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DANIELLE VAN AMEIJDE | FREDERICK BAMFO | SEPIDEH BEHROUZIAN ANA ULRIK

MARIA

BUTNARU

MIKKELSEN

MARIA SANTI

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K AT YA

NAOKO

F I A L K O VA

MORISAWA

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JOSH ANDREA

HUXHAM SALTINI

| GEMMA SCHIEBE | S. VON PUTTKAMMER | MANNY ROCCA

BAMBI

Whipping up a storm from a London studio. By Lula Valletta

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MARCH 15-18, 2018 VISITING HOURS

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THIS FAIR IS ORGANIZED WITH THE PERMISSION OF THE UNION OF CHAMBERS AND COMMODITY EXCHANGES OF TURKEY IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE LAW NUMBER 5174.

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BAMBI WHIPPING UP A STORM FROM A LONDON STUDIO 4 FEATURED ARTIST: NAOKO MORISAWA 9 DANIELLE VAN AMEIJDE 10 FREDERICK BAMFO 16 SEPIDEH BEHROUZIAN 22 ANA MARIA BUTNARU 28 KATYA FIALKOVA 34

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JOSH HUXHAM 40 ULRIK MIKKELSEN 46 NAOKO MORISAWA 52 ANDREA SALTINI 58 MARIA SANTI 64 GEMMA SCHIEBE 70 S. VON PUTTKAMMER 76 MANNY ROCCA 82


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Art Reveal Magazine

BAMBI

Whipping up a storm from a London studio. By Lula Valletta

When roaming through London one is likely to run into one of the works by the infamous Bambi. Not Disney’s own dearest deer Bambi but the contemporary street artist Bambi. Bambi is all over the streets of London and reaches an enormous crowd both from the streets as well as through social media. Bambi’s work challenges us for a reaction. Not on-ly the Londoners, but also souls worldwide can’t have enough of the mysterious creature that calls herself Bambi. Art Reveal Magazine went on a quest in search of the answer the world is waiting for: who the hell is Bambi?

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ambi, whose identity is a well-guarded secret, lets her brand and the viewers of her street art pieces do the promotional work for her. Her works focuses on political and social injus-tices, contemporary female identity and its relationship to patriarchal culture. Her sten-ciled art is found on many street corners in the swinging city of London and is photo-graphed by millions. Her social media is booming and her mysterious being gets the atten-tion of many newspapers and magazines. Bambi’s name was firmly established with the piece Jade, which was a tribute to Britain’s finest soul singer, the late Amy Winehouse. After that, many more works from Bambi’s hands have graced London’s street walls, such as Diamonds, A Girls Best Friend, and her portrayal of the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton with the satirical slogan ‘A Bit Like Marmite’ across their chests. And there is more royalty. Be As Naughty As You Want presents Princess Diana as Disney’s Mary Poppins emerging on the streets of London. Bambi has conquered public space outside of London as well. Nowhere less than in the historic city of Venice, her water front piece called The Pope Gives Us Hope shows the pope reaching out to a polar bear in a boat. The piece is a reaction to the Pope’s


Art Reveal Magazine

comment from 2016 in which he calls to end environmental destruction. Her most well known piece must be Lie Lie Land, which features a dancing Theresa May and Donald Trump. Anyone who is a bit familiar with contemporary pop culture cannot fail to recognize the pose made famous by the movie La La Land. Bambi’s works hang both on the streets of London as well as in the living rooms of celebrities such as Brad Pitt, Adele and Rihanna. It seems like we all want a piece of Bambi. But first, let’s try and unravel Bambi’s mystery. Only a handful of people seem to know her secret identity. According to UK’s Daily Mail, Bambi lives quite a fancy life, drives an Austin Martin, wears designers’ clothes and most possible is a famous pop singer by day. But who is to know for sure? Due to her often being compared with world

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famous street artist Banksy and her need to stay as anonymous as possible, one can hardly suppress a slight suspicion that we might be talking about the same individual here. Especially since the two have collaborated on the exhibition ‘When Banksy met Bambi’ together. Could Bambi be one of Banky’s smart ways of fooling us helpless hipster art addicts and the countless hip art critics? Why not just go and ask her? Because of the protection of Bambi’s identity, I unfortunately could not conduct an interview in the flesh, but was allowed the honor to e-mail a questionnaire via Bambi’s agent. Bambi’s answers are short and to the point and somewhat lacking in dogma. Bambi’s got attitude and is not afraid to show it. You can see that in Bambi’s

I was never going to be a “traditional” artist. I was always comfortable on the street, and inspired by the life I saw there.


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answers to my questions and I saw it too when I got some of my answers back simply unanswered. Now we will never hear Bambi’s final word on the vile insinuation of her being really only Banksy in drag. Since Bambi’s works are as open to the public as can be, and as well known among the street-walking public as among the Internet-surfing public, I thought it would be interest-ing to dive into what exactly defines Bambi: her studio. Since I wasn’t granted an actual visit to Bambi’s studio, it is a bit of a pity that Bambi declined to answer a couple of questions specifically devoted to her modus operandi: how exactly does she prepare her art-works; does she work alone or does she have a team assisting her; does she have an archive of imagery at her disposal? But I reckon myself lucky for receiving some pictures of Bambi’s studio and Bambi‘s work in the making, so we can take a peek into Bambi’s studio, after all. And the answers that Bambi did give turned out to be revealing enough.

You are most famous for your street art. What was your main reason for bringing your art into the streets? Is it a critique on the mostly conformist art displayed in galleries?

I could not see the necessity of bullshitting for hours about work I’d made, I just wanted to get on with making it.

Who is Bambi? Bambi is a self-representing female artist, someone who is passionate about righting wrongs, fighting for social justice. My weapons? A sense of humour and a stencil. What does Bambi stand for? The nickname Bambi is an abbreviation of ‘bambino’, a childhood name my dad would call me. Have you ever been recognized as Bambi while on one of your nightly artistic ventures creating a new piece in public? No, but I have had a few close calls with the police, and always have to be on my guard, creating under cover of darkness. Why do you as a person as well as an artist hide behind Bambi? Mainly out of a desire not to get arrested… Is it fear? If so, for what? Are you afraid of the cops? I’m not afraid, I’d rather go back to my studio and make more work than be stuck in a prison cell! Would you be willing to take the risk of imprisonment for your art? No. That’s what I told you.

No. I find the whole art world very pretentious and stuffy. I was never going to be a “traditional” artist. I was always comfortable on the street, and inspired by the life I saw there. So creating work on and for the street was a natural fit for me. It still is.

Besides your street art, it seems you also do art commissioned by celebrities to hang on their walls. If this is correct, what is your motivation for doing this? Doesn’t it go against your own political ideas and the basic idea of street art being available for everyone? Art is available for everyone, even celebrities. Please tell me something about your artistic background. I started painting outdoors at a young age, after annoying my parents by stealing my dad’s air compressor kit and spraying the house. Then I went to art school - to Central St. Martins


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in London, but didn’t agree with the way art was taught. It was very pretentious and I could not see the necessity of bullshitting for hours about work I’d made, I just wanted to get on with making it.

conceived notions about what art is, and I like to think street artists are doing that too.

Do you see any connection between the work that you are doing now and the things you have learned in art school?

Cindy Sherman, I think her newly public Instagram account is amazing. The works are theatrical and spooky and yet comment poignantly on our self-obsessed era.

Yes, absolutely. I learned lots of things, and was inspired by many of the other students, and the other artists I was exposed to there. It also taught what sort of artist I didn’t want to be.

What other artists past and present inspire you?

Do you let yourself get inspired by anything else than art? If so, what?

On your Facebook page you mentioned that Francis Bacon is an inspiration for you. Why is that?

Anything and everything, from social injustice, to news, to feminism, to the Royal Family.

I bumped into Francis Bacon frequently while at St Martin’s. I feel that Bacon, in a way, is similar to today’s street artists. During his time he demonstrated a rebelliousness, and a certain eccentricity that is so important to British art. He was challenging

How do you prepare your works? I think people think street art is a bit of random graffiti, but it’s very time consuming. I hand cut all my stencils and hand


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draw all my artwork, and a street piece can take weeks or even months to prepare. My art is never computer generated. Could you explain how you start a new piece of art? After inspiration hits you… how is a Bambi being born? How long does the process take of creating a new piece of street art? From the first inspira-tion to the final revelation? Each piece is different, and each inspiration is different. How long is a piece of string? Do you at some point return to walk past your own street art? If a particular piece of your street art is damaged or removed, will you repair it or put it back? No, I don’t repair my street-art work or check on it. I really like the way that street art isn’t permanent or precious. I like it when other people deface it or add to it. If it’s not defaced then the weather will attack it in the end! All that is constant is change. What kind of works do you have in store for us? Keep your eyes peeled on the streets of London. You can always follow me on Instagram for cheeky teasers. @therealbambistreetartist Is street art a male dominated game? If so, why should it be? It sure is… I think it’s a lot to do with safety sadly – a lot of women wouldn’t be encouraged to be creating art in dark streets in the dark of night…. Do you consider yourself a feminist? Yes. If so, how important is feminism for your art? It’s vital. It’s an integral part of who I am. I think women who don’t consider themselves feminists need to think again, and imagine themselves having no right to education, birth control, choice of partner, financial independence or any kind of freedom…. Do you consider art a right media to bring awareness of feminism or other social and polit-ical issues? Yes. Especially street art has wide reaching audience.

Find out more about Bambi:

@therealbambistreetartist

streetartistbambi.com

How do you feel about being labeled ‘the female Banksy’ by so many? I read that you despise this but isn’t it rather a compliment? IId say Banksy is the male Bambi. It’s so passé to use the male as the benchmark. And now the final question… Who killed Bambi? No-one, she’s alive and kicking and whipping up a storm on the streets of London.


Art Reveal Magazine

FEATURED

ARTIST

NAOKO MORISAWA

photo: Zorn B Taylor

More at pages 52-57

My artwork is hand-made of thousands of very small slices of natural and oil-dyed (wood) chips on board. I like to incorporate the patterns in the wood and enhance them with oilstain. The variety of wood grain is very beautiful and the pattern is never the same. The combinations of natural and oil-stained grains create interesting shadows and impressions. My imagery comes from common items: a cupcake, shoes, a wave, and waterfalls etc. On the cover: “Illusionist� 26x20inch, Hand Crafted Oil-Stained Wood Mosaics, Acrylic, Oil, Sumi and Japanese Paper

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Danielle van Ameijde Amsterdam, the Netherlands Danielle van Ameijde (b.1976) lives and works in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. She studied photography from 2010-2016 at the Academy of Art and Design St.Joost in Breda. During these years of practising visual art she explored the relative differences between abstract/conceptual and figurative/narrative art. She uses botany and the human body to trigger existential questions, focussing on transience and the threshold between life and death.


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Its inscenation of the shots of decomposed plants gives them either a new identity or points to something that doesn’t appear plant-like anymore. The warmth of the slide projector’s light causes the freshly picked plants to dry out visibly. The attractiveness of the image that is thereby created veils the act of destruction involved. But is it destruction or a slow transformation that is taking place? The philosophical concept of pantheism, the transition from the plant-like to the bestial, from the human to the divine, and vice versa, are used as the underpinning of my visual work. The following quote by Ovidius best illustrates this: “Nothing keeps its own form, and Nature, the renewer of things, refreshes one shape from another. Believe me, nothing dies in the universe as a whole, but it varies and changes its form, and what we call ‘being born’ is a beginning to be, of something other, than what was before, and ‘dying’ is, likewise, ending a former state.” Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? From the beginning, important influences in my artistic work have been the variety of natural forms and many philosophical and spiritual teachings, such as those of Aristotle, Pythagoras and Gurdjieff. I have always been interested in existential questions, the seeds of which were probably sown by my Christian upbringing. Also, the influence of people I’m surrounded by is a huge factor, as well as day-to-day experiences and life-changing events, like the loss of a loved one.

Briefly describe the work you do. As an artist, I am fascinated by what lies hidden behind the physical matter of an organism. I attempt to fathom the essence of life, the place where the manifestation of the soul dwells, visibly as well as invisibly. The central question in my research in my latest project “Transition” is: “Is dying a one-way road or an (ultimate) transformation?” I used botany as a visual metaphor for existential questions about transience and the endlessly repeating cycle of life and death leading to rebirth. Out of the illusion of coming to grips with the soul, I examine how life withdraws from the plant. “Transition” aims to bring to light something buried, becoming an archeology of being, letting the observer glimpse into places of discovery.

Artists such as Joan Miró and Wassily Kadinsky, Collier Schorr, Karl Blossfeldt, Stephen Gill, Gert & Uwe Tobias also have had a huge impact on my development as an artist. How would you describe the art scene in your area I live in Amsterdam in the Netherlands, a city imbued with history, art and culture, and home to several world -renowned museums, galleries and art festivals. I love to stroll through these


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areas, to bike through the typical “grachten” of Amsterdam, to spend time in its natural areas like the parcs, sit at the Amstel river and go to the Hortus Botanicus, the municipal botanical garden. Nevertheless, I don’t really have a personal notion of an “art scene” here in the city. What does art mean in comtemporary culture? I see the value of art in our contemporary culture in its ability to lead, sometimes even forcibly pull us out of our ordinary, everyday perceptions of the world. This power to challenge and change one’s perception has, of course, from the earliest times been an inherent potential in art, but contemporary art has many new mediums at its disposal that were unavailable to previous generations of artists that allow us to further delve into the hitherto unknown. What are your future plans? I wish to increase the visibility and awareness of my projects and exhibit the captivating themes around existential questions to the widest possible audience. In the near future I would like to work on promoting my art and extend my practise. A this point, I am looking for the right representative to exhibit my work. I want to explore all the possibilities in my art form, to create art and experiment with different techniques and materials and to evolve my work in new ways. Name three artist that you admire. In particular, I admire the work of Broomberg & Chanarin, Thomas Grünfeld and Taryn Simon.


www.daniellevanameijde.nl


Frederick Bamfo Kumasi, Ghana

Bamfo is part of a new generation of Ghanaian contemporary artists who is redefining Ghanaian modern art. He has received several academic honours and has been featured in various exhibitions locally and internationally. He served as a Teaching Assistant and Research Assistant at the Department of Painting and Sculpture in Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi where he obtained his BFA and MFA. He has exhibited in Incubarte 7 Biennale Exhibition in Valencia, Spain, Barclays L’Atelier Competition Exhibition in Johannesburg, South Africa and It’s LIQUID International Art Show in Venice, Italy. My work investigates into cultural identity, adaptation and hybridity through the interventions of mobile communication. It reflects critically on ways mobile telephony technology mediates amongst people in our societies and the world around us, in Ghana’s post-independent communication environment. It is inspired by Kente cloth –the traditional stripe weaving of the Ashanti people of Ghana. The cloth is actually a symbol of mosaic of colours which is a metaphor of our world with diverse cultural origins. I extend this weaving tradition to embrace contemporary conversations by using products of various telecommunication companies in Ghana. Found objects such as scratch cards, scraps of mobile phones and other objects which have similar presence and narratives are being transformed into quilt –a metaphor of Kente cloth. These found objects are objects that connect our societies together because they are being consumed by people of all walks of life, classes, race and gender. I consciously collect the objects from eclectic sources including people’s homes, workplaces, towns, cities and regions. Through ardent process of weaving, stippling and wrapping, architectonic forms are created. The forms evoke countless conversations without boundaries and interconnection of our voices. Indelible texts, icons, symbols and images embedded in my materials challenge us to stay connected and mess-up. It speaks into our aspirations to communication in modern times and also reflects on the power of our voices.


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Briefly describe the work you do. I basically collect found objects from many places; including people’s homes, workplaces and streets. Found objects of various telecommunication companies in Ghana such as scratch cards, mobile phones, chip cards and earpieces. These materials(objects) embody the colourful

presence of the traditional Kente cloth –a historically charged cloth of the Ashanti people of Ghana. By using unconventional methods of weaving to achieve the physical qualities of the cloth, I think of the attitudinal changes (processes of self-criticism) people go through when they plan not to think only about ‘self ’ but also ‘others’. That drive is embedded in the unflinching

desire of an individual not only to connect with the people of his/her family but also people of different backgrounds; groups, locations, and diverse beliefs through myriad symbolic stitches I make on the individual objects. I start by weaving, stippling and sewing the objects together to form long stripes –a reflection of having deep vertical cultural affiliation. These individual stripes are again woven, stippled and sewn together to form a large quilt (multiple networks quilt sort of) – a reflection of having deep horizontal cultural networks. I subtly create minimal forms of the ubiquitous masts of various telecommunication companies, which are spread almost everywhere in the country into multiple architectonic structures – kinds of life-size sculptures. By wrapping the structures with the already created quilts, they assume the power of the 21st century people –people with complex network culture; people in constant conversations with people, between people and machines, between machines and people, and even between machines and machines. Rare facial expressions (kinds of humanoid robots) are sometimes skillfully created out of scraps of mobile phones and earpieces. The sex, status and race of my form is being neutralized. You can barely pinpoint its identity as to whether it is male or female, rich or poor, black or white. Like societies of multiple networks and connections, my work implicates hybrid form using contemporary lens. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? I am greatly influenced by my environment especially transformations that come with it in the advent of new technologies and the experiences that are created as a result. I am interested in the cultural dynamism of people over time and space (many layers of experiences of both human and material). How people’s identities and attitudes are altered through today’s network culture. It is clearly experienced within the physical transformations in elements that constitute social constructs of a community at a particular point in time. I make subtle study of the transformations at every level over a period and then try to put the experiences into context. I sometimes capture the experiences using the power of drawings and stories, which are later translated into hybrid forms or installations.


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How would you describe the art scene in your area? I live and work in Kumasi, a city of rich cultural heritage and the seat of Ashanti Kingdom. It is a very exciting place to live as an artist. The art community here is small but over the past 3 years, it has become more viable in terms of serving as the main creative hub; hosting art talks and shows within the city and other parts of the country at large thanks to the special intervention of BlaxTARLINES KUMASI, an independent project space for contemporary art established by the faculty of Department of Painting and Sculpture in Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi. The future for the arts here looks promising as more and more emerging artists are realizing themselves and their environment –freeing themselves from the confines of material specificity and institutional restrictions. The challenge however, has been how to find permanent spaces (museums and galleries) for the amazing works they produce. In your own opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? In contemporary culture, art is embodied in the spirit of “anything goes”. It is as my learned professor kąrî’kạchä seid’ou would say: “any shit can become a hit provided there is no ‘s’ to disturb it.” It expresses the unceasing freedom artists have enjoyed for the past decade and beyond. It speaks into today’s world of diversity and abundance as we focus more on globalism phenomenon. Interest now therefore precedes quality. Name three artists you admire. There are many artists I admire in the world but I greatly admire these three artists so much perhaps due to how their artworks push the boundaries of art and technology. They are as follows: Nick Cave Kate Hartman El Anatsui What are your future plans? I am currently working as an independent artist in my small studio in Kumasi. I plan to increase my presence at international exhibitions and other prestigious art venues around the world. Ultimately get represented by a reputed gallery and produce art. I also plan in the long term to establish gallery in my lovely city, Kumasi.


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works.io/frederick-bamfo

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Sepideh Behrouzian Isfahan, Iran

I am not concerned with the notion of “style”. The eclectic way seems to suggest that, the language of painting is not something to project on things I always think there is a consistent sensibility. For me this sensibility derive from the Dichotomy of nature and culture. Everything in our universe belongs to either nature or culture, but consciousness about it make this notion Significant. Due to long mankind history, both of these two have been overlapped so much that is impossible to look at nature out of human’s eyes (culture). For me practicing art is a hope to find new methods of organizing different perception of nature. I believe there is no chance to achieve the essence of nature despite our trained mentality culture). Therefore I try to think about how our universe begin, how was it looks like at its earliest stage and how the universe in its diversity, makes us human, this idea makes me inspired to imagine different possibility in existing nature and culture and how it can relate to the “painting” that is the core of my practice and I am unconcerned with a definitive style. I’ve always been a fan of minimal and monochrome painting, but at the same time love elements of figuration and drawing in works. Spideh Behrouzian was born in 1985. she has a BFA painting and MA Art Research in art university of Tehran. she has shown in O’gallery in Tehran, in 2017 she was selected among 8 young emerging Iranian artist in Assar art Gallery by the Jury including Pooya Arianpour and Alireza Adambakan. She also curated a project “Food:” in contemporary museum of art in Isfahan in 2017, she was selected in “echo” show of 7 Iranian female artist in Kayafas gallery in Boston curated by Azita Moradkhani. now she is living and working in Isfahan Iran.


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Briefly describe the work you do. My initial interest in nature and un-nature grew out of a more personal narrative, human as part of whole universe has always been a drawback and all the problem is not the intervention of human in nature but our conception of ourselves as a whole in the universe. The center of my practice has a lot to do with ‘place’, cultural and natural character of a place, and through an autobiographical linear, contrasts between ideologies, landscapes and mindsets that I have met after a series of tragic private circumstances. Human lifestyle, their relationship with nature in contrast with culture is what often drives my research and also effects my work. In other words, place in my practice has lot to do with the timeless question: Where did we come from and where are we heading for? I am not concerned with the notion

of “style”. The eclectic way seems to suggest that, the language of painting is not something to project on things I always think there is a consistent sensibility. For me this sensibility derives from the Dichotomy of nature and culture. Due to long mankind history, both of these two have been overlapped so much that is impossible to look at nature out of human’s eyes (culture). For me practicing art is a hope to find new methods of organizing different perception of nature. I believe there is no chance to achieve the essence of nature despite our trained mentality (culture). Therefore, I try to think about how our universe begin, how was it looks like at its earliest stage and how the universe in its diversity, makes us human, this idea makes me inspired to imagine different possibility in existing nature and culture and how it can relate to the “painting” that is the core of my practice and I am unconcerned with a definitive style.

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? I lost my parents both 5 years ago during a long and dire cancer disease. Witnessing how cancer condemn them to death gradually, has made me revise my attitude of the world and our existence on it. this always lead my works to have a deepest layer of fail and despair despite the deceptive colorful elements in my works. It is not something deliberate in my works, this is the way I believe things go. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Art in Iran has its own character and unfortunately is mostly represented by some exotic characteristic, in particular calligraphic style as well as contemporary “orientalism”- works that have been largely intended for a Western audience. But


Art Reveal Magazine

younger generation of Iranian artists are seeking ways to be represented by a more independent style rather than insisting on the concept of colonialism that has created East/West polarities and so greatly influenced our modern era. Self-identity in relation to social context, environmental and political issues as well as aesthetic obsessions are among concerns which define Iranian Contemporary Art. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? The world in which we live and work has become increasingly economically, politically, and culturally interconnected - the accelerating interconnectivity of human activity and information across time and space. In today’s global world I reckon art can play a fundamental role in moderating the complexities of globalization. We have seen the ability of the art to act as a conduit for strengthening transnational

community connections. Threats can open dialogue among diverse groups by creating safe spaces for engagement, thus allowing new relationships to take root. I believe art helps us understand and bridge cultural distinctions as well as enhances our quality of life. Through its multiple means of expression, the art helps give voice where once there was only silence. Name three artists you admire. It’s quite difficult question to answer, because so many artists are inspiring me aesthetically, Theorically… Tala Madani, Craigie Aitchison, Cocomidori, Forrest Bess, Eva Hess, Milton Avery, Louise Bourgeois Hans Haacke… What are your future plans? I’ve been recently working on plants as both a living thing and another species with different way of life. Knowing how

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plants play a much more important role in the formation of our thinking, and life story than we typically realize. Especially in comparison with human, plant’s intelligence is paradoxical. Human as the most successful species spread over the entire surface of the earth. Our evolutionary success is a failure; our capacity for adaptation that molds any environment to our needs is, simultaneously, a catastrophic non-adaptation to the finite ecosystems we strive to dominate. I’m trying to find a way to use them as my material and also preserve them, as sculptures, they can react to its environment. I first started with some studies on cacti some drawings and notes and then grafting them. In the first step I chose cacti for several reason first they have an acceptable variety of forms and also because of this specific forms any changes due to environments is more recognizable. Grafting is also another potential that can help me to work with cacti, I hope to identify other sort of plants with its specific traits.


http://sepidehbehruzia.portfoliobox.net/


Ana Maria Butnaru Iasi, Romania

I don t describe my work because I think words alter the pure sensations which lay within them, regarding of what I feel. I will mention whatsoever that these shapes of matter from the paintings are a glimpse of thoughts or emotions that inspired and fascinated my mind at some point.


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Briefly describe the work you do. My works are building their own world, born from within the depths of my mind, of my imagination. I find fascinating and ravishing to paint shapes from matter, by needle and brush, and so creating images which are the embodiments of fragments of my sensations. I want to feel that I gave life to an emotion, animated through shape, color, texture and ambience. As long as this happens, it doesn’t matter how the painting looks by the end. Above form, content and appearance there is the affective side of my works – the imaginary world which grows with each image, and stays faithful to itself, uncompromised. When it comes to my paintings, nothing symbolizes or has any other meaning besides that this is the manner in which my fantasy manifested. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? I believe that my art is driven by feelings. I paint what I feel; I create my own imaginary world of sensations. I experiment lots of emotions while I paint, as well while I contemplate my works. This is maybe part of the motivation that makes me express myself through visual art – to feel, to unleash my imagination, to challenge and fascinate my mind and experiment with sensations. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I can say that the art practiced here it is in some ways diverse. Everyone is trying to give a meaning to art, in some cases too much meaning in my opinion. Sometimes I have the feeling that I see the same type of art everywhere, although different individual artists are exhibiting their works. I think it has to do with the fact that some ideas and approaches to art are more predominant here than others and tend to overwhelm. There is however some great and creative art I have seen here and really enjoyed it, but in general I am not really fond of the art in my area. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? I believe that art in general is what has always been – the way through which the human being expresses his inner thoughts and emotions. Regarding the contemporary context, art has basically the same principle stated above but the ways of expression and representation adapted to the ideas and pursuits of our times. Name three artists you admire. I enjoy seeing art that moves me – creative, unsettling, unusual, dark or weird. It must challenge my mind, to intrigue my ideas or to awake some sort of fascination. I don’t have any artists I admire; I just have works that I enjoy to look at. What are your future plans? My plans for the future are to continue my painted world of shaped sensations.


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behance.net/AnaButnaru

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Katya Fialkova Berlin, Germany

My work is focused on place, specifically landscape. There is a dystopian element in these works, an unease. While most dystopias are set in urban spaces, my view turns away from cities to look at rural places. Factories abandoned to nature, overgrown highways with unstable bridges, lone empty stores on the edge of darkness, burning fields, billboards with nothing to sell, empty screens and stages. There are no people in these places - they have fled or otherwise vanished. The rare interiors in my work are places of performance, empty of the people and pageant they were built to present. Abandoned to nature, they slide slowly into memory. While these works are anchored in specific places, you would never find them on a map - in the drawing process they morph, absorb bits of other places, or take on fantastical elements. They are familiar places that you can never get back to. Katya Fialkova immigrated to the US from the USSR with her mother at age three. She grew up in New York City, and has lived and worked in Mexico, Israel, the US, and Europe. As such, thethemes of place and environment are central to her work.


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How would you describe the art scene in your area? Really diverse. In Berlin there are museums, established galleries, artist-run galleries, project spaces, ateliers that put on shows, collectives. Some friends are putting on art shows in the hallway in their shared flat. In 2014 two friends and I put on a show in a former bicycle shop that was between tenants. We renovated the space and had a great opening night; people stayed until 2am. In Berlin it’s still possible to do things like that, although it is getting harder. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? That is a big question! We need a bottle of wine and a late night. On the one hand, art as a form of expression feels more important than ever, especially with the shifts towards populism and nationalism in the US and Europe. Art can have multiple interpretations, it’s complex, often outside of the mainstream. Art presents different points of view, different ways of seeing and thinking. It can promote discussion; Briefly describe the work you do. I make drawings, and sometimes ink paintings, or a mix of the two. The most recent series I call “Screens” and are dark ink paintings of empty billboards, theater stages, and movie screens. With that series, I started depicting interior spaces again, which I hadn’t done in years. My work is still focused mainly on place and landscape, however. There is a dystopian element in these works - abandoned factories, overgrown highways, crumbling bridges, burning fields…the push and pull of buildings and nature, where the people are gone and nature always wins. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? I was lucky to have great teachers growing up, specifically Randy Williams, who is an artist and also teaches at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where I took drawing classes. He really encouraged me to find my own way, and it gave me a lot of confidence to explore. There is a class there called “Looking and Drawing”, and the “Looking” part is so important; that influenced me a lot and how I see art as a practice.

My peers and college professors also had a huge influence. They taught me to show up even if I don’t feel motivated, because making art is wonderful but it’s also hard work, or maybe a better word is hard effort. As in, sometimes things flow, but for me making art is working, albeit the best kind of work. It’s not always easy and it’s sometimes scary, but if you have a habit of showing up, then it’s easier to just keep going, even when you’re full of doubts. I am very much influenced by the world around me. The landscapes and places I see and imagine, my fascination with grand things that we built that are now abandoned and forgotten. I think that started because I grew up in New York City, and loved Coney Island, especially in winter. It had this lost sparkle to it, like something that was once spectacular and then kind of forgotten. Years ago, I started reading about its history, about places like Dreamland, and made work about destroyed and abandoned amusement parks. Brash, bright places that feel so lonely when there’s no one watching them. I’ve lived and worked in a few different countries, and those landscapes and places made their way into my work as well.


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it raises questions. It can be ambiguous, mysterious, uncomfortable. It “takes away our certainty”, as Gerhard Richter said. On the other hand, however, art - and I mean visual art here - is part of a market; it’s a luxury commodity, and often feels inaccessible to people. I think museums, public art, and artist-run spaces do a great job to bring art to more and more people. And I wouldn’t necessarily expect galleries to have that mission, since they’re businesses that need to sell artworks to stay in business. That’s why it’s great to have diverse spaces and places for people to engage with art outside of the traditional marketplace. I wish we had even more. It’s important that art exists, that people make it. It should be fought for. Children love making things, creating things. It’s important that some people never lose that wonder and interest and drive, and never stop exploring, whether they call themselves artists or not, whether they make a living from their art or not. I wish the US government, for example, was more supportive of the arts. It’s difficult to have an impact when artists are working long day jobs alongside making their work and taking care of their families. I wonder how much more incredible work we’d see, how

many more cultural treasures we’d have, if more people could get funding to make their art. Name three artists you admire. There are many, but three living artists are Tatiana Blass, William Kentridge, and Gerhard Richter. Tatiana Blass is known for her installations, but I especially love her paintings and gouaches. A man in a room, and it’s magical. They are really masterful. I love their confidence, how she plays with space and depth and color. I’ve admired William Kentridge’s work since I first saw it as a teenager. Drawing is central to his work and process, and as someone who works primarily in drawing, I like that it stands alone and isn’t necessarily in the service of something else. When he writes about his process it’s also one of discovery, more intuitive – for lack of a better word – and this also resonates with me. If I let the image emerge by responding to what’s there, it will be much better than trying to control it with an idea beforehand. I also feel his work is really honest. I’ve heard him discuss his doubts, and it was really refreshing to hear. I was like, “Okay, if someone whose work I really admire

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is also filled with doubt, then it’s okay, I can work with this.” Gerhard Richter’s work is like the work of several lifetimes. It’s broad and challenging and beautiful. For me, his writing and interviews on art are also very important, especially about how great contemporary art doesn’t have a single meaning or interpretation and how it “presents itself as the Unmanageable”, how it short circuits the parts of us that look for the linear and the logical. What are your future plans? I’d love to travel to more places with landscapes to draw from. I went to Iceland a few years ago and that was really great. Some Icelandic landscapes had already influenced my work and it was wonderful to finally be there in person. The sounds of the glaciers creaking, the wind, the way the snow made everything quiet. Looking out over the treeless horizon and feeling like I was walking on the moon. So many things I could only feel by being there. Those things then later seeped into the work I was making. I’d also like to go back to working larger, when this small series is finished. Maybe then I also need to find a larger studio!


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www.katyafialkova.com


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Josh Huxham Plymouth, England, UK

Josh’s work seeks the inner thoughts which we do not share in order to avoid protest. After developing a strong connection with his heritage through archiving historic photographs and other family relics, Josh continued to explore the vernacular, allowing him to form relationships in a space in which he feels visible. ‘Silence’ aims to extricate a sense of belonging within a dysfunctional family. The work expresses an essence of feeling invisible to those who are closest to us. To those who are as yet unaware. “One must not sit in their room and doubt the existence of themselves. For this is the point in which it will all begin. The fear of being out of line. The fear of not being good enough for somebody else. The fear of not being able to succeed. The fear of losing everything. And these fears, amongst many others will continue to rule the life you lead. But you must not let this control you or define who you are as a human. You are strong. You are worthy. And you will succeed. Do not blame yourself for the wrongs of others, for this will be carried with you throughout your life. Unnecessary weight can drain you. It can kill you. So, let go of that weight. And for heaven’s sake, talk.” Born in Devon, Josh’s work seeks the inner thoughts in which we do not share in order to avoid protest. Since graduating from Plymouth College of Art in 2017, Josh has seen successes including being a finalist of this years South West Graduate Photography Prize, and also making it to the finals of this years National Open Arts Competition. “From a young age, art has given me a sense of empowerment. Growing up in school I always felt most connected within my creative studies. Art gave me a space to think, control and create whatever I wanted, when I wanted. This sense of control allowed me to use visual language as my own voice, when I felt I could not communicate verbally.”


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Briefly describe the work you do. My work has always, whether it be photography or another art form, been a response to my own thoughts and feelings. Having a gateway to express how I feel continues to allow me to share my voice when I have felt insecure about sharing my deeper emotions. Having control within the process of making art is a very important aspect for me as it is a response to feeling like I have little to no power within day to day living. A majority of my work is created in response to my childhood and the events that took place whilst I was growing up in Devon. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? I found it quite difficult to pin point something in particular to answer this question.

I would have to say that life as a whole continues to influence me in making work. As I create work as a process of dealing with emotional trauma’s, my experiences within life influence my practice greatly. My more commercial and lifestyle photography work doesn’t behold the same amount of depth as my personal projects, but they are still documentations of the everyday, so they become responses also in a way. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Being based in the city of Plymouth, I find the art scene to be quite disconnected. When comparing to other cities like Bristol, which is known for its street art, Plymouth has the potential to behold a creative driven culture. The art scene is developing though. With smaller organizations beginning to start their annual

projects and shows like Plymouth Art Weekender, the art scene is on a rise. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? In today’s contemporary culture art can really mean anything. I believe it all depends on the person and the way in which they respond to art when they view it or create. For me, art is a space to have conversations, to learn and to develop responses to topics in focus. Art is about communication. What is the best book you’ve recently read? I recently read Roland Barthes ‘Camera Lucida’. This book gave me the chance to question my own thought and beliefs when it comes to the photograph as


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a piece of art, and not just an image of a member of the family. Focusing on the family space in particular, my work has become a process of identifying characters and their stories. Barthes process of analysing both the ‘Studium’ and ‘Punctum’ of a photographer continues to engage me as I revisit the book quite frequently. Name three artists you admire. Lucas Simoes, Lorena Guillén Vaschettiand and carl Bigmore. The artists I have chosen are all rather separate in their medium and their processes of making work. Each one has, at a point in my life, influenced me and my work in a way that has changed me and therefore changed the way in which I approach making work. What are your future plans? I am currently studying an MA in Photography at Plymouth College of Art. I don’t want to say too much about the project I am currently working on but I can say that it is portrait based and will be focusing on the theme of reconnecting. I have just begun to work with local schools in order to provide workshops and lectures for students that are interested in pursuing photography further after they finish education. Being able to give back something from my experience is very satisfying and has given me the opportunity to develop not only my professional portfolio, but also my confidence. A singular piece of my ‘Silence’ project will be on exhibit during this year’s 21st National Open Art Competition at Bargehouse Oxo Tower Wharf Southbank London from the 17 – 26 November 201, so please come and see the show if you can make it. Teaching is a possible direction for me but right now I am focusing on continuing to develop and refine my own practice by collaborating with other artists and also students in order to find out more about me as I find this process to be one that is more productive. Communicating with others and helping others with their creative processes always ignites thoughts within my own head about my practice and what I may want to explore, investigate and respond to.

joshhuxham.com


Ulrik Mikkelsen Hamburg, Germany

Although, I have always been able to draw and paint, it wasn’t until 2015, in my 27th year, that I began to exhibit my, back then, more graffiti inspired pieces in a small gallery in Copenhagen, DK. But as I wasn’t feeling “it” nor surrounded by the right people I quit and put art on standby. After taking a more than one year break from art, I began to express my emotions on paper in the end of 2016. After having made 5 pieces, I signed an exclusive contract with my agent Marisha Gulmann and exhibited for the first time at Galerie Knud Grothe on the annual “Fantastic Figurations” exhibition two weeks later. During the first half of 2017 I’ve spend most of my time developing my style and expression. I have also made several new pieces which will be shown at the art fair Kunst For Alle 2017 in Copenhagen which I have been selected for.


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Briefly describe the work you do? Although my work is generally very figurative, I mostly feature and portray beautiful women in my pieces made from ink (markers), watercolor and gold. I don’t claim to be a portrait artist of any sort, although I always use a “real” subject, because I don’t portray the subject’s emotions. Instead, I see myself as a visual storyteller, that use the subjects to express a concept or a feeling to the viewer or audience. I always seek to portray feelings or a though, that I find beautiful. And the most beautiful ones, are for me, the tragic and sad ones that also accompany us in our lives. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? If I must say one thing, that has shaped or influenced me and my art, it would be the rape I experienced in my 23nd year. Because it made me do art. After the rape, I was unable to find meaning with my life. I got into such a deep depression, which made me unable to work or study. I lost my job, couldn’t continue my master’s education and started to drink every day for a long ass time. I couldn’t function and nothing made sense anymore, because how could such a horrible thing happen to me. I was forced to sell my apartment, my dog and I basically lost everything materialistically speaking. Due to the depression, my cognitive abilities were also so severely impaired, that I also couldn’t think, shower and sometimes not even eat. I became homeless for some time and was also, on top of the other shit, committed to several mental hospitals during the worst times. But as a complete shadow of my former self - with no future, no believe in anything and the with the feeling of being completely worthless, I started to express myself on paper. Peeling everything away: job, education, friends, home, dog, confidence, value, money left me with something basic – my need to express and create. How would you describe the art scene in your area? In Hamburg, where I live, there are various possibilities to see art, no doubt. There are lots of galleries. But as I rarely go to exhibitions myself, I never know what’s going on. I’m kind of the anti-artist in that sense. My image of an artist has always been someone opinionated, who always have something to talk to other artist or intellectuals about. And I’m just not like that. I don’t like to converse about my art with other people. I wasn’t given the gift of great conversation skills, and on top of that, I’m an extreme introvert. My voice and body always tremble when I do talk to other people about my art, because I know, that I’m better in expressing what I feel and think through my hands. But anyways Hamburg is good when it comes to art. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? I will be quite frank and point out, that I never studied art. Therefore, I don’t know the exact cultural and societal meanings connected to art. I studies social science before deciding to go into art. And according to an old friend of mine, who now studies art, I don’t know, what it means for our culture. But since I also have been given the ability to observe, I do notice some similarities amongst the people who have a great interest in art. Generally, I think that art has become a very precious commodity, that can distance rich from really, filthy rich. I think art and the act of buying art is the same as buying an Iphone these days – but for people with a thicker wallet. For the people who can’t afford art but like to talk about it (the ones that often go exhibitions), use it as a cultural declaration to manifest their belonging to a highly intelligent and “finer” tribe in society.

Name three artists you admire. First, I would say Guillemoro del Toro, because I love his sad and yet beautiful universe. Toro is very special, because he deals with concepts such as the afterlife. And when I for instance watch the ending of “El Labyrinto del Faun” Toro makes me believe, that Ofelia has returned to her rightful kingdom, although her body on earth has died. It gives me hope. We all need hope, although we’re doomed from the beginning. Secondly, I would say the composer Michael Nyman, because of the way, that he is able to create a feeling of longing in his music. I often listen to the music from the “The Piano”, when I work. I want to capture this serene feeling I get from listening to his music, in my work. Thirdly, I will say Alexander McQueen. I loved the intelligence and obscure concepts of beauty throughout his creations and shows. I went to The Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC to see Savage Beauty, when the exhibition was there, and I just loved to look at his breathtaking creations. I know, I have named artist that work with different mediums than I do (and I know it’s a bit strange since the question prompts me to name artists whose work hang in museums and galleries), but for me the ones above are all artists, because they simply can do something very, very few people can do. What are your future plans? To conquer the art scene internationally.


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ulrikmikkelsenart.wordpress.com


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New Wave - Mandarin Oriental Knot, 30x24 inch, Handcrafted, Oli-stained, Wood and Paper Mosaic, Acrylic, washi on Board


Naoko Morisawa Seattle, USA / Japan

Wood is an important component in my art. The life of a tree and the energy in each grain of wood are why I use wood. When seen from a distance, my artwork looks like a painting. The details of the work and mosaic technique slowly emerge when the viewer comes closer. Look closely and see the vibrancy and movements of the wood patterns. By using wood mosaic I can show the life and energy. I can talk about life and the energetic atoms inside the shoes, wave or waterfalls with my tiny wood slices. I make art that is natural, playful and lifts people’s spirits. But I also want my artwork to be about myself, like a diary. Each piece is created with the care one would use writing a letter to a loved one or friend. Bright, fun, and unusual subjects attract and inspire me to work in new directions. Mysterious creatures/objects such as magic mushroom and jellyfish, gravity, Illusions and Waves are recurring themes in my work. My work is featured in Studio Visit magazine Vol. 19, 20, 28, 30, 34, and 35 issued 2017 February, and upcoming publication 2017 Summer Vol.37/38, and several other international publications printed in Tokyo, London, Dublin, Athens- Greece and NY. My artwork has been exhibited throughout the USA more than 20 states. In 2016 my artwork was selected for the permanent collection by City of Seattle and Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) and the work will be exhibited in public buildings owned by SPU and City of Seattle. City of Kent has also collected one of my abstract artworks, thankfully. CBS Seattle News named Naoko Morisawa Studio as one of Best 5 Seattle local Artists in 2016. I am currently developing a new body of work using other materials such as paper, cardboard and garden hose etc in addition to wood mosaic art-form. My newest works both wood mosaics and paper mosaics are currently exhibited at Frederick Holmes and Company- Modern and Contemporary Art Gallery in Pioneer Square, Seattle WA.


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Briefly describe the work you do. I have been working on contemporary style mosaic art based on wood and paper. This form is transformed from traditional Japanese art, parquet that was in fashion along with Ukiyo-e art during the Edo era, Japan. In addition, I have been working for public art projects in the Greater Seattle area, USA. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Katsuhiko Hibino, In early in 1980 in Japan, Mr. Hibino’s work was considered as sensational and cutting-edge nationwide level. Although I was not an student at Art University back then, I was admiring very much for his sensitivity. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I think that art trends in my area prefers theoretical rather than emotional and sensory. I think people in Seattle are smart and intelligent. Art Market in Seattle is not that big enough though. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? Power of imagination beyond the real world. Although this is hard to describe, I think that an ideal artist is the one who treats beauty that no one has seen, creates something never experienced, and brings them in front to our contemporary world. What is the best book you’ve recently read? “Flower bird’s dream” written by Kenichi Yamamoto. This is a great novel depicts the life of a Japanese painter, Eitoku Kano. A painter who was said to be a genius and served for Noble Class (Shogun) was always suffering. I was surprised that his overwork caused him die. Actually, I have began to read Japanese historical novels after moving to the U.S. “Madame Chic” written by Jennifer L. Scott. I want to become a more fashionable artist! (Lol) Name three artists you admire. Serge Lutens, Oscar Murillo, KatsushikaHokusai. All of their works are delicate and also bold style. What do you like/dislike about the art world? Like: To be judged solely based on the artwork itself and regardless of race, language, or age. Hate: Although it is said that artists do not need academic backgrounds, artists cannot make a living by doing art only. It requires educational background for side work such as being an art teacher etc. Time and money are inversely proportional. Professionally, what’s your goal? There is no goal for being artist. I want to ensure that my latest work is always my best work. I want to stay active as an artist for the rest of my life. I am Japanese so oriental elements have been influencing my work consciously and/or unconsciously. I don’t mind that influence though, I’d like to create a work that make others feel “Japanese newness” or “Japosinsm nuevo” by arranging motifs, colors, and techniques, rather than just incorporating old fashioned oriental form. For me, it is important to create something that is one step ahead of what everyone else thinks. And also I would love to present series of my works to as many people as possible in major world cities. Translation supported by Aki Banks, TX USA


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New Wave- Mandarin Knot kotobuki, 9x12 inch, Handcrafted, Oli-stained, Wood and Paper Mosaic, Acrylic, washi on Board


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Energy XI - Rise, 36x48 inch, Handcrafted, Oli-stained, Wood and Paper Mosaic, Acrylic, washi on Board


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naokomorisawa.com


Andrea Saltini Carpi, Italy

My name is Andrea Saltini, I was born in Carpi, a small town without music in the north of Italy. I express my art mainly through painting, even if it has been exposed to several different channels of communication, such as writing, performance art, video, etc. After studying art, becoming “Maestro d’Arte”, I have received a Master’s degree in Communication with a thesis entitled: How to Talk Dirty and Influence people.
For a few years I lived out of canned food, spending my days looking out the window, drooling in the throes of the mania of painting, waiting to, waiting to become an established painter.


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Briefly describe the work you do. Like all artists I spend most of my life earning my living. I never leave my job. I am full of chaos and all my life I’m been working to put order, my order, in this endless mercimonium of emotions and notions, poetic orgasms, Rubens, Rembrandt, William Shakespeare, skeletal trees bending to the ground, sunglasses, dwarfs with thick red hair and spinning stars spinning endlessly and beyond. Painting helps me a lot and at the same time worsens my situation. Light and darkness together. How would you describe the art scene in your area? Sad. The artistic scene in my surroundings is sad and with no music. There are good artists with whom I compare and I am friend , too. I see genial things around me, which are not fully understood, contemporary art across Italy is always surrounded by something obscure. It is for very few elected people. The market is a jungle. There are times of the year where a myriad of contemporary art exhibitions are organized, at the same time, stuff to lose your head, and then, for the rest of the year, nobody promotes, or speaks more of the artists he has seen. So every time it’s a beginning from the starting point. It is for this reason that most Italian contemporary artists seek to relate themselves on an international level . In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? For an artist there is no limit, because art is the attempt to renew that limit. Anyway, I still think that you can do everything, but as long as a community, even a small one, does not recognize your gesture, does not recognize you as the one to whom it has given the honor and the burden of redefining its knowledge , you will be a failed artist. An artist who doesn’t do art, a tired poet, a writer who does not write. All the artists consciously or unconsciously experience an insane attraction towards confrontation. It is something stronger than them. How can I say it ? The poet who does not write to have his poems read: he is not a poet! I’m an artist because I love exposing my chest to the stabbing of judgment. My chest is punctured all over, I never get enough. The function of an artist today, like a thousand years ago, is to compensate and redefine necessity. A successful work is a needed one. An unnecessary work of art, which does not move anything and does not redefine an emotion, a meaning, can not be defined so. The meaning must be perceived. I perceive that work as a spectator, if it is not so, for me the work is rightly meaningless. Even ugly. The art that works is the one that puts you in a different position from reality. An unsuccessful artwork is a half-thought, the telephonic equivalent of nodding. Name three artists you admire. Francesco Clemente, Julian Schnabel and Peter Paul Rubens. What are your future plans? As for my future plans, I hope I can paint a series of works I have had in mind for a while, I hope to do a good job, above all. At this present time, It is almost ending a beautiful exhibition I’m doing at the Novam Art Gallery in Aarhus, Denmark. By the end of the year I will inaugurate a large personal exhibition titled “The Rasor Edge” at the MAC Museum in Milan, Maimeri Foundation, curated by Alessandra Redaelli, and with the new year I have a couple of appointments in the USA.


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www.andreasaltini.com


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Maria Santi Buenos Aires, Argentina

Today, my artistic work refers to the natural world. In it I question the materiality with which I work, the power of images, the use of the senses. I work creating a structure that interweaves the strength of the material with the visible, my personal experiences and the experiences of those whom my work challenges. In this process I show an underlying premise: the matter is alive, that is why I consider it an active component of the pictorial practice, which is especially noticeable in its manifest expansion during contemporaneity. I am interested in the fusion between different representations of nature; also in exploring an instictive “sixth sense”, which I think is a quality of the natural world, which makes purity and beauty its primordial elements and which I feel closely linked with the intuitive process present in my painting.

Maria Santi lives and works in La Plata. Since 1995, she has a degree in Fine Arts, Faculty of Fine Arts. National University of La Plata, Buenos Aires. In 2014 she Graduate in Specialization Course in Media and Technologies for Pictorial Production in Visual UNA. Also she attends a “Análisis de Proyectos” course, by Alicia Romero and Marcelo Giménez. 2017: In April/May 2017 she attended a Residency Program in Berlin. GlogauAIR. In 2016, she attended a Residency Program in Arteles Centre for Creation in Finland. In 2015 she attended an artist residency program in Leipzig, Germany. In the years 2015/2014 she attended clinic work by Tulio de Sagastizábal. Some individual and group exhibitions : 2015: Winning Project “Natural Force” of the call Curatorial Projects Fondo Nacional de las Artes, Buenos Aires. “Hot Hause” Leipzig, Germany. “The common place can be extraordinary.” Installation drawing. Praxis Gallery. NY. “The eternal and the ephemeral”. Praxis Gallery, Buenos Aires. “Nomadism and Periphery. Between wandering and precarious” Space Project La Paternal, Buenos Aires. “Gonnetlandscape”, La Plata, Buenos Aires. Argentina. She also participes in several contests: 2014 National Hall. Drawing. Palais de Glace. “Summa Madrid” Gallery Casa Cuadrada, Bogota, Colombia. 2013: ArteBA, Praxis Gallery, Buenos Aires.2012: Art BA, Praxis Gallery, Buenos Sires. “National Hall. Painting” Palais de Glace, Buenos Aires. 2011: “La Zona“. School Project. Arte x Arte Gallery, Buenos Aires.


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Briefly describe the work you do. My work begins with painting and then takes different forms. Today, I question the materiality with which I work, the power of images, the use of the senses. I work creating a structure that interweaves the strength of the material with the visible, my personal experiences and the experiences of those whom my work challenges. In this process I show an underlying premise: the matter is alive, that is why I consider it an active component of the pictorial practice, which is especially noticeable in its manifest expansion during contemporaneity. I am interested in the fusion between different representations of nature; also in exploring an instictive “sixth sense�, which

I think is a quality of the natural world, which makes purity and beauty its primordial elements and which I feel closely linked with the intuitive process present in my painting. In my last series of works I question painting as a concern in itself and its anatomy, exploring and developing my own language with a vocabulary that I hope to keep the voice of my painting going. Painting is thought The context also plays an essential role in my works. There, I can question the limits of representation, painting, the creation of the artistic process, as well as the borders between the physical, the imaginary and the represented space; on the fragile line that separates reality, fiction, presence and absence, materiality and evocation.


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Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? There are lots of different influences in my work. It could be a place, a trip, a poem, an artist. Literature and philosophy as well are builders of my ideas and in consequence are influencers in my artwork. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? Contmeporary Art takes up issues such as labor, the city, the enviroment, the language, and is a big challenge for us to be aware and show contemporary and real world issues. And I am sure that contemporary art is helping to make mankind aware of this circunstances. Personally, I expect that my artwork has the capacity to make people think, question and interpolate and to manifest by means of perception and intensification of consciousness. Name three artists you admire. I admire a lot artist. I can t name only three artist, I have a long list that are my favourites. But nowadays I can name: Helio Oiticica and his Parangole, Katharina Grosse and her painting exploring the space and also Julian Rosenfeld who is my chosen one in video art. How would you describe the art scene in your area? I live near Buenos Aires and I think it is a great city to develope ideas, to explore , to grow, with fantastic artist and a good scene. The problem is that there are no many collectors and foundations that invest in art. What are your future plans? Next March I have a solo show in Praxis Gallery in Buenos Aires which is a gallery I have been in its staff since 2009, and I am working on that. Also I expect to attend a residency program in USA os Spain. I am waiting for the final list of artist they select. And my plan is always to paint and to explore my own practice, hoping it could last forever.

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www.mariasanti.com


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Gemma Schiebe Brecon,Wales, UK

Gemma Schiebe is a Fine Artist based in South Wales. She is primarily a painter and works in predominantly oil paint as well as creating drawings and using collage as a method of art making. Gemma uses the environment as an inspiration for her practice and is interested in Landscape and Nature. Her current practice explores the world around us, landscape broadly and more specific themes and approaches such as contrasting the natural landscape with imagery associated with environmental harm. Nostalgia for traditional paintings of the sublime landscape is challenged and the landscape format adapted. In July 2016, Gemma achieved a First Class Fine Art Degree from Cardiff School of Art and Design, Cardiff Metropolitan University.


My current practice aims to challenge and confront our nostalgia for traditional landscape paintings which portray unrealistic, aesthetic and romantic views of the land and to highlight the causes and effects of the harm our earth experiences as a result of human neglect. It is easy to overlook and ignore the damage that is being done to our environment and to cling on to the image of an unpolluted landscape. My work explores an attraction to the beauty of nature and relies on it to expose the reality of the harm it is subjected to. Contrasting fragments of our natural landscape and imagery associated with environmental harm are brought together in a dialectical way so that they have a conversation. The imagery present together emphasises the fact that these images exist in the same environment and underlines the reality that the elements of unspoiled natural landscape may one day be lost and only a distant memory if the causes of its depletion are not acknowledged. Throughout my current practice, my ideas are explored mainly through painting, drawing and collage. Collage is employed to create works in their own right and also to create amalgamations of imagery to be translated into painting. My work breaks the conventions of a typical landscape format and painting from collage incorporates many different perspectives but builds up a believable image where natural landscape beauty is not separate from environmental issues. Some influences on my work include John Akomfrah, Dexter Dalwood and Keith Arnatt. Contrasting imagery of nature with snapshots of environmental toll highlights the realism of the landscape we are very much part of today.


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Briefly describe the work you do. My current practice aims to challenge and confront our nostalgia for traditional landscape paintings which portray aesthetic and romantic views of the land and to highlight the causes and effects of the harm our earth experiences as a result of human neglect. It is easy to overlook and ignore the damage that is being done to our environment and to cling on to the image of an unpolluted landscape. My work explores an attraction to the beauty of nature and relies on it to expose the reality of the harm it is subjected to. Collage is employed to create works in their own right and also to create amalgamations of imagery to be translated into painting. Contrasting fragments of our natural landscape and imagery associated with environmental harm are brought together in a dialectical way so that they have a conversation. My work breaks the conventions of a typical landscape format and painting from collage incorporates many different perspectives but builds up a believable image. The imagery present together emphasises the fact that these images exist in the same environment and underlines the reality that the elements of unspoiled natural landscape may one day be lost and only a distant memory if the causes of its depletion are not acknowledged. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice?

exhibitions and events myself, I practice as an artist and rent a studio space with six other artists and use my artistic skills on a variety of different projects and I also do a bit of art related volunteering every now and then, for me the art scene and my life as an artist here is fairly vibrant. I would say like many places my area is cultural on a small town level but that hasn’t stopped me getting involved in art opportunities further afield, such as exhibiting in London and being featured in global magazines, through an online presence and applying for opportunities. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? I think art in contemporary culture means expression, commentary and giving an audience a different view of the world, your view of the world. To say something, to leave a lasting imprint on a surface rather than through words alone. I think it can be used as a gateway to express things that need to be addressed or changed in today’s society but I also think it can be used as a platform for creating positivity and providing a moment that allows people to escape from everyday life and to relieve the worries and horrors of the world that we live in today. Name three artists you admire.

The Landscape itself will always have a lasting influence on my art practice. The different views, terrains and components. The natural beauty, the results of human impact, the change of the landscape, the evolution and erosion of the environment and also a need for an appreciation of nature. The complexity of Landscape inspires and influences me, the variety of issues and commentary that surround it compel me to create. In the past I have been influenced by the beauty of the land, the sense of freedom it presents and the need to be surrounded by a landscape of natural beauty, but I have in contrast, also been influenced by scenes of pollution and cityscapes and the feelings of entrapment and loneliness that can be associated with them.

Firstly, I admire John Akomfrah, particularly his piece “Vertigo Sea”. Even though he works with film footage and video art, his vision of bringing imagery together to comment on situations and to let one image say something about another has always inspired me and related to my want to collage and bring fragments together.

How would you describe the art scene in your area?

Being a young artist, It is hard to predict how my art will develop and how the relationship I have with it will change. As I have mentioned, I am always taking inspiration from landscape so I imagine my work will evolve with it. I want to grow more confident, become more motivated and work towards larger goals such as exhibiting in larger more recognised exhibitions and getting my work included in private and museum collections. I would also like to further my artistic career and curate more exhibitions incorporating both my work and the artworks of others.

I live in a small town in South Wales, and considering it’s size, I feel that the art scene in my area is quite lively. There are lots of creative and artistic people in my area, from all different disciplines and backgrounds. There is definitely opportunity to exhibit artwork and to hold and be part of artistic events. On a personal level, I manage to live a very arty life in my area, I work in an Art Gallery, I have held

I also admire and am influenced by David Tress, particularly his use of materials and rough papers in relation to erosion. I have also always admired Anselm Kiefer, his show in the Royal Academy has been the most captivating I have seen so far. What are your future plans?


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S. von Puttkammer

New York, NY, USA

I have a love/hate relationship with Gustave Courbet, the 19th century French Romantic Realist. While I love the bluntness ofhis work, his stubborn commitment to the common folk of 1850s France, you can choke on the arrogance radiating off of his paintings. The more you explore his biography, the more repulsive his narcissism becomes. This was the first artist to demand his own solo show when the Paris Academy couldn’t fit his enormous paintings into their exhibition. God, the audacity! Why can’t I be more like that? Maybe I can be. Maybe instead of waiting to get my foot in the door of the art world, I kick the door down. By painting my cartoon avatar, Anchovy, in the likeness of Courbet’s self portraits, I expose his ego in the same bluntness characteristic of his work and make my own place in the annals of art history. I poke fun at this monumental artistic genius, in all his seriousness, and deconstruct the barriers that place him at the top of the art pyramid and me, an Asian female cartoonist, at the bottom. Look at how big my head can get. S. von Puttkammer was born in Englewood, New Jersey, in 1995. In addition to painting, she writes, makes performance art, and publishes cartoons on her Instagram @anchovyicecream. She is currently studying Fine Art at the School of Visual Arts.


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Briefly describe the work you do. My work deals with obsession and the absurd. These days I mostly paint and perform, with each piece having a conceptual edge to them. In my current project (I need to work in series, all my pieces must have a family), I am satirizing self portraits by the 1800s French Romantic Realist painter, Gustave Courbet. I had reached a block in my creative practice a few months ago and decided to revisit my interests from my freshman year of art school. My focus settled on comics -I was initially a cartooning major- and Courbet. I had developed a schoolgirl crush on Courbet and the depths of this infatuation fascinated me, especially now that I’m personally repulsed by the grandiose arrogance he displayed as an artist. I set about inserting my cartoon avatar, Anchovy, into his paintings, spoofing his ego and asserting mine. I researched the exact dimensions of his paintings and attempt to recreate his technique. Over time the paintings took on a life of their own. My subject Anchovy no longer feels like an extension of me but rather a child I am making with Courbet. I refer to Anchovy as my son now and I often find myself talking to my paintings. I paint each piece methodically and lovingly, yet the work still embodies my original concept of satire. In addition to my Courbet paintings, I’m currently working on a series of performances where I act as Anchovy. I have a large mask that helps me transform into the role. In each piece I have Anchovy explore social anxiety and frustration. For one performance, Anchovy painted a life-size door onto a blank wall and attempted to break the door down. In another, Anchovy sat in the lobby of a building and waved to everyone that passed them. If a person waved back at Anchovy, the character would reach out and try to hold the person’s hand.

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? If I had to whittle my options to the bone I would say Mark Rothko’s paintings, Roland Barthes’ A Lover’s Discourse, the string of bad romances I’ve accumulated, and the relationships I form with other artists I work alongside with. Friendship among artists are especially important. I can not work in an isolated environment and the amount of inspiration and motivation I gain from talking to my peers helps tremendously in my practice. How would you describe the art scene in your area? New York City is considered one of the pinnacles of the art world and I am extremely grateful to have the opportunity to live here. I am surrounded by galleries and studios, so I am in no shortage of inspiration. Of course, the city’s energy can get a little overwhelming at times, but usually doing something away from the art world for a weekend serves as a good decompressor. Despite the large amount of artists living here however, it’s pretty easy to become too isolated. It is important to maintain close relations. In your opinion what does art mean in contemporary culture? For me, art has always been an expression of creativity. Especially now when it is so easy to slide into passivity with streaming services, social media, and stagnating politics, it is important to maintain a creative thread. I just so happen to enjoy conceptual performance and painting but art could be anything from writing to bookbinding to cosplaying. Too often people need to differentiate between craft and art but I believe they are one in the same. We do not need a deep psychological reason to create, self expression is enough of a justification. Name three artists you admire. Judith Bernstein, Robin F. Williams, Mark Rothko What are your future plans?’ Recently, I have become fascinated with the sublime. Moreover the idea of capturing a quiet sublime. In art history, the sublime has been talked to death as this monstrous natural force of gigantic proportions but I want to focus on the small moments that overwhelm us with emotion: a dark hallway in your childhood home, a gesture between two people, the view from a window on a cold, bleak morning. The little things that make us pause and shift the perspectives of our lives. As for bigger plans I want to start an artist co-op. I will be graduating from art school in May and want to set up the foundation for myself and others to sustain a life-long art practice. My friends and I are looking for affordable places large enough to accommodate five to six people.


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Manny Rocca

Seville, Spain

Manny Rocca (Manuel Rocca Vargas b. 1957) was nourished between United States and Spain, where he presently lives and works. As a photographer who has worked for The Washington Post and The Washington Times, among others newspapers and magazines, Rocca has an experience of over more than two decade as photojournalist covering; the White House, the State Department, The Senate and House of Representatives, also the glitz and glamour of well-heeled society in Washington D.C. Presently Manny work as an editorial and fine art photographer, creating collections for public and private clients and working assignments on his own. I like to see in a photograph more than just a plain image; to me photography is at the same time an instant in time and a document of information, of course it can be used much other way and depends basically on the final purpose. I should say that a great photography It´s the result of a well balanced composition, together with craftsmanship and fine art quality can be a piece of art. Any good photography is the successful synthesis of techniques and art. I make photography to convey feeling to people, to create a more perceptive atmosphere of the things around our world. But over all to show the world things from another view. As a photojournalist, I was always looking to capture the document behind the picture, but as a fine art photographer am more in to search for the aesthetic part, working with volumes of colours and high lights to find a sensation, adding mode and feeling into the photograph.


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Briefly describe the work you do. We could described the way I work as documentary photography, with a cross of fine art, when I seek and capture an image I can have more than one purpose in mind. My photos may serve as a tool and be instrumental in building a lasting historical record- a cache of knowledge, a ‘memory-bank’ for future generations to aid their research into what once existed. But also just serve as a memoir of things. On the other hand, I like to capture the aesthetic simplicity of an image. I believe that beauty lays in the simplicity of things and that´s the key to my photography; it is the ability to capture that detail with the simplest shot. I try to avoid complicated compositions where are too many elements that may break-up the scene. When capturing photographs I’m always looking for symmetrical harmony - which will bring the viewer to the point of interest that originally caught my attention. Perhaps the hardest thing to do is to create a fine art photograph that is at the same time a document; with unique aesthetic and as correctly possible, can strike an emotional chord in a viewer’s memory. If I can draw the viewer’s attention to the photograph, and make them start asking questions about what it´s, or ‘What/ where is this picture of?’ and ‘What is it trying to say?’ etc., then I will have succeeded. In my opinion every photograph needs to be related to a story (cannot forget I did my grounding as a photo journalist); telling visual lies has not been my reference as a photographer. Even went I do like to make pictography, (the way I have called my fantasy pictures) My personal style sometimes makes it more difficult to portray the truth, but as a fine art photographer author my main concern is ultimately the aesthetics part of the image. My pictures speak mainly of; people and their environs, culture and things that on that day I could see, meet and photograph. Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? My work has been influence by my coworkers at the Washington Post, mainly with a photojournalist style; I did received knowledge from people like Bill Snead, Douglas Chevalier, Frank Johnston, Harry Naltchayan or Craig Herndon, Dayna Smith, but also from many other good friends at The Washington Times. Now my inspiration for fine art photography comes from looking at the painters of the impressionist, like Degas, Renoir, Caillebotte, Monet. As a child I used to paint all over the wall at home, later I started drawing and painting on panels. Soon after, I started paying flamenco guitar at the age of 11. And recorded my first LP record when I was 17 years old, with the RCA Record Company in Spain. Never did study art at school, only took some drawing classes at Elementary School and read some books of art. But I always feel attracted to all art forms.

I think that contemporaneous photography is a form of communication from the subjective viewpoint of the photographer, it may or may not be a correct reading from the informative point of view but it can also be a way to know others. In my opinion photography is something more than a concept, it has to be a way of looking at the reality of the world around us, but we cannot tell lies without telling the truth of what we do. The big problem that exists in the world of contemporary photography is that everyone wants to break the rules, with concepts, some without logic and others without any quality. In your opinion what does photography mean in contemporary culture? I think that contemporaneous photography is a form of communication from the subjective viewpoint of the photographer, it may or may not be a correct reading from the informative point of view but it can also be a way to know others. In my opinion photography is something more than a concept, it has to be a way of looking at the reality of the world around us, but we cannot tell lies without telling the truth of what we do. The big problem that exists in the world of contemporary photography is that everyone wants to break the rules, with concepts, some without logic and others without any quality. Name three artists you admire. Personally I do not lean towards the misnamed contemporary photography, since contemporary is now, and photography is as usual and fulfils its social function since 1839. Among the photographers that I admire are the classic ones like Henry Cartier Bresson or Richard Avedon, but also others like Annie Leibowitz or Edward Burtynsky, to mention a few, although there are many more that are in my mind. What are your future plans? To me the future is now, thinking long term is almost a luxury in a world so changing where today something exists and tomorrow is no longer here. But it is true that there is always a purpose of wanting to carry out projects that are admired by present or future generations. On the other hand I think that inspiration and creativity are elements that arise freely, sometimes without searching. In order to respond coherently to what my future plans are, perhaps I must have to say that for the moment am still alive and letting people know more about all that work that has been done during more than 37 years dedicated to photography. Perhaps am going to promote more the pictography work, but this type of work is more in to the fantasy world and I would like to be remember as a fine art photographer that describe reality from a personal point of view, as a social observer.


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Art Reveal Magazine no. 35  

Danielle van Ameijde, Bambi, Frederick Bamfo, Sepideh Behrouzian, Ana Maria Butnaru, Katya Fialkova, Josh Huxham, Ulrik Mikkelsen, Naoko Mor...

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