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GIOVANNI ARMENIO 4

ROBERT BALIELLO 10

FRÉDÉRIC DROUIN AKA SMITH SMITH 16

ANDREA EICHENBERGER 22

GABRIEL FERACCI 28


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CATHERINE OLIVIER 34

ANNE CECILE SURGA 40

BENEDICTE THORAVAL 46

JENNY VOGEL 52

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GIOVANNI ARMENIO Italy

2011

chosen as one of the 100 artists in the world selected to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Taiwan. His artwork "Wind from Taiwan" was projected onto exterior walls of Chiang Kai-shek Memorial hall' main building in the capital of Taiwan, Taipei

2014

Exhibition in New York: "Art to Heart: In Support of the Children's Heart Foundation" February 7 - February 27, 2014. "Figuratively Speaking" February 7 - February 27, 2014. At the Agora Gallery - 530 West 25th Street New York, NY 10001

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Exhibition "La 7éme ART" for the Festival de Cannes at Monteoliveto Gallery in Nice, France

2014

6th International Art Competition of GemlucArt Exhibition in Monaco from October the 16th to October 26th, 2014. Auditorium Rainier III, Boulevard Louis II. 98000 Monaco (Principauté de Monaco)

2015

Published in the art book "Vanguard Visionaries - the art of creativity: a directory of fine art artists, designers & creatives from around the globe" (printed and published in New York, USA - 2015)

A TENDER SPOT MALAK-MAKE THE WINDS YOUR MESSENGERS


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A KING REBORN IN GEMINI'S SKY Giovanni Armenio born in southern Italy in 1987, the artist Giovanni Armenio currently lives and works in Italy. The artist studied Fine Arts with a focus in scenography, and he was heavily influenced by a lot of travels throughout the creativity-rich territories of Lecce, Venice and Rome. In 2012, he created the AZURITE COLLECTION a series of graphic works that combined the art of drawing and painting to digital art. Giovanni Armenio was one of 100 artists chosen to exhibit in Taiwan as Part of Its 100th anniversary, is currently represented by Agora Gallery in New York; he has exhibited in Nice, France at Monteoliveto Gallery on the occasion of the 67th Cannes Film Festival; On October 2014 he was among the artists of the 6th International Art Competition of GemlucArt in Monaco chaired by Her Royal Highness Caroline Princess of Hanover; He has been published in the artbook "Vanguard Visionaries - the art of creativity" a directory of fine art artists, designers & creatives from around the globe published by ArtPlatform NYC (USA) and presented in MIAMI. Soon his works will be exhibited at Art- EXPO2015 in Milan in Italy and at Art-expo in New York.


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RETURN TO LIGHT

There’s a lot of photography works these days, what do you feel makes your work unique and truly your own? My photographic works are works of mixed media in digital support, I use different traditional techniques such

as painting, drawing and photography and I combine them with the most modern techniques of computer graphics. This way I get a work that keeps both the stretch of the hand and the calculation of the mind reported with the computer.

But I think the most interesting aspect of my art is knowing how to use my eyes, or rather the ability to see a world beyond, a world that does not exist, this can be printed but is not material, it belongs to a virtual reality created by the imagination and by a personal way of seeing the world.


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Art Reveal Magazine Citing the title of my work "LINK life is art ocular", is the way to see through the eyes of the artist who makes my work unique and personal because it belongs to my subconscious, in the places where only I can access it. It is as if my work is a bridge between the reality that surrounds me and my mind, a concept that I wanted to express with the work "Stay Away- in my mind." In my series of photographs and graphics (titled Azurite Collection) I represented my youth with all my passions, my experiences and moods, proposing not only the art created by me, but the art of my life.

What was the artist/artists that most affected your approach to art? During my artistic training, and even today, there have been a lot of artists who have influenced my art, my style and my artistic personality. I've always loved the history of Italian painters of the Renaissance and they have always been an inspiration to me, especially Michelangelo, Raphael and Leonardo Da Vinci. From these artists I try to capture the elegance and solemnity of their works but mostly I try to recreate their Italian style because I love my country and its great culture, from art to Opera, to fashion and it is my wish to insert " a little bit of Italy" in all the my creations. When I was at high school I started painting realizing reproductions of the works of the French impressionists. This style has been always one that most represents me as a painter but the most important thing that I learned by painting the artworks of Monet and Renoir has been the use of colour and lights. This is a fundamental characteristic of all my work, and thanks to the French

Impressionists I learned to use color to give more personality to my works and to use lighting effects to highlight my sensitivity to perceive things that I represent. Another artistic influence came from Disney Studios. When I was younger I was very interested to animation, it was my dream to work at Disney Studios, so I followed passionately some great Disney artists like Andreas Deja (the animator of the character of Hercules and many others). From this, in addition to improve myself in the drawing, I have learned especially the importance of telling stories through art, a concept that I like very much and I try to add in all my works, each of them has in fact a protagonist, a scenery and a story to tell and to imagine, as if there was a screenplay on each of them. And finally, among the artists that most affect my art and especially the theme (and often also the title) are the musicians as New Order, the Cure and L'Arc en Ciel. The music has inspired all my works and I am sure, will continue to do so in future.

particular by analyzing the fresco of the Delphic Sibyl. So I realized in 2012 "Return to Light" in which I show a modern and contemporary version of the sacred figure of the Sibyl. The pose and the drapery is similar to the figure painted by Michelangelo but I wanted to give in my work a more mysterious and enigmatic look with bold colours and enhancing the light effects. In fact I think that the real protagonist of my work "Return to Light" is not the female figure but the glow of light on it, this represents the divine of our earthly existence, it is a halo that illuminates our lives and also when we fall into darkness, it makes us return to the light. My works always show experiences and aspects of my life and with "Return to Light" as well as "Awake" and "Everlasting" I explore the most intimate and personal aspects as faith, often represented as a glow of light, a symbol of hope.

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received?

I believe that the most difficult aspect of being a mixed-media artist is to be devalued or often considered as a minor genre of art. Instead I think that being a mixedmedia artist wants to mean knowing how to handle multiple techniques and know how to combine together, have a wider view of the work that allows you to focus more on the search of the meaning. Personally, I have created a collection that combines different techniques on digital support, this technique has allowed me to explore the more modern aspect of my creativity succeeding in creating something new and in harmony with my era.

Express yourself. This way you can propose you with sincerity and be conscious of doing what you love. Also you can transform part of yourself in art and capture fragments of your life and leave them forever as a portrait of your soul.

Where did you get the idea for the “Return to light” artwork? I found inspiration thinking about the figures of prophets and sibyls of the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo, in

What is the most challenging part about being a mixed media artist?


Art Reveal Magazine

PERSEUS (LOOP DOLLARS V.)

WWW.GIOVANNIARMENIO-AZURITE.COM

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ROBERT BALIELLO Port Coquitlam, BC, Canada

1980-1986

President “Diagraf Inc” Multi Media company 1980 – 1986 Mtl. PQ.

2012

Group Exhibition: Place Des Arts Coquitlam BC

2016

Group Exhibition: Place Des Arts Coquitlam BC

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UNTITLED 5 Robert Baliello My form of hybrid photography is based on using custom made motion control hardware and software combined with traditional forms of analogue optical effects. Combining photographic imagery with the technical aspects of motion control allows me to experiment with a variety of abstract imagery. I also rely on prototyping to further develop and assist my photographic style, creating or modifying hardware components which will in turn, add more creative photographic options. I am constantly balancing the technical aspects of my work to meet the visual artistic challenges required to transform my work into this abstract category. Whether I need to change the programming options, camera settings or create new art works, I always have avenues available to quickly change artistic directions where needed.

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There’s a lot of photography works these days, what do you feel makes your work unique and truly your own? What makes my photography unique, is that I make and use my own custom made tools. My lens based work combines graphic art with optical effects and analogue large format photography. I also use traditional motion control to further enhance my visual designs. This hybrid camera system combines analogue and digital photography on a prototype rostrum camera. This system allows me to experiment and develop new image concepts. Combining traditional motion control with early forms of optical effects, I create my imagery and add plotted movements which can then be altered or modified where required. All of my photographic work can be rendered in either large format analogue film or digital formats. What was the artist/artists that most affected your approach to art? Norman McLaren’s work at the National Film Board of Canada , Douglas Trumbull, John Dykstra, Terry Gilliam. They were all involved in the development of the various stages of special cinematic effects.

How has your style changed over the years? My style of photography has changed over the years and continues to change. As I add more and more hardware options and progress from analogue to digital camera systems, with more and more features coming with each new professional DSLR camera, I find new ways to adapt these improvements into my hybrid photographic imagery. I have slowly been adding more background imagery to my effects. I am also starting to work with large (35 cm x 50 cm) back lights (Duratrans). These backlight films are mounted on custom made LED wooden boxes which could then be animated as part of a 3D assembled structure ( circular frames spin inside squares and triangles).

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? In my field of photographic work, I have not received any tip…yet.

What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts? It’s a large, ever changing artistic landscape, where everything is in constant flux, and therefore very hard to predict. You have to have some talent, and believe in your work with perseverance and conviction.


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WWW.ROBERTBALIELLO.COM

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Frédéric Drouin aka SMITH SMITH Nantes, France

2015

Collagistas Festival, Greece

2014

Expo Médiathèque, France

A TENDER SPOT LIGHT MY FIRE


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AVEC VOTRE MAMAN The first bits of paper that I have collected and glued together were pictures of my idols, Kurt Cobain, Jim Morrison, Jimi Hendrix. I was 14 and I absolutely did not want to lose those pictures of them so I started to assemble them religiously ... 20 years later I continue! It became a means of expression in itself, a playground for my life. I love the beauty of the absurd, humor, surrealism and provocation. I love working in the construction as well as the deconstruction of an image... When I approach the creation of a collage I have no specific technique, sometimes I know what I want, sometimes I listen to what the images tell, sometimes I cut hundreds of bits of paper and other times of the sets. But at the end of the story, I wish one thing, I want the both form and content... Collage = Freedom of Thought


Art Reveal Magazine Briefly describe the work you do. I make paper collages using cuttings from magazines, which I glue together with other elements that I find or create myself. I develop collections that are variations on a theme; in each I try to express a new idea, a different part of my worldview. My style could be called Idealist/Utopian/Underground/Provoc.

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out rapid production—people like Bukowski with his poems, Daniel Johnston with his songs, Picasso worked quickly too.... Finally, I often look to the work of Erin Case, I'm a fan of her collages.

What advice can you give to those who are just starting out in the arts?

Do you think of yourself as a conceptual artist? No, I don't think I consider myself a conceptual artist. I never really liked straightforward Concept—it brings too much intellectualization to the act of creation. When I start to stick, with an idea newborn in my mind, I try to work fast so I don’t lose my thread. When I love a collage, I immediately want to make him some little brothers and little sisters, and these I gather into collections.

Sincerely, this is a very difficult question. I don't like to give advice because my truths are only good for me. But if I have to say only one thing it would be to be positive and face creation cheerfully, and be consistent with it. We all go through difficult times. Creation (in my case music, photography, collage,) helps me to extract myself from a sometimes too-violent reality…allows me to get to know who I am and free myself of codes that are not my own. Being positive and being you is important!

I would say that I am an instinctive artist. Whenever I have been too thoughtful making a collage I have found that the result tends toward the average. Nevertheless, I understand that from the point of view of the public, this is a fair question. Concepts provide the thematic frameworks in which I move, but nothing more. What is the best part about working with collage? It really depends on the type of collage. When I make portraits using a technique of cutting little pieces of paper to create a set mosaic, the best time is the beginning of the assembly; for the imagination is boiling as I move and stick and slowly discover the evolving collage! It's a very long process, and pretty exciting. When I build a collage with pictures, it's the moment when the elements unite and it becomes appreciable—in one second, a story is created. There’s a connection sensation: I know that these two pieces of paper were made to meet!.

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? What influences me most in this art are the images themselves, wherever they may come from. They talk to me. I have the kind of imagination that escapes quickly, and when I see a thing, whatever it is, I tend to think of it transmuted to another function. The result can be very funny or disturbing or totally illogical. Then, also, I’m continually influenced by artists of all stripes, I can be inspired by musicians as much as by painters or other collage artists. I work intensively and I work fast, so I was always impressed by people who turned

AVEC VOTRE COPINE


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Art Reveal Magazine What are you working on right now? Right now I am finishing my first large-format: an 80cm x 80cm portrait I made using the mosaic technique. It took me a lot of time, but it was good to confront myself with an ambitious project. To experience large achievements is important, I think. For me, anyway. I also work on collaborative projects (I have three in the works and one waiting!). It's very exciting to work with someone on the design of a collage—two different worlds meet, and they have to play together with subtlety. Also I get the great opportunity to work with artists for whom I have enormous respect—it is an honor! The first

LOVE IS IN YOUR MOUTH

collaboration was recently posted and shared on social networks. It's a work that I realized with Eugenia Loli. She's an artist I love so much…she knows how to play with colors and put things in relief! My ongoing collaboration is with Erin Case, whom I mentioned earlier. Erin’s collages ooze charm and sensuality—she has a fabulous inner universe! Next, I’ve started to produce some collages for Walter Paganuzzi, and he for me! We will exhibit together at the Collagistas Festival to be held in Greece this coming May. And I have many ideas in store for future collages ... To be continued!


Art Reveal Magazine

TIMIDITÉ

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ANDREA EICHENBERGER Brazil A TENDER SPOT

(IN) SECURITY


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(IN) SECURITY

Andrea Eichenberger was born in 1976 in Florianópolis, Brazil. After studying Visual Arts in Brazil, she did a PhD in Visual Anthropology, between Brazil and France, where she also studied Photography. In 2013, she received the price Funarte Women in Visual Arts of Brazilian Ministry of Culture, in 2012, she was winner of the Prix UPP Découverte, in Paris, and in 2006, she was winner of the best photographic narrative of Festival Fazendo Gênero 7, Brazil. Her work has been exhibited in Brazil (Museu de Arte de Santa Catarina, Museu Etnográfico Casa dos Açores, Museu Théo Brandão, Centro Cultural BRDE, Museu da Escola Catarinense, Museu de Arte de Blumenau), New Zealand (Auckland Festival of Photography, Live Brazil Festival), in France (Maison des Photographes / UPP, Galerie de l’Olivier, Festival Photaumnales, Maison du Brésil – Cité Internationale Universitaire de Paris, Ancien Musée de Peinture de Grenoble) and in United States (Gallery FAB, University of Missouri).


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(IN) SECURITY

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(IN) SECURITY

(in)Security is a project carried out in Florianópolis, my hometown, in southern Brazil. After the transformation in the urban environment (walls, barriers, fences, etc.) connected to people’s feelings of insecurity and lack of safety in the city, I tried to find out what people thought about these transformations in urban life. It is a work that combines photographs (portraits, images that document the city and capture moods) and videos in which the inhabitants talk about the presence of security apparatus in their lives and express their feelings. This project was developed in partnership with the Brazilian anthropologist Marta Magda Antunes Machado.


Art Reveal Magazine

(IN) SECURITY

WWW. ANDREAEICHENBERGER.COM

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GABRIEL FERACCI Nancy, France

2015

"Souffles": Performing art, Vannes-le-châtel (54), France

2014

"Black Out": Gallery of Globe, Toulon (83), France

2014

"Les visiteurs du soir" 7ème Edition: Espace Gilletta, Nice (06), France

2013

"L'attention est requise": Gallery G, La garde (83), France

2013

"Screen: Between europe and asia": VIII eme International Biennial of Contemporary Art of Samara, Russia

A TENDER SPOT


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L'ATTENTION EST REQUISE Gabriel Feracci is particularly interested in what we can call the critical threshold, a kind of special state, a precise moment, somewhere between tension and balance. This artistic practice allows some situations on the edge to be upgraded and shown off. The artist aims to reach the threshold and breach’s tender spots, by using unexpected material usually not made for this kind of handling. The main purpose of this artistic work is to draw audience into some deep straight feeling. Only the danger’s impendence is able to reach this thrill. On that behalf, this artwork is obviously playing on the edge tirelessly looking for its own limits. Whatever the emotion has its origins in technical, physical or mental effects, this limit is the one dimensional array of it. It’s also dreadfully risky. However, the potential and permanent danger must only be felt and not met.


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L'ATTENTION EST REQUISE

When, how and why starting? Do you create? I was always passionate about drawing, but I have never been interested in school. It was later on, at the age of 23 and after several different jobs that I decided to start my studies in art again. I started with two years of graphic design which gave me a good basis in drawing and allowed me to understand how powerful art can be as a means of communication. As a natural consequence of this I then went to Art School: it was during these five years that I grasped the meaning of artistic process and I started projecting it on my present and future self. Henceforth, my true passion has been to understand the sense of the history of our societies, both from the traces of their past memories and in their possible futures. This feeling never leaves me, and in turn I decided to commit my life as an artist to trying to perceive and understand new challenges and issues in this art field, and the different thoughts that contribute to generate and shape our worlds. Describe briefly what you are doing. I work on the concept of tension, of the instant, of being between two different states. A time where many forces cross, the juxtaposition of balance imbalance, strengthweakness, risk ‌ so many words that describe uncertainties, doubts. I use glass as artistic material because I find it to be is intrinsically linked to a feeling of danger


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Art Reveal Magazine and risk but it also awakes a sense of fascination and aesthetics. My work can take the shape of an installation, a sculpture or a performance. My goal is to create in the spectator a sense of awareness of what we are.

students to be of paramount importance in transmitting our experience and in guiding them into the awe inspiring field of the history of arts and civilisations. Which are your future projects as an artist?

Who or what has a lasting influence on how you do art performing? Since I was a teenager I have practiced kung-fu, a Chinese martial art that allowed the development of myself both physically and mentally; in the same way this practice has accompanied me through my life and my art. During my studies I became interested in the Japanese movement GUTAI; what really made an impact on me was the physicality that the artists were using to create art and how they interpreted space limitations. Furthermore, I need to mention Yves Klein, whose entire artistic path showed us new shapes in performances art, thanks to his abilities in displacing bodies and altering the perception of space. This particular mastery has enormously influenced me. If you had another profession apart from being an artist, what would you choose to be and why? I would definitely be a teacher. Having already taught for two years after my art studies, I find the contact with the

JAIL

To keep on progressing, travelling, observing, meeting people and new artistic movements, creating and sharing. Currently, I am still studying to master the glass work in order to achieve a better understanding of this multi-faceted material. I am following this path with the aim of enlarging my mind’s view yet preserving my artistic and personal freedom. Which suggestions would you give to neophytes in the art world? I would say to take your work extremely seriously but at the same time never stop enjoying what you are doing and try always to find the fun part of your profession, as it is a full time job, whatever people say. Keep your curiosity alive, always; never stop studying, as our work is a constant learning process; cultivate yourself and your interests; never lose the sense of engagement that should characterise the artistic process and never be led astray by easy representations of art without real interests and meanings.


Art Reveal Magazine

BLACK OUT

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CATHERINE OLIVIER Paris, France

2014

art fair Artigo RIO DE JANEIRO BRESIL

2013

Singularité plurielle Pavillon Carré de Baudouin PARIS Prix Boesner

2010

Maison Sinan SHANGHAI , Zhejiang Art Museum HANGZHOU CHINE

2008

Art fair BIENNAL CACHAN FRANCE

2007

Art fair 52nd EXHIBITION OF CONTEMPORARY ART MONTROUGE FRANCE

SAUSADE I A TENDER SPOT


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MES RACINES

With always this idea of to show various qualities of presences, the capacity to keep the attention, and capacity to disappear, states going from dazzling to fantomatic that I like to confront itself. I continue also a work on the transparency, the image becomes filter, the things become remote, impalpable‌


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ETAPE I When, how and why started you creating? I create for a long time ago from childhood, when I have to spend my time alone in the farm of my parents I have to imagine program, activities and the drawing was very important to fix things and keep me compagny. After I chose to study fine art, E.N.S.A.D to Paris

different supports , work on the matter drawing in burning, painting with mixt techniques ‌ etc

What are some of your favorite things for inspiration?

Briefly describe the work you do.

I try to be the most heartfelt, so I think the unconscious reveals what’s important, I have made a lot of dream about the house the uncertainty of the future, the human behaviours in relation to success.

I try to find different ways to express about the same theme, how the picture, vision metamorphose with

Trips haves been source of inspiration working on what remains in the memory.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? I have other occupations outside of being an artist, I am art visual teacher in companies , I like it because people find themselves to create without hierarchy. I work sometime in design , around light and fabrics. What are your future plans as an artist? I want to continue and harmonize with different means expressions, trying to stay pertinent.


Art Reveal Magazine

PARCOURS VIII

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ANNE CECILE SURGA New York, USA

2015

Festival de la Sculpture de Bressuire, France

2014

IAF International Art Festival, New York City, USA

2014

Me, Selfie, and I, New York City, USA

2014

Something Borrowed, Something New, Brooklyn, New York, USA

2013

Residency at the Pablo Atchugarry Foundation, Uruguay

FAKE IT TILL YOU MAKE IT & FEAR

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UNTITLED (MONSTER) Through my art practice, I aim at exploring the intrinsic values of being a human being. I am extremely interested in the question of the definition of the self and how much the social context in which we evolve is responsible in shaping our own image. As a woman artist, I am slightly more focus on the definition of identity for women. The current consumption society sends out tones of messages to every human, thus influencing how we see ourselves and how we want to define ourselves. I believe there is a psychological triangle between who we really are, what society tells us to be, and the image of ourselves we decide to project onto society. The realization of the self is often placed as the ultimate goal or success in life, and I am exploring whether or not this can be tangible knowing that we are not 100% in control of who we are. I like to create different levels of interpretation in my works, thus giving keys to the viewer about the subject I address without offering one unique interpretation of the artwork. Each artwork becomes public as soon as if it offered to the viewer eyes, and I let it to the viewer to construct his or her own understanding of what is in front of him.


Art Reveal Magazine When, how and why started you creating?

otherwise I would just lose myself in my work for days and days I believe.

As long as I can remember, I have always been creating human figures in different materials. As a child it was in salt dough, play dough or even with cloth. My parents did not want their children to grow up watching tv, so I had a lot of art materials for 2D and 3D creation. I also attended creative extra activities such as piano lessons, theater class, and drawing class. During my teenage years, I researched other materials and went on to use clay, papier maché and plaster. Interestingly these materials are still present in my artistic creations, but today I prefer to use stone, marble and steel. I cannot really explain why I started creating, I just liked to create things with my hands and I remember that early on I was looking for perfection and beauty. Often I would be dissatisfied with my own creations, which would push me to create again and again. Also I believe the fact that my parents are doctors played a role. Growing up I was surrounded with medical and anatomy books as well as a life size human skeleton, which made some effect on me. I was kind of obsessed about being able to recreate a total human being from the inside out.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist. I did a business school and graduated with a MBA in Management, then after I did a Master in Art History. I never had a classical education in art such as a BFA or MFA, but I always managed to keep on creating and even to attend some art class while doing my studies. I tried to keep myself close to the art world and worked for some galleries internationally, which allowed me to get acquainted with some major contemporary movements. Of course contemporary

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art influenced me a lot, I am amazed by the freedom of use of materials, textures and colors, as well as the juxtapositions and crossing over with installations. It inspired me to push further my own artistic research and to dare more. However my main artistic influences are from wellknown Old Masters I discovered at an early age such as Michel-Angelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Caravaggio, or Rodin for example. I remember a calendar with works of great masters on the theme of medicine, and I was deeply trouble with Rembrandt “The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp.” As much as I am now more interested in contemporary art, these first artwork discoveries were the most shocking and powerful of my

What is the most important item in your studio? My studio only has the exact tools I need, no more no less, which help me to stay focus and to not lose time searching among thousands things in the process. Therefore each tool is extremely important and cannot be replaced. There is not exactly one tool that stands out above all the other. I would say that probably the clock is the item that stands out. It is the only piece of “decoration” on the studio wall. It helps me to keep track of time and to remember appointments; BORN GUILTY


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Art Reveal Magazine life and they are the one which shapes and inhabit my deepest thoughts as well as my unconscious nowadays. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? I am not quite sure any other occupation would satisfy me as much as being an artist. This allows me to use my full mental and physical capacities. Once I have the inspiration, I need to reshape it to the most interesting form, and then I have to think about how to physically make it. During the making process, there are also a lot of thoughts going on, challenges to tackle, and the necessity to keep the right balance between control and letting go over the work itself. I really enjoy the process, even if I often end up thinking for hours in front of a work visualizing what best to do next before actually doing any modification on it, which is kind of a mad thing. Giving form to one’s idea is like trying to catch a shooting star: a wonderful idea in theory but a great if not impossible challenge in practice. One is left only with stardust and the memory of a dream. And the will to catch another brighter star on the next try!

How has your style changed over the years?

great atelier, tools, and working with stronger materials.

If I look over the last 10years my style has evolved on two main points: the ideas researched and the materials used. As I stated above, I was greatly impressed and influenced by Old Masters, and in my early artworks I chose similar themes as they did. From my education I have a good knowledge of the First and Second Testament which inspired me. Over the years I forged some personal beliefs and got more interested and inspired by philosophy, psychology and social evolution. My artworks became more and more personal and now reflect directly on my own vision and life experiences, although I always think about a part of universal concept to share with the general public. I used to work a lot with clay, plaster and papier maché before working with steel and stone. I have been travelling extensively across the world over the last 8years, living in Mexico, Turkey, Singapore, the US, and I had to create with light materials that I could find everywhere and that I could ship back to France when leaving a country. Recently, as I decided to put my artistic practice first I also decided to stabilize myself in one place, thus allowing having a

What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received?

UNTITLED

To work everyday, even if it is only for an hour. What are your future plans as an artist? Conquering the world! From an artistic point of view, I wish that in the long term I will develop a style that will rely less on figurative exactitude or following anatomy rules, so that I could focus more on giving pure form to ideas, concepts or feelings. Also in the future I am interested to incorporate more industrial materials in my practice in order to allow me to find new way of expression. I believe I am aiming at a more synthetic creation, where details would be put aside in order to let more space to the concept of art itself. From a professional point of view, I am working on my first solo show which will take place in the Spring of 2016 and I am organizing some group shows as well. My short term goals would be to get recognition in Europe then international recognition in the long-term.


Art Reveal Magazine

CAGE OF THOUGHTS

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Art Reveal Magazine

BENEDICTE THORAVAL Toulon, France 2014

“Emergency2!” exhibition, residency, Fonderie Kugler, Geneva, Switzerland

2013

“Beauregard” by Florent Dubois, publication, Tombolo

2012

“Bleu fixe”, exhibition and publication, Piedigriggio, Corsica

2011

“Domestiquer”, exhibition, Association Mine de Rien, Mazamet, Tarn “Silent Lectures”, exhibition, 6b, Saint-Denis, Seine-Saint-Denis

2010

“San Francisco Lyon”, exhibition, with A. Feriot, A. Czmil, Skp, Lyon and San Francisco, CA

A TENDER SPOT HUA LAM PONG


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Art Reveal Magazine

CLASH My work involves dealing with the statut and the role of images. My goal is to question the authenticity of the images so that’s why I use different medias and processes. For instance, I associate or superimpose paintings, drawings, videos, objects, so, my installations are made from leaps and bounds. Initially, for starting points I use different documents like printed images, photographs, extracts from movies that I transform by several plastic operations. My work is influenced by the beginning of the caricature, the comics, and the Japanese movies, Lessing and the theatricality of the work of FahlstrÜm.


Art Reveal Magazine

PAYSAGE

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When, how and why started you creating? I’ve always created but I don’t remember any starting point or incentive in particular. For me, creating is like the hidden part under the surface while the artwork is like the visible part of the iceberg. In years, creating is becoming more and more a necessity. I often wondered if I should respond to social and cultural norms by pursuing a different vocation but I always came back to the same desire to do something creative even through this entailed a certain insecurity. What is the most challenging part about being an artist? Insecurities in fact, are what drove me forward because that’s one way to learn and not to fall into a boring, linear and narcissic practice. The most challenging part is when you feel that you’ve reached a comfort zone, when your practice and your work seem to become a well oiled mechanism, you have to stop and make a new start. The most difficult part is always not to lose self confidence. If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? No more idea... What is your creative process like? When I begin to make a work. I keep mental notes and I try to make visual and sensitive associations influenced by comics, movies, caritcatures etc. linked with my spirit of the moment, the atmosphere, the light. It comes from a phantasmagorical mix. Everything is in my mind and always linked with experience and culture. In recent years, I have often felt that analyzing my creative process could even be a “rhétorical trap”. So I prefer to keep some distance in that regard and allow for the element of surprise. What’s the best art tip you’ve ever received? Feel free to stop creating if it's becoming boring for you. What are your future plans as an artist? My future plans are to move, because moving to a different place opens up new questions and it’s a way to emancipate your work. .

BLUE STRIPES


Art Reveal Magazine

SLOTH

WWW.BENEDICTETHORAVAL.COM

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Art Reveal Magazine

JENNY VOGEL Brooklyn, NY, USA

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The Shortest Distance Between Two Points at Syndicat Potential, Strasbourg

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named on of 30 Artists to Watch in 2012 by NYART Magazine

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Dead Men Are Heavier Than Broken Hearts, Reading Room, Dallas, TX

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PortCity, Arnolfini Museum, Bristol, UK

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Special Projects: Jenny Vogel, PS1/MoMA, Queens, NY

A TENDER SPOT BEFORE OUR ETERNAL SILENCE


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Art Reveal Magazine

THE BEAUTY OF ALL THINGS FALLING

Jenny Vogel works in video, photography and computer arts. Vogel’s art explores the world as viewed through new media technology using web-cameras, blogs and Google searches as source material. She received her MFA from Hunter College (NYC) in 2003. She is a 2005 NYFA fellow in Computer Arts and is currently Assistant Professor of New Media Art at the University of Massachusetts. Her work has been screened and exhibited in group and solo- shows in numerous locations and galleries: Storefront Gallery, NYC; The Dallas Museum of Art, TX; McKinney Contemporary, TX; San Francisco Camerawork, CA; Arnolfini, UK; The Siberia Biennial, Russia; The Swiss Institute, NYC; EFA Gallery, NYC; Kunstwerke, Berlin; PS1 Contemporary Art Center, NYC.


Art Reveal Magazine

When, how and why started you creating? I think I have been creating all my life. I had the privilege to attend a school where creativity was part of my daily curriculum. After high school I signed up for art classes because I realized that I was lacking the talent to become a theater actor, which had been my plan initially. Though I was determined to go through with art school I did not feel an emotional connection to the work I was making beyond the class assignments until one day I found Agnes Martin’s writings. Like for so many other young artist, the clarity and beauty of her words was revelatory to me, and they taught me how to establish a connection between my work and life outside the classroom. I remember very clearly the sensation of now wanting to spend every free minute in the painting studio and how good it felt to come home late on the subway, with paint all over my pants. Of course my work has drastically changed since then in medium and content, but this was the moment when I became serious about being an artist.

Who or what has a lasting influence on your art practice? Incomplete and in no particular order: the poetic courage of Werner Herzog; the drunken stillness of Bela Tarr; the strength and fragility of Ingeborg Bachmann; stories of individuals battling against large systems regardless of the obvious hopeless outcome; Shostakovich; all glitches, cracks and disruptions on shiny surfaces both physical and metaphorical; opera; the precise surface descriptions of Alain RobbeGrillet; images of people looking out windows, or on to landscapes with their backs towards the viewer; descriptions of UFO sightings; darkness; the provocative trash talk of Muhammad Ali; the self-destructive monologues of Thomas Bernhard; Chantal Akerman’s sense of time; Lauren Bacall’s whistle; the emotional coolness of JeanPierre Melville; the suggestive dialogues of Marguerite Duras; the state of awe and the need to resist it.

What kind of subjects have your films? My films are usually narrative, but the actual content and meaning change. Often the images or text are found footage. Whatever the appropriated material might be, it is always informing the content of the work in some way. For example, the subject of The Desert is a poetic description of an online relationship, or perhaps any kind of relationship that gets lost in translation. The images are all gleaned from webcams I found online, while the text is inspired by conversations I witnessed in online chatrooms. Combined the blurry images and suggestive writing create an atmosphere full of potential, that gets lost in the fog of the medium around each corner.

Do you think of yourself as a media artist or as a conceptual artist? It is hard for me to think of myself in categories, and sometimes I am not sure where the boundaries between these categories even would be. Perhaps I am an artist because it allows me to be so many things at once: sometimes I am a performer; sometimes I make videos; sometimes I photograph or make prints. My work usually starts with an idea, a story I read, or an image I see. The material or final manifestation of the work develops from there, often in direct response to the source material. Sometimes I call myself a project-based artist, but essentially it doesn’t matter. What matters to me much more is that not only can I be flexible about my medium but also about my exhibition venues. These range from traditional galleries and museums, to film festivals, building facades and recently theater performances and

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Art Reveal Magazine academic conference talks. It makes me happy when my work can be seen and discussed outside of the visual arts context and has meaning to people not usually interested in the visual arts.

Where did you get the idea for the “The Beauty of All Things Falling� xerox animation? I was invited to submit work to an exhibition about glitches as creative medium. I was interested in making a video that would be about glitches in history, while also using a glitchy medium. Since I had done a lot of readings into chaos theory and attempts for disaster prevention and prediction, specifically in the case of earthquakes for another project, I combined some of that research with my interest in photocopy technology. The photocopier is an amazing tool. It directly references documents, something official and perhaps classified, which creates a visual language for my narrative about history. The machine itself is also very much prone to glitches. We are all familiar with the document jams, and copies that come out either too dark, or to light or otherwise distorted. These glitches are magical to me. They are beautiful accidents of an outdated machine, which is also being misused from its original purpose.

What are your future plans as an artist? I hope that I will never give up making art in some shape or form. As I review artwork I made in previous years I continue to discover connections and common strains that I was unaware of as I was making it. I wonder if by the time that I am 80 years old, all my work will become one long storyline that will just magically fit together like a puzzle. That would be something to look forward to.

ALLES MUSS IN FLAMMEN STEHEN (EVERYTHING MUST BE IN FLAMES)


Art Reveal Magazine

BEFORE OUR ETERNAL SILENCE

WWW.JENNYVOGEL.NET

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Profile for Art Reveal Magazine

Art Reveal Magazine no. 2  

Artists: Giovanni Armenio, Robert Baliello, Frédéric Drouin aka SMITH SMITH, Andrea Eichenberger, Gabriel Feracci, Catherine Olivier, Anne C...

Art Reveal Magazine no. 2  

Artists: Giovanni Armenio, Robert Baliello, Frédéric Drouin aka SMITH SMITH, Andrea Eichenberger, Gabriel Feracci, Catherine Olivier, Anne C...

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