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Peripheral

Michaela MacPherson

eries

agazine

Contemporary Art

the what you’re getting at, but I’m not making work just for avid artists and admirers. I’m not saying that Demand is wrong, I think that conveying expression through handling of materials is a beautiful idea and I’m know there have been incredibly emotional pieces created strictly following that plan, but I want my work to be accessible to absolutely everyone. Using symbols that people are familiar with helps make my work accessible to other artists, as well as the average passerby with no artistic training whatsoever. Take a look at “Fear of Commitments,” for example. A chain and key are familiar symbols, the chain symbolizing being trapped and the key potential freedom. No one should look at that piece and struggle to understand whats going on there. And I mean I’m sure there are ways I could have handled the paint or composition that would get that message across, but my audience would be much narrower. Additionally, the average passerby isn’t going to take the time to dissect and analyze the underlying meaning of an artwork. I use a strong image, and simple one with familiar symbolism, and people get it and it will stick with them. It may not be a visionary idea, but its tried and true. We have really appreciated the way the vibrancy of thoughtful nuances you combine in your artworks, showing that vivacious tones are not strictly

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SPECIAL ISSUE

Profile for Artpress

Peripheral ARTeries // Contemporary Art Review // Special Edition  

Contemporary art review, featuring Andrea Riba • Gerdi Möller-Jansen • Valentin Gonzalez • Esther De Vlam • Marcel Harrison • Michaela Macph...

Peripheral ARTeries // Contemporary Art Review // Special Edition  

Contemporary art review, featuring Andrea Riba • Gerdi Möller-Jansen • Valentin Gonzalez • Esther De Vlam • Marcel Harrison • Michaela Macph...

Profile for artpress
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