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ANDREW AGOSTINO 4 ANDRO BANOVAC 10 GIULIA FILIPPI 16 JAMES FREW 22 BARBARA LOUSIE HAUZINGER 28 EMMA HILL 34 MIJA JUNG 40


JORGE MANSILLA 46 PAULA RAE GIBSON 52 LAILA SEIDEL 58 SARAH TOMPKINS 64 VIX WALKER 70 AGENT X 76 ANNA YEROSHENKO 82


Andrew Agostino Knowlton, Canada Photography has always been a process whereby the artist has little control over the final outcome. The reason is that the end product is often the result of an artistic endeavor that is necessarily encumbered by technology and chance. Unlike a painting where one starts with a blank canvas, a photographer requires a camera, a variety of lenses and so on, and the random good luck that she or he is at the right place and at the right time for any creative process to take place. My goal is to regain some of this control. The single photograph that is taken accidentally by using the right equipment is not what I am after. I like to begin with that idea, concept, theme or image that is festering in my mind (usually after listening to a piece of music or a particular song). Subsequently, I go out and intentionally attempt to capture what I need. I shoot subjects, objects, textures, tones and colors (a beautiful woman, a concrete wall, distressed paper, tattered wood, discarded trash, or a vibrant red sweater that someone left behind). Most of these pictures hold little artistic value and are not in themselves end products but rather, they work as my tools, my paints, my brushes to be combined and manipulated onto my blank canvas (my computer monitor) in an a variety of unique ways.


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When, how and why did you start your art practice? I grew up in Montreal, Canada where I worked for many years as a film and theatre professor, instructional designer and at times, a freelance writer, photographer and corporate videographer. In 2010, I retired from teaching, moved to Knowlton, a small town situated one hour east of the city and decided to work full time developing my craft. My educational background is in literature, film production, education and theatre. I also hold a Ph.D. in Educational Technology. Because of this diversity, I never felt the need to identify myself with a particular profession or create work that is restricted to a particular genre. I embrace all media, and employ any necessary technology to create my work. I feel just as comfortable behind a camera, as I do directing a film, choreographing a movement piece for the stage, teaching a class or writing a script. I firmly believe art to be a product of the soul that is illuminated through composition, lighting, technique and meaning. The end product is what moves an audience regardless of the process or the medium. Photography has always been a practice whereby the artist has little control over the final outcome. The reason is that the end product is often the result of an artistic endeavor that is necessarily encumbered by technology and chance. Unlike a painting where one starts with a blank canvas, a photographer requires a camera, a variety of lenses and so on, and the random good luck that she or he is at the right place and at the right time for any creative process to take place. This has always been a point of contention for me when I work in photography. My goal is to regain some of this control. The single photograph that is taken accidentally by using the right equipment is not what I am after. I like to begin with that idea, concept, theme or image that is festering in my mind (usually after listening to a piece of music or a particular song). Subsequently, I go out and intentionally attempt to capture what I need. I shoot subjects, objects, textures, tones and colors (a beautiful woman, a concrete wall, distressed paper, tattered wood, discarded trash, or a vibrant red sweater that someone left behind). Most of these pictures hold little artistic value and are not in themselves end products but rather, they work as my tools, my paints, my brushes to be combined and manipulated onto my blank canvas

(my computer monitor) in a variety of unique ways. At this point, I am a painter using an assortment of virtual paint. I rely on my conscience and subconscious to layer and fashion these different pictures into a single, more potent image that did not exist prior to the montage. Only in this way, do I feel that I am exercising control and ownership over my work. Strangely enough, during this process, the images themselves seem to animate, reveal their dirty little secrets, and yell out to me when it’s time to back off and finally, the work is done, so much for control. What is the most challenging part about being a photo artist? I’m a control freak and I often had to grapple with compromise when working with other people on various productions. Abandoning even a little creative control is a struggle for me as the need to realize my personal vision is strong. Working on my own has freed me from this struggle but new challenges have come forth. I now need to muster enough discipline to schedule the work so that it happens on a daily basis. Working in isolation is also somewhat limiting in the sense that it is difficult to judge the work without feedback. Because of this, I discard many images that may hold some artistic value. Albeit, this filter results in end products that wholly satisfy my expectations and hopefully, those of the audience. In your opinion, what role does the artist play in society? I’m not sure that artists play a role in society. Let me clarify this by saying that I believe the artist stands outside the social framework. From this distance, the artist is a mere observer and not a true participant in society. Moreover, the compulsion to express these observations via some artistic form is actually, quite involuntary. Most artists do not consciously set out to be the purveyors of culture. No one creates artwork initially as a catalyst for change or to document or criticize political, social or historical issues. Why artists do what they do is unclear and likely, unbeknownst to them or anyone else. Most artists are not even able to extract meaning from their work. Certainly, they can explain the process, and what media they manipulate, but the meaning, beauty or ambiguity that materialize as their final products rests solely in the hearts and minds of the audience. If the artist does play any role at all in society, it is that of a conduit.


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How would you describe the art scene in your area? A few years ago, I moved from the city to the small town of Knowlton about an hour east of Montreal. The town is situated in a valley; mountains surround it and it circles a beautiful lake. Therefore, it attracts numerous tourists both in the summer and during the winter months. As such, it is has become a hub for various artists, artisans, and performing artists to showcase their work. However, given the nature of my work, I find myself constantly returning to the underbelly of the city to collect my material. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. I don’t consider myself to be a photographer in the traditional sense because I never really married into any particular medium. Consequently, I’m not influenced by great photographers, but rather, by great artists. Specifically, my work draws inspiration from the pre and post war expressionist and abstract expressionist movements. If I had to pick three artists that inspired me, I would have to say, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Franz Kline and to some extent, Edvard Munch.

What do you like/dislike about the art world? I’m not sure how to answer this question. I could talk about traditionalists in the art world who approach a work of art with pre-set notions and expectations or the inability of some people to see value in the employment of new media, or the difficulty an emerging artist faces in order to make the work accessible to the public, but I won’t. It’s like saying what do you like/dislike about life? I’m not sure. I like to be in it, and I hate that one day, I will have to leave it. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? I started quite late in life so I definitely would not recommend that. I would tell them do what they need to do at an early age. Forget about plan B. Although, I do realize that everyone needs to eat. Explore and embrace all media and any crucial technology needed to produce your vision. Once you have developed a your own style, stay focused, schedule work on a daily basis, and follow the market to see how your fits in. Lastly, never give up. Besides, you know you can’t even if you wanted to.

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http://www.saatchiart.com


m/account/artworks/743218


Andro Banovac Split, Croatia Working as an artist means expressing myself through medium that allows different communication modes. I’m not so much unto creating something beautiful to hang on a wall but rather made people question. I wouldn’t say shock. I create mostly in prints even though I feel ‘’saturated’’ at the moment with that medium. I am thinking about turning to installation, sculpting, as I work on one piece for upcoming group exhibition. My exhibitions are composed of two graphic cycles; Bonds and Serotonin addiction.


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When, how and why started your art practice? I can clearly remember the moment in primary school when teacher accused me for forgery as she couldn’t accept the fact that I made the drawing, although I drew in the class. I now see it as compliment but then I saw it like some sign of distinction from others in visual art. Child cannot actually predict future outcome. Enrolment in High school of fine arts has pretty much directed my activity toward art. There were some school artworks displaying in the classes and I remember one print, mezzotint, that got my attention. Something drove me, tonal range or so, even though I didn’t knew technical aspect, I knew that I want to do something like that. That is how my aspiration toward art of print started. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? It seems like great challenge is to keep motivation continuous. It is natural that in longer period there are ups and downs, but even, so called, crysis, productive, artistic or existential, could produce some new understandings and acknowledgement. What art do you most identify with? I’m not sure if I understood the question, but as an visual artist I identify within visual category of fine art. Although contemporary time understands interception and interdisciplinarity in art field. But if question implies influences, then I can say that I get impulse from music, movies and everyday life. Name three artist you’d like to be compared to. It is difficult to answer this question. I consider that our way of thinking, focus of interes in art, in life, is result of constant change. It is inevitable that artists are influenced by other artists, even on subconscious level. What I found intriguing before, doesn’t have to be subject of my interes anymore. During postgraduate study in Ljubljana, I tried to compare myself with top regional printmakers. But focus of my work is changing even within same seria. I’m not the type of an artist that would subject his opus to only certain technique, color palette or, God forbid, thematic. Life of an artist must lead to constant exploration, changes, upgrades. Currently, I’m doing installation for one local group show and I found interesting work of Ron Mueck, his brilliance of technique, perfection. Although, I can hardly compare to him.


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How would you describe the art scene in your area? Cultural scene in Split is by quantity smaller then one in bigger european cities, but it doesn’t get behind when it comes to quality in form and concept. Off course that larger cities offer more possibilities and backup with financial support and infrastructure. Money is crucial factor that dictates final realization. If I need to give some critical notion about the art scene in my town, then I would point out the commercialisation of art feature on common basis. Some part of art scene is adjusting for touristic demands by changing expressions and thematic usage to create likeable, corny, artworks more acceptable for mass touristic market. Line that determines work of art and plain souvenire is becoming vague in my local area. In my opinion, it is wrong when commercial characteristics become standard, a tradition. I do get sometimes interesting feedback about my work. One girl asked me, not long ago, why do I create works that no one would hang on a wall. She probably thought of Serotonin addiction seria. What does art mean in contemporary culture? As I see it, art is communication and expression through medium that surpasses common verbal pronunciation of idea, terms, and creates complex syntax in audio or visual language. Maybe emphasis is on communication itself, due to the fact that in contemporary culture social networks have great importance. That also has negative impact in sociological terms. There are no more Warhols 15 minutes of fame for an individual. Everybody is celebrity and popularity is something to strive to nowadays. Almost like a virtue. What are your future plans as an artist? As an artist I wish to activate residency for foreign artist in my atelier in Split. Furthermore, I expect to continue exhibiting my works, especially abroad. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? Drama. Work of art has to have dramatic impact. That is what my Macedonian colleague said one day during potgraduate study. Since then, I work on artworks that shouldn’t be boring.

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www.androbanovac.com


Giulia Filippi Berlin, Germany


Briefly describe the work you do. I come from Italy and I am 25 years old. I have studied Illustration and Animation at the European Institute of Design (IED) in Milan, and after I moved to the multicultural and artistic city of Berlin, where I currently work as a illustrator, photographer, photo model freelancer, with past experiences in Art Galleries and Fashion Agencies. In Berlin I’ve also studied German and I’ve doing a Professional Training Course (Weiterbildung). I’m still studying Photography but I’m working already as a photographer for the magazine “Berlino Magazine”. As Illustrator I have received many commissions, both for individuals (artists, writers, musicians) and for public entities (associations, Startups , theaters). I’ve realized spontaneously also many art exhibitions, both in Italy and in Berlin, and I’ve won several International competitions of art, that have exhibited my art works in London, Los Angeles, Berlin, Milan, Monza, Venice, Vicenza, Trieste and Genoa. I work with my Mac at home, I find customers, events, shooting, artistic competitions that I like and when I want, and not only in Berlin. I manage my time and my work alone. My dream. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? I think that the most difficult part is the high competition in the arts sector, especially in Berlin: it’s true that this city offers a lot of opportunities, but it is also true that the number of artists is very big. Furthermore now the concept of art is really changed if compared to the past: on one hand it is positive, because you can re-invent yourself in any possible way and you can express your own per-


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sonality, there is more freedom and you can vent your creativity. On the other side of the coin, to be an artist today it doesn’t take much, sometimes it seems that everyone can be an artist and people should not have “a genius.” So art runs the risk to be diminished, sometimes it ends also in something ridicule. And it’s really sad. The second hardest thing is to try to create an own style, to be recognizable, in a world where everything has already been created and done. What art do you most identify with? Art is my life: one of the oldest memories that I have is just my first drawing. I am a reserved person, and I’ve always dedicated myself to art, because it allows me to express myself and to release what I have inside, without the use of words, since I was a child. I have experienced all the artistic techniques, and i love all them, but only at the European Institute of Design in Milan, where I studied, I found my way: there with the teacher Paolo Rui, famous Italian illustrator, I discovered conceptual art, I fell in love and decided it would be my way of working. I simply use some concepts and symbols, to express something else,something deeper. Conceptual art is not easy to guess and that’s what I like of it: I invite the reader to escape reality, to think, to discover unknown worlds. I’m a curious person, I love to be versatile: now for example I’m studying photography. My works are complex also for this reason, the technique and the materials too: a mix of drawing, painting, graphic, photography. I love doing the so-called “mixed media”,describing both personal topics, that I can’t do with words, and social: I wish that my art could open the mentality of society, so that people are more available to others, without racism and without bias. It is not utopia, but a way of life and a

possible reality that I found in Berlin, where i live since 2012, and I would get everywhere: art is my first love, Berlin is my second. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. I don’t love copies and comparisons in the arts: I think that every artist is unique, because each artist has a different inner world compared to the others and everyone tries to get it out. I can certainly speak about “inspiration”, inevitable and normal process in the arts sectors: each artist looks what other artists do, each artist takes something that has already been done, something that he likes a lot, from this and from that, and recreates it, shuffles it, brings it back with other means and words. Everyone does it, although not all admit it. I love some who define the pillars of modern conceptual illustration: Alessandro Gottardo, Emiliano Ponzi and Noma Bar. They are “monsters”. I have to mention the fourth, the king of all, that does everything in a conceptual way, not only illustrations: Banksy. But there are so many… How would you describe the art scene in your area? Is this possible to compare somehow Italy and Germany? Berlin is simply my heaven: Berlin made me realize what I really want from my life and allowed me to do what I do. I just have to say “thank you“ to Berlin! I had the opportunity to realize exhibitions, to work in various fields of art, and to know a lot of people. It’s an open city, multi-ethnic, where art lives everywhere. It’s a city that gives you a lot of possibilities, a city that always moves and evolves, that gives you every day more stimulation and desire to create. I always say “Wake me up when Berlin ends”, presenting another version of the Green Day song.

I wish that Berlin will remain forever a source of energy and vitality for all the artists, where even if the competition is very high, you can create a really huge network of contacts and you can collect a lot of experiences. The best thing of Berlin is the possible collaboration between artists who come from the most various fields of art, cinema, music. As already mentioned, however, it’s not easy: it is a city that attracts every day a lot of young people, and many of these are artists. The competition is really important. Italy and Germany? Unfortunately, there is no comparison. For many things: Italy is in crisis in many areas, young people are not helped and stimulated, that’s why we talk about “brain drain.” But I think that even if there will be work for me in the future, I would never come back: freedom of expression is minimal, the mentality is really closed. Germany has been evolved 1000 years, in all fields. In your opinion, what does art mean in contemporary culture? Art is a huge world and rich of meanings. Be an artist can have different meanings. As mentioned, each artist has an infinite world, that can be expressed in different ways. For this reason art, especially conceptual art, it is not easy to understand and to interpret. How many times we find ourselves in front of an artwork, and we do not understand its meaning, and we even ask us if there is a sense? Surely I can speak about my poetry: I took this job as a mission. I wish that my art could change society in a better way, to open the mentality of people, so that everyone is more united, and more available to the next, without racism and without prejudices. Now I’m forced to quote my artistic installation exhibited at


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the Museum of European Cultures in Berlin, from 2015 to 2017, a project in collaboration with the Italian Institute of Culture and the Association “Network Women Berlin”. I think it’s the best work I’ve done: a world in black and white, divided into two hearts but held together in several areas with red threads, gives rise to the idea of mental and expressive freedom, social equality and the joyful coexistence of different cultures, as a bastion of harmony, respect and brotherhood, where all foreigners become locals, where linguistic and ethnic differences are no longer an obstacle to overcome, but which actually contribute to mutual enrichment. This work was born in Berlin, and it represents this wonderful city. Berlin welcomed me in this way, with open arms, and I wanted to represent it to the world: I wish that every city will become so. What are your future plans as an artist? I want to carry forward what I am doing and I want to continue to grow professionally, enriching my knowledge. I’m a very curious person, I have many passions: for example now I’m doing my third photography course and I started this new collaboration as photographer with the magazine “Berlino Magazine”. I love to create the so-called “mixed media”: photographs mixed with drawings, graphics, painting, etc. Another project is surely to study video and deepen your graphics concepts. I love to be versatile (ie a person who does so many different things together). I want to continue what I am doing and I want to continue to grow professionally, enriching my knowledge. I am a very curious person, I have many passions: for example now I’m doing my terse photogra-

phy course and I started this new collaboration with the weekly magazine “Berlin Magazine”. I love to create so-called “mixed media”: photographs mixed with drawings, graphics, painting, etc. Another project is surely to study video and deepen the graphics concepts. I love to be versatile and polyhedric.

to look, look so much. Watch what the other artists do now and what they did in the past. To be inspired, to understand what you like and what you don’t like, what reflects yourself, what can work,what can be improved.” Every morning, I spend at least an hour to read newspapers, articles, to look photos and artistic projects. Observe is everything! (For What’s the best art tip you’ve ever me, it became like a drug, tI received? have to set the alarm clock after When I decided to be an artist, too an hour, otherwise I can go on for many people, also really close to me, days...) tried to stop me. “You will not earn money” or “the art world is satu- The third advice comes from Umberrated,” and I can go on and on. The to Eco, famous Italian semiotician, best advice that I received is surely philosopher and writer, that I studied by my father: “do what you love and at the university in Milan, and unforwhat makes you happy, because only tunately died recently: “An artwork in this way you will be a better per- is always a confession”. I have takson and you will show the best part of en literally this thing: there is nothyourself”. He is the most important ing more true in the world for me. In person of my life. He told me always every work that I realize, there is a this sentence, when I started,at the piece of myself inside, something sebeginning,and also now, when I have cret of my being and the viewer has to create a new project. the duty to understand the sense. I find that this mystery is great, someThe second best advice came from thing magic. I never had the opportumy favorite teacher, Paolo Rui, at nity to meet this great man, but I will the university in Milan: “You have never stop to take him up.


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www.behance.net/giuliafilippiart


James Frew Glasgow, UK James Frew’s work considers sexualised themes which fuse humour, titillation and irony, whilst also exploring the relationship between an elevated painterly discourse and the depraved: this could be seen as an ironic critique of the formal qualities of painting. These themes are sometimes considered in relation to the appropriation of text and how this changes the context of the work. Existentially charged scenarios are placed in relation to notions of Absurdity and the Grotesque. He makes visual plays on associations, pre-existing conceptions and interpretations of words and images. Inherent to the contemporary use of traditional painting techniques is the idea of Kitsch; he uses this as a tool to strengthen his work conceptually. The medium of paint and its many variations are critiqued just as much as the subject matter itself as he interrogates the formal qualities of paint by juxtaposing painterly techniques.


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Briefly describe the work you do. At the moment, I primarily work in oil paint depicting a wide variety of subject matter which includes the human figure, still life and animals. In the past I have experimented with sculpture, performance and video art, but I have always gravitated more towards painting. I have a massive respect for the traditional craft of painting and aim to show this in my work. In conjunction with painting I also write, which provides much of the narrative zest in the scenarios I depict. What themes do you pursue? My work considers sexualised themes which fuse humour, titillation and irony, whilst also exploring the relationship between an elevated painterly discourse and the depraved: this could be seen as an ironic critique of the formal qualities of painting. These themes are sometimes considered in relation to the appropriation of text and how this changes the context of the work. Existentially charged scenarios are placed in relation to notions of Absurdity and the Grotesque. I make visual plays on associations, pre-existing conceptions and interpretations of words and images. Inherent to the contemporary use of traditional painting techniques is the idea of Kitsch; I use this as a tool to strengthen my work conceptually. The medium of paint and its many variations are critiqued just as much as the subject matter itself as I interrogate the formal qualities of paint by juxtaposing painterly techniques. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? This varies greatly! Sometimes it can be formally realising concepts and sometimes it can be not having the right concept at all! As artists, we never make it easy on ourselves: where would the fun be if it wasn’t difficult? How would you describe the art scene in your area? I live and work in Glasgow which is a creative hotspot for a lot of young emerging artists. We are host to the biennial Glasgow International festival which showcases a wide spectrum of art from various disciplines. Within the Glasgow scene there is a fresh sense of freedom and progression that I’ve not witnessed anywhere else. As well as this, there are a number of forward thinking art galleries, such as Art Pistol in Glasgow’s West End, which encourage artists to really spread their wings, whilst also helping them make a living from their craft.

What art do you most identify with? I identify with a wide variety of art: I try not to pin myself down too much. I’m as much inspired by Francis Bacon’s existentially profound figure studies as I am from a Kitschy offering from Jeff Koons or John Currin. However, I do tend to latch on to the transgressive sensibilities found in some Postmodern art. In my mind, the best art is the kind that doesn’t take itself too seriously whilst simultaneously trying to articulate serious themes. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? That it’s better to draw for five minutes every day than for an hour once a week. By constantly thinking through drawing you keep the mind and the hand ticking over. What are your future plans as an artist? I have always had a fascination with teaching at an art establishment, so I can see myself gravitating towards that, whilst also continuing my work as a practicing artist. I have a strong belief that it is an artist’s duty to pass on skills and knowledge; even if in some small way I am able to do that then I will have given meaning to my role as an artist.


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www.jamesfre


ewfineart.com


Barbara Lousie Hauzinger Burlington, Vermont, USA Barbara Hauzinger is an artist and photographer living on the beautiful shores of Long Island Sound. She received a BFA in Art Photography from Syracuse University in 2008, and has continued her art in the forms of photography and collage (note that her art forms require no pens or paintbrushes as her hand cannot create with these tools what her minds wishes it to). She is a also an active member of the ONE Arts collective, located in beautiful Burlington, VT. Barbara has exhibited in Vermont, New York, Montana, and Italy. She has had publications in Kolaj Magazine, Montana Outdoors, and Syracuse Quarterly.


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How and why started you creating?

a collage fairly quickly. Lately, I’ve been slowing the process down and composing my pieces with an alI had always been one to cover my notebooks with im- most sculptural state of mind; how can I use shape, ages and packing tape, but I got serious about making color, depth, and negative space and how will I place collages after I graduated collage. I studied photogra- the pieces of this puzzle together? phy while in school, but once I was out I didn’t have If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, the same hands on resources that I had while I was a what would that be and why? student. I mainly shoot with film, so I missed that tactile element of developing film and processing images One of two things: Professional Musician, I am a in the darkroom. Collage kind of invited itself into my huge music lover and also play in a band. It would life in this way, to fill this void that digital photography be amazing to travel and play music and make people lacked for me. Collage also does not take much space dance for a living. Second, a Backcountry Wilderness to make or cost that much to produce. As a post-art Photographer. It is the most humbling feeling for me to school student, I didn’t necessarily have the means be far out into the backcountry; you are the unnatural to rent studio space or pay for darkroom time, so in- one in a natural and wild land. The Earth’s natural stead I could make collages at home on my desk, using places are slowing slipping away, and I believe it’s imvintage National Geographics and interstellar space portant to compassionately document them, almost as books from the thrift store with only scissors and glue. an act of preservation. There’s a thrill in destroying another’s work and reconstructing its fragments to create a new reality; you get to destroy and create at the same time. I am also What is the most challenging part about working one of the worst illustrators or painters you’ve ever with photography and collage? seen, so collage was the perfect match. For photography, I’d say the saturation of images and photographers that have come with the Digital Age How has your work changed in the past years? and iPhone Photography. Everyone can be a photographer with a camera always in their pocket and I think I have become more methodical with my work. with an unlimited number of shots. There are so many In much of my past work, there is person at a place images out there, so I have to create for myself a spedoing something, much like a snapshot one would see cific aesthetic. For me, photography is about stopping in a family photo album. I had a formula for making and pausing to be truly present. With film, you have a collage and with the right images, was able to make to slow down, you have to be patient, you wait for the


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perfect moment even when you don’t know when it will come. My images strive to create a kind of nostalgia for the viewer; for them to revel and remember this beautiful ordinary moment which does and does not belong to them. I want my images to transcend the notion that they belong only to my memory and for the viewer to share with me a feeling of hope and warmth, like someone else gets it. The use of film enables me to portray these stillnesses in time that I find impossible to do with digital technologies.

How would you describe the art scene in your area?

The art scene in Burlington, Vermont is glowing. The city is expanding and growing at a very quick rate, and more artists are in the city than ever. There seems to be a niche for everything, performance, sculpture, music, poetry, street art, artistic food and dining. Anything goes in Burlington, and the same can be said for the art. The growth of the city, however, only increases the cost to live there, and many of the artists I think the biggest challenge with working with collage are getting pushed out of their spaces as rent increasfor me would have to be the amount of endless possibil- es. The scene is very supportive of one another, but ities there are. It’s hard not to get wrapped up in all the it’s still extremely competitive (as it is in most places). ideas and thoughts and options of what each image has to offer. You can start in any direction, and sometimes What are your future plans as an artist? it’s really hard to find that direction. When I’m feeling creative but and not sure about where to start, I’ll give I am currently working on a book of photography, a myself a set of rules that I have to follow. For example, series of images from when I was traveling around one exercise might be to only use images from two sourc- America over the course of sixteen months. I am also es, it must incorporate text, and there is a 30 minute time interested in shooting more with large format camerlimit. I find that it sometimes takes me in places I wouldn’t as as well as playing around with alternative processes. I also am working on an untitled digital series, normally go. which uses both my images and found imagery from What advice can you give to those who are just start- 35mm slide film. In collage, I am interested in exploring this sculpture-like realm I’ve recently wandered ing out in the arts? into. Less can be more, and I believe that is where I Persistence, perseverance, and positivity. Be proactive have found myself currently creating. I plan to travel to make things happen for yourself, be prepared to deal as much as I can, and be out in nature wherever and with rejection, and don’t take those rejections personally. whenever the opportunity presents itself. I believe it is I also believe it’s important to fill your head with art; visit so important for personal and artistic growth to see museums and galleries regularly, try an art form you may unknown places with fresh eyes, to change the scennot be good at, listen to music, write haikus, find others to ery and to challenge one’s self by getting out of your comfort zone. discuss art with.

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www.barbarahauzingerphotography.com


Emma Hill Manchester, UK My work is an experimental visual representation of my own perception of the world in which I illustrate through multi-disciplinary platforms such as video art, performance, installation, and most recently painting. I am continually creating and developing ideas through my education, my own research and life experiences. The themes and issues I explore are self-expressionism, the perception of women, female anatomy, contraception, everyday objects, shock and controversial subject matter, the environment and animal rights. I am interested in creating work that prompts the viewer to come up with their own explanations as to what it means, or to offer a different view point about an issue.


I am influenced by Marina Abramovic, Gina Pane, Joseph Beuys and Carolee Schneemann, as well as artistic movements Dadaism and Surrealism. Through my education and independent work these past seven years, I have grown as an individual and my study has severely changed. Originally I studied Media Production and I wanted to work on TV/Film sets behind the camera, I now see myself as an individual in front of the camera ready to create, experiment and to be scrutinised. In the future I plan to continue my education and study an MA in Fine Art. I also wish to volunteer for local charities and community projects and use my filmmaking skills to create promotional work for them and gain further experience.


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When, how and why started your art practice? I originally studied Media Production for 3 years and I was set on working within television or films. But after the Media Production degree course I applied for fell through I was offered a place on a Fine Art degree. I decided to take the offer although I didn’t really consider myself an artistic person in respect to Fine Art, but I was told I would still be able to do Media within the course. From then on I transitioned from Media to Art, I found a love for the subject and I decided to explore performance, video art and installation which have now become my areas. What art do you most identify with? I am a big fan of shock art, I go to galleries and see art that I find incredible, but I loved to be disturbed or amazed by something. After watching the short Surrealist film Un Chien Andalou (1929) I have been inspired by artistic movements such as Surrealism and its predecessor Dadaism, I love the obscure and experimental nature of these movements and I try to angle myself in that direction when I create. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. I can’t really think of anybody I’d like to be compared to, every artist is pretty diverse and I don’t think as of yet I am able to live up to some of these pretty big names so I wouldn’t really want to compare myself. I guess in the future I would like to be alongside Marina Abramović, Bill Viola and Pipilotti Rist if I had to pick. These artists have been very influential to me and helpful to-


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wards my student research, I love their work and I can only aspire to be as good as them one day. How would you describe the art scene in your area? My home tome is a village, which is slowly turning into a town and I wouldn’t say there is much of an art scene there, but where I study there is an artistic revolution as such happening! The art society is really pushing to bring a creative element to the town and it’s great to see, there are always events happening or new artistic spaces opening, and this has also given students studying in the area a chance to get involved which is good work experience, a great way to make contacts and get their work out there. In your opinion, what does art mean in contemporary culture? I think art is now very much about the artist and their work is personal to them. As I stated on an earlier question every artist is very diverse and their pretty different from one another even when studying the same discipline, each artist has a style which is unique to them and their art reflects them in a sense, its escapism and going to a gallery is like entering the artists mind, it’s their wild idea or perspective. What are your future plans as an artist? After I finish my degree I am going to go on to study a masters in Fine Art. Alongside my studying I am going to rent out a studio space where I can keep making work, getting myself out there and learning how to be a better artist.

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http://emmalouhill.w


wix.com/emmalouart


Mija Jung New York, USA My inspiration is derived from the politics of North and South Korean struggles and feminism. I reference Western luxury brands, advertising, and surveillance, and juxtapose these images with propaganda and iconography from terrorist organizations and war-torn nations. My work is ironic but also has a philosophical and revolutionary message. Some of my portraits are impersonations of traditional Asian male roles, altered in a way to reinterpret the feminine role in our culture. I paint slogans of freedom fighters and find similarities in potent images that are used to serve branding of overt violence. Representing the conflict of a modern independent woman reveals how women are victimized in a politically dysfunctional society. The same images in different contexts communicate a completely different, sometimes opposite meaning. The male-dominated messaging systems are abrasive. Fascism, marketing and surveillance are the things that frustrate me and influence my artwork.


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When, how and why did you start practicing?

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become more commonplace. The neighborhood attracts a lot of art lovers and young hipsters, which is great. Now, I am more concerned that I must commercialize myself, in order to keep up. I left Korea right after the collage. At the time, the country had fewer foreigners and was less international. But now the mega city (Seoul) has become a global hub for artist, as well.

I started painting when I was eight years old. I had a revelation, a vision. While I was crying, I looked over the hills and the lights of the houses in the distance became flairs of magical light. It was shiny and colorful and beautiful. After years of art school, my ambition has always been a career as an artist. I always strive to achieve that wonderful memory. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. Do you think that art makes social change possible? I like artists that have a strong point and clear message. Art can serve many purposes. I believe that art Three artists that have inspired me are Martha should always be of a pure expression. Art and Rosler, Nancy Spero, and Nam Jun Paik. These Society can learn from each other. Art is abso- artists deal with social political issues and perlutely that which changes the world. Art imitates sonal identity. Martha Rosler (American artist) life, and life imitates art. Artists live in a society was my teacher during my MFA program. What and criticize what they see in the world. They re- I like about her is that she is an activist. She flect the world in an attempt to create a utopia. demonstrates that actions are like a performance The person who looks at the art has the capacity art. Paik was a Korean, who came to New York, to change their mind, because of how impactful where I live now. He was the most important Kothe art is. The person who looks at art is expe- rean artist at the time. He inspires me as I can riencing what the artist feels, so they are expe- relate to his heritage. I relate to Nancy’s feminist riencing the artist point of view. The observer of point of view. the art will take these feeling with them in their everyday life. The more people who see the art, What do you like/dislike about the art world? the more effective it will be, therefore, the more capacity it has to change society. Millionaire artists are my envy, but practicing art makes me alive and overcome the frustration in What role does the artist have in society? my life. Unfortunately art has become a commodity. This is not what I imaged as a child. I thought Art education is very important because it sparks art was magical, not products to invest in, like the imagination. It can open a child’s mind to gold. new ideas. Art has the capacity to prevent war. It makes people smile and laugh. It makes people What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? happy. It helps to beautify everything. It prevails when a Creating a masterpiece take a lot of experimentasociety is open. The artist gives people inspira- tion and patience. Artists need to be mature and tion for their life and their work. I would love to need to be good people, first, before they can be see people talk about social political issues while great artists. An artist has to believe in their inlooking at my work. stincts and trust herself. Self-promotion is necessary. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Is it possible to compare somehow, USA What is your future plans as an artist? and Korea? I want to make many more paintings, and expand I live in the Lower East Side of New York, where my medium. I hope to participate in future resithere is currently a very vibrant art scene. Un- dencies, and show my work through out the world. fortunately, It has become very commercialized I would like my art to help in the awareness of which has impacted the creativity in the neigh- political conflicts in Korea and promote reunifiborhood. Art galleries in the neighborhood have cation. I would like to broaden my audience.


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www.mija


ajung.com

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Jorge Mansilla Sydney, Australia Being exposed to technology in an exponential manner allowed him to witness the drastic alteration of our lifestyles and the sudden rise of our new cyber worlds and identities. His art results fall in the intersection of figurative and abstract, constantly obsessed with the possibility of making visible the intangible. Jorge Mansilla has been producing art since 1999: exploring various themes such as sexuality, spirituality, our relationship with nature and death. He has been producing collages on paper for various reasons: paper represents ancient cultures and for centuries now the triumph of our civilization, it is also a practical and simple material that enables the creation of images whilst more importantly consolidating time and space as a unique physical document. He has collect and recycle materials because these practices speak about the saturation and overconsumption representative of our times, all this paper and plastic will then shape figures and images that attempt to materialize this overload, the homogenization and convergence of world trends and the complexity of our emerging status as internet mutants. Most recent works are sculptures made from recycled plastic and are inspired by everyday people; the next step is to giving the sculptures mechanized, robotic skeletons.


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How and why started you creating?

can complicate and slow down your processes. It is hard to allocate time for art when you have not sorted other more basic needs first. So I had to adapt to these changes and to the fact that I did not have a studio or even a space at home. Recently I found a great studio space so the flow has been restored.

Since an early age it was very obvious to me that sports were not my thing but drawing, colouring and painting were my favourite activities. As far back as I remember I was intrigued by the act of producing representations of our thoughts and imagination. I was lucky my parents encouraged me and enrolled me in painting and drawing classes from a young age. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? How has your work changed in the past years? Last year I decided to shift from 2D to 3D. During my Bachelor’s degree I made some sculptures so it was clear to me what was required, so then I started compiling plastic and figuring out the way to shape the figures.

Is there such a thing like a massage parlor critic!? Hahaha Ok then I would love to be one of those style hunters who travel to other cities to study people’s street styles. I think it is really interesting how cultures accept different trends depending on their history or concepts of normality. What is your creative process like?

Another influential aspect to the work would be my geographical position, being an immigrant I have a core/base of subjects that I am always


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investigating or approaching through my work, the way in which I do it varies. In general I am always devising solutions through which I may be able to register our times, mainly because I am concerned with the oblivious consumerism of the world, for this reason I try to use discarded materials such as paper and plastic. Also I’ve always produced work on a series method: I would define the main theme and then develop several artworks at the same time. What is the most challenging part about working with Mixed Media? The technicalities of the materials, even though you find amazing, fascinating materials, they can be hard to join or blend. At the moment I have not discovered how to intersect plast ic sculptures with paper collages but I am certain that this will be resolved, I think some progress

has been made by laminating the most recent collages, they are now “plastified�. What are your future plans as an artist? I am always looking at how to improve and make more complex and intricate work, or how to express my perception of reality and concerns in ways that everyone can understand. As an example I am looking at adding more mechanical/robotic parts to my plastic sculptures. I find collaborating with other artists a very interesting process in regards to the final product and the experience of bringing several brains together. So I will be spending more time and energy on my collaborative work with my friend Sissy Reyes, we produce gender equality content under the name of PurpleMoustacho. We had a good 2015 and we are already developing more projects.

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www.jorgemansilla.net


Paula Rae Gibson Utrecht, The Netherlands “You and Your Selfies” was featured by Lensculture in 2014 and selected in their best eleven self portrait series of 2014 An Honorary award for a project called” Destination Love”, from the Moscow Foto Awards 2014 A finalist award for the Julia Margaret Cameron Woman’s Photography Prize, 2015 for fine art category, and portrait and childrens portrait. She is working on a new photography book with Eyemazing Editions which will be published 2016.


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When, how and why started you creating?

Name three artists you’d like to be compared to.

I think creativity was always in me, it was stunned quiet not being raised in a creative environment and then burst out of me after a car crash , aged 21, where I was literally ripped open from breastbone all the way down, loosing my spleen - which the chinese say is the place you store emotion. without this, i pour my emotions into my photographs- thats what it feels like anyway,

Well speaking of who i admire.. Man Ray, Louise Bourgeois, Julia Margaret Cameron to name three

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice?

In your opinion, what does art mean in contemporary culture?

LOVE, I have to say being in love, feeling the weight of love missing, burying love literally - my art allows me to feel my life as the journey it is, and is a way to always get something back, no matter of the negativity i could be going through

I feel work can be very emotional and personal right now... but then I’m only noticing that sort of work

What art do you most identify with?

How would you describe the art scene in your area? Right now, very low key. Im living in Utrecht... feels very much more of a cafe culture than art

What are your future plans as an artist?

To use film music and photography to capture whatever touches me , inside myself, and outside... Music, photography, painting sculpture - anything that to let my work lead me to those I want in my life, to carries passion carve a world i believe in

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Laila Seidel Bremen, Germany Art lets me interpret, distort or enhance images exactly how I want, without limits. I paint scenes that particularly interest me, often inspired by encounters I have made or special places I visited during trips in Germany and abroad. I am very interested in different cultures and languages. Eastern Europe, and in particular Slovakia is currently the source of my inspiration. Thus, I am constantly searching for possibillities to work or exhibit in these countries. Artist’s symposia or field excursions which lead to dialogue and mutual inspiration are very important to me. On these occasions I take plenty of photos as potential material for future artwork. I paint with acrylics and oil on canvas or glass, I print and I also do cut outs.


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When, how and why started your art practice? One key experience that I remember quite clearly was when I was maybe 5 years old and an older friend taught me that a human’s leg can be drawn with two strokes instead of one. After that I drew and painted a lot. When I was a teenager I painted portraits of my favourite band and swapped them with other fans for photographies or live tape recordings of their concerts. That gave me a lot of confidence. There were several points where I had to make descisions whether to continue with art or do something else. Every time the coice was for the art because it is the best thing for me in life. What is the most challenging part about being a painter? Really to take the time for painting! Applying for and organizing exhibitions, maintaining a web page, facebook, writings newsletters and concepts, earning money etc. is very time consuming. Another challenging part is to accept that not every application is successfull. What art do you most identify with? Realistic painting and sometimes not quite realistic painting. I like the early American and German/ Austrian photorealistic paintings but also artists like Elizabeth Peyton, Marlene Dumas or Slovak artist Jana Farmanova who create very intense atmospheres by using watercolour techniques. Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. Of course I am influenced by artwork I like and sometimes I make references but I would prefer not to be compared to other artists. I like to experiment with different styles and techniques. I guess in the end I am searching for my own unique style, like most artists. Three painters I admire however are Gerhard Richter, Elizabeth Peyton and David Hockney. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I live in Bremen in Northern Germany. There is a vibrant art scene here but there are not many big galleries or events (like high quality art fairs) to

present art. It is all very familiar. Artists visit each other’s exhibition openings but there are not many buyers. It is sais that collector’s don’t like to spend their money in their home city.Therefore many artists go to Berlin for more support and business. In your opinion, what does art mean in contemporary culture? I am not an art scientist, just a painter. Art reflects contemporary culture. Art is used for many political and social issues. Art is also the essence of culture in general. For me it is only important what art means to me. Almost everything! What are your future plans as an artist? I want to take part in many artist residencies abroad. I’d love to go to Serbia, Croatia, Slovenia and also Japan. Residencies are perfect opportunities to combine travelling, working and meeting other artists from around the world. Those events and journeys are the inspiration for most of my artwork. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? A human’s leg can be drawn with two strokes instead of one!


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www.lailaseidel.com


Sarah Tompkins Ottawa, Canada My recent body of work, rendered in oil paint, graphite, and ink, developed as a means of confronting a long period of severe illness and loss in my personal history. The work relates directly to these experiences and to lingering feelings of displacement. My overall vision is to produce a series that captures the ripeness of a moment just before it falls into decay. This series examines the dangerous allure of rooting oneself in memory by contrasting the willingness to be present against the comfort of complacency and melancholy. The resulting body of work is quiet and contemplative, with undertones of the sweetly sinister.


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Briefly describe the work you do. My practice is based out of a live-in studio, where I have spent every weekday for the last two years. I am first and foremost a painter, but use consistent experimentation in sculpture and printmaking to develop my aesthetic. The work is generally figurative or floral in nature, and continually traces an intangible sensibility that I think every artist possesses uniquely. What themes do you pursue? My most recent series of oil paintings and ink drawings developed as a means of confronting a long period of severe illness and loss in my personal history. The work relates directly to these experiences and to lingering feelings of displacement. In addressing these issues I became interested in the history of burial shrouds and death masks as a mimicry of life. The imagery associated with the living’s often lighthearted imitation of the dead penetrates the majority of my work. As such, my overall vision is to produce a series that captures the ripeness of a moment just before it falls into decay. The resulting body of work is quiet and contemplative, with undertones of the sweetly sinister. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? Being a professional artist takes a tremendous amount of conviction and quality time spent with your face inches from a canvas. Some challenges are integral to the process, such as developing a form and style that is unique to you and marketable as a product. What I find more challenging, however, are the necessary polarities of being an artist and a business person. It requires balancing the solitary nature of developing a collection with building critical business relationships and breaking out of your own creative quarantine. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Ottawa has an intimate and ever-growing art community which is anchored by the Nation-


Art Reveal Magazine

al Art Gallery of Canada, and littered with a host of small contemporary galleries. It’s developing from a city of older collectors and historic Canadian art into a haven for venturesome writers and painters, and an art scene being designed by innovative curators. It also functions as a hub between Montreal and Toronto, which have terrific and well established art communities. What art do you most identify with? Ironically, given that my most recent work is largely rooted in tight detail, the art I most identify with are richly gestural paintings ranging from Modernists to my own contemporaries. Most notably, the lush sensibility developed by Cecily Brown had an instant impact on the development of my own work. More visibly and practically, however, I very closely identify with the ghostly aesthetic and disquieting undertones of Marlene Dumas. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? I have two that I generally keep in mind: firstly, don’t worry yourself to death over where your next paycheque is coming from - if you’re working consistently and with purpose, you’ll find a way to sustain yourself. If you’re a creative person, it tends to come naturally to develop alternate way of making money. Secondly, be relentless. The longer you work and the later you’re willing to stay in the studio, the more naturally your forms and reputation will develop. You have to make a conscious decision to embrace the often harsh realities of being a professional artist, and take joy in every breakthrough. What are your future plans as an artist? I’ve been giving the same answer for years as long as I’m sustainably selling my work, I’m happy. That being said, I have work being shown shortly in Venice and London, and am working with connections in L.A. to further branch into the European and American art markets. My focus is also currently shifting from developing this latest series to pursuing an artist residency abroad, which will mark the beginning of my next major project.

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www.saraht


tompkins.ca


Vix Walker New York, USA My work experiments with the physicality of photography. I often make use of mixed media in my work, across various stages of production, as I am intrigued by the way the tactile quality of a photograph can change the meaning of the image. I’m interested in the limitations of this two-dimensional medium, which is used to describe our three-dimensional world. My process is often born out of an idea for an image that’s stuck in my head like a song; I photograph it and produce multiple iterations of the idea until I am satisfied. The visual and conceptual logic behind a single image may or may not be obvious, but each image has a deeper meaning. The concept behind each body of work I create is inspired from a personal place, while simultaneously engaging in a dialogue that is widely relatable.


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When, how and why started your art practice?

can take a decent picture on their smartphone, how do you make your expertise a commodity? It’s important When I was a little kid I always said I wanted to be to have a compelling visual identity that flows through an artist when I grew up. I’ve always been passionate your work. about art and had a strong creative drive. I would ask for a camera every year for Christmas and my birthday What art do you most identify with? when I was growing up, but it wasn’t until I was 15 that I first picked up an analogue 35mm SLR. I got hooked Photo montage and collage. My work often incorporates pretty immediately and I decided to pursue photography mixed media when it helps me articulate my concept. as my college major. My current practice started when I I’m interested in expanding the medium of photography. attended art school and I found that I work best when I experiment. These days, I often try to combine working Name three artists you’d like to be compared to. with my hands with photography. John Baldessari, Wolfgang Tillmans, and Brea Souders. What is the most challenging part about being photographer? How would you describe the art scene in your area? I think in this day and age it’s really difficult to stand I live in New York City so I would say that it’s very out as a photographer. When everyone and their cousin competitive and exclusive. It can be both inspiring and


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discouraging to be surrounded by artists with equal or greater talent. The commoditization of art as an investment opportunity is what I most dislike about the art scene here. On the other hand, it’s a great pleasure to have access to such a variety of art from around the world.

I’m graduating from Parsons The New School for Design and I plan to stay in New York afterwards. I’m hoping to have a few part time jobs that are flexible so I can focus on my own work in my free time. My long term goals are to be able to travel with my work doing residencies and exhibitions.

In your opinion, what does photography mean in contemporary culture?

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received?

In school I had a lot of professors telling me how imI love that photography thoroughly permeates our so- portant failure is. As an artist, it’s really easy to get disciety. A photograph can be a moment, a memory, an couraged or frustrated when your work doesn’t come advertisement, and so much more. Most people don’t out how you want it to. I do a lot of tests and make realize just how often they are confronted with chal- many preliminarily versions of works and I have to go lenging imagery because there’s so much external stim- through a process of trial and error to get a refined uli around us. piece or series. Failure is also a big part of the artistic career, because you’re going to get told NO a lot and What are your future plans as an artist? you have to keep trying. The key is to recognize that trial and error is an integral part of the process.


www.vixw


walker.com


Agent X Vancouver, Canada Agent X, cultural explorer and agent of the unknown, creates experimental, multimedia collages, paintings, and 2D artwork. Described as ‘Pop Art with thought,’ Agent X juxtaposes pop culture, technology, fashion, music, politics, and race in visually complex amalgamations expressing the anxieties of the global, post-modern world and the dark side of consumerist, media-obsessed culture. His work occupies a unique intersection between the aesthetics and philosophy of Futurism, the social critique of the Dada movement, and contemporary artistic movements ranging from Pop Art to Superflat. Agent X was raised in Connecticut and studied in New Haven and Atlanta before moving to Canada and training at the Art Institute of Vancouver. While his work draws from formal training, his mashup multimedia style is primarily self-developed. Agent X often combines the ephemera of the past with the glossy world of contemporary magazines and newspapers, adding paint and other mixed media to create images that cleverly critique humanity’s current obsessions and where they are leading us. While presenting a contemporary, urban veneer in his work through influences of music and fashion, sub-layers of his work dive into loaded socio-political subject matter. Agent X jumped onto the radar when named as a semi-finalist in the 2011 New York Art Marathon, with multiple international honors that rapidly followed including winning Top Entry in the competitive Curious Art-Pie Show at Curious Duke Gallery, London and being named among ‘12 Artists to invest in now’ by New Blood Art Gallery, London. Currently based in Vancouver, Agent X has exhibited in art meccas around the world including London, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Spain and Toronto. He is currently a featured artist working with Microsoft for the Surface 3 Tablet Campaign and is represented by galleries including Beautiful Crime Gallery in London.


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What is your creative process like? The process for me is simple. A lot of old magazines,glue and paint. If a piece needs more in it I will add it. I like to make sure that when you get a original artwork from me, it’s more than just what everyone else has. all forms of music and going for a “dig” for sounds is a big part of my art practice. I never make the same artwork twice like sampling the same record. Always be original but respect the past and look to the future is what I try to represent in my art. Forward thinking. I never make the same thing twice so that’s why I embrace “the unknown” in my creative process, it just comes down to the subject and theme. All of my artwork has a intellectual side to it. Either simple or complex. I listen to a ton of Electronic,Drum and Bass,Jazz and Hip Hop music. I really like mixes with different artists. I need to listen to different types of music so I know that it makes sense in the past and especially for the future. What is the best part about working with collage? Collage for me is the best. I do not like to be limited to just one aspect of creating. I love getting tons of magazines and just go on a artistic rollercoaster. I try to make sure I have lots of paint (acrylic,oil,watercolor) and glue. If I need extra things like wool,sim cards,wire,etc to put in the piece I will do that as well to enrich the uniqueness of the artwork. Even the materials in the artwork can have so much meaning in a piece. Not just the visual aesthetic. The best part of working with collage is that I can make anything with any topic. Nature,Pop Art,etc. People I always want to add something special to a original piece , like Pepto Bismol,Tea Bags,Sim Cards and more. If you buy one of my pieces I want you to get more than just something to look at. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? The artists that I admire now are David Hammons,Banksy and Damien Hirst. I like the process that they being with their artwork and the


Art Reveal Magazine

messages behind it. I like the timeless work of David’s bigtime. A ton of Afro American artists just do artwork on race, which I hate. If we are going to move forward we need to explore many more ideas and subjects which Hammons does. I love Banksy artwork with the wit and subject matter.Also that he keeps it real and always street. Finding his artwork is a adventure in itself. Hirst artwork and evolution process is second to none. People give him shit but his ideas alone can make any artists go “Dammm I would never think of that in my artwork”. That’s why he wins. I’m like him in that way, that I would have great artwork and the ideas of the work is amazing as well. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? I would say look at the best artist from the past to now. Look at the styles,colors,subjects,etc. Then find your own style and then enter your artwork into contest,shows,etc. If you have a love for it and you work hard you can make it. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Well the art scene is very good here with more galleries opening up.I always check the galleries in South Granville,Gastown and the big Vancouver Art gallery. I wish they showed more Native Indian,Asian and East Indian artists from Vancouver and the community. The art scene could be bigger but hockey is the religion lol What are you working on right now? I am working on more nature type artworks that I will release in the fall. I also am working on some 3D printer artwork and some sculpture work. I like to switch it up. Always evolving.

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www.agentxart.com


Anna Yeroshenko Boston, USA Architecture is first created on paper, to be then embodied into solid material. By photographing the vernacular landscape of Boston’s periphery, I bring its mundane architecture back to paper. My photographs can prolong its life, or they can give it a new life. By making new structures out of my photographs I, perhaps, fulfill what I gave up doing as an architect. Just as Paper Architects created their utopian projects, that were never meant to be built, I build an imagined reality with an intention to bring back to the viewer the joy of looking at the things we are surrounded by and take for granted, things that are the stage sets of our lives.


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When, how and why started you photographing? I began photographing while being an architecture student. I loved experimenting and exploring. With my camera and my friends I often roamed the city haunting to capture something surprising on the street. Photography inspired me to go out and discover new striking places in the city that I thought was extremely boring. Walls, backyards, fences, and signs were the subjects of my photographs. There was a sense of impermanence and malfunction: warehouses in which nothing was stored; fences, that did not protect from anything or anyone; and road signs that lead nowhere. These structures conveyed a sense of displacement, temporality, and wandering. They occupied space and their presence reminded me that there was nothing more permanent than the temporary. My camera gave me (and still does) the reason to look at the things, that otherwise would have been left unnoticed, and to find the meaning and beauty in them. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Even though I no longer practice the profession, I consider myself an architect. I studied art history from the perspective of an architect, I studied drawing and painting as an architect. This background has shaped my current artistic identity. I don’t design real buildings, but I construct my photographs using the language of architecture. For example the work presented here, Enduring Peripheries, is as much about photography as it is about architecture. It deals with deconstructed images of urban landscapes, re-observed as sculptural representations. I fold and manipulate my photographs to create dimensionality and to give the images new depth. Then I re-photograph the folded structures, leading to a new perception of the subject. The photographs of the architectural miniatures are intended to transform the viewer’s vision of ordinary buildings and to stimulate a dialogue about the quality of the built environment and the effect it has on people that inhabits it.


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What is the most challenging part about working with b&w photography? For me the approach to color and black and white photography is as different as to painting and drawing. Color is always a dominant compositional component of an image, as opposed to a black and white photograph which is formed by lines and shades. I look at the world with different eyes when I photograph color and b&w. The challenging part is to be able to adjust your eyes and not to be distracted by colors. How would you describe the art scene in your area? It is vibrant. It is dynamic. It is vivid. Boston is one of the cities that attract artists and intellectuals with diverse backgrounds from all parts of the world. Its art scene is a melting pot of ideas and interests and that’s what I love about it. What advice can you give to those who are just starting with arts? Lately I’ve heard quite a lot of young artists complaining about their talents being undervalued and their work underpaid. Indeed, the artist’s job is hard and takes an incredible amount of time to succeed, but money should not be the motivation for making art. If your primary goal is financial success - it is better to stop now, you would hardly produce anything worthy. if you cannot stop, then complain less, enjoy what you do, and you will be rewarded for your hard work. What are your future plans as an artist? I just began working on a new work, which I am very excited about. Next few months I want to dedicate as much time as I can to this work. It is different from anything I’ve done before, at the same time it is a continuation of my earlier work. So far I’ve been experimenting with the medium, tried various approaches, but now I feel that I’ve distilled the main idea that connects all my work and found the appropriate form that conveys it. It is an exciting time for me as an artists – after almost ten years of practicing photography I feel like I am again in the very beginning or rather, in the beginning of the next stage.


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www.annayeroshenko.com


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Art Reveal Magazine no. 16  

Artists: Andrew Agostino, Andro Banovac, Giulia Filippi, James Frew, Barbara Lousie Hauzinger, Emma Hill, Mija Jung, Jorge Mansilla, Paula R...

Art Reveal Magazine no. 16  

Artists: Andrew Agostino, Andro Banovac, Giulia Filippi, James Frew, Barbara Lousie Hauzinger, Emma Hill, Mija Jung, Jorge Mansilla, Paula R...

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