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ART QA ISSUE #4 - SPRING 2016

FRONT COVER: PAINTING BY ARTIST NINA TOKHTAMAN

INSIDE COVER: PAINTING BY NINA TOKHTAMAN

BACK INSIDE COVER: THANK YOU FROM ART QA

BACK COVER: PAINTING BY NINA TOKHTAMAN

EDITOR: DAVID MANCINI CO-EDITOR JONI LOWE PUBLISHER - ART QA ART DIRECTION: PAIGE NEWSONE STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER: LOREN FIEDLER INQUIRES FOR ADS, STORY-IDEAS OR ARTIST SUBMISSIONS SEND TO: STAFF@ARTQAMAGAZINE.COM

WWW.ARTQAMAGAZINE.COM Regarding unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, and other materials. If you wish to have a story considered for publication in our magazine please email us and include your contact information and please provide in the email’s subject header one of the sections or topics you are interested in such as, interviews or art stories section. Please allow up to three weeks for a response. ART QA and staff is not responsible for unsolicited submissions.

Art QA Magazine, all rights reserved. No portion may be reproduced in part or in full by any means without prior written consent from Art QA.


ART QA ISSUE #4 - SPRING 2016 ART QA - QUARTERLY MAGAZINE - FOUR ISSUES A YEAR SPRING - SUMMER - AUTUMN - WINTER

5 EDITOR’S TEASHOP 7 ARTIST INTERVIEW 17 SOAPBOX 23 FEATURED INTERVIEW 31 CINE SPOT 35 REVIEW 41 ART SPOT 46 UPCOMING EVENTS

Art QA Magazine, all rights reserved. No portion may be reproduced in part or in full by any means without prior written consent from Art QA.


ISSUE #5 SUMMER ISSUE JUNE 2016

FEATURING ARTISTS WORKING IN ALL MEDIUMS AND MEDIA. PAINTING, SCULPTURE, PHOTOGRAPHY, DANCE, AND MORE IF YOU’RE AN ARTIST OR WRITER AND WISH TO BE FEATURED OR CONTRIBUTE AN ARTICLE TO ART QA SIMPLY SEND A BRIEF EMAIL TO staff@artqamagazine.com


ART QA

EDITOR’S TEASHOP

ART is inspirational. Art is insightful. Art is motivational.

ART QA is now on FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/artqamagazine

We thank you for checking out ART QA Magazine - D. MANCINI

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Samantha Robinson

www.samantharobinsonstudio.com


ARTIST

PAUL McCLOSKEY

When I first saw Paul McCloskey’s work, I wasn’t sure what I thought about it. On one hand, I liked its color, depth and sense of movement, but on the other hand I wasn’t sure why. So after a little more looking, I found myself more interested in the work than at first, and answers didn’t matter as much as simply seeing, looking. So let’s hear from the artist about his work, process and meaning.

THE INTERVIEW AQA: Where were you born? In Ireland? McCloskey: Yes, I was born in a town called Carrickmacross in County Monaghan, a border county of Northern Ireland. AQA: What was that like growing up there and how did that affect your art? McCloskey: It’s a medium-sized town which, at the time, didn’t have much of an art scene. However, one of my uncles was a painter and although not formally educated, he was immensely talented. He would arrive at our house periodically with armfuls of rolled-up paper, sometimes reverse side of leftover wallpaper, with the most exquisite charcoal and watercolour works. This inspired me to follow my passion. Growing up in a border county during the time of the troubles in the 70’s and 80’s was almost like a no-man’s land. I was very aware of the tensions and conflicts across the border, which often spilled into daily life here sometimes in subtle ways, such as who you trust, what you say or even the company you keep and sometimes in less subtle ways, especially at the time of the hunger strikes when there were petitions, marches on the streets and threats to businesses to close, including my father’s barber shop. For a short while, this did result in series of works on that theme. However, it was the Monaghan poet Patrick Kavanagh’s work that gave me more of a sense of place and belonging as I was inspired by the rawness of his work, which I tried to show in a series of works I painted based on his poems. 7


Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW AQA: When did you decide to become an artist? And looking back now, what do you think about that choice? McCloskey: I don’t think it was ever a decision as such, or a choice. It was something I had to do in order to be me - being an artist is part of who I am. I know this because there were times in my life that I didn’t want the burden of having to create. Patrick Kavanagh and William Butler Yeats referred to this burden as a hunger that can only be satisfied through creating, or a monster that would only sleep after fulfilling the creative urge. I would distract myself with anything else, but over time this becomes very dissatisfying. I’ve heard it referred to as “emotional suicide.” Increasingly, it haunts and taunts you to produce and creating is then the only relief. Art has sustained me emotionally, financially and spiritually over the years and the older I get, the more I realise what a true gift it has been, how it has taken my life out of the mundane, and allowed me to explore this enthralling energy that works through me during the creative process into a magical world of spirit. AQA: Where do you live now? McCloskey: I live in Gorey, County Wexford. AQA: How long have you lived there?  McCloskey: I’ve lived in Gorey now for 25 years. About 12 years ago, I built a house a couple of miles outside of town in a stunning country area. The place and the people are a constant inspiration as I’m surrounded by the most stunning countryside. AQA: What brought you to this place? McCloskey: As well as being a painter, I’m also a professional teacher of Art and Design and I moved here from Dublin to secure a teaching job. AQA: When did you start making art? McCloskey: From as far back as I can remember in early childhood, I was always fascinated by art. It excited me and gave me identity. My twin sister is also an artist and when we were very young children, we would spend our time filling copybooks with drawing after drawing. Although, I remember when I was about 14 years old discovering Rembrandt’s paintings in an old book I got from the library and being in total awe. Around the same time, a local man opened an art supply shop in his house selling a limited range of art materials. I would visit, usually after I spent a Saturday or some evenings unloading boxes of frozen food from lorries into freezers for a local business, and use the money to buy art materials to experiment with. I could barely contain my excitement at the prospect of trying out new materials. One of the first paintings I did in oil paint was to attempt to copy Rembrandt’s stunning painting, “Lady Bathing in a Stream”. 8


Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW

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Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW

AQA:Why? McCloskey: In order to be true to myself, to fill the void/hunger to create. AQA: Let’s talk Art. What is your newest series of work about, the “Omega” series? McCloskey: Thank you. “The Omega (awakenings 3d)” builds on my previous series, “Awakenings (The Alpha)” and “Awakenings Reloaded”. This is the third in the trilogy of the awakenings theme. “The Omega 3d” the series consists of fifteen 30cm cubes, twelve of which are wall-mounted and three of which are viewed in the round on stands. These works are based on landscape. However, the landscape is only the starting point - what matters to me is the process of allowing creativity to work through me, the process of trusting and of silencing my own mind. These paintings have moved away from the traditional two-dimensional surfaces into the third dimension, recognising the nature of divinity/creativity/spirituality as multi-dimensional, all things in all directions. They are a natural evolution from the earlier “Alpha” and “Reloaded” series of paintings. AQA: You’ve said your work is about Heaven and Earth. What do you mean? McCloskey: One of the “Omega 3d” is titled “And I saw a new heaven and a new earth”. All the titles of this series have a spiritual context - “Amazing Grace”, “In my heart I have hidden your word”, etc. - as that’s what the work is about. The titles are only pointers towards the discovery of the third dimension of the self, the divine or spiritual. Each work contains what appears to be sky and Earth merging, erupting and transforming the light emerging from or pushing away the dark. This metamorphosis reflects my own self-discovery and spiritual growth. Primarily, these paintings are for me, my learning, my exploration, my discovery; each work gives me a greater understanding of where I’m placed in the world. If from that truth others can begin their journey even in some small way from experiencing these works, then that is more than I could ask for. AQA: Do you believe that art is a spiritual thing, or process? McCloskey: Yes, the process of creating is a spiritual act. In order to be truly whole, open and susceptible, one must first be present. Everything happens in the present moment. True art can only be created from this place, and only from this place of being can anything be truly of merit. So, as I mentioned earlier, by the silencing of the mind, getting out of my own way and through the act of allowing divinity/creativity to work through me, I give consent for that creativity to manifest.

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Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW

AQA: What are or is your favorite medium? Oil or acrylic? McCloskey: I have used many different mediums over the years, but sometimes I will change the medium according to the subject matter. The “Alpha”, “Reloaded” and “Omega” works are mainly in oil. However, before using oils I will build up layers of acrylic as it’s quick-drying and allows impasto layers to hold their shapes. Then I finish using oils as they are slower-drying, giving me more time to work areas. Also, there is a delicate subtlety in tone and colour that oil naturally has. AQA: Who are your favorite artists who have inspired you or your work in some way? McCloskey: I admire many artists. I mentioned Rembrandt earlier, but the Irish painter Jack Yeats was certainly one of my earliest inspirations. I like expressive works that convey an atmosphere or mood. However Mark Rothko’s chapel series of paintings convey a quiet spirituality and are very powerful in their simplicity. AQA: Tell me about the “Alpha” and “Reloaded” series. What are they about? McCloskey: In the “Alpha” and “Reloaded” series, I attempt to explore that energy or spirit existing within all things, the hidden energy that vibrates within all matter. I attempt to create work that engages the viewer with this energy and aim to heighten their spiritual experience as a consequence of experiencing/looking at my paintings. When I speak of “spirituality”, I’m not referring to organised religious assemblages, but more so I'm referring to the belief that the act of creating allows us to tap into our higher selves, which has been referred to as God, Spirit, energy or soul. This can open us to being inspired and allows us to sense, see and feel without the influence of the ego. The “Alpha” and “Reloaded” are based on landscape as it facilitates me in portraying that sense of immensity and space, which in turn assists me in expressing the power of spirit, the glory of something greater than me but connected to me. This is intended to evoke to some degree a sense of spirit, of enormity, through the ethereal qualities of the paint, the contrast of dark and light, and using the vastness of landscape of matter and space as the catalyst in which to express this. I have also used the theme of seasons as a way to suggest the beginning and end, the circle of life, the alpha and the omega. The luminosity of light and colour is central to all the work, light being used to reflect birth or life; for without light there is no life. In places, there is little or no clarity between shapes, matter and space, suggesting unrest and interchange between form, space and the resistance of oneself to grow.

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Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW

AQA: What do you think of the art market and the prices of art and how they effect the art world and artists? McCloskey: There are some artists that have demanded huge prices for their work, but they are only a fraction of the overall market. There is a lot of excellent art out there at very reasonable prices. The question is really, in some circles, has art become a commodity with prices inflated and hyped in order to make more and more money? Often, certain art dealers or companies will hype a new young artist after buying his/her work at earlier prices. The problem is that these dealers are dictating or influencing what is perceived as valuable and worthy not necessarily on the quality of the art. This can blind people in an already confusing art world as to what to invest in, and in turn impede the artist’s development. If an artist is painting primarily for the market or following whatever the trend of the day is instead of being honest and true to themselves, then they are merely making products. AQA: What is your favorite food? McCloskey: I love anything Italian.

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Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW

AQA: You went to art school, at National College of Art and Design (N.C.A.D) and later you completed a Masters in Fine Art painting from De Montfort in the UK. What was that like for you? McCloskey: I was seventeen years old when I attended NCAD, very young and naive. Moving from a small town to a city was daunting, but exciting also. It did give me a grounding and exposed me to many different art forms. I found for the most part that art college learning is autonomous. Its main benefit is the exposure you have to your contemporaries and their processes, the interaction with them and the time it allows you to explore and experiment with your own processes. More recently, I completed a Masters degree in fine art from De Montfort University 2010. As a more mature student, I was able to explore on a much deeper level what art means to me. It was taxing at times, but totally worth it. It enabled me to place my work in context and gave me the confidence to remain true to myself. AQA: How has the art world changed since you started, and is it better or worse? McCloskey: Very much has changed since I began. The greatest development for the promotion of artwork is the Internet. High quality images of your work can now be sent to any gallery, magazine or blog in seconds. Also, with social media such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, an artist can reach an audience unheard of before when depending on a static gallery space alone. Galleries, although they have their place, are no longer the first port of call for buyers or browsers of art. This has removed some of the mystery, and in some cases, snobbery or elitism, from the art world. Getting your art out there is no longer dependent on the opinion of a few. However, as powerful as this media is, artists whether they like it or not must embrace it. It can never substitute for the physical presence of an artwork, from actually experiencing its energy, and it can result in art overload when searching for art/artists to admire or collect, but it also places more responsibility on the buyer to be more discerning. Now this can be done in a much more leisurely way from a tablet, phone or laptop. There are also many artists who have moved outside the traditional venues and set up collectives using any available space to show their work. This is a very positive change as it helps to get art out from the often claustrophobic galley space into everyday public life, exposing people who ordinarily would not see art as part of their life to creative ideas. This year’s Turner prize winners are an excellent example of this.

- J. Lowe

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Paul McCloskey INTERVIEW

www.paulmccloskeyart.com


SOPHIA CHIZUCO

www.sophiachizuco.com


THE MAZEKING

WWW.SAATCHIART.COM/THEMAZEKING


SOAPBOX BY ANNA DOWELL

ECONOMIC EFFECTS ON NYC ARTISTS TODAY Money, money, money, mo-ney. Oh, money. Dealing with the income situation while pursuing creating artwork has continued to be a main challenge for most artists. It’s not a new challenge. However, the situation that’s going on right now globally with the economy, market, and art culture is a distinct, unique situation. How is the economic situation affecting the artists and art culture? Let’s zero in on NYC as a model, as it is one of the main recognized hubs for art, culture, galleries, theater, and productions. Plus, New York has a strong and recent history as a thriving art culture where artists live and work. (Not to mention I live here. … ahem.. hehe) It’s a known thing that you gain credibility for living, working, and being exhibited in NYC. So, how are the New York artists panning out in the current situation? I have noticed lately from talking to many New York artists that most of them are overwhelmed. They are finding it very challenging to support themselves financially with full time jobs or squeezing by with favors from friends and family, and still find enough time and energy to create the type of work they want to create, and also working their asses off to market and present themselves so they are recognized, and find the opportunities to make money from their art. Finding the time, energy, and/or resources to create as much work as they’d like is not easy, they’re mentioning. The rate of their art output is definitely affected. They would like to 17

create more, they struggle to find the opportunities to exhibit and be paid. With the energy they have left after doing their best to survive with a decent life they are still pursuing the dream of being a living, working artist in NYC with the hopes of being consistently exhibited here and making a living from their art, or at least making enough to only work part-time doing something else. To what avail? Many have given up on this dream that is starting to look like ‘pie in the sky’ unless you’re super lucky, come from money, have a hook up, or something. Many of the artists I meet look tired, somewhat frustrated, and are questioning, ‘Is it worth it to live here?’ It’s a struggle to get into big galleries, for example, because so many of them are focusing in on already well-established artists and are not focusing on artists from NYC anymore. It’s all about the globalization and easy money for the big galleries, so the upcoming and even seasoned artists in NYC get left behind in this scenario these days. It seems a consensus that most art dealers are not willing to take the risks like they were before in, say, the 1950s-1980s. They are no longer willing to represent the unrepresented. Plus if you notice, a lot of the so-called top bluechip artists today are ones who happen to come from some sort of money. Wow, wouldn’t it being something if there was still an art dealer like Leo Castelli out there discovering today’s visionaries?


SOAPBOX Now, I don’t want to sound like ‘Debby Downer’. So, ok, it’s all crappy and shithole, but it’s still better than living in Timbuktu in many ways. There is still a culture of support for artists here to some extent. Yes, even if you aren’t already well-known and making lots of money from your art, it’s still a good city to find all kinds of opportunities, with lots of places for potential exhibition, and it can even be a great place to create your own opportunities. It’s still a place where artists of all types are collaborating and making cool things happen. For example, there are some smaller galleries featuring new local artists, there’s the NYC Fringe Festival, places like the Shrine, and a few smaller performing arts spaces focused on the new. However, it’s very different than the thriving kind of artist community that we often envision looking back to the glory days. Instead of hearing a thriving artist voice, it’s more like we hear a bunch of scattered artists trying to stay afloat. Why is it so hard for artists to live here? Well, it’s hard to find any living-wage jobs part-time or full-time in general. The cost of living is way too high. Jobs are hard to find at that. And art supplies just like everything else are rising in price. Plus, gone are the days of an actual art scene. And if there is one, its only for the bourgeoise to enjoy now. Gone are the days of living in Chelsea and working at a little bookstore part-time and scraping by enough to have the time and money to create your artwork. Forget Chelsea, don’t expect to be able to live as an artist with a part-time job whether you live in Brooklyn, Queens, or even the Bronx. Now, it’s more like working 40+ hours or living off of friends’ favors for living situation so you have time for art creation and pursuing your calling. And even then, you’ll probably just be scraping by and showing minimally. Expect to

make your art on nights and weekends or during your minimal time off with what energy you have left after running around the city managing sometimes four parttime patched-together jobs. And cross your fingers that you’ll be one of the few artists that gains recognition who wasn’t born into money. Plus, now the competition for being noticed is higher with so many schools popping out tons of wannabe artists with degrees. Not to mention the incredibly high student loan debt that many of these artists have. However, the situation pushes the serious artists to get focused, to be inventive, to be more creative with their resources and materials. and to make happen what they can, regardless. It’s still like so many say- “New York…if you can make it here, you can make it anywhere.” And those that do manage to make it happen show their passion, persistence, and commitment. And because of the rise above the challenges, they shine. However, even the talented, true artists are getting burnt out of doing it this way and are starting to ask questions like…’What do I do? Where do I live? Is it even worth it to pursue making a living as an artist anymore?’ And say things like, ‘This is too hard. Is it worth it to live here?’ ‘How do I have enough time, money, and energy to create the work that I want to create?’ ‘How do I have enough support?’ ‘How do I get recognized?’ Artists are wondering, ‘Is the art scene dying in NYC because it’s just too hard to live and work here anymore?’ Or, ’Is this going to weed out the ones that don’t need to be here? And is there going to be a revival of the art world that would support artists?’

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SOAPBOX Maybe, gone are the days where you need to live and work where you’re exhibited. With the global connection and connection via the Internet, are our communities and support less centralized from where we live and more focused on our web connections and credibility? Less money and venues for support for artists pushes artists to be recognized internationally with the venues that will show and pay them. And it’s not so hard to be connected to people and exhibit all around the world anymore. So, more and more artists are using their connections via the web. It’s a shifting point for artists in NYC. They realize it’s not really working out right now to live and work here in the way they want to with the economic situation as it is. I’m sure the talented and willful artists will find new ways to make it work for them, whether that means living elsewhere, or coming up with a new way of doing this altogether. And I sure hope they do, because New York won’t be the same without the influence from the artists that live here.

— ANNA DOWELL

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ART QA


FEATURED ARTIST INTERVIEW

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Nina Tokhtaman FEATURED INTERVIEW I love abstraction and I love color, and finding them together in one artwork that works for me is not always easy. But, delightfully, I found them both in Nina Tokhtaman’s works. Her vibrant, colorful and shapeshifting paintings link both the past and present in my mind. When it was time to for me to pick an artist for interviewing, it was an easy choice. I think you’ll find her work as strong and engaging as I do.

THE INTERVIEW

AQA: Where you born? TOKHTAMAN: I was born in the southern Urals in Russia, the oldest mountains on the planet. AQA: What was that like ? TOKHTAMAN: It was a small village surrounded by forests and mountain streams. My ancestors were not native here, and came to this beautiful place from historical events. AQA: When you did start making art ? TOKHTAMAN: My father was very good in the drawing of realistic portraits. My mother was good with color combinations and had the potential talent of a designer. My sister gave me a task to draw a forest or trees before attending school. All of this affected the expression of interest in the art.

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Nina Tokhtaman FEATURED INTERVIEW AQA: Did you study art? What was that like? TOKHTAMAN: I studied art and Art History at the age of 12 at the Art School, then at the University in Ufa city. In Art school, talented children of the republic Bashkortostan studied art for 5 years and passed the exam before attending. AQA: Where do you live now? TOKHTAMAN: I live now in New York. This is my second attempt to live in this city. Once upon a time I lived here from 1996 to 1998. Now I live from 2012, four years. AQA: What do you like about living there? TOKHTAMAN: To be honest, I do not like to live in big cities. AQA: I see you do traditional and mixed media artworks? TOKHTAMAN: I'm doing mostly painting and this is what I love to do most. I use images of my paintings to get a new image or to get the effect to enhance expression with photo editors and filters. For me, there is no distinction between them. I just continue to work with the image on the computer. It's just a complement to my work to express the theme. AQA: Your work has seems to have a strong style. Where does that come from? Are you influenced by German paintings of the early 1900’s? TOKHTAMAN: Not at all. Rather early Renaissance affected the color when the image perspectives and air effect on the colors were not realistic. The artists used bright contrasting colors. AQA: You paintings are colorful and strong, what are your works about? Is there a meaning or theme behind them? TOKHTAMAN: Of course, there are meanings or themes. I use, often, ancient mythologies, or philosophical themes about life and death, creation, and destruction. Sometimes I do Zen in art. AQA: How do you see digital's role in art? Is it a good thing or not? TOKHTAMAN: I think, the role of digital in art is not bad and has an influence on traditional art. Digital is only a tool, like others. An artist can present his talent using any tool, because creativity is the most important thing, not the tool.

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Nina Tokhtaman FEATURED INTERVIEW

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Nina Tokhtaman FEATURED INTERVIEW

AQA: What inspires you as far as style, form and color? TOKHTAMAN: The form and color have to be perfect. I'm bored doing my paintings in the same style. I'm trying to change the style, with each painting. The style needs to be the style that best expresses the theme. AQA: What issues arise when an artist deals with digital imagery, if any? TOKHTAMAN: I do not have much experience in doing digital art works. I do not like the small screen of a tablet. Also, I am not familiar with some programs. So I prefer to use images of my own paintings, if I apply imagery tools. AQA: What gallery reps you? TOKHTAMAN: RoGallery, Art Brokerage, UK agency “Masterpiece Network.� AQA: Do you have any upcoming exhibits? TOKHTAMAN: I do not have any upcoming exhibitions. I have had a health problem, and, at this time, I am recovering after a hospital procedure. AQA: What do you see is the difference between the art world in the US and Europe, if any? TOKHTAMAN: Hm... It is not easy to answer, but my opinion is that more people in Europe are involved, and interested in Art, than in the USA. Also, in the past, more European artists created new styles in Art than Americans. AQA: What is your favorite food or meal? TOKHTAMAN: Fruits, vegetables and milk. AQA: What or who are your favorite artists or artwork? TOKHTAMAN: I like many good artists. I like Malevich, Klee, Miro, Dali, Magritte. I like them, because they created mind-blowing art. AQA: How has the art world changed in your eyes from when you started in art? TOKHTAMAN: The art world changed completely. The biggest change is the Internet, which helps the artists present and sell their artworks. I can not say anything about good changes regarding art galleries. There are many vanity galleries that get money from artists for the display of their work, but do not do proper promotion, and are not interested in the selling of the artworks. It seems money and business, in art, are more important than art and artists!

- D. Mancini 27


Nina Tokhtaman FEATURED INTERVIEW

http://www.valetova.info 28


CINEMA SPOT

What films to see? We have two picks!!! How about this cinema work by Dennis Hopper

Above: Still from Easy Rider. (1969)

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CINEMA SPOT

How about this cinema work by Wong Kar-Wai.

Above: Still from In The Mood for Love (2000)

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C AT

F LO W E R S

www.catflowersart.com


REVIEWS ARTIST: ZAROUHIE ABDALIAN For an installation artist, every exhibition is essentially a new challenge to immerse the viewer in an experience that transforms their perception of the space in which they find themselves. Particularly since the 1970s (but certainly long before), that challenge has been addressed over the years in any number of ways, with or without conceptual intent and with any variety of mediums. A Betrayal, Zarouhie Abdalian’s current exhibit at Clifton Benevento in SoHo, improvises in the gallery space with five sculptural pieces and a scrim over a window, all of which are clever in their own right, and which may or may not be conceptually related to each other. I say “clever” and “may or may not be related” because Abdalian leaves it up to the viewer to dig a little deeper into her work. I am no great fan of so-called “concept art” - or any art form, for that matter - when it requires being hit over the head with a dissertation in order for the viewer to understand it, much less appreciate it. Abdalian’s work may be conceptual, but her approach seems independent of the need to bang her point across. Taken at face value, the six pieces might pass as some sort of a pun. Yet there is a sense of more subtle commentary, and this is where her cleverness is evident. Rather than imposing any particular viewpoint, Abdalian offers only a few clues for the viewer to mull over - namely, the pieces and placement, the materials and their origin, and their titles. Such equivocation might be disparaged within certain contexts, but Abdalian’s domain is that of the explorative observer. Her work places the viewer in a space that encourages one to look with her, and perhaps to ask questions of one’s own, as she comments on social structures and relationship to environment.

Clifton Benevento Gallery 515 Broadway, New York, NY 10012

- Jack Ender 35


REVIEWS

Zarouhie Abdalian exhibits from March 5 - May 14, 2016 at Clifton Benevento Gallery 515 Broadway, New York, NY 10012

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SHINGO FRANCIS

WWW.SHINGOFRANCIS.COM


SPRING ENJOY


ART SPOT

ABOVE: “TODAY’S LEVITATION” by ARTIST NATSUMI HAYASHI (2011)

NATSUMI HAYASHI IS ONE OF OUR PICKS FOR ARTISTS TO CHECK OUT.

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ART SPOT

ABOVE: “IMAGE OF ART” BINARY IMAGE SERIES. PAINTING BY ARTIST COLIN WIGBY (2016)

COLIN WIGBY IS ONE OF OUR PICKS FOR ARTISTS TO CHECK OUT.

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ART QA FREE FULL PAGE ADS FOR ARTISTS GET YOUR FREE ARTIST AD TODAY

ART QA will offer 2 free full color and full page advertisements for fine artists in each issue of our magazine. This way, artists everywhere can have a little more exposure for their artwork and readers have the opportunity to see more artists and artworks.

If you are interested in placing an ad, simply email your contact information and a link to your website to staff@artqamagazine.com Space is limited, so get your ad in early because once we have the two free artist ads in each issue and we will not accept or publish the overflow. However, you can request that we consider your ad for the next issue of the magazine.

ART QA - QUARTERLY MAGAZINE - FOUR ISSUES A YEAR SPRING - SUMMER - AUTUMN - WINTER

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LFFOTO.COM


UPCOMING - THINGS - PLACES - EVENTS Night at the Museums

Governors Ball

Now in its third year, “Night at the Museums” offers free entry to 15 of New York’s Lower Manhattan’s most diverse and culturally significant Museums. On June 21, 2016

The annual Randalls Island event is the one local fest where you can catch hip-hop chart toppers, tastemaker-approved buzz bands, leftfield pop heroes and, yes, dance-commanding EDM overlords. From June 3 to 5 2016.

http://www.mjhnyc.org/nightatthemuseums/

http://governorsballmusicfestival.com/

Free Films in NYC Parks

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn

Each year films are screened at several New York City parks including, Central Park, Bryant Park and others. The event is FREE and all films will be shown rain or shine. In most cases the movies begin at 8:00 pm. For dates, times and parks please see the link below. Screenings start as early as May 2016 and run through Summer.

BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! is one of New York City's longest running, free, outdoor performing arts festivals, attracting 250,000 attendees from across New York City to the Prospect Park Bandshell each summer. Opening night is June 8, 2016 · 8:15 PM at Prospect Park Bandshell
 Enter at 9th Street and Prospect Park West.

h t t p : / / w w w. n y c g o v p a r k s . o r g / e v e n t s / free_summer_movies

http://www.bricartsmedia.org/performing-arts/ bric-celebrate-brooklyn

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ART QA WE THANK EVERYONE WHO CONTRIBUTED TO THIS MAGAZINE.

THANK YOU!

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ART QA Magazine SPRING 2016  

ART QA contemporary arts magazine featuring artists interviews, art reviews, art stories and special features. In this Spring 2016 issue we...

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