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PART ONE The Center Gallery Fordham University at Lincoln Center


PART ONE WITH

curated by Leonard Cassuto

Paul Karasik Fernando Molero Alyssa Pheobus Anne Sherwood Pundyk Peter Scott Kara Walker Karen Yama

Opening reception October 5, 5:00 – 6:30 pm Center Gallery Fordham University at Lincoln Center 113 W. 60th St. New York, NY 10023

September 22nd – October 28th, 2010


cover: Detail from Kara Walker, Testimony, 2005, photogravure, 22.5 x 31 inches


Contents

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Acknowledgments Leonard Cassuto

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Foreword Casey Ruble

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Representing Captivity Leonard Cassuto

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Freedom In Mind Anne Sherwood Pundyk

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Plates, “The Art of Captivity, Part One”

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Exhibition Checklist & Artist Biographies

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Reading List Leonard Cassuto


Acknowledgments “The Art of Captivity” exhibitions, at Fordham’s Center Gallery and Susan Eley Fine Art, result from three years of thought, planning, and preparation. I am grateful to all those who have been involved in that process. My thanks to Fordham University—the Deans of the Colleges at Lincoln Center and Rose Hill, the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, the departments of English and Art, and the programs in Literary Studies and American Studies—for their generous financial support of Part One, and to Susan Eley for her enthusiastic interest and collaboration that led to Part Two of this exhibition. I am grateful to many others within the Fordham University community who contributed their thinking and time. I appreciate the guidance and assistance with all aspects of the exhibition graciously provided by Casey Ruble, Artist in Residence and Coordinator of Fordham’s Center Gallery. Thanks also to Joe Lawton, Chair of the Art Department, and Eva Badowska, Chair of the English Department, for their commitment and support. Peggy Cuskley, English Department administrator at the Lincoln Center campus, resolved innumerable issues with her customary deft and friendly touch. Anibal Pella-Woo, Adjunct Photography Professor and Fordham University Visual Arts Media Coordinator, helpfully provided all technical assistance. Fordham alumna Shannon Copfer created and implemented the compelling graphic design for the exhibitions, including this catalogue. Three interns, Fordham students Apollonia Colacicco, Gabrielle Greenberg, and Kyle Morrison, attended to many details and literally helped put the show together. Outside the university I am grateful to Meg Malloy, Partner with Sikkema Jenkins & Co., who was instrumental in the loan of Kara Walker’s photogravure series. My thanks to Jonathan and Beth Kern for their loan of the painting by Fernando Molero, and Candia Fisher for her loan of Alyssa Pheobus’s drawing. For providing a model and instructions for the student blog associated with “The Art of Captivity,” thanks to Professor Timothy Quigley of The New School for General Studies. Finally, I would like to offer my heartfelt thanks to the artists who have generously loaned their work and agreed to participate personally in events related to the exhibitions, especially Anne Sherwood Pundyk, whose unflagging belief that an English professor could curate an art exhibition was both generative and fundamental—and also wonderfully generous. — Leonard Cassuto 2


FOREWORD Casey Ruble | Artist in Residence, Visual Arts Department, Fordham University In addition to running the galleries at Fordham, I also teach a studio-art course called “Visual Thinking.” One of my goals in that course is to help students—not just art majors but also those studying everything from business to theology and women’s studies—learn the open-ended art of interpreting visual media. I want my students to understand art in a way that informs their comprehension of their individual areas of interest and extends into their personal lives. Art has the capacity to bridge many different realms of experience—a fact to which this interdisciplinary exhibition firmly attests. By thinking visually, people in any area of study can deepen their understanding of the world around them and their role in it. “The Art of Captivity, Part One,” curated by English Professor Leonard Cassuto and hosted by the Visual Arts Department at Fordham University, includes work by a diverse range of emerging and established artists. (Its sister exhibition will be on view at Susan Eley Fine Art at 46 W. 90th Street.) The experience of captivity is one to which nearly everyone can relate, albeit in very different ways. Though the word immediately brings to mind extreme situations—slavery, debilitating illness, persecution based on gender, race, or other aspects of identity, all of which are addressed by the work in this show—the notion of confinement or restriction can also be seen more broadly as related to many parts of everyday life, not all of them negative. Adherence to holiday or family traditions, involvement in cultural, political, or religious communities, enrollment in a particular school or practice in a professional field—these are all ways we voluntarily circumscribe our lives to make them richer. As Professor Cassuto suggests in his compelling essay, “captivity” and “free will” aren’t always as mutually exclusive as they may seem. The Visual Arts Department at Fordham is pleased to help realize this thoughtful, multilayered exhibition, and to bring it to a group of people who have chosen to step into the “confines” of the Fordham community as a way to forward their personal, professional, and academic growth.

Casey Ruble is a painter, freelance art critic, and artist in residence at Fordham University, where she teaches painting and drawing and serves as coordinator of the galleries. She is represented by Foley Gallery in New York and has been exhibited internationally.

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Representing Captivity Leonard Cassuto | Exhibition Curator and Professor of English, Fordham University “The Art of Captivity” exhibitions share an unusual origin in a college English course I devised in 2007 on captivity literature. Soon after the course began, I met an artist, Anne Sherwood Pundyk, who had completed a series of paintings based on the Persephone myth. My students and I had a lively discussion about her paintings, together with an ancient Greek poem about Persephone, including one class session with the artist herself. The Art of Captivity, you could say, was born in mind that day, and the desire for an extended interdisciplinary conversation about captivity proved the seed that eventually grew into “The Art of Captivity, Part One,” at Fordham University’s Center Gallery, and its sister exhibition (Part Two), curated by Susan Eley at Susan Eley Fine Art. Captivity is a prismatic theme. On the most literal level, captivity is physical restraint of one by another—as we see in the pieces of Susan Crile and Carolyn Monastra, for example. That paradigm gains particular historical resonance in relation to slavery, the source that Kara Walker has long mined for her provocative representations of African American life in bondage, as well as in the later struggle for civil rights, which we see in Kim Luttrell’s representation of Rosa Parks as a political prisoner. But the idea of physical bondage is only the gateway to a rich array of representations. For example, the physical aspect of captivity gains a new and forceful expression when it merges with thinking about illness and disability. Works by Paul Karasik and Anne Sherwood Pundyk address the idea of being prisoner of one’s body, and they explore how the effects of physical and mental differences ramify outward to affect family and society. Pundyk’s representation of her own struggle with cancer suggests that the body communicates a sense of both positive and negative freedom (“freedom to” and “freedom from”). Karasik’s depictions of autism in his family remind us that “family ties” are well named, for they restrain at the same time that they connect.

Anne Sherwood Pundyk, Moon Water (detail), 2009, oil & acrylic on linen, 63 x 60 inches

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As the example of family shows, the possibilities of representing captivity extend far beyond the physical. The idea of captivity encompasses a large swath of experience in the world and refracts it into a vast spectrum of human possibility. What does it mean to be a “prisoner of love,” for example? Who is the captor? Is it possible to hold oneself captive? How does captivity merge with captivation? These are only a few questions raised by the art of Karen Yama and Alyssa Phoebus, as well as other artists in these exhibitions. The power of a prismatic theme lies in the way that it conveys the concrete and the abstract at once: It generalizes outward and narrows to the particular at the same time. “The Art of Captivity” exhibitions are a gratifying ending to the thread I started following a few years ago, but I hope that they also mark the beginning of further inquiries. The work in these two exhibitions powerfully demonstrates the need to think more deeply about the many meanings of captivity and its place in the range of human experience. Leonard Cassuto is a professor of English at Fordham University, where he teaches American literature. His most recent book is Hard-Boiled Sentimentality: The Secret History of American Crime Stories, which was nominated for the Edgar and Macavity Awards and named one of the Ten Best Books of 2008 in the crime and mystery category by the Los Angeles Times. Forthcoming is the Cambridge History of the American Novel, of which he is the General Editor. Cassuto is also an award-winning journalist, writing about subjects ranging from science to sports. This is his first curated exhibition.

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Freedom IN MIND Anne Sherwood Pundyk | Artist The premise of “The Art of Captivity” is that the breadth and depth of its theme should be accessed through both the visual and literary arts—and more important, that both our emotions and our intellects will be strengthened by thinking across these disciplines. An artwork or novel addressing captivity is as much about its opposite: freedom. If a captive can recognize and identify her captor’s ways and means of constraint, then her awareness can give form to the possibility of assertion and choice. These are the powers of a free person. Frederick Douglass, for example, after he gains awareness of his captivity in slavery, states, “the white man who expected to succeed in whipping, must also succeed in killing me.” Not all captives can assert themselves in this way, but freedom must begin in the imagination, in the awareness of captivity. Ideas of interrelatedness—between experiencing written and visual expressions, between the agencies of mind and body, and between freedom and constraint—resonate for me personally. As a painter, I found ways to slip from the constraints of self-limiting conventions through the study of philosophy. Entering into this text-based discipline profoundly affected my approach to the visual. I question more freely now, and more directly connect with the choices I make in my work. My artworks, in both Part One and Part Two of “The Art of Captivity” exhibitions, explore the theme of captivity. They also bridge the span before and after my “emancipation.” My reading over the past few years, particularly of Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Judgment, has sparked a formal evolution in my painting. Kant sets out to describe how we judge beauty in a work of art. His initial requirement for this qualitative decision is that we refer to our own reactions to the actual object, which we must see in person. Furthermore, a judgment of beauty is not based on preexisting concepts. Deciding if an artwork is meaningful is a uniquely personal experience that engages both the mind and the body. I find a reassuring thread in Kant’s thinking that I often return to, both inside and outside my studio. I can feel my way back along this thread to the idea that I am free to think and act for myself, to strive in my work to express a complete world appealing to both imagination and understanding. Following the steady logic behind Kant’s examination of subjectivity, I believe that I’ve found a way to 6


trust seemingly illogical, even irrational impulses and reactions. This knowledge has alerted me to the possibility of choosing to be free. In her foreword, Casey Ruble notes that adhering to a discipline often enriches and expands our capabilities—thus enabling us to venture beyond it. That has been my experience. Susan Eley selected for her exhibition my monotype, Persephone, which depicts the moment of Persephone’s abduction by Hades, the god of the underworld. I printed this in 2007 before reading Kant, but during my first exposure to Leonard Cassuto’s generous and rigorous interdisciplinary academic thinking. He invited me to talk about my artwork, based on the Persephone myth, with his class on captivity literature at Fordham three years ago. Delving deeper into the different versions and interpretations of the original Greek myth as I prepared for Cassuto’s class primed my thinking about useful links between written and visual concepts. I painted Moon Water, included in the show at Fordham, as part of a new body of work first shown in the spring of 2010. On top of the formal changes I was making, the work relates to my experience of being treated last year for both breast and lung cancer. (I have learned that I should say at this point that I have never smoked.) Illness illuminates the limitations of our physical existence and highlights the patient’s social and emotional isolation. Like Persephone, I feel that I have made a round-trip to the underworld. The cycle of the seasons recounted in the Persephone myth result from a hardwon compromise: her captivity and freedom must coexist. The two states of mind define each other and together form a new cycle of the seasons. In thinking about my own story during the last three years of sickness and health, I have benefited from the formation of new ideas about captivity—new ways of thinking, my own compromise of seasons. This cycle will continue for me. The “The Art of Captivity” exhibitions are intended for a broad audience—not only that within the Fordham community but also outside the university. To reinforce the interdisciplinary nature of the exhibitions, this fall I will be editing an ongoing online publication of student writing from Professor Cassuto’s English classes, as well as from students from other schools and programs in New York City. In addition to the writings, panel discussions will be hosted at both exhibitions, and other related lectures at Fordham will take place. This combination of artworks, books, and discussion forums will, I hope, extend our collective understanding of the dynamics of captivity—and liberation.

Anne Sherwood Pundyk resides in New York City and has recently shown at Susan Eley Fine Art, Exit Art, and the Philoctetes Center in New York, at Art Miami, and at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Pundyk is also a freelance art writer and curator, who has contributed to the Brooklyn Rail and maintains a blog about contemporary art.

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Part One Plates


Peter SCOTT

Suspect, 2006 digital C-print 31 x 27 inches courtesy of the artist


I’m on Fire, 2007 graphite on paper 70 x 44 inches courtesy of Candia J. Fisher

Alyssa PHEOBUS


Testimony, 1 of 5, 2005 photogravure 22.5 x 31 inches (framed) courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. (top)

Testimony, 2 of 5, 2005 photogravure 22.5 x 31 inches (framed) courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. (bottom)


Testimony, 3 of 5, 2005 photogravure 22.5 x 31 inches (framed) courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. (top)

Testimony, 4 of 5, 2005 photogravure 22.5 x 31 inches (framed) courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. (bottom)

Kara WALKER


The Ride Together (page 125), 2003 ink on paper 8.5 x 11 inches courtesy of the artist


The Ride Together (page 126), 2003 ink on paper 8.5 x 11 inches courtesy of the artist

Paul KARASIK


Paintball, 1of 3, 2003 archival inkjet print 14 x 14 inches courtesy of the artist (opposite page, top) Paintball, 2 of 3, 2003 archival inkjet print 14 x 14 inches courtesy of the artist (opposite page, bottom) Paintball, 3 of 3, 2003 archival inkjet print 14 x 14 inches courtesy of the artist (above)

Karen YAMA


Fernando MOLERO

Autumn Nights, 2009 oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches courtesy of Jonathan and Beth Kern


Moon Water, 2009 oil & acrylic on linen 63 x 60 inches courtesy of the artist

Anne Sherwood PUNDYK


EXHIBITION CHECKLIST & ARTIST Biographies Paul Karasik The Ride Together (pages 119–127; 131, 132), 2003 ink on paper 8.5 x 11 inches courtesy of the artist The Ride Together (pages 128, 129), 2003 double-spread facsimile 11 x 17 inches courtesy of the artist Based in Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, Paul Karasik is the coauthor of The Ride Together, which combines traditional and graphic narration. He is also the cocreator of the graphic-novel adaptation of Paul Astor’s City of Glass, and a recipient of the 2009 Eisner Award for a collection of Hank Fletcher’s comics, I Shall Destroy All The Civilized Planets. His work has appeared in the New Yorker and Nickelodeon magazines. Fernando Molero Autumn Nights, 2009 oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches courtesy of Jonathan and Beth Kern Fernando Molero studied at the University of Barcelona and has taught art at the Leonardo da Vinci Academy of Art, Barcelona. Molero lived in Brooklyn for a decade before returning to Spain last year. Molero’s work has been featured in Barcelona at Artur Ramon Contemporani, Galeria Tertre, and Casa Golferichs, as well as in New York at Studio Facchetti. Alyssa Pheobus I’m on Fire, 2007 graphite on paper 70 x 44 inches courtesy of Candia J. Fisher Alyssa Pheobus divides her time between New York and Lahore, Pakistan. She had solo shows at Bellwether and Tracy Williams, Ltd., in New York in 2009 and at Holster Projects in London in 2010. 20


Anne Sherwood Pundyk Moon Water, 2009 oil & acrylic on linen 63 x 60 inches courtesy of the artist My Atlas, Moon Water, 2010 video loop 3 minutes 20 seconds courtesy of the artist Anne Sherwood Pundyk resides in New York City and has recently shown at Susan Eley Fine Art, Exit Art, and the Philoctetes Center in New York, at Art Miami, and at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Pundyk is also a freelance art writer and curator, who has contributed to the Brooklyn Rail and maintains a blog about contemporary art. Peter Scott Suspect, 2006 digital C-print 31 x 27 inches courtesy of the artist Peter Scott is an artist, writer, and curator, and director of the non-profit gallery Carriage Trade. Venues he has exhibited at in the U.S. and Europe include Apex Art, Momenta Art, the Brooklyn Museum, and White Columns in New York, Museum Fodor in Holland, SMAAK in Belgium, and Riverside Studios in London. He is the recipient of two NYFA grants. His writing has appeared most recently in Art Monthly, artnet, and the Architect’s Newspaper. Kara Walker Testimony, 2005 series of five photogravures 22.5 x 31 inches (framed) courtesy of the artist and Sikkema Jenkins & Co. Based in New York City, Kara Walker has had solo exhibitions in major art museums worldwide, including a traveling retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2007. She was awarded the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship in 1997. Her work is in over 40 public art collections. Karen Yama Paintball, 2003 series of three archival inkjet prints on paper 14 x 14 inches courtesy of the artist After living in New York City, Berlin, and Chicago, Karen Yama now resides in New Jersey. She has recently had a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, Illinois, and at the Galerie Daad in Berlin. Selected group exhibitions include the Erna Hecey Gallery in Brussels, Belgium, and Momenta Art in Brooklyn, New York. She is currently showing at Niels Borch Jensen, Berlin. 21


Reading List “The Art of Captivity” and “Captivity and Conflict” Courses, Fall 2010 This omnibus reading list is a snapshot of an evolving endeavor. I repeat some of my courses, but never in the same form. Reading lists change as I learn more about the subject—this list has already changed since I first started teaching courses about captivity in 2007. I tell my students that I’m a student who never left school; I only changed positions in the classroom. So I teach myself as well as my students, and the argument of a course (for all course presentations, even seminar discussions, contain arguments, whether acknowledged or not) will change as my thinking changes. My students are reading these books this term. Who knows what the next captivity course will bring? — Leonard Cassuto Required Books Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan of the Apes (1914) Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (1845) Patricia Highsmith, The Price of Salt (1952) Paul Karasik and Judy Karasik, The Ride Together (2003) Stephen King, Misery (1987) Christine Baker Kline, Bird in Hand (2009) Robert Murphy, The Body Silent (1990) Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar (1963) Art Speigelman, Maus II (1991) Oliver Sacks, An Anthropologist on Mars (1993) Robert Louis Stevenson, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) Sloan Wilson, The Man In the Gray Flannel Suit (1955) Required Films The Apartment (dir. Billy Wilder, 1960) Full Metal Jacket (dir. Stanley Kubrick, 1987) Gattaca (dir. Andrew Niccol, 1997) Recommended Books Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (1963) Art Speigelman, Maus I (1986) 22


Anne Sherwood Pundyk Persephone, 2007 watercolor monotype 15 x 13 inches courtesy of the artist Anne Sherwood Pundyk resides in New York City and has recently shown at Susan Eley Fine Art, Exit Art, and the Philoctetes Center in New York, at Art Miami, and at Washington & Lee University in Lexington, Virginia. Pundyk is also a freelance art writer and curator, who has contributed to the Brooklyn Rail and maintains a blog about contemporary art. Heather Boose Weiss One With the Birds, 2004 silver gelatin print 15 x 15 inches courtesy of the artist Heather Boose Weiss lives in Los Angeles. Her photographs have been featured in various solo and group shows at Susan Eley Fine Art. She has also exhibited at Gray and Gove Gallery, at the School of Visual Arts, NY, and the Hagedorn Foundation, Atlanta, as well as at a recent Photography Festival in Pingyao, China. Weiss holds a BFA from the School of Visual Arts, NY. Elizabeth White 72 Hours, 2009 Fuji Crystal Archive print 24 x 30 inches courtesy of the artist A Well-Stocked Pantry, 2010 Fuji Crystal Archive print 30 x 150 inches courtesy of the artist Elizabeth White lives in New York. Her work includes photography, video, installation, and social practices. Recently she has been in exhibitions at the Tate Modern, London, and the Center for Endless Progress, Berlin, in addition to exhibitions in New York, Dublin, Leipzig, Japan, and New Zealand. She has received an Aaron Siskind Fellowship and the support of the Hattie Strong Foundation and was featured as a new talent by ArtInfo.com. White holds an MFA from the School of Visual Arts, NY.

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Kim Luttrell In Hiding, 2004 photoetching on stonehedge 9.5 x 7.5 inches courtesy of Tamar Ekstein Rosa Parks, 2006 digital bus tickets and mixed media 24 x 18 inches courtesy of the artist Kim Luttrell was born in Henderson, Kentucky, and lives in New York. Luttrell’s work is in corporate and private collections in the US, Europe, South America, and Asia. She was a recipient of the Adolph & Esther Gottlieb Foundation Grant & Artist Fellowship Grant, was a featured artist at the House & Garden Showhouse at the Havemeyer Mansion, NJ, and is in the permanent archives of the Library and Research Center of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC. Luttrell is a graduate of the Ringling School of Fine Art and Design, FL. Fernando Molero Summer 1965, 2008 oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches courtesy of the artist Coney Island, 2008 oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches courtesy of the artist Fernando Molero was born in Granada, Spain, lived in Brooklyn for a decade, and has recently returned home to Barcelona. Molero’s oil paintings have been featured in Barcelona at Artur Ramon Contemporani, Galeria Tertre, and Casa Golferichs, as well as in New York at Studio Facchetti and Susan Eley Fine Art. Molero studied at the University of Barcelona and taught art in that city at the Leonardo da Vinci Academy of Art. Carolyn Monastra The Captive, 2001 chromogenic print 20 x 16 inches courtesy of the artist Carolyn Monastra was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and lives in Brooklyn. Her photographs have been featured in group and solo shows at Susan Eley Fine Art, Julie Saul, Capsule, and Exit Art in New York, as well as at Miami Art Basel with Ambrosino Gallery, the Tokyo Art Fair, and the Palm Beach Contemporary Art Fair. Monastra’s work is in the Margulies Collection, Miami. She holds an MFA in photography from Yale University.

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Ayakoh Furukawa Long-necked Woman No. 6 (with quotation by Oprah Winfrey), 2010 graphite and ink on paper 60 x 32 inches courtesy of the artist Long-necked Woman No. 7 (with quotation by Marilyn Monroe), 2010 graphite and ink on paper 65 x 36 inches courtesy of the artist Ayakoh Furukawa was born in Osaka, Japan, and lives in New York. Exhibition venues include the Japan Society, Jersey City Museum, Ise Cultural Foundation, Tenri Cultural Foundation, Shanghai Art Fair, Marlborough Chelsea, Art Touch Collection, and many galleries internationally. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Ise Cultural Foundation. Furukawa holds a BFA and MFA from Hunter College. Kentaro Hiramatsu P-1, 2010 acrylic on canvas 12 x 12 inches courtesy of the artist Park-12-r, 2010 acrylic on canvas 28 x 54 inches courtesy of the artist Kentaro Hiramatsu was born in Japan and lives and works in New York City. He has had exhibitions at Susan Eley Fine Art, Asago Art Museum, Urawa Art Museum, the Ise Cultural Foundation, Capsule Gallery, City Without Walls, and other galleries. Jessica M. Kaufman Panopticon 3, 2006 silver gelatin print 40 x 30 inches courtesy of the artist Panopticon 16, 2006 silver gelatin print 40 x 30 inches courtesy of the artist Jessica M. Kaufman was born in Philadelphia and lives in New York. Her photographs have been featured at Susan Eley Fine Art, Michael Mazzeo Gallery, the Sasha Wolf Gallery, the Camera Club, NY, the Griffin Museum of Photography, MA, and the Lishui Photography Festival, China. Her work is in the collections of the Jewish Museum, NY, the Getty Research Institute, CA, Texas Tech University, the Southeast Museum of Photography, FL, and China’s Lishui Photography Museum. Kaufman received a BA from Yale University and an MFA in photography from the Massachusetts College of Art. 22


EXHIBITION CHECKLIST & ARTIST BIOGRAPHIES

Barbara Bashlow All Tied Up, 2002 oil on canvas 40 x 36 inches courtesy of the artist Barbara Bashlow resides in New York. She has had recent solo exhibitions at Allen Sheppard Gallery and Synchronicity Space, NY. Her work is in the corporate collections of Pfizer and Millennium Partners and she was a finalist for the Alexander Rusch Award. Bashlow holds a certificate in painting and drawing from New York Studio School. Susan Crile Crazed Acceptance, 2007 clay paint and chalk on colored paper 34 x 40 inches courtesy of the artist Stressed, 2007 chalk and pastel on colored paper 41 x 33 inches courtesy of the artist Susan Crile was raised in Cleveland and lives in New York. Crile has been featured in over 100 group shows and more than 50 solo exhibitions. Of the latter, 10 have been in fine art or university museums and include The Phillips Collection, MOCA Cleveland, and the Saint Louis Museum of Art. Her paintings are in the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Brooklyn Museum, among others. She has been awarded a residency at the American Academy in Rome and a Rockefeller Residency at Bellagio. Crile is a professor of art at Hunter College.

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Heather Boose WEISS

One With the Birds, 2004 silver gelatin print 15 x 15 inches courtesy of the artist


The Captive, 2001 chromogenic print 20 x 16 inches courtesy of the artist

Carolyn MONASTRA


Elizabeth WHITE

72 Hours, 2009 Fuji Crystal Archive print 24 x 30 inches courtesy of the artist


Coney Island, 2008 oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches courtesy of the artist

Fernando MOLER


Summer 1965, 2008 oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches courtesy of the artist


Long-necked Woman No. 7 (with quotation by Marilyn Monroe), 2010 graphite and ink on paper 65 x 36 inches courtesy of the artist

Ayakoh FURUKAWA


Long-necked Woman No. 6 (with quotation by Oprah Winfrey), 2010 graphite and ink on paper 60 x 32 inches courtesy of the artist


Persephone, 2007 watercolor monotype 15 x 13 inches courtesy of the artist

Anne Sherwood PUNDYK


Kentaro HIRAMATSU

P-1, 2010 acrylic on canvas 12 x 12 inches courtesy of the artist


Panopticon 3, 2006 silver gelatin print 40 x 30 inches courtesy of the artist

Jessica M. KAUFMAN


Barbara BASHLOW

All Tied Up, 2002 oil on canvas 40 x 36 inches courtesy of the artist


Stressed, 2007 chalk and pastel on colored paper 41 x 33 inches courtesy of the artist

Susan CRIL


Crazed Acceptance, 2007 clay paint and chalk on colored paper 34 x 40 inches courtesy of the artist


Rosa Parks, 2006 digital bus tickets and mixed media 24 x 18 inches courtesy of the artist

Kim LUTTRELL


In Hiding, 2004 photoetching on stonehedge 9.5 x 7.5 inches on loan from the collection of Tamar Ekstein


Part Two Plates


gelatin self-portrait depicts the artist tied between two trees via the ultra-long sleeves of her Morticia Addams–style dress. Both Monastra and Weiss explore the Gothic quality of captivity, playing on notions of bondage and sexuality. Elizabeth White’s A Well-Stocked Pantry is a 150-inch Photoshopped image of iconic American food products, such as Skippy, Campbell’s soup, and Hellman’s mayonnaise. White questions our dependence on these consumer products and examines the relentless acquisition of brand-name material goods. Ayakoh Furukawa is represented by two of her intricate graphite drawings of long-necked Burmese women. Each drawing is rendered through the simple repetition of one quotation, written over and over again in tiny pencil scrawl. The series explores feminist issues of feeling captive in male-dominated societies, both in the West and the Third World, questioning social pressures to dress and behave a certain way—whether by putting rings around the neck or wearing spike heels and tight clothing. In the early stages of curating this exhibition, I selected artwork depicting the most literal and violent expressions of captivity. Jessica M. Kaufman’s haunting black-and-white photographs of concentration camps in Poland and Austria today recall the atrocities of the Third Reich. Kim Luttrell’s Rosa Parks, made through a clever collage of digital bus tickets from the Civil Rights era, shows the mug shot snapped after the heroine’s arrest for refusing to move to the back of the bus. Susan Crile’s stunning paintings of victims of the Abu Ghraib prison scandal are the most gory of the exhibition. Her works on paper from this series, exhibited at Hunter College in 2006, depict the human capacity to inflict and endure extreme abuse and abject degradation. I hope this exhibition engages and challenges the viewer to consider the harm inflicted by a spectrum of captivity—from war zones to the more subtle forms of oppression we encounter every day. Captivity is part of the human condition. No one fully escapes it.

In 2006 Susan Eisner Eley founded Susan Eley Fine Art as a salon-style gallery on Manhattan’s Upper West Side. She has worked in public relations and education at the Morgan Library & Museum and the Mayor’s Art Commission of the City of New York, and she interned at the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy.  Eley is a former freelance editor and writer, who has written extensively on fine art and dance for national and regional publications. She is also a former professional ballet dancer. Eley has a BA in art history from Brown University, and an MA in arts administration from NYU. 

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THE SPECTRUM OF CAPTIVITY Susan Eisner Eley | Director, Susan Eley Fine Art Literally, captivity is “the state of being held, imprisoned, enslaved, or confined.” Artists from time immemorial have depicted battle scenes, confinement, rape, and war atrocities: Think of Picasso’s Guernica, Poussin’s The Abduction of the Sabine Women, and Titian’s Danae and the Shower of Gold, some of the most powerful paintings in the history of Western art. Curating an exhibition that explores captivity has challenged me not only to reflect on the graphic depictions of the subject, but also to consider how more nuanced expressions of confinement and servitude can be represented in art. People may capitulate to stereotypes, fall into damaging yet familiar captor/captive roles in abusive relationships, or even feel trapped by self-inflicted forces within their own minds. “The Art of Captivity, Part Two” comprises paintings and photographs by nearly a dozen artists, from the U.S. and abroad, who express this range through a variety of media. The eighteen works on view include pencil drawings, paint on canvas, paper collage, and black-and-white silver gelatin and color photographs. Artists often express a captivation with their past and a celebration of memory. In Summer 1965, Fernando Molero depicts himself as a smiling boy, inviting us to imagine the man he will become. Yet the painting also hints at a longing for childhood that might well hold the artist captive to the past. Barbara Bashlow’s All Tied Up shows a prepubescent girl in bondage. Her hard stare compels us to reflect on the tragedy of child abuse and the vulnerability of children. Anne Sherwood Pundyk represents the mythological Persephone as a young girl, terrified as she foresees her abduction by Hades, whose hand grasps her shoulder. For the past several years, Japanese painter Kentaro Hiramatu has depicted urban grids and entangled landscapes, inspired by his years living in Manhattan. These dense landscapes restrain our movements, but they also provide rules for engagement in the urban wild. In Carolyn Monastra’s color photograph The Captive, a scantily clad woman is tied by a vine to a tree. She looks upward in the manner of saints in classical paintings who gaze toward the heavens. This theatrical role-playing with bondage is also employed by photographer Heather Boose Weiss, whose black-and-white silver 3


Acknowledgments I am grateful to Leonard Cassuto, curator of “The Art of Captivity, Part One,” and Anne Sherwood Pundyk, who programmed the exhibition, for their gracious invitation to curate and host Part Two. I have been inspired by their innovative concepts and interdisciplinary approach to the subject. I appreciate the coordination efforts of Casey Ruble, artist in residence at Fordham, on all aspects of the exhibition, especially the catalogue, where the work in Parts One and Two can be seen together. A special thank you to Susan Crile, artist and professor of art at Hunter College. In addition to contributing two works to the show, Susan offered comments that were invaluable to me during the final curating stages. Many thanks to artist Angela A’Court for suggesting that I contact Susan. I would also like to acknowledge Shannon Copfer for her elegant and sensitive designs of the card and catalogue. I am grateful to Tamar Ekstein for the loan of Kim Luttrell’s In Hiding. And finally, a thank you to all eleven artists in Part Two, whose work has compelled me to think beyond what I believed I already understood.

— Susan Eisner Eley

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Contents

Plates, “The Ar t of Captivity, Par t Two”

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The Spectrum of Captivity Susan Eisner Eley

3

Acknowledgments Susan Eisner Eley

2

21

Exhibition Checklist & Ar tist Biographies


cover: Detail from Jessica M. Kaufman, Panopticon 16, 2006, silver gelatin print, 40 x 30 inches


PART TWO WITH

curated by Susan Eisner Eley

Barbara Bashlow Susan Crile Ayakoh Furukawa Kentaro Hiramatsu Jessica M. Kaufman Kim Luttrell Fernando Molero Carolyn Monastra Anne Sherwood Pundyk Heather Boose Weiss Elizabeth White

Opening reception October 26th, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

October 26th – December 3rd, 2010

Susan Eley Fine Art 46 W. 90th Street, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10024


PART TWO Susan Eley Fine Art

The Art of Captivity: Part One  

The exhibition catalogue for The Art of Captivity, Part One, at Fordham University's Center Gallery

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