complete and shown publicly for the first time. Yes it would have to be this process which fuels the type of art that I’m involved in, whether that’s in creating sculpture, installation or sound. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? My grandfather was a shoemaker all his life and was said to have always felt a great honour in having a trade or a craft like that which I really admire. Since leaving school I’ve worked in either Community or Public Sector jobs, from youth work and welfare rights to nursing. I believe in a decent living wage for everyone no matter what your trade or occupation may be. However I never felt the need or seen the attraction in having some high-powered position within management, ordering people about or making those on a different pay band jump through hoops every day to meet deadlines. It’s something I really despise. Ideally it would be something that you would be able to live off something that I love and enjoy doing like art. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I feel Derry has always had a relatively healthy enough art scene, it’s small unlike other cities despite its history of the past forty years. I find people here who have been involved in the art scene, much like the music scene, they have an energy and the desire to achieve their goals and accomplice things they like doing. In particular over the past decade more established galleries have emerged with internationally known artists exhibiting locally, this in turn has had a positive impact as people locally are getting the


Art Reveal Magazine chance to experience art that they would never had access to before without having to travel. More importantly for myself, I can see that it has motivated some positive independent thinking locally with emerging artists networking more and organising themselves as a community and sharing resources.

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What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? Without a shadow of doubt it has got to be to document your work. Whatever you are doing record, photograph and document its development as you progress to the final outcome. In saying that create a back-up of your files and images in case problems arise. Sadly I had the experience of losing work that I was never able to recover. So for myself that would be the best art tip or advise I could give.

WAR CHILD

WWW.DECONTROL.IE


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CHUNG CHAK San Mateo/Bensalem, USA

As an image maker formally trained as a designer, I have found my voice through semiotic interpretation. Exploring how different levels of meanings can be expressed through complex image layers is another creative goal of mine. I invent photographic metaphors that carry hidden meanings. I view my imagery as timeless visual poetry with psychological impact where viewers can no longer remain passive. Conceptualizing and resolving a solution is as rewarding as the seeing the result. I have always felt that we have very little control of our lives. Therefore I enjoy the process of photomontage because I can randomly connect unrelated persons, events, and environments. Although my subjects may never have the chance to meet in reality, they are permanently bound within my artwork. By taking this approach, I find myself in absolute power to control and design. I have accumulated “image banks” for my photomontages, allowing my instincts to determine the relationship between these random images. Although I normally stitch images by computer program, my projects have been finalized in digital prints, silver prints, gum--‐dichromate, Cyanotype, and image transfer.

TWO BOYS AT SUNSET


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OPEN

Marks: 63/64 is a series attempts to interpret the unknown territory of alternate possibilities, in life and death. When life comes to an end, the few marks we made in this physical world still exist as bliss and as sorrow. Following my father’s death and the loss of my friend in a car accident, I pondered how there might have been a different outcome. Questions of how arbitrary chances affect our fates brought out traditional Chinese religious beliefs I learned throughout my childhood. I began taking pictures on the streets with no particular plans. Traditional photographs have earned a reputation for being an “object of truth�, but are only representations that can still be altered and detached from reality. I turn common places and average people on the streets into characters in my own private world to reflect human longings for existence, eternity, and companionship.


Art Reveal Magazine

BOY ALONE AT CHRISTMAS SHOPPING MALL

When and what inspired you to start photographing? I was talented in drawing and sketching as a teenager which is why I chose to study design after finishing high school. Photography was a mandatory subject for all first-year students and this is how I was first introduced to a camera. After I shot a few rolls of film, I fell in love with the medium, as it is a quick and efficient way of recording an image. My direction changed completely from street photography to image narratives while attending graduate school. As my major was graphic design, I was particularly interested in using photographic imagery to transcend messages in the

public media. I carefully construct images through either staging or digital manipulation in my recent work. To be honest, I identify myself as a photo based artist instead of a photographer.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. My cultural background plays a significant role in my image making process. As an immigrant from Hong Kong living in the United States, my work consistently examines how human beings interact with their

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Art Reveal Magazine surroundings. I find my inspiration through culture clashes, gender expectation, religion, and historical events. At first glance, my work does not show a strong cultural identity, but I believe my ethnicity as an Asian male has made a significant impact on my method of art making. My work consistently carries a theme of alienation.

Graphic Design, I consider half of my career outside of art as an educator. If I had to choose a new career path outside of being an artist, I would be a chef known for deconstructing the process of creativity in my complex concoctions because creating food is an art.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? Don’t wait until the last minute to get your work done.

What are your future plans as an artist?

LONE SHADOW

What is the most challenging part about being an artist? As an artist working with narratives and exploring how different levels of meanings can be expressed through complex image layers is the creative challenge that I enjoy. I invent photographic metaphors that carry hidden meanings. In recent years, I have accumulated “image banks” for my photomontages allowing my instincts to determine the relationship between these random images. Another major challenge of my work is finding the most appropriate process to present the content. Although I create images exclusively through photographs, I believe every project deserves its own unique form of execution to fit the content. Therefore, I have experimented with many production methods, such as cyanotypes, gum dichromate, liquid light, image transfer, photo installation, artist book, as well as combining print making techniques in my photo work.

I have been teaching graphic design for fifteen years now and it is very rewarding to see my students reach their full potential as they enter the professional world. Thus, I have not planned on any drastic changes. As for my creative work, I am currently working on a new project called “Looking for Chinatowns” which is a dedication to the early Chinese immigrants in U.S. in the late 1860’s. The Chinese provided cheap “coolie” laborers to build the transcontinental railroads, but ended up poor and lonely due to racial prejudice. During late 1800’s, many railroad towns had a China sector but most of them were all driven out except the ones in the metropolitan. Since 2013, I have driven twelve thousands miles throughout the eleven western states to photograph thirty historical sites. The project outcome will include three components, including a 40-page letterpress book, a series of photomontage which follows the creative direction I have established, as well as a documentary series which is quite different from the creative direction I have recently taken.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? Since my BFA and MFA degrees are in graphic design, and I am currently working as an Associate Professor of ORANGE STRIPES


Art Reveal Magazine

BIRD & REFLECTION

WWW.CHUNG-CHAK.COM

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DUNCAN GIDNEY Amsterdam, Netherlands

Babayan Culture House, Turkey Nelimarrka Museum, Finland Untitled BCN, Spain VCAM 1,2,3, Canada

My work explores intersections- between civilisation and nature, between different forces impacting and changing one another. I like to document ignored spaces- places that are engineered to be invisible and looked over. By treating them with the same reverence as a natural landscape, I seek to immortalise places seen as ordinary and boring.


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How and why started you creating? I have been creating for as long as I can remember. I think it was just an innate instinct to make objects and try new things. I always wished that I could draw and paint as well as my classmates, and I found it frustrating that I couldn’t. It wasn’t until I seriously started photography and filmmaking in high school that I found something that really spoke to my skill set, and a medium in which I could express myself with less frustration. I have taken breaks from both over the years, but have never been able to stay away for that long.

How has your work changed in the past years? My work has gained focus in the past years. I have gone from being a very scattered photographer, to being one almost entirely interested in landscape and empty interior spaces. Being a real estate photographer for seven years really made me appreciate minimalism, architecture and the beautiful simplicity of lines. As a filmmaker, I made a huge number of short films, working quick and dirty. I have since spent a whole year on a longer film, and am currently working on a feature documentary. I might have just been waiting for the right stories to tell, or maybe I just wanted to really invest myself into a project with a long term vision.


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If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? I have usually had work while being an artist, like being a real estate photographer, event videographer and cookie company owner / baker. Sometimes the responsibility of having to earn money has been a hindrance to making art, but I have always tried to remain productive creatively during busy times. I liked being a real estate photographer because it forced me to take hundreds of photos a day, and also provided opportunities for fun personal projects when I was left alone in people’s homes. It was also the exploration in that job, the visiting of many new places that informs my current work. Currently I am devoting my time entirely to my work, which is new for me, but it would also be nice to be able to use my creative skills in a professional environment again, ideally in advertising. I love problem solving, and advertising provides an opportunity to solve problems, with restrictions and on a deadline. Sometimes I meander, so it would be nice to be under the gun once and awhile.

What is your creative process like? For film, my process involves a great deal of stewing on ideas, up to years before finally producing the work itself. Sometimes a scrap of an idea will remain just that, until it develops into something fully realised after bouncing off other ideas. I have found that I work very slowly, so I try and nurture thoughts and give them space to develop without discarding them for not growing. My photography is more spontaneous, often accomplished with little planning more than trying to see something new and exploring my surroundings. There is nothing specific that I go looking for, I just know it when I see it, so the process is all about putting myself into situations that might provide the spark for new work, whether that be travelling to a new country, or even just cycling on a new road home from somewhere.


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What is the most challenging part about working with photography? My work depends heavily on exploration, so without travelling, either locally or internationally, my work stagnates and I lose interest in my surroundings as a artist. One of the reasons we moved to Amsterdam from Victoria was that I felt like I knew Victoria too well, and nothing there surprised me anymore, and I have discovered that I need that surprise for my work. Sometimes everyday life gets in the way of exploring and taking photos, but sometimes photos come from the most unintentional exploring. What are your future plans as an artist? My plan is to continue with my landscape photography. I’m travelling to Turkey for a month long residency in the Cappadocian region. That should prove to be a challenge, since my work up until now has been predominantly urban in nature, and while there are extensive settlements there, they are primarily cave dwellings, and not traditional urban cities. I’m excited to see how that affects my work. I also have plans to continue my film work, with a feature documentary being completed next year


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ZAINAB HASSAN Islamabad, Pakistan

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2014

Was awarded Merit Scholarship in Rome Art Program

2014

Light, Space and Time Gallery included her in ‘Special Recognition Category’ in an Online Figurative Competition for the month of May

2014

Was published in Starry Retreat’s Catalogue “Artists To Look Out For’’ in October

2015

Washington Art Association held an exhibition “Young Talent 2015” where twelve people from all over the world were selected to participate.

IMAGE NO 7

Although my major was painting, I developed interest in photography. Nature has always been an influence in my life. The place where I reside is a major attraction for tourists for its phenomenal beauty. Over the years, commercialism has turned it into a burial spot with environmental degradation. Experiencing the entire transformation created a stronger emotional attachment with mother earth. Human divergence from the natural world occurred in parallel with technological developments, changing man’s interaction with nature. This separation was made possible by the construction of enclosed spaces in which man was sheltered from the elements of nature. I began with photography to reflect my imagination which led to transformation into more complex imagery resulting in interesting scenarios. I used the technique of panoramic view with various picture modes; (mirror image, x-ray vision, etc.) to formulate a starting point for my concept. The colorful elements in the buildings and monuments are a representation of man’s synthetic attempt to reclaim what was destroyed and exploited. The colors also serve the purpose of depicting man’s memory of nature he grew up around. The spiritual experience and widespread affiliations with natural metaphors appear to be rooted in the evolutional history of mankind originating in eras when people lived in much closer contact with nature than most people do today. Hence, the vivid and vibrant nature of colors provoking nostalgia.


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Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. I’ve been inclined towards arts since a very young age. It’s mainly because I’ve been blessed to have significant amount of talented people to get inspired from. But other than that nature has always been an influence in my life. It’s always been about capturing nature in its all forms. My obsession grew to an extent where I would take sunset pictures on a daily basis for no reason. The place where I reside is a major attraction for tourists for its phenomenal beauty. Over the years, commercialism has turned my hometown into a burial spot with environmental degradation. Experiencing the entire transformation created a stronger emotional attachment with mother earth. I guess spending most of my childhood here brought me even to closer to nature and appreciate what it has to offer.

What is your creative process like? Although my major was painting, I developed interest in photography. This sudden interest in photography started with ruins of a cottage surrounded by a scenic view. I never saw it coming but the more pictures I took the more keen I became towards exploring this particular medium. In the beginning, abandoned places were my top priority but as time passed by and I made progress, I decided to make crowded places seem like humanity doesn’t exist anymore. Yes

it seems boring and monotonous but visiting various places not only enhanced my approach towards it but allowed me to have a versatile visual vocabulary. I began with photography to reflect my imagination which led to transformation into more complex imagery resulting in interesting scenarios. I used the technique of panoramic view with various picture modes to formulate a starting point for my concept.

want to without having any fear about being judged and misunderstood. Yes, one gets to express one’s thoughts onto a surface but there is also freedom for other individuals to perceive it the way that want to. So it’s a win-win situation for both the parties. The art community is supportive and making constant effort towards shedding light on raw and emerging talent they come across.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? What are your future plans as an artist? As an artist, you always have something cooking at the back of your mind. One thing leads to another and this is how it should be. Otherwise, it becomes impossible to survive in this competitive art world. First of all, I would like to get enrolled into a Master’s Program. For that, I’ll be needing substantial amount of work. I’ve started working in hopes of expanding and exploiting my current body of work. Other than that, I’ll continue availing opportunities to get more exposure and recognition into the art world.

What do you like/dislike about the art world? For me, communicating my emotions and thoughts has always been an obstacle. Well I was lucky enough to be inclined towards arts. Art is one subject that knows no boundaries and limitations. You can do whatever you

It may not be directly related to art but the best piece of advice I’ve been given is work hard no matter what venture you embark upon in life. Give it your best shot and don’t have any sort of regrets since hard work always pays off. If you’re determined to make it big in this industry, one must consider setbacks as a stepping stone and move on. Same rule goes for the struggle one goes through to nourish their artistic skills. Learning from mistakes play an important role in every step of an artist’s crucial ‘make it or break it’ phase of life. I’ve always been afraid of making mistakes thinking there’s no way out. But over the last four years I’ve managed to crawl my way out of this insecurity. If you’re afraid to make mistakes then you’ll never step out of your comfort zone to try new things. I know I have and it feels like I’ve just started. It’s exciting to not know how things will look in the end. That’s the beauty of it!


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NIDAL KHADOUR Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; Syria

THE SPIRIT OF FLOWERS


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2015

Future Identities Group exhibition in the Event: Hybrid effects, Palazzo Radetzky, Milano, Italy

2014

Syrian Art & culture Exhibition, Ismaili Center, Dubai, UAE

2014

Masters and Emerging artists in the UAE and beyond have been invited to exhibit original artworks in various mediums and they are being displayed under one roof at the Art Hub. Official Inauguration on the 19th of July, 10:00pm at Abu Dhabi Art Hub

2014

Sandscape annual event for charity, in Dubai park, UAE

2013

Syrian Art & culture Exhibition, Ismaili center, 3-12 October, Dubai, UAE

2013

Group Exhibition in Dubai city, 2013, In Dubai international art center, UAE

In the world of pale and dark, our spaces luminous color, bearing the love and hope, I love the colors, I'm not only a painter, I'm colored, I try in my paintings always, to memorize the smell of each rose, or a leaf, or a grain of sand on the beach, My paintings carry pictures too closes to nature, you feel like you're part of the scene, like colorful, full of energy and love.

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YONGJAE KIM Brooklyn, USA (Republic of Korean citizen)

2015

The Elizabeth Foundation of the Arts Membership - Grant

2014

Best Color Work Award, 2014 KSCS International Invitation Exhibition of Color Works, Korea Society of Color Studies, South Korea

2013

Joshua Tree Highlands Artists Residency Program

2014

See the Light, Attleboro Arts Museum, Attleboro, RI

2015

Brushed with Reality, Porter Contemporary, Brooklyn, NY

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SILENT NEIGHBORS

I paint my psychological landscape that is based on the actual places in my neighborhood. My attention is drawn to the mundane residential environment, which represents disillusioned urban life behind the luxury of city. I see the distance between the windows on the façade, which substitute for invisible residents. As places where physical distance is inverse to the psychological distance among neighbors, residential buildings seem to represent human relations in urban society that shares the attribute of individualism. Ironically, in this structure, one can be anonymous despite the physical closeness among them. Living with unknown neighbors there, I myself become an anonymous neighbor to them. They and I exist, and yet do not exist simultaneously in a psychological sense. In my painting, there is nobody inner and outer buildings ostensibly. The silence of residents evokes my imagination of unseen people and their absence. Between the sense of presence and absence of the neighbors, I paint the invisible, formless, and hidden somebody who is expected to be there through one’s traces in the landscape.


Art Reveal Magazine Briefly describe the work you do. I paint my psychological landscape, which is based on actual places in my neighborhood. My attention is drawn to the mundane residential environment that represents disillusioned urban life behind the luxury of city. In my painting, there is nobody inner and outer buildings ostensibly. The silence of residents evokes my imagination of unseen people and their absence. Between the sense of presence and absence of the neighbors, I paint the invisible, formless, and hidden somebody who is expected to be there through one’s traces in the landscape.

When, how and why started you painting? I have painted through all my life. I have never stopped practice of painting. However I would like to say that I started painting as my main work in 2010. Before that time, I used to try different type of works such as miniature sculpture installation and drawings. These works are mainly about Korean social issues that I was interested in. My attention moved to creating psychological mood on realistic images. In 2011, I concentrated on painting only. It was simple technique, yet very complex image of residential places that were going to be redeveloped. I glazed it several times with a broad brush on linear drawings. It was quite different from what I had done. It is more emotional about the objects that are disappearing and representing the environment where I lived, dealing with the similar issue in my previous installation works. I loved seeing that series of painting very much. I looked at Edward Hopper’s paintings again. I felt that Hooper was treating issues that are still alive

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Art Reveal Magazine everywhere today. His painting evokes a sense of psychological reality rather than just showing buildings and people, through an inexplicable mood and situation, which could be merely banal. Also, I empathized with the work through my experience of loneliness in urban environment. I thought the issue Hopper’s painting shows is still relevant to today’s social psychology. In an urban environment where I have lived with numerous social relations, I think of psychological disconnection and isolation in the suffocating surroundings. These thoughts have led me to paint the ordinary buildings in my neighborhood. What themes do you pursue? I am trying to describe visible traces that imply invisible one’s presence in the landscape. When I started to focus on painting residential environments, I was interested in the distance between the windows on the façade, which substitute for invisible residences. As places where physical distance is inverse to the psychological distance among neighbors, residential buildings seem to represent human relations in urban society that share the attribute of individualism. Ironically, in this structure, which is full of individuals, one can be anonymous despite the physical closeness among them. For instance, in my apartment, more than 40 households live in one building. My neighbors and I live and sleep together with about 20 inches wall in between. However, we don’t know each other’s name, and no communication. I felt looking at the apartment is seeing a symbol of psyche of the society. Although there are so many people, I hardly feel them. I began to think of the meaning of individuals in that circumstance. I identified myself as an anonymous

individual like an unknown neighbor next door. Becoming anonymous was strange experience to me. I came to consider absence of myself. And this made me think of my existence between physical presence and psychological absence. Although there is nobody in my painting, I paint traces of somebody that imply one’s presence with an ironical sense of isolation in urban environment.

composing music requires very similar process of painting. In painting, some color of tiny part can change overall mood, it can make the painting successful or unsuccessful. Likewise, one note in chord progress changes the feeling of the whole song.

What art do you most identify with?

I am preparing new theme. It is not totally different from what I have done. To raise the psychological level of my painting, I am paying my attention to ‘blue hour’, collecting resource about it. My plan is selecting part of my neighborhood, which shows poor surroundings and receives little attention from people, and painting it with various appearance of the time. The blue hour seems to present two different aspects to me; it means the end of a day and rest in silence after daily work with some hope for tomorrow. Also, I am thinking of painting figures, concentrating on people’s facial expressions with a sense of loss, as if their souls are out of body or they lost something that is the most important to them but they don’t know exactly what it is.

If I have to identify the genre of my art, I would like to call it Realism. My work represents the actual environment and my psyche in there in the present, not about the past or the future. I hope social members can understand and emphasize the issue I bring through my psychological represented painting. However, I don’t want to confine my works in merely realistic image on the surface. Sometimes the naturalistically painted surface can be unnecessary for the content that I want to convey in my work, and the realistic depiction and details are not all I want to make. I use these for creating the image I want to show. Some people called my work Photorealism because of the realistic image. However, for that reason above, I don’t want my work to be called Photorealism. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? Well, I am not sure about that. Since I was a little child, I wanted to be a professional fine artist. If I had to choose another job, I would want to be a composer. Still my hobby is playing guitar and writing songs. Music doesn’t have any visible form. It is abstract and emotional, too. And when I listen music on the street, I feel it effects on my perception on ordinary scenery. That is the most interesting thing for me. Also, I feel

What are your future plans as an artist?

What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? I am not sure if I am good enough to give an advice to them. I think principles of most jobs are similar to each other. When some great and brand new idea comes up in your head, and if you don’t know how to realize, you can borrow other’s hands or hire technicians. But if you want your painting to show your own perception, I think all I can say is “Keep practicing”. Practice makes perfection. Practice makes you see what you really want to show. You will see something that only you can make. Lastly, most of all, be honest.


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NOVAK SLUNJSKI Koper, Slovenia

2001

1st prize at the Artmeeting in Padua (Italy)

2001

the Best Abstract Art Work in the opinion of the international panel of experts at the International Painting Extempore in Bratislava (Slovakia)

2006

the Best Work in the opinion of the international panel of experts at the International Painting Extempore in Udine (Italy)

2008

Cooperation with fashion designer Antonio Maras Exhibitions outside Slovenia: Padua, New York, London, Madrid, Roma

I'm painter of an old abstract art ...

Painter Novak Slunjski paves his artistic path with the exploration of art and his own dreams, and so builds a personal, independent expression, away from the traditional frames. He does not identifie himself with any generation and believes in the spell moves on canvas, being self in studio. He is that kind of artist, who only paint, as Willem de Kooning said: I don't paint to live, I live to paint.

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The painter Marijan Novak Slunjski, does not have much to say. His paintings speak for him and about him. The artist exists the most when he is alone in his studio. In front of the canvas, with his brush in his hand. Born Croat he doesn't feel like a Croat, living and working in Slovenia but also not feelling like a Slovene. He is really at home only in painting. The eternal nomad, traveling the world for new experiences and new knowledge. Who wants to go out to verify and compare himself. Always dissatisfied with his work, he knows that this is the only way to find yourself. He is not adapting to the trends, nor has the desire to be likeable. He believes in the power of the individual in his personal effort. He believes in hard work. In genuine, pure art. He believes in painting. For himself, because of himself, not for others. His paintings are in permanent collections in Slovenia and abroad. He has received numerous awards and commendations for his work. But more and more he feels that this is not what matters. The only important thing for him is that he paints. And has the opportunity to paint even more. Time will show the truth, and with all other things, there are others to deal with.

Who are you and what do you do? I am painter of an old abstract art. I exist to paint. I believe in the power of the first move that triggers the idea. The invisible instinct drives me to create and I trust this instinct the most. In front of the canvas, with a brush in my hand, I am the most myself. I fully exist. Without thoughts. Only canvas and brush. The paradox is in the act, so long as you do not see, you do not know what it is, what it is for. My colors are white, red and black. All innumerable shades of black, that

can be used to create an infinite variety of visions and feelings. I do not look at the trends. I don't paint to be famous. I believe that painting is hard work, that's why I honestly, consistently work. Paint. My paintings are not for everyone. I do not want to be likeable, my paintings do not tend to be decorative. I also don't deal with messages, with a purpose of my painting. I leave that to the viewer. Image is the message, a provocation, what they see in that moment is what the viewer understands. I believe in the spell of self in the studio, the power of dreams. Day and night.

What role does the artist have in society? Art is not dealing with the truth or untruth. Today, when the world is full of "artists" and strongly led by capitalist principles, the desire for relaxation and entertainment, as well as the idea of fast satisfaction of bigger and bigger artificial needs, appear true artists with their directness and no mercy somehow redundant. The artist encourages people to think, and doesn't give the answers, but with his works challenges and raises questions for society and individuals. Even (especially) uncomfortable questions. I do not believe, that as an artist I provoke populist messages. I want to provoke quality and real art. Art is solitude. The artist is an individualist. And today, to decide to live that kind of life is some what heroic. As hard as this may be, you also accept that the world will not understand you, that you will live on the border. I am very "ecological and organic" to society. I do not want to disturb anybody, and the outer world does not touch me. I'm a big zero. The only things that matters for me is my close

circle of a few people. For the rest of the world I'm zero, for me the rest of the world is nothing. I do not belong to anyone, only myself. Nowhere I am not superfluous, because nowhere I do not consider myself.

How has your style changed over the years? My style is changing, as has the history of painting evolved from Gothic to Renaissance and through Impressionism to abstract painting. I did not immediately began to paint abstractly. I am learning all the time, seeking inspiration in poetry, philosophy and the old masters. My teachers are the greatest Michelangelo, Rembrandt, Modigliani, Pollock, de Kooning and Emilio Vedova. I believe that frustration is one of the greatest things in art; satisfaction is nothing. I'm always dissatisfied, which encourages me that I'm looking for answers that will challenge me to grow. I always see what and how else could I paint.

What jobs have you done other than being an artist? "I don't paint to live, I live to paint." Willem de Kooning I paint. That's all that matters. Everything else is "patching" the possibility that I can be a painter. I am the eternal nomad. In life, I've moved 28 times. I travel in search of new experiences and knowledge, to verify and compare outside.

What is your dream project? It is easier for me to talk about my life dream. I realized that it is nice to have exhibitions, but that fullfiles you only for a short time. This is not the goal.


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My dream is to paint more. Everything passes by, but painting remains in my life. I want to work and to paint. Have one million largeformat canvases.

What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? School and College gives you the basic knowledge, but on the the other

side, that puts you in frames. You have to stay yourself, because the truth is that it is all in you. I believe in the power of the individual in his own, personal effort. Not in the academy and institutions. I believe in individuality and freedom. I do not believe in rules of painting. It often happens that »great painting« arises, just when you're breaking the rules, of course, there are the »little secrets«, an unconscious

condition, which give that magic to the painting. I see no real meaning in the searching for originality, I think it is much more valuable if you're honest. Even talent, without it painting is only technical implementation, itself is not enough. It takes a lot of effort. It is necessary to work. To paint. Explore. Read. To know the philosophy of painting. To paint. And paint.


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CATE SMITH Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

2015

Get In Lane Exhibition, Catalyst Arts Gallery,

2014

Information Exhibition, Paisley Museum and Arts Gallery,

2013

Afterword: Contemporary Responses to Peploe, Modern 2, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK

2011

Intimate Space with Georgia Creimer, Innsbruck, Austria

2013

Helen A Rose Bequest Award, Edinburgh College of Art, Scotland, UK

My practice explores the fluid and constructed nature of meaning through the framework of drawing and painting. Concerns with spatial and temporal relationships, composition, materiality and form provide the basis for exploring the possibilities of meaning through the process of movement and change. Using found objects and spaces as a point of departure, meaning is deconstructed and new associations, connections and possibilities are created.

TURBULENT NARRATIVES


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THE SUBSTANCE FROM WHICH I AM MADE (PHOTO: JORDAN HUTCHINGS)


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PAISLEY PATTERN

Briefly describe the work you do. I work with found objects and spaces as a start point. I try and understand my relationship to them, how they are constructed and how they are constantly changing through different processes of engagement. I attempt to make connections and form new meanings. It is exciting to create and experience new things but at the same time feel the loss of something. I like that tension.

What is the most challenging part about being an artist? The balance between making enough money to live and make art and then having enough time left each week to fulfil this.

Ludwig Wittgenstein influence my work. Writers such as William Faulkner, William Gibson and David Foster Wallace have all helped me to develop my ideas. I am currently reading the first part of Marcel Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past which is making me have quite interesting dreams.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? It was from Gordon Brennan Head of Drawing and Painting at Edinburgh College of Art. He said, ‘You will find all the answers you are looking for if you just keep working’. I have only just started my career but so far it’s proved to be right, all the answers are in the work.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? There’s a lot of artists these days, what do you feel makes your work unique and truly your own? Everybody makes different work, we all experience things in different ways. If you work with integrity and curiosity, I think you will always create work unique to yourself and people will engage with that intuitively.

Who are the artist/artists that most affected your approach to art? The visual artists I am looking at just now are Phyllida Barlow, Richard Wright, Daniel Buren, R.H. Quaytman and Corin Sworn. The philosophy of Gilles Deleuze and

I do have an occupation outside of art. I am also a Physiotherapist and there are definitely connections between the two in terms of both the subject matter I work with as an artist and the wider issues around both health and creative practices.

What is your dream project? I am happy with all the art projects I am involved in. They are all challenging and interesting in different ways. The dream would be to devote all of my working time to my art practice.


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LANCE TURNER Memphis, TN, USA

2015

Artfields

2015

New American Paintings June/July

2014

Solo show at Hickory Museum of Art

2014

MFA in Painting from SCAD

2014

SCOPE Miami 2014

COMPRARARTE


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COMPRARARTE

When we look at Manet’s A Bar at the Folies-Bergère, why don’t we see the viewer reflected in the mirror? This question inspired my interest in a painting’s ability to convey and distort multiple realities. I am concerned with a kind of imagery that is involved with framing experience. The narratives in my work incorporate viewers and their space as an extension of the space inside the painting. I do this by depicting spatial loops and by using parallel mirrors and other devices for representing infinity. Paintings are an extension of reality, because every mark describes something about the person who made it, and every mirror reflects the person viewing it. My paintings are portraits of my friends, whose identities have been transformed to fit formal conventions, my past experiences, and my interests. I consider the stuff in my paintings to be a framework for an interchange between a self-portrait and a portrait of the viewer.

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What is the most challenging part about being an artist? Right now I'm working all the time to pay student loans. The most challenging part about being an artist is finding time to read and write enough to keep from painting the same thing over and over.

Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? I am a conceptual artist because I think it's important to have a strong concept before you start painting. I have also been influenced by Sol Lewitt's objective art making process, and Lawrence Weiner's consideration of the syntax of words in relation to art.

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Olafur Elliason and Nicholas Bourriaud's treatment of the viewer as a participant has had a major impact on how I create paintings. I like to make work that the viewer can interact with or be the subject of. The formal aspects of Chuck Close's paintings have always been inspiring to me.

What is your creative process like? My creative process involves relating ideas and writing about my work until I come to a combination of ideas that I like. Then I work obsessively until it's finished. What are your future plans as an artist? I have been working more on installations lately. I can see my work having more sculpture in it. I would like to do more with curating exhibitions too. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I currently live in Memphis, Tennessee (United States). I think its a great place to be an artist. It is affordable to have a lot of space for making art, Memphis has a rich history of music, and Memphis College of Art has kept a lot of great artists in the city. There is a lot of potential to make your own way here. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? It's most important to make good art. Reading about art will help you figure out what good art is. Self-promotion is secondary to making good art.


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THE TREACHERY OF IMAGES, A PORTRAIT OF THE VIEWER IN A HOLOGRAPHIC MULTIVERSE

WWW.LANCETURNERPAINTING.COM

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THE UNSTITUTE Marianna and Daniel O’Reilly London, UK 2011

'39th Festival of Nations' (Jury commended for 'The Double'), Ebensee, Austria

2010

'New Media, Sex and Culture in the 21st Century', Museum of New Art, Detroit, USA

2010

'Davis Feminist Film Festival', University of California, Davis, USA

2009

'Voyeur', Whitechapel Gallery, London Whitechapel

2014

'Urban Explorers Festival', Dordrecht, The Netherlands

1. Structure The Unstitute is an 'Evolving Interactive Environment', which consists of a series of makeshift sites and excavations created in the form of a digital burrow. Built to offer challenges to establishment language and practise, The Unstitute creates and curates multi-media digital projects, manifesto writing machines and anarchic web-design as well as supporting up to four online residencies per year and a monthly video-channel as a part of its ongoing Participation programme. Each department of The Unstitute's virtual building constitutes a series of movements which proliferate into extensions and entrances, holes and dead-ends, annexes and chambers - never singular, absolute, permanent, profound – always plural, temporary, mobile, superficial.

2. Current Project Title: neo-london Medium: online environment Year: 2013 Website: www.theunstitute.org Description: neo-london - a vast organic outgrowth of The Unstitute - is an Evolving Interactive Environment; it is a reproduction of London quite unlike Google Earth. Evermore drifting tangentially from civic norms, the population of this parallel London divide into two seemingly distinct groups: the Inert and the Hostile. Both exhibit symptoms of the affliction known only as (x). From the old man burying his food in a hole in the ground for safekeeping to the people shipwrecked on a reef of apathy on their way to work, the glue of social cohesion is undermined by a casual nihilism. CADE - our virtual guide to this environment - has traipsed the streets from Belgravia to Peckham like a bloodhound to reveal the territorial disputes, clan-dominated enclaves and community group fascism of this neoLondon, a citizenry unconstrained by class or status, governed only by the sinister topography of the streets and buildings themselves.

AYAZ’S PALACE


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Art Reveal Magazine

How has your style changed over the years? The stylistic regime at The Unstitute is designed and implemented by a vast array of sensitive machines, hidden at secret underground locations throughout the internet. These devices produce large quantities of raw, emotional material for harvesting and throughput at a later time by drones. These devices do not work within strict parameters however, but instead are loosely programmed to favour superficial, temporary, disposable concerns. There is even a machine at The Unstitute solely for producing rubbish. Sometimes it seems quite impossible to tell exactly what these devices are doing, but such lassitude is encouraged. Everything is archived. This archive is The Unstitute.

What is the most challenging part about working together? The Unstitute has an abusive character at times, and can be quite insensitive to personal needs, demanding all sorts of miracles when we drones still need to eat, sleep and earn hard cash money to keep the servers alight. But The Unstitute doesn’t care about this, simply demands like a baby for its bottle, wants data.

How would you describe the art scene in your area? London now seems to be European Art Capital. London is dead. London was only ever as alive as its inhabitants, and now they are all dead. Everything’s dead. Now that the city we used to call London is little more than rubble and ash, the art scene is buried under piles of clinker and rotting organic material. But this apocalyptic vision is not yet commonly accepted, (especially by Londoners,) who just keep going like nothing’s the matter. Our most senior field researcher CADE, in conjunction with curator Bettany Unction, have investigated this paradox in depth. You can see the research carried out by The Unstitute in the archive ‘neo-london’.

It is largely hoped that ‘neo-london’ will be developed into a groundbreaking virtual-reality mobile app in the near future, allowing people from locations all over the world to experience how truly awful neo-london first-hand.

What role does the artist have in society? “The Unstitute is open to Participation, and closed to Interpretation.” What this means is uncertain, but we are working with artists the world-over to help develop a strategy for developing art into an indispensable means for personal and social growth. This strategy can be accessed by clicking-through to the Participation portal, where, if you come as an active visitor, you may also find your invitation to Participate. The Participation portal is where collaborators are invited to take part in online screenings, virtual residencies and experimental exhibitions, creating an opportunity for artists and audiences to merge together, forming new online communities which we hope to develop into a much more powerful engine in the future. To enable this to happen, The Unstitue, (like many banks and other industrial concerns,) is outsourcing itself to India. This move will enable us, as workers, to pay ourselves far less than we would need to back in the UK. The Unstitute will be solar-powered as well. If you are interested to find out more, we recommend you subscribe to The Unstitute’s mailing list.

What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? Answer a) Stop. Don’t add to the competition. It’s already difficult enough without you trying to muscle-in on the scene as well. Anyway, nobody really likes artists, do they? Answer b) Never put yourself in the position whereby your own success hinges entirely upon the whims of another.


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Art Reveal Magazine no. 5  

Artists: Eri Agriou, Achraf Baznani, Rhine Bernardino, Benjamin Bird, John Black, Chung Chak, Duncan Gidney, Zainab Hasan, Nidal Khaddour, Y...

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