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ART QA ISSUE #5 - SUMMER 2016

FRONT COVER: PAINTING BY ARTIST VAKSEEN

INSIDE COVER: PAINTING BY ARTIST VAKSEEN

BACK INSIDE COVER: THANK YOU FROM ART QA

BACK COVER: PAINTING BY ARTIST VAKSEEN

CONTRIBUTING GUEST EDITOR ARTIST THE MAZEKING EDITOR: DAVID MANCINI CO-EDITOR JONI LOWE PUBLISHER - ART QA ART DIRECTION: PAIGE NEWSONE STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER: LOREN FIEDLER INQUIRES FOR ADS, STORY-IDEAS OR ARTIST SUBMISSIONS SEND TO: STAFF@ARTQAMAGAZINE.COM

WWW.ARTQAMAGAZINE.COM Regarding unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, and other materials. If you wish to have a story considered for publication in our magazine please email us and include your contact information and please provide in the email’s subject header one of the sections or topics you are interested in such as, interviews or art stories section. Please allow up to three weeks for a response. ART QA and staff is not responsible for unsolicited submissions.

Art QA Magazine, all rights reserved. No portion may be reproduced in part or in full by any means without prior written consent from Art QA.


ISSUE #6 AUTUMN ISSUE SEPTEMBER 2016

FEATURING ARTISTS WORKING IN ALL MEDIUMS AND MEDIA. PAINTING, SCULPTURE, PHOTOGRAPHY, DANCE, AND MORE IF YOU’RE AN ARTIST OR WRITER AND WISH TO BE FEATURED OR CONTRIBUTE AN ARTICLE TO ART QA SIMPLY SEND A BRIEF EMAIL TO staff@artqamagazine.com


ART QA ISSUE #5 - SUMMER 2016 ART QA - QUARTERLY MAGAZINE - FOUR ISSUES A YEAR SPRING - SUMMER - AUTUMN - WINTER

5 EDITOR’S TEASHOP 7 ARTIST INTERVIEW 21 FEATURED INTERVIEW 33 CINE SPOT 39 REVIEW 47 ART SPOT 50 UPCOMING EVENTS

Art QA Magazine, all rights reserved. No portion may be reproduced in part or in full by any means without prior written consent from Art QA.


ART QA

EDITOR’S TEASHOP

ART is inspirational. Art is insightful. Art is motivational. A few months ago, we decided to change things up just a little and invite an artist to come in for one or maybe two issues of ART QA as the Contributing Editor of our next magazine issue, which is this summer’s issue. After some looking, talking and thinking we picked the contemporary artist, The Mazeking (Gabriel Asoka) as this summer issue’s editor. We are happy to work with The Mazeking and hope you enjoy this issue.

We thank you for checking out ART QA Magazine. - D. MANCINI

ART QA is now on FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/artqamagazine

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BARNETT SUSKIND

Type to enter text

http://barnettsuskind.com


ARTIST

EHSAN MEHRBAKHSH

Ehsan’s work is more than illustrations. His work moves into the dream world, the silly and playful world. Every time I see his work, I smile, laugh or think “yes”. It plays itself down in many ways and by doing so, it moves into art and away from backdrop or side story. So let’s hear from the artist himself on what his work is about. That’s always the best way.

THE INTERVIEW

AQA: Where are you from? EM: From Tehran, Iran.

AQA: What was it like growing up, living there? EM: It was great. Well, there is a totalitarian state, some freedom of choice issue, censorship and blablabla… but the image which is unknown to the West is that as an illustrator in Tehran I had the privilege (like everybody else has) to grow up in a modern chaotic city full of contrast and creativity, and which has a contemporary art museum with original masterpieces from Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Dali, Max Ernst, Giacometti and Roy Lichtenstein. A lot of art galleries, one of the most innovative and artistic cinema industries in the world (Asghar Farhadi, winner of an Oscar, a Golden Globe, Cannes and Berlin, lives and works in Tehran) and one of the highest percentages of graduate women in Asia (my first animation teacher was a young woman). Well, there are limits everybody knows, but as a medium-class very normal young boy in Iran, I had a fantastic life there.

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Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

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Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

AQA: When did you live and come to the place you are now? EM: I left at the end of the summer of 2006. I'd just finished my illustrations academy there and began learning Italian at the Italian embassy. Choosing Italy was a sentimental choice, and I'm so happy with it. My decision was not to leave the country but go to Italy, nowhere else. I had this unconditional love for Italy since I was a teenager and Roberto Baggio was my hero. I got a student visa from the embassy and moved to Rome to begin my Italian journey, which still continues. AQA: Where do you live now? EM: I live in Milan, it's my fifth year here. I've lived 5 years in Rome as well. 10 years in Italy. AQA: What made you start making art in the first place? EM: In Iran I did the science school, and applied for an engineering university, but. I was drawing all the time as a hobby. Then when I was about 19, I fell in love with a girl whose bigger sister who was a painter and animator. She made me understand that it doesn't matter if one day I'll make money with my art or not, I have to just begin doing it, as if it was like my love for the younger sister. So I quit the university and began my illustration academy. AQA: Did you go to art school or are you self-taught, or both? EM: Both, both. AQA: Your drawings and paintings seem like they are a mix of fine art and contemporary art. How do you see it? Is that true? Or just that it’s all fine art? I ask because there are some who see art as something very different. EM: I can not categorize them as well. I think in the end it doesn't matter. I partially respect some classic rules of composition, but what I really don't like to respect is a categorized, well-defined container as contemporary art or whatever. AQA: Your work has a sexual element, where does that come from and what’s it about? EM: Sometimes it's a precise idea behind it that I would like to make people understand, but mostly it comes from my subconscious, and I don't filter it. AQA: What are your influences regarding your drawings and paintings? EM: City life and its stories, bar counters and drinking stories, humans around and humans I dream about, psychology, philosophy, music. The complexity of our subconscious.

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Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

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Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

AQA: What is your work about to you? What do you wish for the viewer of your work to think or feel, or is that not an issue? EM: I divide my works in two main categories: 1. I try to develop an idea. A precise idea, even if the concept may seem not so "absolute". In this case, I want everybody to understand it. If you do your free interpretation which is totally different from the "idea" or you don't get the irony of the final artwork, then I have failed to communicate with my art. 2. I just begin drawing whatever comes out from my brain without filtering it so much, and I don't even know how the final result is going to be. It usually happens when my feelings are positively chaotic! I call it "the subconscious leaks". In this case, the viewer is totally free to interpret, dream, put himself inside the images or psychoanalyze me. AQA: What is your favorite meal or food? And why, even? EM: I'm a lazy omnivore and a tenacious drinker. I don't know what my favorite food is. Regarding seafood, I'm so influenced by the "image" of the creature I'm going to eat. The more unreal and strange it looks, the more I love to eat it. I like doing breakfast alone in a bar. Persian and Italian cuisine I like a lot, but that's probably because I know it better than other nations’ foods. AQA: Tell me about your videos. You've done several video works; some seem to have a surreal and sexual theme, and even political. What are these videos about? And how do you see them in relation to your other works, such as drawings/paintings? EM: I've always loved to make animation videos. Most of the animations I’ve made are music videos; musicians usually like my work and ask me for video clips or album artworks. Writing down the theme of each video, I try to be loyal to the lyrics, the music and the style of the song. I've done some advertisements as well, and once some animations for insertion in a documentary movie. In relation to my "mono frame" illustrations or paintings, making animations without a team helping you needs very much more time and very much more work, and sometimes it may become an obstacle to doing an experimental independent video. AQA: I believe your prints are on plexiglass printed with acrylic ink, is that correct? EM: My digital illustrations usually have very sharp and aggressive colors without so many shades. The suggestion of printing with acrylic color on plexiglass came from my dear friend and art promoter, Mr. Sallenave. The result yields a relief effect and exalts the lines and the texture of my work.

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Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

AQA: Who are your favorite artists, or those you admire? EM: It's difficult for me to name one, but let's say most of the Surrealists and the influence of Freud on them, a lot of Soviet-era cartoonists, contemporary Iranian typography and graphics, Roy Lichtenstein, Francis Bacon, Egon Schiele. AQA: Some of your works have text in them, rather like a comic. How do you see that? EM: Experiments. Sometimes the text has a meaning that I wish you read, sometimes it functions just as a "form". AQA: Let’s talk color. Do you simply do what comes to you when it comes to color, or have you created a palette of colors which you work within? EM: If the artwork belongs to the category 1 (idea) I talked about, the color functions in service of the idea, to make it shine as best as it may. If the work is done with the second method category 2 (subconscious), the color has its individual identity, and I choose it as it comes. AQA: Are you signed with a gallery? EM: No. AQA: How do you see the art world? Do you like it or not? EM: It's a really complicated question. I'm nostalgic about the “modern art" era. I usually don't like what is categorized as “contemporary art". If we talk about this period of time we are living in, I'm very optimistic and happy how the European and Asian cinema is moving on, not that happy about installations and 3D animations, happy with painting and digital painting art. 12


Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

AQA: What are you favorite mediums? EM: Oil markers, watercolor, graphic tablet. AQA: What are your largest-sized works? Are these, or any of the works, on canvas? EM: My digital paintings can be printed with about 2 meters of length in high resolution. Each artwork has a limit of print, they are numbered. I used to paint with oil or acrylic on canvas, but mostly I use paper. My latest works are digital paintings.

- Joni. Lowe

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Ehsan Mehrbakhsh INTERVIEW

www.ehsanmhr.wix.com

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ART QA


SOPHIA CHIZUCO

www.sophiachizuco.com


Paul McCloskey www.paulmccloskeyart.com


ENJOY

SUMMER

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Samantha Robinson www.samantharobinsonstudio.com


FEATURED ARTIST INTERVIEW

POP SURREALIST VAKSEEN

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

Vakseen’s work plays and pushes the idea of Pop and Surreal art by pushing them together into one form. While they are colorful and fashion-intense, they still give the viewer something beyond the normal, beyond simple collage or given meaning. Now let’s hear what the artist has to say about his work and life.

THE INTERVIEW

AQA: Where are you from? V: I was born in Athens, GA, but my dad was in the military so I only lived there a few months. I was way too young to remember. I actually grew up and spent most of my life in Jacksonville, FL. AQA: What was it like growing up, living there? V: It was cool. Jacksonville is a big small town so you have city aspects, but it’s also country as hell. [laughs] We were given an NFL team so it’s not like the backwoods, but there wasn’t really a thriving entertainment scene. That’s what ultimately led me to leave around 2004-05 and move to South Florida. AQA: Where do you live now? And how long have you lived there? V: I live in Los Angeles and I’ve been here for 5 years now. I moved here from Miami back in 2011 and it’s been one of the best moves for my career.

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

AQA: It’s interesting that you do both music and fine art. In many people's minds they are very different and many see music as art and fine art as something else, something different. What is your view? V: Art is at the top of the pyramid so everything we’re creating from fine art to music, dance, film, etc., definitely falls under that category. It wasn’t until I started moving in the art world that I realized the music and art scenes are different. They definitely work hand in hand, but I feel people tend to view art as a more intellectual experience. The people I meet at gallery shows aren’t the same people I meet in recording studios or record labels. For me, I think the fact that both worlds are different yet fall under the entertainment category presents the opportunity to experiment and fuse the two. People say they can see the musicality in my art so I guess it’s already happening organically. AQA: When did you start making art? V: I’ve been an artist since birth. I used to sketch and doodle here and there, but music really took over my life in high school. I started as a producer, writer and rapper, and was pursuing that for years when I started doing A&R work for a record label. Little did I know, working in the biz consumes most of your time and I slowly stopped creating my own music. I loved what I was doing and I’ve been blessed to work on a number of amazing, successful projects, but I think something was missing for me. It took moving to L.A. for things to really change and I realized how important creating my own work was for me. People kept seeing old art from high school and recommended I take things more seriously. I finally listened and decided in January 2012 to pursue art. I had my very first gallery exhibition February 2012 and that affirmation confirmed this was my path. AQA: Did you go to art school or are you self-taught, or both? V: 100% self-taught. Some things can’t be taught. AQA: What or who are your influences regarding your drawings and paintings? And are any of them from music? V: I have inspirations, but can’t say I have specific influences. I didn’t grow up idolizing artists, but I definitely appreciate greats like Dali, Picasso, Rene Magritte and a few others. I’m inspired by anyone creating something amazing, period.

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW AQA: Does music you make, or grew up listening to, in any way influence your artwork? V: I look at painting the same way I do producing a record. At the end of the day, I’m creating multiple sections that must work together cohesively to present my overall vision. Music and art are very similar in that way. The perfect juxtaposition is everything. I also title my paintings the same way I go about titling songs. They’re well thought out and I feel titles are very important. AQA: Does music have a role or influence on and in your fine art paintings? V: Sometimes I create listening to music, but it’s not a necessity. I love creating in complete silence as well. People always say they see musicality in my art, but it’s truly an organic thing. I’m not trying to do this. Music is a part of me, so in that aspect, it does influence my work. I also have a cubism-based music collection that’s a part of my earlier catalog. People really love them and I have fun painting them, so I still do custom pieces occasionally. AQA: How do you see your fine art work? Meaning, are they abstract to you or something else? V: My work is surrealism so it’s definitely abstract. I’ve created a signature, collage-influenced painting style that I call Vanity Pop. I’m basically fusing elements of photorealism, cubism, pop art and fashion design to create an optical illusion. My paintings look like collages, yet are all hand-painted, abstract portraits of women with an incredible story to share. AQA: Do you see your music and paintings as one body of work or as very different things? V: Some of my thought processes of how I create music and art are very similar, but I wouldn’t necessarily say they’re one body of work. They certainly come from the same place. I’m actually working on some projects that fuse the two worlds in a fresh new way, so I’m looking forward to sharing that with the world soon. AQA: What is your work about to you? What do you wish for the viewer of your work to think or feel, or is that not an issue? V: Creating something that’s aesthetically appealing with substance and a message is very important to me. I aim for my art to celebrate the acute imperfections and endless perfections that exist within every woman. In essence, my art is a visual dialogue about societyʼs idolization of beauty and the surreal, superficial times we live in. AQA: What are your favorite mediums? V: I tend to work very quickly, so acrylics are best for my workflow. Before coming into my Vanity Pop style I was experimenting more, so I’d try to use at least 2 mediums in a creation. In a general sense, I have an appreciation for most, if not all, mediums. I simply prefer acrylics.

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

AQA: What is your favorite meal or food? V: Umm, that’s a hard one. I LOVE food! [laughs] Some of my favorites are any kind of Latin, Italian, Asian, Mediterranean, fusions... see, it’s hard to say just one. [shakes head] I’m truly a foodie, so I really appreciate creative, amazing food. AQA: Who are your favorite artists, or those you admire? V: I really appreciate a lot of different artists' work. I have a mentor (L. Croskey) who’s a dope artist and gallery owner. He’s helped me tremendously in my career and I’m definitely a fan of his work. I’ve been curating for a year, so I also work with a lot of dope artists. I’m honestly a fan of anyone doing what they love, creating something unique. Stylistically, I really love feminine work. AQA: Are you signed with a gallery? V: No. I have great relationships with a lot of dope galleries, but I’m 100% independent. I love having the freedom to do whatever and show wherever I want. AQA: How do you see the art world? Do you like it or not? V: I’m a part of it so I definitely love the art world. I feel like art is trendy now, so it’s cool for the average person to appreciate and want art. That benefits all of us as artists. No matter what you create, there’s space for you. I just hate the politics [laughs], but that comes with anything. Balance is always necessary. I think it’s an amazing time to be a creator. You don’t have to be signed to a gallery or have a big agent to actually create a following and become successful. I love that you can connect directly with an audience and create lifetime supporters. The Internet has changed a lot in entertainment. I do think the art world is still behind on a lot of things in that respect. It reminds me of when Napster was hot and the record labels were fighting it instead of embracing it. I think there are a lot of opportunities to really take art to the next level. I actually try to incorporate a lot of those ideas into how I move with my personal career. AQA: What are your largest-sized works? On paper or canvas? V: My largest piece thus far is on a 48"x36" canvas. I haven’t worked on paper in years. I recently painted a large water barrel for this big water preservation campaign in California. I usually keep my work around the 20"x20" range, but I plan on creating larger pieces and possibly murals soon. AQA: How does digital play a role in your work and process? V: I use the digital world to market and promote my creations, but nothing about my actual process is digital. I know Photoshop would probably simplify things, but I’m sort of a purist. I love the intimacy of creating something with your hands.

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

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Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

AQA: A lot of your work seemingly draws from fashion images, is that the fact? V: I’ve always had a high appreciation for fashion. I also think it’s interesting how we use it to cover ourselves or enhance our self-esteem. Whether it’s a cultural standard or not, we stylistically use fashion to mask our authentic selves and, in a lot of cases, our deepest insecurities. These ideas are the foundation of my message, so it seemed pretty natural to incorporate different patterns and textures into my portraits. AQA: Your earlier work was a little different from your more recent series, why is that? V: My earlier work is basically me experimenting, trying to find my voice and style. Everything was selling, but I really wanted to find something cohesive that challenged me and allowed me to get my message across. That was VERY important. So Vanity Pop is simply an organic evolution of my experiences. I wanted more.

- The.Mazeking 29


Vakseen FEATURED INTERVIEW

www.vakseen.com 30


CINE SPOT

What films to see?

GUEST CURATOR ARTIST THE MAZEKING MAKES THIS ISSUE’S CINEMA PICKS. How about this cinema work by Bernardo Bertolucci

Above: Still from Last Tango In Paris. (1972)

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CINE SPOT

How about this cinema work by Christoffer Boe

Above: Still from Reconstruction (2004)

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CINE SPOT

How about this cinema work by Liliana Cavani

Above: Still from Night Porter (1974)

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CINE SPOT

How about this cinema work by Ang Lee

Above: Still from In Eat Drink Man Woman (1994)

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www.valetova.info


REVIEWS ARTIST:

ARIEL DILL

A liquid vision of impulse, colors seeded in the Fauvists’ palette outbreak and streak. They meet, their borders talk, shapes begin to form. Just before an explicit description emerges, what would be something wholly verbalizable, there is a dissolution of the facts. The facts we always bring as viewers or as artists. But Ariel Dill’s work asks us to suspend this purely factual, verbally conducive interpretation. However, it does not subsume our givings, for we bring the meaning that consents its inanimate, mineral being to animate us and any meanings we bring to the work. Forms and line likened to those of Masson, Arp or Miró, this animation is brought upon by these subtly biomorphic presences: jaws gape, orifices wish, an organ flowers from dormant passions, they cavort on their landscapes, colors swallow others, only to exude them in another passage. And from where are they birthed? I was fortunate to meet and talk with Ariel at a gathering taking place at TURN gallery. She came in from the back garden patio and we sat by the window that faced an overcast East 1st Street. Forever interested in process, I asked of hers. She works through automatism. We discussed this process’s lineage throughout Modernism, Surrealism and Abstract Expression specifically, trying to get at what this means now for her, how she uses this method. The act of direct drawing, with paint or otherwise, is the way in which her subconscious impulses are directed (as o p p o s e d t o c o l l a g i n g i n D a d a , o r E r n s t ’s implementation of frottage, as counterexamples). As animals we can use instinct and intuition to guide our

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minds. Ariel’s imagination and hand move by impulse, by color, and the responses build. Not always a linear call and answer, this process can wind and branch unveiling hitherto unknowable paths. But in our conversation, we called attention to the fact that our conversing on such a verbally intangible activity was intrinsically amiss. Objectively-oriented speaking of automatic processes quickly gets mercurial, but we did have her paintings, the residues of the elusive means of her craft. She made paintings of different scales using this process. This is where we can feel with our bodies how she worked, if our intellectual language seems unfit to interpret. The smaller paintings, more intimate, made with finger, wrist, elbow, akin to the way we write in most cases, the size of an open book or a face-to-face discussion. The larger the paintings become, the larger she moves, and she has to expand her physical engagement with the canvas, but this does not curtail the immediacy of the mental process. She commented that larger or smaller scales are not not harder or easier, they are just different. A difference in time can be found, not in length or brevity, but the sensational quality of experiencing it, whether your the painter or viewer. When viewing the smaller painting, Hydromancing, we feel each mark’s moment, how they talk to each other in their close quarters.


REVIEWS

Her whole body needed to engage when painting a work like Bird of Paradise and so we stand before it with our whole bodies, creating a circuit between the painter, the painting, and the viewing body. And we may be standing relatively still before her work, but in our very physical selves our intestines wind through our bellies as we see and feel these serpentine hues writhe not just before us but with us. Our blood runs like these reds. Our mouths open in breath, consumption and passion like the amorphously zoomorphic images. In the deepest blue one finds night, sleep, and dream; green, herbal nature; white and yellow, the notion of day. Though at times, these associations are subverted and the color-meanings unexpected, challenging our common symbols and language. This is why new paintings are made, to continually recreate the way we can experience our world and theirs.

Ariel Dill’s Exhibit at TURN Gallery 37 East 1st Street New York, NY 10003

Review by- John Michael Meroney 40


REVIEWS ARTIST:

MARK LYON

I am reminded of the protagonist of the inaugural episode of The Twilight Zone, “Where Is Everybody?”: he happened upon a place he wasn’t expecting, but thought he would understand. Departure: when people have left a place, vestiges remain; their habitats, that of nature they've shaped, tools they've constructed to ease their lives. But maybe they haven't gone far, just out of reach.  Or, Evacuation: they may have rushed away. From what, to where, from whom? Left the lights lit, water ready to run and spray, an absence to receive a new occupant even if only a temporary one. Relative to many of today's pop-dystopias being marred and zombied, these used, but not rent, vacant spaces in Mark Lyon’s Bay Views depict a quiet, subtle presence, an unknown power shivers beneath their appearances. Lyon gives us the content of a world, one he surely has seen stories in, histories, and fantasies to be filled by. Though we story our own.

Mark Lyon’s Exhibit at Elizabeth Houston Gallery 34 East 1st Street New York, New York 10003

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REVIEWS He captures partings of an unknown cause. As viewers, we always are intellectually aware of the photographer’s presence in that invisible foreground outside the frame, their standing behind the lens. In this work, a world is projected that is beyond an objective documentation of these interiors and the landscapes outside of them. The symbiosis between Lyon and his camera gestates time and place in such a way to render meanings of these places otherwise nonexistent by either alone. The shooting process of Bay Views required him to wait for hours, days, and sometimes seasons for an emptiness of sentient withdrawal, a humanless and creatureless environment. The places he has found are of escaped utility, what could be havens from a storm, cold, or heat. The tension between the openness of the architecture, the way the elements of the exterior world inevitably enter, and the building's insularity with its own harbored elements of artificial light and mechanisms designed to aid in the erasure of the outer dirt. Their symmetrical framing evokes Kubrickian corridors laden with memories of events that we know have passed, yet cannot see. Each of the entries in Lyon’s suite, Bay Views, has a similar macro-composition: rectangular framing; the walls, ceiling, and floor centrally vanishing. The gravity of a central vanishing point focuses a meandering eye to somewhere that one can enter or fall into. Once there, the image puts us in a place departed or evacuated. The bays themselves are, in part, simulated conglomerates of the stage and camera obscura: where there would be a black box, there is the concrete, metal, and buzzing lights; the one small oculus has enlarged into an open wall where the exterior floods in. Meanings of the familiar fade and are replaced by unconscious associations; we know the objects, but something has turned against us, because there is something about this world that was not expected to be seen. Then you leave these photographs behind. Everything back to normal. Everything commonplace. Does that become dissatisfying? How to view the world in such a way to acquiesce creative desires, to always view it as something other than it is? Photography such as Lyon’s activates those impulses. To have art that makes you want to see the art in everything is not a quality that is always achieved. Now, his work asks you for your story of it.

Review by- John Michael Meroney

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LFFOTO.COM


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ART QA will offer 2 free full color and full page advertisements for fine artists in each issue of our magazine. This way, artists everywhere can have a little more exposure for their artwork and readers have the opportunity to see more artists and artworks.

If you are interested in placing an ad, simply email your contact information and a link to your website to staff@artqamagazine.com Space is limited, so get your ad in early because once we have the two free artist ads in each issue and we will not accept or publish the overflow. However, you can request that we consider your ad for the next issue of the magazine.

ART QA - QUARTERLY MAGAZINE - FOUR ISSUES A YEAR SPRING - SUMMER - AUTUMN - WINTER

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SUMMER ENJOY

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ART SPOT

What Artists to see?

GUEST CURATOR - ARTIST THE MAZEKING MAKES THIS ISSUE’S ARTIST TO CHECK OUT PICKS.

ABOVE: “NATWHITE037” Photograph by ARTIST NATALIE WHITE

NATALIE WHITE IS ONE OF THE PICKS FOR ARTISTS TO CHECK OUT.

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ART SPOT

ABOVE: “SGRAFFITO No. 393” Drawing by ARTIST MICHAEL LENTZ (2015)

MICHAEL LENTZ IS ONE OF OUR PICKS FOR ARTISTS TO CHECK OUT.

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SHINGO FRANCIS

WWW.SHINGOFRANCIS.COM


UPCOMING - THINGS - PLACES - EVENTS Night at the Museums

MoMA PS1 Warm Up 2016

Now in its third year, “Night at the Museums” offers free entry to 15 of New York’s Lower Manhattan’s most diverse and culturally significant Museums. On June 21, 2016

MoMA PS1 presents Warm Up 2016, beginning June 11 and taking place every Saturday this summer through August 27. A NYC summer staple now in its 19th year, Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s highly anticipated outdoor music series continues its tradition of introducing audiences to the best in experimental music, sound, and DJs—both local and international. Music from 3 to 9 PM; doors open at Noon. Purchase Tickets $22 in advance, $25 day-of.

http://www.mjhnyc.org/nightatthemuseums/

http://momaps1.org/warmup/

Free Films in NYC Parks

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn

Each year films are screened at several New York City parks including, Central Park, Bryant Park and others. The event is FREE and all films will be shown rain or shine. In most cases the movies begin at 8:00 pm. For dates, times and parks please see the link below. Screenings start as early as May 2016 and run through Summer.

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! is one of New York City's longest running, free, outdoor performing arts festivals, attracting 250,000 attendees from across New York City to the Prospect Park Bandshell each summer. Opening night is June 8, 2016 · 8:15 PM and run through Summer at Prospect Park Bandshell. Enter at 9th Street and Prospect Park West.

h t t p : / / w w w. n y c g o v p a r k s . o r g / e v e n t s / free_summer_movies

http://www.bricartsmedia.org/performing-arts/ bric-celebrate-brooklyn 50


ART QA WE THANK EVERYONE WHO CONTRIBUTED TO THIS MAGAZINE.

THANK YOU!

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ART QA Magazine SUMMER 2016  

ART QA SUMMER Issue #5. ART QA contemporary arts magazine featuring artists interviews, art reviews, special features and more. In this Su...

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