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EDGAR ASKELOVIC 4

BORIS BEJA 10

ANUPONG CHAROENMITR 16

EZIO CICCIARELLA 22

DAVID ELLINGSEN 28


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KATIE ERNST 34

MARTIN GERSTENBERGER 40

MAXWELL RUSHTON 46

DERICK SMITH 52

HELENA TAHIR 58

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EDGAR ASKELOVIC Gifhorn, Germany

ANDY 83


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EVIDENT CHERRY DOUBLE

EDUCATION AND QUALIFICATIONS 2009 – 2013 (June) – Bachelor of Art, Fine Art, Birmingham City University of Art and Design, Birmingham, UK. Study programme include: Review and Orientation, Development, Critical Review and Analyse, Critical Review and Practise, Evaluation and Presentation, Orientation and Promotion. 2006– 2009 – Bachelor of Art (not finished), Vilnius Academy of Art, Vilnius, Lithuania. Study programme include: Professional English, Project Development, Plastic Anatomy, Drawing, The Art of Self Presentation, Computer Aided Design, Computer Design, Introduction into Philosophy and Art, Philosophy and Aesthetics, Contemporary Art, Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, Basic of Video and Photo. 2002 (September) – 2005 (June) – Vilnius Justinas Vienožinskis Art School. Study programme include: Drawing, Painting, Composition, Sculpture, Ceramics, Graphics, Art History, Design, Animation, Photo, Video. 1994 (September) – 2006 (June) – Lev Karsavin School N46.

AREAS OF EXPERTISE Working with clay, plasticine, silicone, fiberglass and resins, chrome, bronze, metals, stone.


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When, how and why started you creating art? Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. I cannot say the specific year, when I started creating art and realized that I am an artist. It all began in early childhood. My parents gave me a squared paper and pen, so that I would just distracted. I decided draw a ship from a picture, what was in my room. Parents found my picture well painted, but I was wonder, that I have received many questions and notes from them. They noted that on ship no people. After I painted one stick man, father asked: "Have you ever seen a man who does not have the human form and clothes?”. I started a new pattern, where tried to depict a muscular man who finally looked like a marshmallow. Father commented, that muscles look different and human have bones. It was my first step towards a detailed study of the human anatomy. From parents’ side it was very important not just to praise, but to guide me as a child, perhaps seeing my inclinations to draw. In school time, I spend all school changes in locker room, where I was drawing. I was very involved in painting. Since my parents not take my art seriously, I went to art prep school (Vilnius Justinas Vienožinskis Art School) only when I was 14 years old. Since I had a bad temper and there was propaganda on abstraction and primitivism, which I did not understand and did not accept, I could not finish the school. Teachers said many times: «in art all tasted and there is nothing we can open new. Everything what we will paint in future - all will be recognizable». I have lost all my interest to art. At that time I was thinking that it is finish with my art.

At the moment I left the art school, I was studying in 11th class and must start think about my future study in university. All what could I do was working with my hands and see threedimensional images. I started thinking, what else exist in art. What else can I do, except painting. And it was sculpture. When I enrolled in art academy of arts (Vilnius Academy of Art), I have no idea, what should I do there. I was growing in environment, where no one was interested in art, except of me. In the university, in front of me opened a whole world of modern art. A world where there are not only the form, but also game of the meaning. It funded interesting, that I have to study the installations, performances. At that time I was very interested with study. New information I soaked up as a sponge. In the second year I was interested in the kinetics. Teachers were satisfied. I had the budget places at university thanks to my achievements. After some time, I decided look at my work from the side. I wonder, that in my works I saw clear handwriting of my teachers. They taught us art, only what they recognize. In the end of third course I have decided apply for Erasmus program and get experience in another university, as also learn English. In Birmingham City University of Art and Design, artists’ works was very different from those, what I had made and see in University in Lithuania. In UK, I saw the absurdity in the works, poor quality, and most importantly - a lot of decoration. It took me three months to realize that it is freedom of expression, freedom do not forcing themselves into the framework, the freedom to think without stereotypes. I found that in England I can realize myself as an artist and continue my

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study in Birmingham until I was BA graduated. Three years later, how I came to UK, I still did not understand where can I go with my portfolio, to whom can I show it. One day, I took it and went to a nearby local gallery, where my works aroused interest. Based on my previous realistic artworks in silicone, there was adventure to create a sculpture “Andy Walking, Andy tired, Andy take a little snooze”. To realize this sculpture, I had to sell my car. For all money what I had, I bought the materials and tools. However, I could not know what happened in the end. Fortunately, my risk paid off again. The news of the final sculpture has been published in international newspapers. As a result - sculpture has been sold before opening the solo exhibition. It was a success. I continued to work with a silicone, making realism. But my expenses still exceed my income. My portfolio has helped me to get a job related with art. But with time, I understood that I have to find a time for myself and developing as an artist. At the moment I live in Germany and have been exhibited in other countries, including London, England.


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What is your creative process like? Always, first comes emotions, and then details of artwork. Having a specific topic, I am trying to study it as much as possible. To be confident what I am doing. Some of the ideas I'm having for years, studying the details, pick up the image. And some work get to implement in the short term, as the finished image comes spontaneously. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? Yes, as my background was traditionally contemporary. At the moment I am working in three directions: contemporary, contemporary-commercial and commercial. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I never pay attention on my location. My art is orientated and open for international audience.

What are your future plans as an artist? My future plans are aimed at continued experimenting with materials to study different techniques and identify new movements in art. The main one - to what is going to be an objective and honest with yourself. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? The first advice you have to decide what aims you want to reach. Do not overplay with your art and take it easy. Before you start, always imagine how your artwork will fit in the place where you want it exhibit. Imagine yourself not as artist, but as visitor and will be this artwork interesting for you? Be critical to your art. What may help to develop final look. And if you still sure about your work, wait at least four days before you start. If after these days you still satisfied with your idea - start. Also quality is important in our days. So I would advise work not only on idea, but also on final look.

ICON


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BORIS BEJA Ljubljana, Slovenia

BETWEEN THE LINES


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SILICONATO BIANCO

Boris Beja first graduated in 2009 from the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering from Graphic Communications and then graduated again in 2013 from Sculpture at the Academy of Fine Arts. He has had a number of individual exhibitions and has collaborated on several group ones. He has recived some awards, among them the 2012 Prešeren Student Award for sculpture and, in the same year, the higest award for a contribution to the sustainable development of our society, the Slovene Human Resources Development and Scholarship Fund. Beja is also a critic and a curator. In his work, he unites various visual practices into an aestheticised, direct address with an emphasis on social criticism. From 2010 to 2013, he was writing articles on the subject of culture for the web portal Planet Siol. As ob 2014, he is the assistant to the art director of the Škuc Gallery. He lives and works in Ljubljana.

2015 2014 2014 2014 2013

Dormitorij, Galerija Ravne, Ravne na Koroškem (Slovenia) Between the lines, Galerija Simulaker, Novo Mesto (Slovenia) ID grad.:BB/SB 14 - n. 3/3, Galerija Božidar Jakac, Kostanjevica na krki (Slovenia) Menuet zanj, Peterokotni stolp - Ljubljanski grad, Ljubljana (Slovenia) Človek človeku žival, Galerija Krško, Krško (slovenia)


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MENUET FOR HIM

How and why started you creating?

How has your work changed in the past years?

From an early age I was interested in art. Luckily I was always, also in nowadays, supported by my father and mother, they helped me to discover unknown worlds. As well in the field of art. After the artistic high school I have not passed the entrance examinations to the painting departure at art academy. I enrolled in the graphic technique. Today I am happy that I can work in the field of art scene. Engineering faculty has been in the program imbued also with artistic lectures which gave me new knowledge concerning artistic design of the product. Already during my first studies at the college I started writing about the arts and to publish my contributions in different media. In addition to write, learn about new artists, their work, I could also be financially independent. At the end of study in graphic technique I decided to entrance exams at the Academy of Fine Arts, where I passed them and began to study art at the Department of Sculpture.

I always start my artistic practice with the perception of the surroundings as a base for infusion of my statement through the artwork, through which I strive to find beauty in relation to the correct. I believe the artwork is correct and “beautiful� only when it appears as such. And I don't think that my work or artistic creation has been changed, I would say its developing. Every time I find something new, what occupied me and from different topics or reactions from the daily life I can change material, form and protocol. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? Difficult to answer. With my profession I am satisfied. Although with installations is very difficult to create money. I'm currently working as an assistant of artist


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Art Reveal Magazine director at the Gallery Škuc. This work pays me costs and buy me time to think about art. I can be independent and free whit that. But I think I would be a writer. There is another space to be creative and feel free.

What is the most challenging part about working with Mixed Media and sculpture? I'm starting projects always with intuition. With more serious and deeper reflection in the working progress I involve systematic examining of the chosen problem. When creating, I build the content or the form as a collage. I link the content with subtitles of the working title, which is followed by formalization, combining various artistic media. By thickening or adding on, I wish to create a comment or a piece of art that could provoke thought and would be able to inspire thinking in others as well. I tend to avoid the notion of art as a therapy, hence my wish for the requirement of thinking process. Therefore I am present in the field of art also when I think, read or speak of it. Various resource and communication channels through which I receive different information are the matter with which I create or supplement and change the project and then to a certain level adjust to my own ambitions and society in which I operate. The spectrum of my work and interest is broad. For attaining better goals I simultaneously follow various discourses and mostly choose none. By reflection, I take usefulness and necessity from everyone. Reflexive experience is shown in architectonic constructions, objects and installations, all through to documentation projecting of an art work. I try to create works that are not selective of the public for I believe that art is for everyone. In regards to this, I advocate the comprehension – an artist. Art as a profession shouldn’t be viewed only by the connoisseurs, but also by wider public.

What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? There is no recipe but there is one truth. “History of art is the history of friendship”, as Gerhard Merz once said. Some artists who have no friends or very few of them, are usually not to be found on the art map or space. We all need to be something special, we need to rethink our ideas, read about art, following what is going on the world… And we need to be hard workers.

What are your future plans as an artist? In the autumn I am preparing for a solo exhibition in Zagreb. In the Inkubator gallery will exhibit project entitled “Du bist”. The project »Du bist« thinks the issue of belonging, rituality, and the inevitability of its performativity, and – with it – repetitions of rules set in advance that do not change in the form of signs. Photography as a tool of research, documentation, and classification of the reality of the preparations for a ritual, complements formal solutions made up from a game and the rules, performed with triangular dominos. In both cases I think the pattern and notation as well as categorization of an everyday detail. The artwork consists of photographs taken at an international airport, a place of the future, where in just half an hour a waiting lounge has changed into a place of a ritual. The images record a performative action of orthodox Jews, preparing for their repeatable morning ritual. A sociological pattern is completed with a formal pattern of a board game, especially popular in northern Europe. Like every ritual, like-wise every game has its beforehand set and written rules that we must follow in order to win. The title of the project originates from the game that I used to play at home on the kitchen table, from a simple communication with my counterpart.


Art Reveal Magazine

SISYPHEAN TASK

I always start my artistic practice with the perception of the surroundings as a base for infusion of my statement through the artwork, through which I strive to find beauty in relation to the correct. I believe the artwork is correct and “beautiful” only when it appears as such. Then it has an effect on the viewer, me and other works. When creating, I build the content or the form as a collage. I link the content with subtitles of the working title, which is followed by formalization, combining various artistic media. By thickening or adding on, I wish to create a comment or a piece of art that could provoke thought and would be able to inspire thinking in others as well. I tend to avoid the notion of art as a therapy, hence my wish for the requirement of thinking process. Therefore I am present in the field of art also when I think, read or speak of it. Various resource and communication channels through which I receive different information are the matter with which I create or supplement and change the project and then to a certain level adjust to my own ambitions and society in which I operate. The spectrum of my work and interest is broad. For attaining better goals I simultaneously follow various discourses and mostly choose none. By reflection, I take usefulness and necessity from everyone. Reflexive experience is shown in architectonic constructions, objects and installations, all through to documentation projecting of an art work. I try to create works that are not selective of the public for I believe that art is for everyone. In regards to this, I advocate the comprehension – an artist. Art as a profession shouldn’t be viewed only by the connoisseurs, but also by wider public. Since art is for real, there is no place jokes.

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ANUPONG CHAROENMITR Bangkok, Thailand


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JUST DANCE (INSTALLATION)


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How and why started you creating? The originality of my work comes from private interests and previous experience of self-perceived of the course of things in life as well as social and collective memories of people. Then comes to development of a style and create possible presentation in conformity with the idea without a definite pattern or stereotype for the show as media Video Art. How has your work changed in the past years?

UNPREPARE

In the beginning, my work is often resulting from the inspection and search for things arising from the experiences and memories of my past in response to some sense of selfcontain. However, my works during this period were presented as an openended questioning to the audience in the creation of new experience which had not neither been concluded nor rectified. And that were not either for judgments for right or wrong to my artwork. What is the most challenging part about working with video? As a creative, I think that the works of all art forms are challenging the same. Concerning video art, in my opinion, the creation of a whole novel, may not be able to challenge the perception of the audience with the media on this. Nowadays, the technology has been developing very fast; therefore, creating new experiences in the open view of the audience’s thought could

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be a challenge for the media Video Art. Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? I never define myself as Conceptual Artist or grouped myself in rig on it. Just take into consideration as an artist who likes to present my wills by the process of still and moving images in response to the concept. Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. The background of me, I was quite interested in social, memories and history. Maybe these things are hidden with the belief that as unreasonable. The perceptions of people in society are sometimes obscure and distort the truth out of some power and various discourses which strike my interest. The artists that influenced my thought is Prof. Sakarin Krue-On, he is an artist and also my professor. He was the first person to open my view of see the possibilities in liberty of Media Video Art. What are your future plans as an artist? I have not much planned an orderly development as an artist, but always try to motivate myself to explore new challenges in working field. And hope that my work will be alive and linger in the memory of viewers, more or less.


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EZIO CICCIARELLA Vittoria RG, Italy


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Ezio Cicciarella was born on 22nd September 1976 in Vittoria, a small town in Sicily. As a child he was attracted to open spaces, construction sites and the tools used by his craftsman father, as opposed to the classroom. From an early age he was particularly interested in construction and restoration techniques, as well as stonecutting and intarsia. As he grew up, his longing for knowledge, his need for new encounters, and his thirst for novel experiences increased, thus leading Ezio to travel frequently both within Italy and abroad. He continued to be dissatisfied and restless, and was always looking for that "certain something" that would gratify him and make him feel completely fulfilled. In 2001 he started to create his first sculptures, unaware that he had discovered a source of inspiration, which would, in turn, give sense to his life. In 2008 a turning point: in the face of numerous difficulties, he decided to open his own studio in the centre of Vittoria and devote himself entirely to his art, which would both fascinate and enthrall him from then on. It was from that point onwards that he started to create a wide range of works of art, constantly developing his own style and refining his technique. In the meantime, he studied and discussed art, and extended the artistic connections, coming into contact with the likes of Franco Sarnari and Vittorio Sgarbi. This long and demanding path culminated in his participation at the Venice Biennale in 2011. In the same year, he also set up an exhibition space in Via Cavour, a few steps away from his studio where, to this day, he still creates his works of art. Sculpture - Ezio says - has illuminated my life, but it requires an absolute and unconditional dedication, courage and endless sacrifice. If it is true that art is more of a calling than a profession, than Ezio Cicciarella's inclination has led him inevitably to this calling.


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Why did you choose sculpture as your medium? . I come from the world of the brickwork. For this reason the more instinctive and immediate approach has been with the medium, the stone, that more I was used to manipulate. Calcareous stone, pitched stone and different kind of marbles I have then experienced the different typology of this substrate with which I have a privileged relationship.

What art do you most identify with? With which kind of art I identify is a wide question and I don't know what you refer too... If you mean the avant garde, the experimentation, invention that is opposite to the art of the hand, the hammer I recognise myself mostly with this second category. Obviously with the eyes opened between tradition and innovation and I always confront with the trends and the artistic experiences of nowadays.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? With the risk of being rhetorical, different people have suggested it: the importance of a continuous research, of the continuous over going of myself. In reality I have always followed my instinct more than advice or suggestions


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www.eziocicciarella.com

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DAVID ELLINGSEN Vancouver, Canada Beaty Biodiversity Museum, Vancouver, Canada. Solo Exhibition, Lishui International Photography Festival, Lishui, China. Guest Artist First Place, International Photography Awards, Los Angeles, USA First Place, Prix de la Photographie Paris, Paris, France Shortlisted, Photolucida Critical Mass Book Award, Portland, USA

WESTERN RED CEDAR


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PORTRAIT 2

When, how and why started you photographing? I started my career in photography at the age of 30. In my late 20’s I began searching for a new direction and I hired a career counselor for assistance. As soon as the subject of photography was discussed it immediately struck home. I grabbed it and have not let go yet. I went to a small technical school from 1999 to 2000 to learn the mechanics of the art, received a diploma, and set off.

that it will contribute in some small way to the challenges we face. Tell us more about "The Last Stand" series.

What is the most challenging part about environmental artist and photographer at once?

As you may realize by the close of this interview, I am consumed with making work that speaks to the anthropogenic environmental crisis and the dialogue surrounding it. This body of work touches on themes of globalization, impacts of colonialism, and the cognitive dissonance arising from the dilemma of participation in, and yet responsibility for, the fouling of the environment.

I don’t feel the challenge is in pairing the two. The challenge is attempting to produce strong work in the hope

The Last Stand is a very personal project that has its beginnings in my childhood, as I walked daily through the


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PORTRAIT 8

woods to catch the school bus, passing by these dark remnants of the old growth forest. This experience left a lifelong impression on me. I later discovered that these ancient trees had in fact been cut down by my own ancestors and, with concurrent reflections on personal environmental responsibilities, confirmed that this would be an important project for me.

important public art institution, is about to embark on the construction of a new space designed by Herzog & de Meuron. In addition, the new Capture Photography Festival is now in it’s third year and has done a lot for the photographic arts in the city.

How would you describe the art scene in your area?

“Keep going. If you do, it’s all going to happen”.

Major international artists like Douglas Coupland, Jeff Wall, Ian Wallace, Vikky Alexander and the rest of the “Vancouver School” have raised the profile of the city’s art scene since the 1980s. We have world-class private galleries and the Vancouver Art Gallery, our most

What are your future plans as an artist?

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received?

Very much the same as before. Continue making work that speaks to the situation we now face and our response to it.


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http://davidellingsen.com

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KATIE ERNST New York, NY, USA Katie Ernst is an emerging artist from New York. She primarily works in painting and mixed media, as well as in figuration and abstraction. The connecting theme in the two is atmospheric space, present in the scenes that she paints, as well as in her abstract prints and ethereal color fields. The underlying framework for her pieces is transience and twilight spaces: the moment between waking and sleeping, between life and death; states of meditation.

Member of the Golden Key International Honour Society Artwork published in the Olivetree Review Issues 53 & 53 Writings published on BUST.com Artwork Published alongside interview for Cult Magazine Issue 2 Scholastic Art and Writing Award: Gold Key for Photography Portfolio

SLIPPING AWAY


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When, how and why started you painting? I’ve always been involved in the arts; my mom is a musician and brought my sisters and I up in a very creative household. I had always wanted to paint, but was very intimidated by it, and honestly still am sometimes! Instead, I turned to writing and photography. It wasn’t until my final semester of college that I seriously began painting. I had an amazing professor that really had us examine and explore our artistic influences from all different aspects of our lives. This helped me understand what I wanted to paint, and why. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? Being an artist requires a lot of late nights and caffeine, at least for me! It’s hard to find a consistent balance between your obligations and your art. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Death and sexuality are major themes I like to explore. The underlying framework for my pieces is transience and twilight spaces: the moment between waking and sleeping, between life and death; states of meditation. I’m also continuously inspired by strong women. I practically grew up under a matriarchy, which has influenced the ways in which I interact with the world-- more empathetically and intuitively. Those are qualities that are traditionally and historically considered “feminine”, though I do not mean to limit them as being only

BUONA NOTTE

accessed by women! I do find inspiration in feminism. Embracing your sexuality, and your (historically) “feminine” qualities does not make you un-feminist. I am also very inspired by groups like FEMEN because I love how they unabashedly take back their power through the use of their bodies in order to get a visceral reaction from people. Other lasting artistic inspirations are Ana Mendieta, Shirin Neshat, Louise Bourgeois, Balthus, Ilya Repin, Egon Schiele and Francis Bacon. What is your creative process like? I work from photographs and from my head. The use of photography and the female body are important influences on my work. There is a certain immediacy and rawness in photographs that I seek out. I get very inspired from old photographs (I have many boxes from my grandmother), and sometimes fashion magazines. Many times I will use my findings as paintings references, changing certain aspects of the composition and figures. I also paint directly from my head. But every once in a while when a photograph or my mind is not giving me what I want, I will stage an image myself. If it involves a figure I will use my own body (sometimes with a mirror, but mostly I take photographs of myself and paint from that). In a certain way, I suppose this practice relates my work to self-portraiture; however, I would not call my works self-portraits, or even autobiographical. I just use my body as a vessel to help communicate my ideas. I do not see myself as the

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women or figures I paint. I can identify with aspects of them, as I presume many women can, but they are not depictions of me. What are your future plans as an artist? My future as an artist will continue through visual and academic exploration. I plan on continuing to paint, enter more exhibitions and publish more works. Overall, I will continue to make and promote my art no matter what. I would also like to further my studies and go for a PhD in Art History, specifically looking at the impact of religion on feminine sexuality through historic representation compared to the modern female response. What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? Do what you love no matter how hard it is. If you cannot do what you love in some capacity, then what’s the point? I see art as my god, or religion if you will. For me, that brings greater depth to my life beyond myself, and my family. Otherwise, life gets a little dull. Even if you have other responsibilities and obligations (as we all do), spending some time on something you are passionate about will be worth it. And for those periods when life gets seriously difficult, and you absolutely cannot dedicate anytime to your art or your passion, just be kind to yourself... Remind yourself that when you can, you will. That will make all the difference.


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THE EXCHANGE


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www.casadikatie.com

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MARTIN GERSTENBERGER Landshut, Germany 2015

“Fresh Legs 2015�, Gallerie Heike Arndt, Berlin, Germany

2015

"Revenge of the 5th", Thumbprint Gallery, La Jolla, USA

2008

Annual Art-Show, Friedberg, Germany

2007

V-Gallery, Basel, Swiss

2001

Television documentary for the Bavarian Broadcasting (BR3)

Born 1981 in Landshut Germany I started my way into art as a teenager who fell in love with street art and soon was able to do big murals with well known people like os gemeos and flying fortress. In my recent work I try to combine elements of Street Art and Naive Art/ Outsider Art with traditional ways of painting or sculpturing as well as using its subjects or copied elements. This way I am experimenting with the different energy and history of the individual art forms and the possibility to combine it. Like the modern way of living and especially the capitalistic way of life absorbs all rude and natural forms of living, my work shall reflect this in an ironic way. My pictorial narrative technique is that of the stream of consciousness - protagonists, landscapes and motifs arisen from the stream of consciousness, are cut out of their larger context and intertwined in free association with new content and figures. And yet, follow the pictures a clear intention and statement: they offer the viewer familiar shreds of collective memory and embed it in a carefully staged design from the strangest landscapes, situations and constellations. The viewer opens up a wondrous universe of styles, time frames, social developments: often seemingly naive, sometimes expressive, sometimes wild - as fantastic as castles in the air in the forest of thoughts, and yet extremely precise in the architecture. In its wild mix of levels of meaning, details and contexts it includes the riddle and its solution at the same time. Behind often humorous, ironic titles hides such as behind the image plane itself a reflexive attitude towards the old questions of mankind or social constructs.

THE BATTLE OF GOOD AND EVIL


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THE STREET ART COLLECTOR


Art Reveal Magazine When, how and why started you creating?

What is the most challenging part about working with Mixed Media?

I started to write graffiti at the age of 15 and for that reason did all my work outside. As I never really liked the idea of performing on a stage on the one hand but wanted to create something on the other hand, painting was the best way to leave something of you without being in the spectator`s focus yourself. I am not sure what actually makes one doing something, to speak for myself I would call it an innate driving force that made me like scribbling as a kid more than playing ball etc. So as it seems to be some part of ones personality the desire to create will always be there, what means that calling it just a hobby was like calling your fingers just tools.

If it comes to my sculptures it is a kind of a challenge to find suitable objects one can use, especially if you already have a picture of a possible sculpture in your mind and can`t find the needed material to realize it. On the other hand if you just let the material speak, it always has different voices and it is hard to decide which one to listen to.

How has your work changed in the past years? Due to my graffiti -related background and my first studies in communication-design I was quite into lettering and all kind of graphical art around 2001. The years after I got more and more bored as the kind of styles I prefered popped up almost everywhere around and I felt like having a visual overload. So I urgently needed to find a new direction and three years ago I fell more and more in love with naive and outsider art. As these artworks always seem not to be bind to a special period or fashion but just exist in a timeless capsule of its own, it just felt right to enrich my work with this artistic style. Up came a stylistic collage that I will keep up as I actually do not see and feel any need to strictly settle down on a style scheme, material or theme. Anyway my work should keep and hopefully reflect that naive spirit for as long as I do art.

What is your favourite experience as an artist? So far working on some piece of art was the only way to really get in that absolute feeling of flow, to forget about time, problems and sometimes even your organic needs. Besides that I love being one of those outsiders that use their precious time to create something not „useful“ and do not really care about a possible financial return of the spent energy and time while being surrounded by all those self-optimizing people. Last but not least art has somehow saved my life in a way not to get too frustrated with all the problems going on in the world. As I can not save the problems with doing art, it can at least be a healthier and cheaper way to create your catharsis using artistic materials and not psychopharmaca. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? I do make my living by creative work in the social field so I do already inhabit different worlds „naturally“. Besides that I appreciate oldfashioned handcrafting and could imagine to work as an artisan, especially as I do use wood and and other material for my artworks anyway.

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To create something may it be mental or material should always be the important part of any job I do and if you look close, a lot of work offers this. How would you describe the art scene in your area? In my hometown I do not see an art scene at all, just single persons who struggle in their various creative fields. Nevertheless the quite known sculptor Fritz König is living here and kind of influenced me with his thoughts about primitive artforms. Citizens in the area are quite conservative and whenever bigger modern artwork is shown outside of galleries and museums you can expect a lot of negative response sadly often really offensive ones. Munich as being quite close to my hometown offers more change but compared to other cities seems lacking this spirit of young creative people. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? I have not received an art tip so far but just like the sentence Jenny Holzer used for one of her installations: „Protect me from what I want“. Hopefully I will know one day why I am so in love with this sentence.


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MAXWELL RUSHTON London, England

"In the one hand I try and turn selling out into an art..."

Maxwell Rushton was born in 1989 in Swindon, UK. In 2009 he moved to the North, where he worked as a fish monger whilst studying for a BA in Fine Art at Leeds College of Art. Moving to London with 1st Class Honours in 2012 he continued to create art based upon his own relationship with commercial culture, expressing both his rejections and obsessions, and the influences it has on him. Maxwell identifies an unavoidable spectrum between a world saturated in commercialism and one that on that resits it. His work often imitates a materialistically driven culture in order to stand provocatively close to it..

Through physically becoming a brand by painting 10 pints of his own blood into a logo in Buy In Bleed Out, or spending a year in isolation constantly drawing and repeated symbol for Drawn Out, Maxwell identifies an unavoidable spectrum to encourage his viewer to question their placing within it. Maxwell articulates the force of commodification in today's culture by adopting the characteristics of commercialism in order to stand provocatively close to it.

".... and in the other I try and turn myself away from buying it all."

Selected to exhibit in BCN Art Fair, Barcelona, Casa Batllo, Spain The Brick Lane Gallery "Art in Mind", London, England West London Art Factory, Solo Exhibition, "Industry and Artistry", London, England Cella Shows, Solo Exhibition, "Post Product", Leeds, England LAB, solo Exhibition, "X" Leeds, England

ALL I HAD WAS THIS LOUSY T-SHIRT


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CANDY FROM A BABY

Briefly describe the work you do. My work isn’t restricted to one medium, I move around from short term projects to long durational work. I’ve been focusing on two larger projects over the last few years, one of which is a painting of a logo made from 10 pints of my own blood called Buy In Bleed Out, the other which I have just completed, is a drawing which I made over the course of a year in complete isolation. This piece I have named Drawn Out.

What themes do you pursue? Generally I’m inspired to make art which expresses the influences that commercialism and pop culture have on me. I do like representing materialism but not in a preconceived or conclusive way. Sometimes I exaggerate brands and sometimes I make art that renounces them - basically I experiment with it all.

OLD MR MARKET


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A few of my pieces and projects indirectly address the influence of pop culture, but these themes do always seem to appear at the source of my work. Guess I can’t escape that part of culture artistically, but that’s not really surprising as they are hard to escape anyway.

What is the most challenging part about being an artist? Keeping patient and positive when things don’t seem to be going forward.

How would you describe the art scene in your area? I work between London and France so it depends. In London there is a huge scene, on average one or two face-melting exhibitions open every day. The scene however is mainly based on artist/gallery reputation, nepotism and money; therefore it can be seriously difficult to enter such a tight arena. All the artists and curators I know that are crazily dedicated enough to persevere with their ambitions have definitely had their fair amount of trials and tribulations, just as I have. It is worth it though, in a masochistic sort of way. I can’t say it hasn’t been a slog to get my career launched, but I do have four exhibitions coming up . . . so London is paying off.

What art do you most identify with? Outsider Art. That isn’t to say that I make anything like it, in fact my work could be described as an exact opposite to Outsider Art, which I why I enjoy it so much. Since I don’t particularly like to categorise what I do, I look to Outsider Art to inspire work, but from an opposing angle – if that makes sense? By adopting this methodology my mind becomes free and this somehow this encourages ideas to flow far more than if I were to create work as a development of something similar. I have a logo which features in most of my work. The shape originates from a technique of mark making that I adopted as an infant, often I made those marks subconsciously. These marks themselves are the only things that can be related to Outsider Art. No other expression that I have made, or will ever make, will be remotely as primal as these. I redesigned the markings into a logo which I use as my own. The act of destroying the marks which are pure and uninfluenced, and transferring them into a symbol/logo is a comment referencing the way we allow ourselves to be identified by the commercial stimuli and cultures that surround us.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? There are no rules.

What are your future plans as an artist? I’ve got loads. Artistically, I’d like to always have a couple of durational projects on the go, projects like Buy In Bleed Out and Drawn Out really test my creativity both physically and mentally, which I enjoy. Publicity means a lot to me because it means that my work is being seen - which other than the satisfaction I get by making it, is the point.


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www.maxwellrushton.com

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DERICK SMITH Dublin, Ireland 2015

Holy Mountain - Backloft Gallery - 7 St. Augustine St, Dublin (solo), Ireland

2006

Behind the Eyes - Pratt Photo Gallery - 144 West 14th St., New York (solo), USA

2005

Dualism in America -Tenement Museum -97 Orchard St, Lower East Side, New York, USA

2015

Surveyor Exhibition - Solstice Art Centre, Navan, Co, Meath, Ireland

2009

Achieving Art Exhibition - The Bernard Shaw, 11-12 South Richmond Street, Dublin 2, Ireland

BLUE SWEEP


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HOLY MOUNTAIN

Curiosity has always been at the root of my creative investigations and from an early age I developed an aptitude for drawing and disassembling toys. The unseen insides of things held a great appeal for me. I later studied Industrial Design and began my professional experience in New York in 2003 where I worked for a design firm. This became the basis for my creative exploration and from there I went on to experiment with chemical photography using the city streets which culminated in my first exhibition. In the case of painting I seek to explore the verge of near collapse and to highlight the delicate relationship between the physical material and the abstract idea. Themes of emergence, transformation, mysticism, renewal and regeneration are explored through physical manipulation.


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Briefly describe the work you do In my work I seek to draw form out of the paint through explorative interaction guided largely by intuition. Often times I will work this form into a figure while simultaneously trying not to overly control it. What themes do you pursue? Primarily I think about emergence and about drawing forth something which is unseen. When successful, a form or image can be distinguished which pulls away from the paint. It can absorb your attention for a moment before the illusion fades and the awareness of the physicality of the paint as an object draws you back. It is this dialogue, this toggling back and forth between image and object, this momentary suspension or interruption of the usual mode of perception, which I most readily pursue. What is the most challenging part about being a painter? For me, it is finding the space where I am not completely in control as I work. This involves taking risks and being aware of how habits and tendencies, mental and physical, can narrow down the potential for a more open, freer creation. In short, it is attempting not to overlay too many ideas on the work, as I work, that it may breathe for itself. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? ‘Honour thy mistake as a hidden intention’. It is one of Brian Eno’s Oblique Strategies. It helps me to get into the mindset of there not being any mistakes and of trying to remain open to how the painting wishes to unfold itself. What are your future plans as an artist? My work has taken on more depth recently. I have been using thicker paint and am interested in building up form three dimensionally. I would also like to explore this on a larger scale.

www.dericksmith.ie


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YELLOW CYAN SWEEP


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HELENATAHIR Jesenice, Slovenia

ILLUMINATION SERIE


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Art Reveal Magazine When, how and why started you creating? I have been creating since my early childhood. As a child I was quite interested in drawing jewlery and in fashion design. When I was eleven, I had my first fashion show: clothes were remade, cut in different ways and painted with acrylic colors. But this was important for me because I became aware of my ambition related to art. Soon I realized that sewing didn't interest me, so I put my attention mostly on drawing. Creating was always some kind of meditation for me but I was quite sceptical about being a professional artist. Because I thought it was really hard to make a living out of it, I was always seeking other options in life. Soon I realized there was no other option - this was what I needed to do, this is what I'm good at and what makes me content. I started creating more seriously 4 years ago, when I started my studies at the Academy of fine arts and design in Ljubljana.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist? I grew up in Slovenia as a child of a father printmaker and mother curator. I developed my personality and life interests in creative enviroment and my parents always supported my creativity. I still remember how I painted the walls of our apartment when I was five and my parents were happy with it. We lived in a small industrial town Jesenice, where people didn't know much about art and culture. I always felt a bit different from other people there and never felt like I belong to that enviroment. When I was 15 I applied for artistic highschool in Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia, where I finally met people with similar interests. In that time I realized this was where I

should be: in the art world. So I countinued with studies of printmaking at the Academy of fine arts in Ljubljana, where I learned a lot about fine art visual thinking and about art world in general. In 2013 I moved to Porto in Portugal, where I finished my last year of bachelor degree studies. Recently I moved back to my country where I created a series of drawings that art reveal online magazine is showing now. I believe that all my experiences shaped my perception of life which is shown also in my works. But I have to stress out that the biggest influence on my artistic development was my father. Since I was a child I was observing him during artistic processes and I'm sure that this gave me some kind of artistic feeling( that made my learning process easier) and interest in classical approach to drawing.

What is your favourite experience as an artist? Probably one of my favorite experiences as an artist is the abillity to be independent and organize my time for work as I want to.

What are your future plans as an artist? I would like to continue working in colored pencils technique and create more complex drawings with bigger dimensions. My plan is to exhibit more, to become international, join some artistic resindence outside Europe and finally, make a decent living from it.

What do you like/dislike about the art world? What I like about the art world is connected with what I don't like. What I like the most is that it is full of

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interesting, authentic people. In our society we like to follow others, because that means acceptance - the more different you are, the more difficult it will be to get accepted by society. In the art world it is just the opposite. It is true that there are some hidden manifests in art, but a key for recognition is to create something new, something that hasn't been seen before. Being unique and different is nessesary. But because of that, the idea of art became undefined. What I dislike about the art world is that nowdays it is hard to see the difference between art work and everyday object. Because we always seek for new art, the concept of it changed so much that it is hard to understand it. Ordinary people and even some artists don't understand it, though they often pretend. There is no recipe for the true creation, which sometimes makes you question about the value of the art work. But at the same time this is what makes art so special and interesting.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? There was a time when I got confused by all the contemporary artistic movements around me. I was always watching other artists and trying to get close or copy their approach to artistic creation. Mostly I truly liked their approach but I always forgot about my own way. I neglected what I'm good at. So I found myself insecure about my work. I talked about this with my father and he said: Set your goal, make a plan how to do it, decide how much time the work is going to take you and do it. But do something that you are good at, something that you like, follow your current knowledge and take it to a higher level.


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http://cargocollective.com/helenatahir

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Art Reveal Magazine no. 7  

Artists: Edgar Askelovic, Boris Beja, Anupong Charoenmitr, Ezio Cicciarella, David Ellingsen, Katie Ernst, Martin Gerstenberger, Maxwell Rus...

Art Reveal Magazine no. 7  

Artists: Edgar Askelovic, Boris Beja, Anupong Charoenmitr, Ezio Cicciarella, David Ellingsen, Katie Ernst, Martin Gerstenberger, Maxwell Rus...

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