Page 1


LORA AZZA and DIMITRI DIMOV 4 CHRISTINE CARR 10 RACHAEL EDGAR 16 MISTA FIG 22 MARIJA GRADEČAK 28 ALEX GIEGOLD and TOMKA WEIß 34 SARAH HILL 40 GÜNES-HÉLÈNE ISITAN 46


ANNA KILLIJUNEN 52 GÖZDE KIRKSEKIZ 58 CAROLINE MONNET 64 PAOLA RICCI 70 ROSA ROBERTS 76 KATRINA STAMATOPOULOS 82 GEOFFREY STEIN 88 ANGELINA VOSKOPOULOUS 94


Lora Azza and

Dimitri Dimov Strasbourg, France 2015

Award from the “Incubarte 7” festival, Valencia, Spain

2014

Award Revelation, “Salon Arbustes”, France

2014

3rd prize, photography festival Clic - Clac, 2014, France-Germany

2014

4th prize, TheCoffeeArtProject, Paris, France

2014

Théophile Schuler Prize; shortlisted

Dimitri Dimov and Lora Azza twist the ordinary into something marvelous. Taking a minimalist approach, domestic objects are transformed into surprising works where fiction and reality merge. Their visual vocabulary speaks of poetic metaphor and bold statements communicated through manipulated objects from the everyday. Their works exhibited in Hide and Seek - Rubik’s Truth and Zarchencence are fantastic examples of how their intelligent works can delight and surprise viewers, addressing the surreal. These are two artists who break our expectations of the objects that surround us, testing what we think we know and refreshing our preconceptions of the world. Sophie Erin Cooper Hide and Seek Curator Fringe Arts Bath Festival


METAMORPHOSES


6

Art Reveal Magazine

METAMORPHOSES

Metamorphoses Statement We are two visual artists working in France. We are Bulgarian, a half-barbaric tribe coming from the east to get all the social benefits and all the jobs of the western citizen (in particular England if we trust the British media which provokes Chomsky to be even more proud of his theories / Noam Chomsky; Media Control, The Spectacular Achievements of Propaganda, 59p/). Bulgaria is a country situated on the Black Sea and the Danube, it has borders with Turkey, Greece, Macedonia, Serbia and Romania. At the moment it is the Black Sea, which interests us and especially its coast filled with rich history. Recently we moved into a new apartment. The exact address is 67, Roman Road, Strasbourg. Our residence is called Julius Caesar. Yes, Julius Caesar on the Roman Road in his precious Gaul: what a coincidence. It is necessary to pursue our thoughts. This famous Julius is murdered, but not before adopting

his nephew, Octavian, the first Roman emperor. It is the latter who lived during the time of Ovid, the famous author of “Metamorphoses�. The work tells the stories of transformation of men, heroes or gods in animals or plants. Ovid lived in the first century, a time when the worship of the sacred mysteries in Ancient Rome was flourishing. This is deducted by the place accorded by Ovid to Orpheus (the famous Thracian singer who lived 150 km away from our home town, in the sacred mountain of Thrace: Rhodopi) and Pythagoras (book XV). We find a deep interest in the philosophy on the fate of souls. Moreover, we also notice the fact that for Ovid the metamorphoses can be ascending and descending. His work inspired numerous artistic works through the centuries to our days. We as artists want to develop several objects and ideas which pull his influence of these antique texts. Nevertheless, we want to adapt them to our modern time. Today we changed our heroes, we changed


Art Reveal Magazine

our gods. We present you a series of small objects which translate Ovid’s “Metamorphoses» with our own heroes and gods, the heroes and gods of computing and information. Interesting questions immerse as for the direction of the metamorphoses: upwards or downwards. One last notice: Ovid begins the writing of «Metamorphoses” in the year 1, the year Jesus Christ was born according the monk Denys Le Petit in 523. Given that in-depth studies on the Gospels (James D.G. Dunn, Jesus Remembered, Eerdmans Publishing (on 2003), page 324) show us that his birth would occur 3 to 5 years before that and taking into account that the second major event with traces during the centuries of this year is the writing of “ Metamorphoses “, we can say that we are 2015 After Metamorphoses (AM). Nevertheless Ovid falls into disgrace and he is exiled by the emperor. He was sent to the beginning of our story: to the Black Sea, on the territories of former Thrace. He dies in Tomis, current Constanta in Romania (named after a different emperor). Our story made a complete tour and now it is necessary to pursue a last line of thought. We must admit that we began this artwork statement with a certain idea. This statement is going to be different. We wanted to explain and work on the metamorphosis. The Larousse dictionary gives us the definition of the term: a) Change of a being in another one, a total transformation of a being to the point that it is not recognizable anymore; and b) Complete modification of the character, the state of somebody, the aspect or some shape of something. It is necessary to add that the metamorphosis sticks perfectly to the evolutionary concept which was crucial for anthropology science. Then from an anthropological and bi-

BREAD LADDER

ological point of view we can say that the metamorphosis is actually a kind of evolution. So you can consider this statement as a thing which wants to evolve. Think of all the artwork statements which want to be more, they want to be the Artwork. Maybe the real metamorphosis is not in the objects which we are presenting? Maybe this text, which is supposed to be nothing else than a simple statement, said to itself “Why not me?... I can be the first one.” We would like to believe that those were the same exact words as the first organism, the first plant and the first animal said to themselves. Then the total change begins. Nevertheless, this text cannot make the ultimate step of evolution without the works which provoked its existence in the first place.

7


8

Art Reveal Magazine

METAMORPHOSES


BREAD LADDER

www.loraazza.com www.dimitridimov.com


Christine Carr Ankeny, IA, USA Virginia Museum of Fine Arts: Professional Fellowship Monolith, The Kiernan Gallery, Lexington, VA (solo show) WPA Experimental Media Video Screening Series, The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC Looking at the Land, 21st Century American Views: A Collaboration with Flak Photo, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI Hirsch, Robert. Light and Lens: Photography in the Digital Age. 2nd ed. Oxford: Elsevier, 2012:145. Christine Carr received her MFA from the Tyler School of Art, her BFA from the Corcoran College of Art and Design and her AAS from the Tidewater Community College Visual Arts Center. She is a two-time recipient of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Fellowship. Her work is included in the 5th edition of Exploring Color Photography, the 3rd edition of Photographic Possibilities and the 2nd edition of Light and Lens, all by Robert Hirsch. She has exhibited in solo shows in Washington, DC, Richmond, VA and Roanoke, VA, and in numerous group shows throughout the United States. Carr has participated in residencies at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts and at the Prairie Center of the Arts. She is currently teaching photography at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.


VAPOR PROJECT


When, how and why started you creating? My experience with creating began in my late 20’s. After high school my attempt to study engineering didn’t turn out well, so I worked in the restaurant business for years. During that time I drove to remote parks and one day I took a picture that I really liked. I looked into photography and found out that it was a whole lot more complicated than I realized. Fortunately a nearby community college had an outstanding program; I took a few classes and was hooked. Creating began as an ecstatic process-I was learning new techniques and experimenting. For many years I worked through personal issues and now address more universal issues. By creating I have a voice. It is different than telling someone I’m sad or I’m angry or I don’t agree with something. It allows me to express my concerns in a broader, more complex way. Why did you choose photography as your medium? Photography allows me not only to express myself, but also to explore the world. An important part of my process is discovering the unknown, whether that refers to shooting in a new location or seeing an issue in a new light. I’m driven by curiosity, and photography never disappoints. There are so many options regarding techniques, processes and applications. In addition, the medium itself is constantly changing due to technology and cultural trends. Importantly, light is integral to photography. I’m fascinated by the way light sculpts objects, how it colors the world and creates an ever-changing impact. Finally, photography contains elements of magic. Seeing an image appear in the developer still thrills me after almost twenty years. Also, I get an exciting sense of anticipation at not knowing what moving objects will look like when shot with long exposures. Where did you get the idea for the “Vapor” project? It came together from a few directions. I’ve been obsessed with clouds for years-they VAPOR PROJECT


are evocative, powerful and constantly morphing. I worked on a cloud-based project for some time but was not satisfied with it. In addition, I’ve been fascinated by simple building forms, as seen in my Monolith project. A couple of summers ago, I learned to work with plaster and started creating small structures. I photographed them and added clouds to the images and Vapor was born. The landscape has been my means of expression and I’m drawn to nature as a place of exploration, relaxation and joy. As this project was developing, I was thinking about the possible dire repercussions of climate change. I was also wondering about past civilizations-were they aware of their impending doom, and if so, did they make attempts to stop it? This project is the result of my concerns and questions. What art do you most identify with? I identify with contemporary landscape work in general, the color photography of the 1970’s and projects that involve travelling to document the United States. Also, I feel a kinship to almost all light based art, especially that which deals with the mysterious or the ethereal. Finally, I relate to art dealing with perception, especially concerning space, scale, color or light. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? Don’t be afraid to fail. What are you working on right now? Many projects at once. I moved a little over a year ago, so I have new buildings to photograph for my long running Monolith project. In continuation of my CURB project, I’ve been collecting cigarette debris in my new location and have been identifying differeances in the way the debris accumulates here. Meanwhile, I have been formulating ideas, doing tests and accumulating materials for a couple of new projects, one dealing with air pollution and the other dealing with overlooked women. VAPOR PROJECT


VAPOR PROJECT


VAPOR PROJECT

VAPOR PROJECT

www.christinecarr.com


Rachael Edgar Oxford, UK 2015

Graduate Award – London Print Studio

2013

Postgraduate Award for Outstanding Contribution to Visual Communication, Buckinghamshire New University, UK

2014

Exhibition – ‘Alternative Process’, The Engine Room, Ashton-under Lyne, UK

2014

Exhibtion – ‘Exploring Photography’, The Wiseman Gallery, Oxford as part of biennial Oxford Festival of Photography

My work is concerned with the juxtaposition of the personal versus the universal experience, exploring my experiences of motherhood in a feminist context. Whilst my work has a strong conceptual basis it is often representational. I exploit the often contradictory concerns of the underlying concept and the production of, what the author Angela Carter called, the ‘entertaining surface’.


DIVINITY


18

Art Reveal Magazine

LOVE AND HATE

How and why started you creating? I am sure that many artists who are asked about how and why they started creating would say three things; firstly they don’t remember a time when they didn’t create. Secondly they met someone along the way who inspired them to continue. And then the first two eventually led them to the third - being unable to imagine a life without art. My memories of growing up are punctuated by particular drawings or paintings that I did, right back to drawing the Moon as a very young child. My seminal influence was an art teacher at school - he was a printmaker with his own press, a rare piece of equipment in English state schools in the 1980’s. Right there and then I fell in love with printmaking and the magic of pulling a piece of paper off a printing plate and being endlessly fascinated with the result. Now I can’t think of a day where I don’t at least think about making art. How has your work changed in the past years? My work has changed a lot in the past few years, partly since I decided to do my MA in Printmaking. It gave me a complete change of perspective on my practice.

I found the confidence to produce work which was more honest. It has moved from whimsical, humourous but essentially surface driven prints to a more mature practice which has begun to address more serious conceptual issues around feminism and the personal versus the universal experience, albeit retaining what the writer Angela Carter called a ‘glittering surface’. My personal life also changed during my MA as I became a mother and suffered from post-natal depression. Continuing to create became an essential way for me to work through the changes in my life and my practice. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? In another life I would probably have been a chemist. I just love mixing chemicals together, wearing googles and gloves and seeing what happens. The difference between me and a chemist though is that they understand what is happening and they don’t just think ‘wow, that’s like magic!’ My husband jokes that one day I will be arrested as a terrorist for ordering strange substances off Ebay. Either that or I will blow my art ‘shed’ up.


Art Reveal Magazine

LIKE MOTHER UNLIKE DAUGHTER

What is your creative process like? Much of my work is sparked by something I am experiencing or thinking about on a personal level. I then sift around the writings and experiences of others to place my thoughts into a more universal context. Words are very important to me and key words often survive the whole process to become part of the artwork’s title. Then I try and synthesise al those thoughts and writings into a piece of art work. I used to find it more irritating than magical that the end result sometimes bore no relation to how I visualised a piece of work might look. Increasingly though I have embraced my art works as an outward expression of inner thoughts which are, lets face it, pretty jumbled. The resulting work, if you trust it, is a distillation of all those thoughts but made somehow sane and beautiful. But I have learnt that to get to that point ‘happy accident’ has to be embraced along the way. What is the most challenging part about working with Mixed Media? The only part of working with mixed media that

can be a challenge is making the surface homogenous when more than one technique is involved. If it doesn’t all meld together, it can look a bit of a mess. But working with lots of different techniques is what I love. Usually though, the concept that I am trying to work through dictates the medium that I use. What are your future plans as an artist? I am currently making a conscious effort to make my art more visible, including finding new galleries to represent me that are more suitable and sympathetic to the new avenues that my work is embracing. My medium term plans are to work through a suite of fairy tales, inspired by my reading around the psychology of those stories and their influence on children. In the longer term I may register to do my PhD. Maybe I will do some teaching. But in the meantime I am just trying not to blow up my shed.

19


www.rachae


ledgar.co.uk

DOUDOU


Mista Fig Bristol, UK 2015

Artist of the month, June – ‘Outside In’, art company Chichester, UK and on-line

2008

Hookers & Lookers, The Buttermarket, Birmingham, UK

1991

Working with Shona sculptors in Zimbabwe, Africa

1986

Awarded sculpture scholarship to ‘Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts’, Poland

My artwork is mainly figurative, offering an interpretation of life’s characters, with a social comment. Through the years I have enjoyed exploring a wide variety of materials, from clay to plaster, mosaic, found objects, rapid prototyping and life-casting, plus carving centuries old bog oak (fossilized wood). Focusing on a theme, I may spend a few years completing each series. Created alone, my artwork is produced by hand. Each sculpture is individual and an edition of one.

LITTLE PEOPLE


24

Art Reveal Magazine


Art Reveal Magazine

When, how and why you started working with sculpture?

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice?

My introduction into the wonders of creativity, began when I was about 6 years old. My grandfather, a coal miner (I come from a long line of pit- workers), sometimes had off-cuts of wood delivered from the local joiners, to be used as fuel to heat the house. The huge pile of wood captivated me and I attempted to create a “new world” from it, spending many hours with this wonderful material and my new found freedom of thought.

The lasting influence on my art practice, are my ideas and the urge to create them. It is something inside me that desperately wants to be released, as if I am the narrator of a story that needs to be told. I feel a heavy burden when I don’t tell and gain a feeling of empowerment once I have. As for individuals that have lit my pathway, above all, my mother, offering me protection and freedom to create, through her unconditional love.

I continued to be enraptured with the idea of making things from my imagination. These early beginnings led to a greater interest in art, when, aged 14, a teacher introduced me to the history of art plus a realisation that there was more to life than spending time in a coal mine or the army (these being the occupations which 90 % of the school-leavers in my area went into). This gave me belief in my chosen direction. Tell us something about the technical equipment you use. Invariably, I use only hand tools, as often my studios are without electricity. Sometimes I may need a chainsaw or glue gun, but the most important equipment are my hands and any workable materials I find around me. To explain, I come across a medium, for example, during time spent in Norfolk, hand-carving centuries old fossilized wood, also known as bog oak, beginning the series “Fishes, Fishes, Everywhere“ and when living in London, I first began using found objects. An artistic idea will develop from something of great importance I have recently seen, heard or experienced and I translate this using a specific medium. Thus begins a series of work based on a particular theme, with each sculpture being an edition of one. A series can take several months or years to finish, depending on my appetite for what I am creating. When I feel the series is complete, I look for a new material to manipulate and begin my next adventure.

How has your work changed in the past years? My work is forever changing. As I have aged, so, it has evolved. From my starting point, learning traditional techniques, studying the human figure and nature, working in clay, to, it’s current form. Recently, I completed the series, “Little People”, where I would see the opportunity in other peoples’ cast-offs and in a ‘Frankenstein-esque’ way, alter and re-work their un-loved and sometimes loathed objects, into sculpture, to be loved once more, coating these in treated rolled lead, then flooding with colour. Now I am creating smaller, bejewelled figures, known as “The Untouchables”. The theme is about the concerns and fears we may have about life. Each figure is encased within a sealed glass dome. Through the years, time has taught me how to be free with my thoughts and provided a confidence to respond to any material I come across. I have a compulsion to tread an individual path, irrelevant of fashion trends within art. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? I believe art chose me, not the other way, but to anyone just starting out in the arts, I suggest, be true to yourself and take pleasure in what you do. Great energy is needed to make your mark and

25


26

Art Reveal Magazine

leave a message in the art world, but do not be too focused on gaining recognition, as it can be a false idol. Rewards can be a greater understanding, not necessarily, a greater bank account. Most of all, enjoy the ride. What are your future plans as an artist? My long term future plan, is to open a gallery / sculpture garden, for the artwork still in my possession, that I have created throughout my life. It would give me great pleasure to see it displayed together. Also, I look forward to using materials that I have not yet discovered and translating current ideas into another sculpture series. In the very near future, I will be showing some life-size mosaic figures from the series, ‘Hookers and Lookers’ ------ ‘’Modern Panic V1’’ group exhibition at Apiary Studios, London E2 from November Sat 14th to Sun 22nd 2015 Open 11 am -- 7 pm

www.mistafig.com


Alex Giegold and

Tomka WeiĂ&#x; Berlin, Germany


PARA DAYS


30

Art Reveal Magazine

PARA DAYS

How has your style changed over the years? The more often we exhibit, the bigger our work gets. We feel the need to see how certain pictures appear in extremely large format. Today we take up more space than before. Our style is less dirty and superimposed. Our installations are deceptively simpler yet participatory; they’re focused on the topic and at the same time associative. We apparently have grown up and learned a lot. ”Belly Button Art” (in German, Bauchnabelkunst) – meaning art revolving around our scenes and ourselves – is what we almost exclusively used to produce. Our minds were hung up on genderfuck, queer relations and identities. That was a magnificent and exhilarating time, and our pictures and performances offered plenty of opportunity to recognize ourselves in the art. Our imagery reflected our identity and, at the same time, shaped it. We had the impression we could make everything new, more intense and wild, and that we were part of a queer revolution.

Nowadays we take a step back. We are wholeheartedly dedicated to our work, but these days we prefer to talk about the issues we’re not personally involved in, observing topics from all sides. This gives more strength to our artwork. We try not to give answers but to raise questions. In our installations, we typically make room for a variety of voices to have their say. We try to create a space in our artwork for different realities. What is the most challenging part about working together? For us, working as a duo is not challenging but empowering. Sometimes we see our collaboration even as a slap in the face of capitalism and the individualization it prioritizes. But mostly, we’re simply thriving, high on the creative exchange. We are a duo in which one person is read as a woman and one as a man. It is occasionally challenging to avoid stereotypical gender roles. And it’s annoying. Additionally, we have to prove ourselves more than if we were two old men. But we don’t care; we’ve


Art Reveal Magazine

PARA DAYS

got things to say. A duo only functions if both people are focused, creatively obsessed and not afraid to work hard on the implementation of good ideas. At least we both think the other person is like that. To add another layer to all of this, we also need to cooperate as a duo with other artists. So… what’s most challenging? “Communication” is the answer to the question. Good communication is a work of art. And there are so many codes and languages. How would you describe the art scene in your area? There are several scenes in Berlin, but the question is about visibility. Who is visible, who is not, and why not? Who is exhibited? Certain art is selling better than other art. There are many small galleries and many poorly paid artists. Things happen quickly­—and much of it is happening via networks. Our focus is on Berlin’s Trans* and Queer Art Scenes. That’s where the most interesting projects

and widely inspiring collaborations take place. People are willing to work on themselves, criticize and learn from each other. Amazing artwork seemingly materializes out of the creative atmosphere. What role does the artist have in society? Art without content just for the sake of art is decoration. (Is there art without content? Something is always transported, obviously even with Deco. But that’s another discussion.) Images have an incredible power and artists must take responsibility for it. Art should challenge the society, make it beautiful, uncover abuses, and ensure that people feel good and respected. Art is a way of communicating. Art should encourage people to rebel against conditions that make them feel insignificant. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? Last weekend, we attended a wildly inspiring conference about networking called “Vernetzt Euch!”

31


32

Art Reveal Magazine

GENITIAL CALL

It really drove the point home that you need to network. If there are no other people where you study or work exploring your topics, then look for them outside your institution. Think about the perspective from which you speak, who you want to reach and who you actually do reach. Find out where you want to be as an artist. It has turned out to be tiring to bend our art for sponsors. Stay true to yourself and organise with others. What are your future plans as artists? We want to be amongst the top ten best-paid artists worldwide. The natural first step is to become self-centred old men. Beards and hats, I think that’s our next step: we’ll order beards and hats. No seriously: in two months we’re going to Bangkok for a collaboration. That is what we’re preparing as a duo right now. We’re planning to make a trans*-related piece and are so excited

to see what will come of it. We have another mixed media installation entitled “Über das Meer” (Across the Sea) that’s already made but hasn’t been shown yet. The opening reception will be in May or June 2016. This is a huge thing for us! We are happy to announce that “Über das Meer” will be exhibited on a former refrigerated cargo ship in Hamburg and at a shipyard in Greifswald, on the Baltic Sea! The two venues will make the work beam. Recently, a project about bodies and architecture came up that relates to our work “Giants.” We are also looking for a publisher for our catalogue of the 2014 installation “Genital Call.” It would be perfect if financing were no issue and we could easily get the financial means for implementing our projects, without any interference. We are planning to make our artwork available as platforms for communication and hope that they have an impact on society and culture.


Art Reveal Magazine

GENITIAL CALL

GENITIAL CALL

www.giegold-weiss.de

33


Marija Gradečak Zagreb, Croatia 2015

exhibition “Dan D”, old military hospital, exhibited project ReM ruGs, Zagreb, Croatia

2014

exhibition ”O za osmijeh”, MKC, exhibited project Zebra, Split, Croatia

2013

happening/poetry/video installation “Acivilizacija”, Metel Ožegović library, Varaždin, Croatia

Marija Gradečak was born on 8th April 1986 in Varaždin (Croatia) where she completed her elementary and secondary schooling. After graduating from high school she went to study History of Art at the Faculty of Philosophy in Ljubljana (Slovenia) and graduated in Interior design at Famul Stuart School of Applied Arts. During her college years starts her long lasting fascination and experimenting with recycled materials leading to her brand of unique products and accessories made from leather. Innovative in recycling pieces of old furniture she also expresses her creativity through interior design. Conceptualism as a main theme is present in all her work, in product design as well as in visual arts in which she incorporates her own poetry and writing. By observing deeply ingrained dogmas, she trys to play with people’s perceptions and through indirect criticism provoke and prove a possibility of avoiding and challenging conventions.Her expression through words, palpable materials and concepts, is a reflection of her profound and complex need for expressing herself through different media. At the moment her work is focused on product design, making of tapestries, from art installations to the unique and commercial carpets made from wool.


36

Art Reveal Magazine

Briefly describe the work you do.

What is your creative process like?

Years of research on and education in art and design led me to an interested media – carpets and tapestries. It is a specific area that includes both textile design and product design, opens up a large number of new spheres in conceptual and artistic approach to design. My current creation work is mostly based on studying materials, my own response to them, innovation and inter-disciplinarity which allows me to venture into new and unexplored areas. Curiosity and open-mindedness most certainly provide an abundance of ideas that I transfer through experience in somewhat simplified forms by leading educational art workshops for children and adults. I’ve always found recycling, or available materials, interesting. How to create unusual from the usual? I would have to say that those are creativity trainings where, through non-verbal game and the game of mind of observation only, one starts to form creative formulas where, thanks to discipline, emerges only technical capability.

With regard to the media I create, there are processes and different approaches. For example, we distinguish between several independent categories of carpet design, one of which is conceptual creation of tapestries. Categories should be distinguished and clearly defined by unique properties. Nevertheless, all processes have one thing in common – analysis as the beginning of the idea that later turns into more specific and, finally, tangible results. Do you consider yourself an artist or a designer? I have never liked to put things into some kind of boxes, and, although you receive a title though education, I better like the one that is from life, more emotional and intrinsic. I am what I emulate. My work is the result of my complexity, relationships, states, labour, and honesty; that is why I cannot easily separate between the two concepts. I do not consider


Art Reveal Magazine

37


38

Art Reveal Magazine

myself more or less of an artist if I design, or more or less of a designer if I create art. What matters to me is that I create and feel what I create. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Every day I feel intensely the influence of my surroundings, differences, way of life, and the struggle to maintain identity in latent competitions. It creates internal urges and opinions that are later reflected in my work. All of that results in a product of accumulated emotions. Long walks and observing architecture in buildings and people, drawing imaginary lines by moving my eyes across the outlines of buildings, creating another dimension within the one seen by all is what inspires me. During that time I get an idea or one appears in my dreams based on what I have experienced. I am also greatly influenced by thoughts that I turn into a public affair through poetry and based on that I analyse myself: “Who am I and what am I in the corners of creation?” What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? I have received many tips, critiques, and commendations that have most certainly helped me to change direction or focus even more on my creation. Since I find other artists inspirational, their lives and work, there are several thoughts that keep me up, and one of them is: “In our life there is a single colour, as on an artist’s palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the colour of love.” Marc Chagall

What are you working on right now? Apart from my regular and daily job as a carpet designer for larger or smaller public buildings, private clients, or artistic realisations within the scope of the Regeneracija (Regeneration) programme, I am currently creating a completely new and innovative product.


Art Reveal Magazine

www.marijagradecak.com

39


Sarah Hill Peterborough, England, UK 2015

Summer Salon, Candid Arts, London, UK

2015

Black and White: The Power and Beauty of Monochrome, BAR Gallery, North London, UK

2015

Bells from the Deep, Hundred Years Gallery, East London, UK

2015

Open Exhibition, Shape Arts Gallery, Stratford, East London, UK

2009

Wimbledon College of Art Degree show

Sarah Hill studied at Wimbledon College of Art, London and currently lives and works in Peterborough. Drawing is central to her practice, and her work is based around personal experiences, imagination and memories. Her drawings focus on self-generating forms, space, and intricately drawn textures that are spontaneous, but also well considered. She is inspired by contemporary drawing, cellular biological forms, machinery and doodles.

UNTITLED


42

Art Reveal Magazine


Art Reveal Magazine

How and why you started creating? I decided when I was about 4 or 5 years old that I either wanted to be a nurse or an artist, and throughout school I leaned towards art more and enjoyed it the most. I went to Wimbledon college of Art and graduated in 2009, and after that time worked in various office jobs and lost motivation and confidence in my artwork. Around a year ago though I had a big wakeup call in my life when I had a death of a close family member and I decided it was time to do what I want, that life is too short, and that I was not happy. From that point on I found my spirit again and made new works and subsequently went for an interview at Chelsea College of Art in August this year. When I went to my interview I was shocked that one of the course tutors even bought a drawing from me! I feel as long as I am creating, I am now on the right path again in my life. How has your work changed in the last 5 years? I used to have a lot of patience but now I don’t! I used to be able to sit for hours on a drawing but now I want something instantly! At Wimbledon, I mostly did pen drawings and doodles, but recently in the last year I have been doing collages and most recently using text in these. I think I am more aware of what is happening in the world now, whereas before my drawings were more introspective and personal. I think that you can learn a lot from other people and by travelling and having life and work experiences.

FINGERS

Collage seems to be in fashion at the moment, and there seems to be a lot of wacky stuff out there that is exciting, wacky and amusing! Nowadays I can visualize a finished picture of what I want to do whereas in the past I couldn’t. However, some themes have always reappeared such as repetition and obsession. What occupation would you be if you weren’t an artist? A translator as I think language is fascinating and I have always wanted to be fluent in French. If I could quickly pick up French I would have liked to have done a degree in it and lived abroad. I admire people that can speak several languages and it is amazing how as a child you can remember a new language easier as the brain is like a sponge. It’s interesting to hear when people say they think in a certain language when it’s not their first language. At the moment, I am a student at Chelsea, but hope to perhaps pursue teaching, as my past teachers have always been so inspirational and memorable to me personally. What is your creative process like? In my collages I cut out pieces and play around placing them until they are in the right place. I also go by instinct. I look at spacing, repetition, line, symmetry, size, colour, and meaning, when placing these cut-outs. I like wrapping paper at the moment, parcel paper and newspaper, all cheap and I can get them in large quantities. I gather

leaflets, flyers, booklets, foreign newspapers, anything with imagery and text for me to dismantle and change its meaning. I like to make a few cheap things into something valuable too. Sometimes phrases pop into my head and I write them down, aswell as recording rough ideas as sketches in notebooks, which I go back to and then bring into existence physically. What’s the challenging part of working with mixed media? I find collages easier than drawing and in my head there’s more freedom, even though there’s freedom to do what you like in both categories. I cut pieces out constantly and put them away and then when other imagery crops up that will go well with it and makes sense to me then I will go back and find what I’ve put away. The only challenge I would have is if the world ran out of newspapers, leaflets and consumables, and I don’t think that is going to happen anytime soon! How would you describe the art scene in your area? In Peterborough there is a small art community compared to London. Every year in Peterborough there is the Arts Festival and the Peterborough Open Studios. We have an art gallery/museum and the Key Theatre for performing arts. I think in time it will grow as there are quite a lot of people who are passionate about art in my hometown. In London, there are so many galleries, museums, and more platforms to get your art out there. There is much more opportunity

43


44

Art Reveal Magazine

in London for art courses, talks, classes, and social events. The smaller galleries I like in London are the Hundred Years gallery in Hoxton, Shape pop up gallery in Stratford, and Islington arts factory in North London, amongst others. What are your future plans as an artist?

BIRDS HALF CAGED

I am currently doing my master’s degree in London, in which I hope to develop personally and creatively; and still continue to participate in exhibitions all over the world. If I could I would have an international presence and possible gallery representation, go on residencies around the world, and travel and enjoy life and be free! I am also interested in going on the Drawing Year programme at the Royal School of Drawing in Shoreditch, London, as I feel I could benefit from learning observational drawing and increase my skills and range of drawing.

BIRDS HALF CAGED

BIRDS

NOT ON THE SAME PAGE


Art Reveal Magazine

45


Günes-Hélène Isitan Montreal, Canada 2015

MicroScapes (duo) – Val d’Or Exhibition Center – Quebec, Canada

2015

MicroScapes (solo) – Beaulne Museum – Quebec, Canada

2014

MicroScapes (solo) – uNo Art Gallery – Quebec, Canada

2014

MicroScapes (solo) – Riviere-Rouge Exhibition Center – Quebec, Canada

2015

The Brain (group) – Walter O. Lecroy Gallery, New York Hall of Science – NY, USA

Born in Turkey in 1978, Günes-Hélène Isitan is a Montreal-based professional biological artist, represented by the uNo Gallery (Qc). Her transdisciplinary practice, anchored in biomedia arts, is a unique interweaving of art, science and philosophy. Inspired by contemporary issues, she uses a living medium to explore the cultural barriers humans have built in the life continuum, questioning the Nature/ Culture dichotomy and offering a new perspective on our relationship to non-human agents. Her award-winning works are exhibited in solo and group shows in artist centers and galleries across Canada, the US and in Europe; they also have been featured in various art books & magazines and are part of private collections.

"Nothing is lost, nothing is created, everything is transformed"... this sentence of Lavoisier, revealing the transient essence of reality, inspires my art since the beginning. Integrating this principle through the ubiquitous themes of evolution and transformation, my work questions the Nature/Culture dichotomy by exploring the cultural barriers humans have built in the life continuum, thus offering a new perspective on our relationship to non-human agents. By way of an interdisciplinary practice rooted in biomedia art's young tradition, I explore from the evolutionary angle the ontological and ethical issues raised in laboratories, giving extra attention to research that raises questions which can only be truly understood through the intersection of art, science and philosophy.


NEW VOICE


HOPE

Fusing biomedia art and photography, I create alternative images of our reality by using the biological potential of the film in contact with life itself: this way, I grow an image, rather than take a picture. Through this personal technique, I manage to record on film a unique trace of reality: an organic footprint. Requiring the interlacing of my creative process with the tools and techniques of the scientific laboratory, this approach gives a new twist on the photographic field’s tradition of “recording reality”: as I let microorganisms “imprint” themselves on my film, creating images through their own action, I achieve a less anthropocentric point of view of reality. Thus, the resulting artworks, both a trace of my subjects and a living fragment of it, present our world from an unusual perspective: a non-human one.


Art Reveal Magazine

How and why you started creating? I guess I’ve always been a creative type. From photography and film to costumes, I was never far from the culture industry. But the moment I could pinpoint as the start of my artistic career would be when, after my technical degree in photography, I was working full time at a family photo studio. After about two years there, I was feeling a pressing urge to have more free time to create. Not simply to express myself: I had something to share that I felt needed to be heard. This feeling was new to me, as before this job, although I did not really notice it, I had always had time to do some creative projects on the side. Despite the fact that I had never planned to become a professional artist, ultimately, that need pushed me into taking the big step: I quit my job and when ahead to carry out my first series, Paradise’s Aftertaste. After that, I realized what most people around me already knew: to be truly fulfilled in life, I had to create. Supported by my partner and my family, I decided to undertake studies in art and signed up for university. Currently, I am completing a graduate degree in Practice of Actual Arts; I am pursuing my professional artist career and am represented by uNo Gallery in Quebec City. All in all, that big step turned out to be the right one for me! What has your biological artist career path looked like? I’d say a little bit like a maze, especially in the beginning. Indeed, one of the biggest challenges I had when I began was to situate my practice within the art world. Like many people, I had never heard of bioart and, since I was using the photographic medium, I believed my works were relevant to that tradition; it took quite a few refusals to understand I was approaching my own practice from the wrong angle! When Dr. Daubner, an amazing teacher at Concordia University and specialist of all technological arts, introduced me to bioart, it was a revelation: THAT was my field. There were no doubts about it.

A new world was opening to me, and I wanted to learn as much as possible about it. I took up biology classes to better understand the techniques and vocabulary; I also attended all bioart symposiums, classes and workshops within reach, where I had the fantastic opportunity to meet many of the precursors and leaders of the biological arts, such as Joe Davis, Oron Catts, Steve Kurtz, Tagny Duff, Jennifer Willet and Elaine Whittaker, just to name a few. From then on, my practice had a name and a history to relate it to; it got easier to select the right potential galleries and markets. Learning about that history also allowed me to expand my practice in ways I might not have thought possible before. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Montreal is a technological hub that harbours thriving and very diverse artistic communities. Some of those communities are more open than others; but they are all vibrant in their own ways. There are festivals (music, comedy, visual arts, circus, dance…) all summer long… in fact, since summer in Montreal is not that long, we even began doing all-night art festivals in the coldest months of winter! In the bioart field, although Concordia University hosts a nice community, the local art scene has not yet caught up to the movement: there is no specialized art/science gallery in Montreal, nor, to my knowledge, in the rest of Canada.

What do you like/dislike about the art world? Bioart being a rather new discipline, talking about it and my works often raises a lot of interest. To me, actual arts, and, more specifically bioart, are about pushing boundaries and hybridizing our practices to create something that speaks to people about our present reality. However, innovation like this also comes with a price, especially when dealing with institutions. Indeed, most of them have not yet embraced the art/science field, and it can be hard sometimes for bioartists to get funding.

49


50

Art Reveal Magazine

FELIS ASTRUM

Anther challenge specific to bioart is access to specialized equipment and knowledge: since the Enlightenment, there has been a schism between art and science; mending it, even locally, takes a lot of work. Thankfully, slowly but surely, some communication and respect between those two fields is being restored; there are more and more opportunities for artist’s residencies in laboratories, especially university affiliated ones, and makerspaces for biotechnology are coming into existence thanks to many initiatives all over the world. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? To never take a refusal as personal. As an artist, it is often hard to dissociate our self from our work; both are so intimately connected. But if we want to survive and thrive in the art world, and not be destroyed at each refusal, we need to learn to do it. In this business, we get more than our share of rejections; the only way to make it through is to keep our self-confidence, and the first step in this direction is to acknowledge the difference between our art and us. What are your future plans as an artist? I am always working hard to renew my practice; one way I do it is to push myself to work outside of my comfort zone. As a result, the project I am currently conceiving, Hybridity, takes me away from the printed image of MicroScapes and HumanScapes, presented here, and brings me closer to the installation and the art object. Keeping things fresh is beneficial for my sanity, my career as a whole, and my viewers, especially since I wish to continue to exhibit and hope to gather more recognition in the art world.


Art Reveal Magazine

BINARY SYSTEM

www.gunesisitan.com

GRAY MATTER

51


Anna Kiljunen Helsinki, Finland | Brooklyn, USA


TO THE OTHER SIDE

2015

Seeking Space group show, Bushwick Open Studios, Brooklyn, NY, USA

2015

The Big Draw 2015, group show, Catalyst Gallery, Beacon, NY, USA

2015

Wasser Schรถpfen/Zagrabiti, group show, Zagreb, Croatia

2013

Schรถneschnitzelnoize, group show, Halle 14, Leipzig, Germany

2013

Lacunae, group show, Leipzig, Germany


54

Art Reveal Magazine

Anna Kiljunen is a Finnish painter who currently lives and works in Helsinki and Brooklyn,NY. She works with various materials and techniques; coinciding with building and destroying. Not to forget the emotional spectrum of humanity, the irony of life, desires and passions, and its converse. Having studied textiles and then experimenting with many forms of artistic expression on her own, painting turned out to be the most natural and free form of expression. It offers the opportunity to freely combine a variety of elements together without rules. She works predominantly in oil, but also frequently uses acrylic, ink, pastel and pencil. Sculptural elements and diverse surfaces are made of plaster, beeswax, acrylic, wood, thread and collage. Interest in mysticism, philosophy and science influenace her work, but, above all, the main influences come from her life experience. Constantly researching and seeking, what is hidden below the surface. LOOK THE DOG

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. I’ve always had a very intense imaginary world. I grew up on an island and our house was in the middle of the forest. I was born into a world where there are no borders and the whole world is a playground without any rules. My favorite playground at the time was all the forests around our house and I spent all my time outdoors, exploring nature and creating everything from sticks, cones and mud. I was super fascinated by things like, when i found real clay from the ground. I created my own world and had many stories in me. I didn’t need or want people around me. The best time was when I was alone. My grandmother had looms so I used to make rugs and tablecloths from a very young age. I also sewed clothes by hand. After many detours I ended up studying textiles for four years. At the time in school, I knew that it would be ground for something else. I always painted with the yarn and I was very curious about all the materials and what I could create with them. I was not able to internalize product design as it is in industrial design. It imprisons my thinking and it just sickened me. I went through several short art classes in different media and philosophical studies. I did lots of research by myself. Gradually I found myself painting every day. I applied to painting school in Helsinki because I found I wanted to concentrate on colors and paint. School was about painting and painting only, nobody told us what to do and that’s why it was a good place for me to keep on doing my own research without too many restrictions. It was a safe place to make mistakes. I graduated as a painter four years later. There is always more to learn, and the most interesting part is the life-long education, which never ends. The older I get the more I find unexplored areas.

RULLAA


Art Reveal Magazine

55


56

Art Reveal Magazine

What is the most challenging part about working nowadays with traditional media - like painting? Self-challenge is always present in life and in art, without it there is no progress. You could look at this question in many ways. If it is about how painting is compared to other medias, I’d say that there is and there will be place for painting always, no doubt. In my work painting is the basis for everything. However the most challenging thing is not working with the painting or art itself. It is the other stuff that has quite a huge impact on the artwork. What you have to do so that you can keep on painting in this society.Very few artists can really make a living with their art. If you have a day job you’ll have to find time and energy to paint. If not, then you use that same amount of time as in a regular job to write shitload of applications to get funding etc. That drives me bonkers sometimes. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I am between two very different areas at the moment. Helsinki / Finland where I was born and grew up and my current home, Brooklyn, NY /USA. Brooklyn is fierce, trashy, outrageous, obscene, noisy, smelly and cool. Lot’s of art, lot’s of people, lots of noise. Everywhere. It is the total opposite of where I am from. It took a while until I became friends with the city. I am still going through transition but I’ve definitely found beauty in that big mess.

I live and work in Bushwick with my boyfriend. There are many good galleries and lots of artists so there is always new things to see. Besides commercial galleries there are of course the streets. Many of the gray buildings are covered with graffiti art. Almost everyday you see new stuff on the walls. New small galleries arise like mushrooms after the rain. So there are many opportunities for artists and a lot to offer to the viewer. Not forgetting to mention about the music scene, which is absolutely crazy! I have seen many good bands in that neighborhood. Many loud venues give a platform for everything. The area is full of art but it is also very young. It was very different only a few years back. Areas go through rapid change and money makers come and kick artists out from their studio buildings. This keeps happening all the time and everywhere in the city. And it seems like it has been like that for years.. Nowadays it is very difficult to find a place where artists can live and create art in that city. I’ve been away from Helsinki for almost three years now but every time I visit Helsinki it seems like there are new interesting things happening. Many galleries, interesting artists. It is a small city and things are happening very slowly. There is a lot of empty space where interesting things could happen. People are realizing that everybody can make a change. There are restaurant days, etc. but the same thing would be good with art. More spontaneous small intense concerts, pop-up exhibitions etc. And you don’t need anyone’s approval for that. Just do it. I hear that people say Helsinki is the Finnish Berlin. I wish they

would stop saying that. It is not. It is Helsinki. It has its own unique character and people who live there should maintain and develop it to their own direction. There is one mind set that should be totally demolished from Finns’ heads: The idea that the grass is greener on the other side of the fence. What art do you most identify with? Abstract expressionism, surrealism, outsider art and macabre/ dark art. I actually cannot categorize myself and it may not be necessary at all. But this kind of art gives me a boner. What are your future plans as an artist? I will continue my research and the implementation of new works, combining a variety of techniques. Alongside the production of artworks, I have to apply for funding and places to show my work in the future. Also I have an ongoing collaborative art project. The plan is to create more art with my amazing partner and potential exhibitions. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? Focus on your own view but be open. Whatever you decide to concentrate on, just do it as much as you can and with full force. Go away from your comfort zone and allow yourself mistakes. Above all, be honest.


Art Reveal Magazine

FACE

www.annakiljunen.com

57


WHERE SHOULD I GO NOW?

Gözde Kirksekiz İstanbul, Turkey 2015

Artots Gallery (Netherlands) / Performativity Wave / Performance with video & audio installation

2015

Halka art gallery / “You are scared, admit it!” Group exhibition / Installation

2014

Contemporary İstanbul Art Fair / Performans with video installation

2014

Nazım Hikmet Cultural Center / Solo exhibition / painting

2012

1. İstanbul Design Biennial / Video

As Stuart Hall mentions, “Identities are the names we give the different ways we are positioned by, and position ourselves within the narratives of the past.” Identifying a location, a body, a room, a house, a society which molds you or a country which separates you from the others is the same as identifying your identity. Since 2005, I’ve been using environments that are both mine and not in my art works. I have been using my new relationships and the adaptation period within them. I have been making observations regarding people, situations, memory and identity. I strive to preserve my identity within my connections with these people and places. I use my memory as my location and aim to constantly transfer my ever changing concepts into and this is why it is crucially important to me.


WHERE SHOULD I GO NOW?


60

Art Reveal Magazine

WHERE SHOULD I GO NOW?

The most important factors which define our identity (religion, language, race, and family) also play a vital role in defining our characters. Our characters which we can also identify as our essence, are bound to change as we communicate and interact with other people. I believe all these changes happen in accordance with what we have coded as appropriate and acceptable through our life experiences. These are the moments where the memories come in to the play. Using the “materials” I inherited, I aim to define subjects such as belonging, being disposed, processes of adaptation, finding one’s self and communication. I sometimes use fictional ideas alongside my own real life experiences to define these subjects. My focus shifts between being tied down to a location and being ripped away from it and what lies in the middle of the relationships occurring between. The reason for the contradiction between form and content in my work, lies in the belief that it’s not whether you win or lose but that the actual importance is in the journey. This is the reason behind my preference for adapting childhood games- which have no winner or loser- in my performances. If I were to describe the environments I created in my work, I would say they are a collection of feelings taking place in the present. I use my memories as a bridge between my past and present. I use my past experiences to create moral codes which help me make decisions in my present life. As a result I do not use these codes to define and reminisce about my past but rather to live my present life. Because of this bridge between my past and present, all my actions take place in the present tense. Just like with time, these environments I create are neutralised by reason and understanding. In some instances these locations are more complicated than time and memory itself. They have a direction, a shape and repeatable order which make it easier for us to naturalise these locations. With this perception, it is correct to assume that the environments I create in my works are not a product of anything physical but are a result of a wide collection of memories that I have accumulated.


Art Reveal Magazine

61

WHERE SHOULD I GO NOW?

How and why started you creating? Art became important to me by curiosity. Like every artist I always had an intention to create, but I didn’t know how to reflect and didn’t know how to gather my thoughts. After discover and understand things and find some answers, than I had the expression problem. Even while chatting, constantly we need to explain things, I did not know how to simplify my work that requires more explanation. Sometimes I’m still trying to solve this understandability problem by asking questions to myself and my close friends. Also the conversations that we made with my teachers at University was very productive for me to improve myself.

What is the most challenging part about working interdisciplinary? Working interdisciplinary is very helpful to find out what I want to do actually. Relationship between different dimensions helps to see what you can do or not practically while thinking and creating a project. On the other hand, to understand and become skilled in one technique it requires many time that i did stuck and forget what do I want exactly. Preparation, research, practice and rehearsal is fine. Learning your craft is fine. But there comes a point when it’s time to face the stage, the page, the canvas or the blank screen. At that point, you may see that you left your plans behind. To have daily rituals and discipline helps

to deal with these problems and reminds you what the main idea is. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Communication is the most effective thing for my work. While creating process I’m always reading, watching and listening to reach the “thing”. And it takes time to find out what it is the “thing”. At this time I’m always talking to my friends and my partner who I trust his perception and ideas. I’m finding the “thing” mostly by talking and talking with researching. Also I’m working with an art initiative in İstanbul “halka art project”. Because of the residency program I had a chance to meet and work with many artist from all over the world. Especially to


62

Art Reveal Magazine

WHERE SHOULD I GO NOW?

see different practices and how they handle with their problems is really opening my mind. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Living in İstanbul is an advantage to reach interdisciplinary artists to discover different medias. On the other hand, it is not possible to discover all exhibitions when we lose so much time to maintain our life in a big city. There is very talented young artists but like every country we have funding problems to discover the other countries or do exhibition. What are your future plans as an artist? Everyday I’m learning and feeling something while creating

process. I want to reflect these things more clearly by doing my performances. I think its also necessary for me to understand myself. I’m willing to maintain my projects with more opportunity to travel the world by participating residency programs and collaborate with another artists and share experiences. Recently I had a chance to participate in Artots Gallery in Holland for a performance. In 2016 I will be involve in a group exhibition in Spain and than solo show in Serbia. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? Like I’m saying to myself; as an artist, if you have something in your mind don’t hesitate to try it. You have tried and it didn’t go

well? Keep it. When you return to your draft/sketchbook/memory stick, what you find can give you a clue to what to do next. And enjoy not knowing. You may not know what are you doing or doing for what, but after a while maybe years after you can undestand why you did that work. And it will complete your project.


Art Reveal Magazine

SOMEONE ELSE’S HOUSE

www.gozdekirksekiz.com

63


Caroline Monnet Montréal, Canada 2014

Group show, Musée d’Art Contemporain, Montréal, Canada

2014

Residency Les Ateliers - ARSENAL, Montréal, Canada

2012

Les Rencontres Internationales Paris/Berlin/Madrid (Palais de Tokyo)

2013

Short listed for the International Emerging Award, Dubai, UAE

2012

Cannes Film Market Talent tout court (Telefilm)

A self-taught multidisciplinary artist from Outaouais, Québec, Monnet uses cinema, painting, sculpture and installation to demonstrate a keen interest in communicating complex ideas around Indigenous identity and bicultural living through the examination of cultural histories. Her work is often minimalistic while emotionally charged and speaks to the beautifully intricate limbo of indigenous peoples today. Monnet has made a signature for working with industrial materials, combining the vocabulary of popular and traditional visual-cultures with the tropes of modernist abstraction to create unique hybrid forms. Monnet is always in the stage on experimentation and invention, both for herself and for the work. Monnet has exhibited in Canada and internationally in such venues as the Palais de Tokyo (Paris) and Haus der Kulturen Der Welt (Berlin) for the Rencontres Internationales, Toronto International Film Festival, Aesthetica (UK), Cannes Film Festival (not short on talent), Smithsonian Institute (NYC), Museum of Contemporary Art and Arsenal (Montréal). Monnet lives in Montréal where she is the artist in residence at Arsenal Contemporary Art Gallery. UNLIKELY PROCESS


66

Art Reveal Magazine

UNLIKELY PROCESS

When, how and why started you creating? I have been creative for as long as I can remember. As a kid, I would draw and paint a lot. I would write plays and perform them for my family and I loved to dance on all kinds of music. In my teenage years, I would buy poloroaids and disposable camera and catalogue my friends. However, it’s only in 2009 that I made my first professional artwork and decided that I wanted to do that for the rest of my life. It all started with an opportunity to make my first independant short flm with the Winnipeg Film Group. I made a video titled Ikwé that allowed me to travel to festivals and galleries accross Canada. I started making connections in the art world and was able to continue making films. My work

as a filmmaker was quite experimental and allowed be to branch out to video installations and later to sculptural works. What is the most challenging part about working interdisciplinary? I enjoy working in different mediums. For me they inform each other in a very subtle way. They always explore some of the same themes and aesthetics but it’s the rendition that changes. I feel very lucky to be able to dwell in the worlds of both cinema and visual arts. It broaden my persceptives by stimulating different areas of my brain. The challenging part is that both discipline are very demanding. They require an dedicated amount of production and therefore has me alternate between both world. I seem to have found a good bal-

ance in doing so and would not want to choose between one or the other. Some people know me as a filmmaker, others as a visual artist. That’s totally fine with me. The other challenge would be to find a specific niche. Working in so many different mediums, audiences don’t necessary recognize my work right away. Mediums are for me a way to tell a story. Sometimes a particular medium is more suitable for the concept I have in mind. In my opinion, concept, message and medium need to be in complementary, just like a dialogue. Tell us more about “Unlikely process” work. Unlikely Process is a meticulous and joyful work process that passes between painting and sculpture, drawing and installation. The show was initially conceived


Art Reveal Magazine

UNTITLED

UNTITLED

67


68

Art Reveal Magazine

and presented at RAW Gallery of Architecture and Design in Winnipeg. It comprised of two parts, each based on the minimalist cube. First, I exploded the form into hinged plywood panels that hang by slender cables from the ceiling, folding around walls and confounding the gallery architecture. Busy triangular patterns in black, white and grey spread across the amber-stained surfaces, generically echoing motifs from indigenous art and design. Thanks to a hidden base, a solid concrete cube near the centre of the gallery appeared to hover several inches off the ground. A closer look reveals embedded articles of clothing, the frayed red canvas, black leather and lace peeking out like fossils in a limestone block. The approach was playful while concealing long histories. The concrete cube uses industrial materials to create a kind of personal archeological site that resonate to something organic and poetic. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? I would like to be a restaurant owner, or work in a sort of bistro that blend french cuisine with traditional indigenous recipes and products. Retaurants are places of gathering and where I feel at ease. I grew up with a French father and an Algonquin mother where the art of the table was always something important. My parents would always have people over and we spent hours around the table. Nowadays, I still do this with my friends and my family. I’ve had the most interesting conversations around food and wine, sharing a moment. As a child I really wanted to become

a chef. Somehow I never pursued that dream but I still love to cook, have people over and share a good meal. I find restaurants to be a beautiful piece of joy. People go there to have a good time, to live an experience and discover new taste buds. I consider chefs to be artists and I admire them for the long hours they have to work and the lifestyle they choose.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received?

How would you describe the art scene in your area?

Keep working at what I do. I feel like I still have so much to explore and express. I just did my first public sculpture and I would like

I moved to Montréal only two years ago after spending five years in Wi n n i p e g . It has been such a positive change in my career and I’ve been loving every bit of it. Montréal is a burgeoning place with endless amounts of festivals, galleries, pop up events, music venues and it’s emerging as one of the most exciting places in North America for boundary-busting art. Artists have a lot of freedome to create here, and a lot of support though initiatives. And you can actually be a full time artist here even if you are still emerging. Life is still affordable. There’s not much of a market in Montreal, so there’s lots of space for experimentation. There’s something punk rock in the way we create here.

David Altmejd once told me to create the most grandiose piece of work each time. It really stuck with me and made me realize: if you don’t give it all, why bother? What are your future plans as an artist?

to do more. I’ll be going to Haiti for the Port-au Prince Biennal and then maybe have the chance to work in Europe. On the filmmaking side, I am developping a feature film project that should see the light in 2017. I am always developping new projects but these days I am focusing on spending time at my studio at Arsenal gallery in Montréal and developing works in sight of an exibition. AMIK(WAA)


www.carolinemonnet.ca


Paola Ricci Venice, Italy Artist’s Statement Paola Ricci As written in the original text Arboreal wire (Paola Ricci art work in Ireland 2006), I worked on the line, as a sign, drawing, sculpture and thought. The line is not a drawing, as it may seem at first, but the definition of contour space. The line marks the boundary between significance and meaning, marks what the view does not always show, marks what is beyond the marked area. The line draws the territory that surrounds it. Thus the overlaping of different lines creates the mass marking the space you would see if there were no line. In Greek philosophy: The Greek meteorology seeks rather to describe the more uncertain movements of the air, in an attempt to explain the rarefaction of the bodies and the big difference between solid bodies, the material and what delicately approaches the blowing of the wind to the inexistent. They seek with the imagination what is hidden in the world’s naturalness, that is, how the presence of the latter is both characteristic and fleeting at the same time. We know that for some pre-Socratics the soul corresponds necessarily to the experience of a body whose matter is so ethereal that its explanation can only be compared to the air. The breath is the last thing to leave the body. For the Greeks, there was clearly a close relationship between the air, the void and the infinite, either because the soul was regarded as a particle so ethereal that it evaporated at death, or simply because the air until the horizon represented seeing as far as the eye could see These things are best understood if we think of art as still occupying the edges and that its utterances, because they lean towards the eccentric, supply clues to what is hidden. The Occidental culture considers the world as a whole of objects, instead Chinese thought considers the world as a emanation of a vital breath, of an energy (qi) that develops on different plains of condensation, more or less visible: the rock is (qi) concentrated, the cloud is (qi) rarefied. An artist whose soul is the mass of the sculpture 1 Knowledge passes through sensitive knowledge. A first aspect on which knowledge is sensitive knowledge The space is normally seen as full, but in the empty space we perceive the sensitive space. 2 The space is virtually empty, endless and grows in size. Then Universes holding the space are created. I have worked to let us hear the space as empty and the eye to see a succession of dots and lines that float in the air, our sensitive part individualizes and projects them in the air as projective space. So our eye is like a point in space and everything that it intersects becomes something that adds to creating other sensitive lines. 3 The sculpture becomes an opportunity to draw the air or the empty space. The line marks the boundary between the different meanings, marking what the view does not always see, marks what is beyond the marked area. The line becomes mass and it draws the territory by which it is surrounded. Thus the overlap of different lines creates the mass that marks the space that you see if the drawing of the line were there. Paola Ricci Š October 2011

SPACE WEIGHT


72

Art Reveal Magazine


Art Reveal Magazine

73

WEIGHT IN MOTION


74

Art Reveal Magazine

How and why started you creating? I consider the creative moment as my bodily necessity that as I perform it or act it out, my body vanishes and only what I’m doing exists. How has your work changed in the past years? My work has changed since I let my willingness to listen emerge to the artistic wit that suddenly appears and catching it each part that I had highlighted in the research is connected like scattered elements. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? Teaching children aged 0 to 6 years to observe them play with art and nature and around the world; because this would lead to having a different society than the current one. What is the most challenging part about working with Mixed Media? The most interesting challenge is when you use it you need to know it so well that mixed together is as though you were working with a single Media. How would you describe the art scene in your area? The area I believe I am living in, is not mine, I’d prefer to go somewhere else to see and describe artistic scenes. The possibility of staying in new places, opens the way to the development of new ideas and new things in me, art is experiencing the different scenes of life. What are your future plans as an artist? I do not know what my artistic future is and I don’t even want to imagine it because it seems to concern others more than myself.


Art Reveal Magazine

www.paolaricci.com

75


Rosa Roberts Brighton, UK 2013

Investigations in Landscape and Place(2 person exhibition), The Friary London, UK

2015

Contours of Spring, Mint, London, UK

2014

Contours of Spring, Mint, London, UK

I produce colourful graphic paintings that fall into two main categories , abstract or autobiographical figurative. The first 7 images I have submitted to this competition fall into the autobiographical category. I tend to work from memory and in a gestural free spirited way with an emphasis on colour and bold mark making. When working figuratively I find myself drawn to subjects with an element of social commentary such as branded products, interior design, or elements alluding to sexuality and race. The final 3 images are from my abstract work where again there is a strong emphasis on colour and a tendency towards graphic motif and pattern. UNTITLED


78

Art Reveal Magazine

Briefly describe the work you do. I’m a painter. There are a couple of different strands to my work because I make some completely abstract work and some which is more figurative and autobiographical in nature. I like working in a way where I don’t know what the finished piece will look like so even my figurative work is very intuitive and improvised and mainly from memory or my imagination. I work quickly, most paintings only take a day max and often much less. I like reducing things into simple forms What themes do you pursue? Bold mark making, and colour are constants in my work though I’m not sure they are themes exactly, the subjects range from everyday scenes – like new trainers in a box on the kitchen table, to sex, nature and sometimes products and interiors. Graphic shape, humor, atmosphere and simplicity are what I love. This summer I have been working on some small painted series on paper. One series is called Sex and one called Nature. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? Balancing making the work, getting the work out into the world and making a living from other work. I can be lazy, shy and scared about trying to get my work out into the world. I do want it to be seen but the computer admin, organization and networking it involves are not my strong point so I have someone who helps me for a couple of hours a week now. She makes sense of all those artist opportunity newsletters and whittles down the ones that I am eligible to apply for. For years I never opened any of those emails, head in the sand like. Also when the work is very personal, about spirituality or sexuality say I have to fight against my natural tendency to be fairly private about it.

How would you describe the art scene in your area? Well I live in Brighton, there are loads of artists and crafts people here. Its pretty lively and there’s a lot going on. Some of it’s a really good standard and some of it’s more amateurish than the things you might see in London. There are lots of kindred spirits here and people are friendly an encouraging and approachable. What art do you most identify with? All painters with a naïve, graphic, painterly style Paul Housley, Phoebe Philo, Danny Fox, Alfred wallis, Tracey Emin’s drawings, Matisse. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? I liked something that Tracey Emin said about the art in her being like a lover because no matter how badly she treated it, it always came back. I find my creativity comes in waves and when it’s a gathering time as opposed to a making time I always worry that its gone forever but it always comes back. What are your future plans as an artist? Keep painting, make some prints this winter. Keep entering competitions and open call exhibitions with the goal of a solo show and gallery representation so I can continue to make work, though I’m sure I always will whatever happens, it’s more my lifestyle that will vary, the paints always seem to get bought no matter what. Mainly though to keep getting better at what I do, aesthetically, conceptually and professionally. Also to be true to myself and my unique creative voice.

THEORY


Art Reveal Magazine

79


MORNING COFFE & FAVOURITE SHORTS

www.rosaroberts.com MORNING BY THE POOL


Katrina Stamatopoul London, UK True in my fictional world

Mermaids exist at the nexus of mythology and popular culture. Legendary aquatic creatures, these human-animal hybrids participate to a broa ical scheme that subsists as expressions for understanding general psychological, cultural or societal truths. True in my Fictional world defi between rational and imagined through exploring water environments. As an impossible existence for human beings, they remain unfamiliar a With the impossibility of deciphering what lies in the depths, the liquid world and its real or dreamt inhabitants are sources of fears and fasc The photographs I have made are with characters I have found through collecting; I collect mermaid objects on Ebay. Whether they have pr used as ornamental figurines, fishing lures or fish tank bubblers, I have interpreted these objects to find new fiction homes for them. Having or information on the mermaids origin and history, I am reenacting a lost past, isolating it in its own imaginary terrain.


los

ader mythologfies the conflict and fantasised. cinations. reviously been g no awareness

UNATTAINABLE

2013

Solo exhibition ‘Specimens of a Collective Condition’ Rubicon Ari, Melbourne, Australia

2014

Participated in Festival Images Contre Nature, Marseille, France

2014

Participated in GSPF (Gertrude Street Projection Festival, Melbourne, Australia

2012

The Australian Centre for Photography Scholarship Award, College of Fine Arts, Annual Graduation Awards

2012

Violin performance with electronic musicians ‘Seekae’, at the Opera Theatre, for Sydney’s Vivid Festival, Australia


84

Art Reveal Magazine


Art Reveal Magazine

When, how and why started your art practice? I’m not sure about a start date. I began studying art at university in 2008, yet my interests started to develop a few years before that. I grew up playing the violin and doing a lot of things music related but I hadn’t really begun to explore ideas visually. Starting a Fine Arts degree in Sydney encouraged me to do so. That helped the birth. What is the most challenging part about working interdisciplinary? Not really knowing what you are doing. This could be an answer for many questions… I am working mainly with images, whether they are found, scanned, filmed or photographed, and do keep a general consensus. Making images help me see. Projects have usually started from a moment observing something, filming or with a collected object. I would like to execute more in a 3 dimensional way though, being it sculptural or with sound. I am used to bringing things into an image but would like to step out of that a bit and explore other ways. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? Yes. Because I work through ideas. Ofcourse aesthetic is really important, but reading or feeling something through a particular aesthetic is key. Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. I studied film theory and art, but grew up playing music, so all things time based are important. I work a lot with photography through movement, whether it is photographing, filming or scanning. I research and listen to music far more then I see exhibitions or research artists work. I also have a lot of role models in my family, my mum and grandma are very special. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I haven’t decided yet. I relocated to London last year so it hasn’t been very long and I am still settling in. There is a lot happening here so it’s a wonderfully monstrous place to be in and there’s lots of potential for artists. What are your future plans as an artist? Produce and show. Work with more people and on bigger projects. At the moment I am working on images for a book, and want to start producing more for that format. I would also like to develop some projects with Alexandra Spence, a sound artist I have been working with for the past 3 years. I am enrolled to do an MA in Fine Art at Goldsmiths for next year, so lets see where things go with that first.

ARTIFICE MIRRORS NATURE

85


www.katrinasta


amatopoulos.net LANDFORM


Geoffrey Stein New York, NY, USA 2013

Solo Show, Geoffrey Stein: A Decade of Portraits, UConn, Stamford

Art Gallery, Stamford, CT, USA

2007

Solo show, Working Process: Drawings & Collages by Geoffrey

Stein, Goodenough Gallery, Mecklenburgh Square, London, UK

2014

The Face of Portraiture, Curator: Rebecca Wilson, Saatchi Online

2011

British Forces Foundation Benefit, Dorchester Hotel, London, UK

2007

SaLon Summer 2007 Show: Works by London’s Top 25 Graduates,

Salon Gallery, London, UK

I paint to find out what I think about the world; to discover the things I do not have words for. I savor the slips of the hand that express one’s unconscious feelings about the person being painted. I am interested in the conversation between abstraction and realism. I do not want to make an academic copy of the model or a photo realistic illustration. My paintings explore the tension between what needs to be shown and what does not, the seen and the unseen. Geoffrey Stein is a recovering lawyer, who has been painting full-time since 2000. He received an MFAfrom the Slade School of Fine Art, London. Stein lives and paints in New York City. BORIS WEB


90

Art Reveal Magazine

How and why did you start creating? I have always made art. I made wood and welded metal sculptures as a kid, worked as a photographer for the local paper in high school, and briefly studied product design at Parsons School of Design. After graduating from Bard College, and looking for a job in New York during the recession of 1982, I fled to law school. I was a reinsurance litigator for 12 years. During that time, I tried and failed for 10 years to combine art and practicing law. In 1999 my wife heard me complaining, again, about being a lawyer. She said if you want to paint, go paint. But if you don’t do it, you can never complain about being a lawyer again. So in February 2000 I quit my law job and started painting, ultimately getting an MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art, London. These days, I paint to find out what I think about the world; to discover the things I do not have words for. I savor the slips of the hand that express one’s unconscious feelings about the person being painted. I am interested in the conversation between abstraction and realism. I do not want to make an academic copy of the model or a photo realistic illustration. My paintings explore the tension between what needs to be shown and what does not, the seen and the unseen. How has your work changed in the past years? For the first eight years I painted--2000-2008, I worked exclusively from life. At the New York Studio School, in the Life Room at the Slade School of Fine Arts and in my studio in NYC, I worked strictly from observation of a model. Looking long and hard over time to translate the living, moving, three-dimensional model into a two dimensional painting. My focus was putting one piece of paint next to another on the canvas, working with line, value and color changes to achieve not an academic likeness or a copy, but rather an image that reveals the history of the painting and, hopefully, communicates some of the individuality and humanness of the people I painted. In 2009, I began working from photographs. I started making portraits of the actors in the credit crunch, using collage materials from their world. At that time, the US economy was being buffeted by the credit crunch and recession. I started gathering materi-


Art Reveal Magazine

TRUMP FINAL WEB

91


92

Art Reveal Magazine

al from the subjects’ worlds: for Madoff, the legal complaints against him, and for Tim Geithner, Alan Greenspan, Sheila Bair, Ken Lewis and Ben Bernanke, text from the Wall Street Journal. When the Dodd-Frank Act was passed, I returned to the series from a new perspective, using text from the bill to create a portrait of Elizabeth Warren and Volcker. When the London Whale hit I began Jamie Dimon’s portrait using collage materials from the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Barron’s and the Financial Times. Recently I have begun working from life, again.

What are your future plans as an artist? I have recently been working on a series of collage portraits that are much larger than any I have ever previously attempted. I am excited about this change in scale and am interested to see how it affects my work.

What is the most challenging part about working with collage? Collage can be a very slow process. I spent lots of time searching for the right piece of material with the right size type with the right combination of light and dark and then figuring out which direction the type should face on the portrait to create a likeness. But collage also gives you a huge amount of flexibility. You can collage over paint or you can paint over collage, and you can sand the collage to reveal previous layers of work. Adding and subtracting with collage and paint is a very satisfying process. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? I think of myself as a painter. As a recovering lawyer I am mistrustful of the overly verbose. I make marks on a flat surface and try to create a likeness of the person I am painting. Using these formal tools, I attempt to find interesting people to paint in interesting ways. I am trying to make interesting visual work. While there is a conceptual aspect to my work, particularly in the collage material I use; I am primarily concerned with the visual, not the conceptual or the verbal.

ORANGE KIMONO

What do you like/dislike about the art world? I love exploring visual ideas in paint and collage. I worry about de-skilling in the art world and the trend towards conceptual work that is not particularly interesting to look at. I do not like when the most interesting part of an exhibition is the wall label.

BB GRID


MENDES SELF-PORTRAIT

www.geoffreystein.com


Angelina Voskopoul Athens, Greece


lous EXOGENESIS TRILOGE THE SEED VIDEO


96

Art Reveal Magazine

BEHIN

How and why started you creating? I was mostly exposed to art through an esoteric need for experimentation. How has your work changed in the past years? Well, when you working with video/ film, you You have to constantly push yourself to grow and learn with the changing times. Pieces of us exist in all of our work regardless of how good, bad, old, or new it is. What is the most challenging part about working with video? Experimenation! Experimentation is the key to test on an idea and try to create an art project. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? hmm, yes, I suppose, since I am adopting a l’anguage’ , a concept,as my starting point and then …experimentation begins…

BEHIN


Art Reveal Magazine

ND THIS PAGE

ND THIS PAGE

BEHIND THIS PAGE

97


98

Art Reveal Magazine

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. When I was growing up I was mostly exposed to art through an esoteric need for experimentation . I attended schools which, did not have an art program but, luckily, was brought to art galleries and fairs, shown documentaries, even spent weeknights drawing on the kitchen table...and though I really don’t think I was ever pushed in any way toward a career in art, I’ve always been interested in something art-related. When I was in highschool, I took my “experimentation” to the next level i continued exploring the world of drawing, until I basically spent all my non-homework non-dancing hours in my room working on art stuff. I have always drawn...but i didn’t think about fine art as a career until I began spending nearly all my free-time working on it and, at that point, it was hard to think about anything else… I can’t say that this is a path that any artist should plan, but I also don’t know where I’d be had anything gone differently. The lack of structure taught me to experiment… But ‘painting ‘ wasn’t enough for me , I was trying to find my ‘mean’ of expression . That happened when I first met my maestro (Nikos Navridis). It was a meeting at the art school’s theater where he show us his video works and other works related to film and experimental filmmaking and that moment, was the moment of my rebirth! I have found my way -That was it! But The truth is I have been interested in filmmaking since I was 15 years old. I had watched and loved a lot of films prior to this time. I had written some ‘spontaneous’ screenplays and had also tried to film them. I was interested in finding a way of telling a story…. What are your future plans as an artist? To continue to write , my concepts,concerns and then try to turn them into an experimental film.


Art Reveal Magazine

BEHIND THIS PAGE

www.avos.wordpress.com

99


www.artrevealmagazine.com

Art Reveal Magazine No. 10  

Artists: Lora Azza and Dimitri Dimov, Christine Carr, Rachael Edgar, Mista Fig, Alex Giegold and Tomka Weiß, Marija Gradečak, Sarah Hill, Gü...

Art Reveal Magazine No. 10  

Artists: Lora Azza and Dimitri Dimov, Christine Carr, Rachael Edgar, Mista Fig, Alex Giegold and Tomka Weiß, Marija Gradečak, Sarah Hill, Gü...

Advertisement