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LOCAL FASHION DESIGN BEN CLARK POETRY ZACH WILLARD

MARGARET BERRY JUSTIN LEPARD BOGUSMAN

PRICELESS


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VOGUE MADE BY HAND

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Local Fashion Designers

VISUAL OWNER

ZACH WILLARD IS A NERD

Sara Kovanda

Glitch Art and Nostalgia

ART DIRECTION & GRAPHIC DESIGN

SHARING ENCAUSTIC WORKS

Nate Chapman

Marriott Hosts Margaret Berry

ADDITIONAL LAYOUT & DESIGN

GRAPHIC NOVELS TO RECIPES

Lindsey Auten

Andrea Davis Illustration

COPYEDITOR Grey Castro

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

VISCERAL/CEREBRAL

Lindsey Auten Dorothy Booraem Grey Castro Lori McAlister

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The Music of Bogusman

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Jon Weirman

NEBRASKA & MEMORY

Vicki Wood

Poetry by Ben Clark

CONTACT

TRUE-CRIME NARRATIVES

Email, text or call Sara here:

Murder & Scandal on the Plains

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artmovemagazine@gmail.com 402-630-0945

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ARTISTS AND THEIR PETS

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Oswald and Theo

JUSTIN LEPARD

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Young Star Cellist

GRUB A BLISSFUL VORTEX Piedmont Bistro

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ZACH WILLARD IS A NERD GLITCH ART AND NOSTALGIA LINDSEY AUTEN

Digital glitches abound in the modern world. As sure as words are printed on this page, so too are tiny cyber bugs weaving in and out of electronic systems, infiltrating algorithms and codes that are meant to make our interactions with technology seamless. A few notes of a favorite song flicker off beat for a few seconds. A screen freezes on the virtual tundra of the Internet. Moving pixels hit a snag on one of Times Square’s big screens. Such data friction is the foundation of a captivating art form, especially in the Internet age. It’s known as glitch art.

A R T M O V E M AG A Z I N E

A Brief History of Glitch Art In 2012, PBS’s Off Book web series released a short documentary, “The Art of Glitch.” In it, glitch artist Phillip Stearns defines glitch art as “manipulating electronics and [discovering] gateways into understanding cultural values that are associated with our technology.” Even decades ago, artists were manipulating mediums and electronics with methods that served as precursors to the glitch art practices of today. For the 1935 film A Colour Box, director Len Lye found a way to paint directly onto celluloid film, producing dancing streaks of color. At the time, color film was still in its experimental phase. Dutch art theorist and glitch artist Rosa Menkman has cited Lye’s innovation as a significant example of mechanical noise in visual art and a precedent of glitch art. The Whitney Museum of American Art houses documentation on Nam June Paik’s Magnet TV from 1965. One of the artist’s “prepared televisions,” the work consisted of a seventeen-inch black-and-white TV set. On it rested an industrial-size magnet. The magnetic field manipulated the TV’s electronic signals, creating beautifully distorted abstract forms that changed when a viewer moved the magnet. While Paik’s work anticipated trends in sixties performance art, it also foreshadowed the participatory nature of some of today’s digital glitch art. According to the magazine Neural, actual mechanical glitches, sans separate variables like magnets, were present in media art as early as


A Glitch Artist among Us Glitch artists welcome modern machines’ unwelcome behavior. Some of these artists build upon or replicate true glitches to provide commentary about contemporary media. Others create new glitches using a combination of old devices and new digital tools. Zach Willard is one of these latter artists, but he sees his work as more of a creative outlet than a direct commentary. A help desk supervisor by day and video gamer and glitch artist by night, Zach was born and raised in Omaha and earned a degree in graphic design from the Creative Center. A self-proclaimed video game nerd, he lights up when he talks about the glorious myth involving his mother beating the original Legend of Zelda while she was pregnant with him. “I’d say I’m 25 percent GIF nerd, 25 percent glitch art nerd, and the rest gets video games,” he says. Zach’s fascination with digital art began when he was in high school. Around the same time, he developed an object-dismantling hobby, breaking down devices or toys to create something new. He relates physical toy and electronic manipulation to the digital file breaking and reconfiguring he does in some of his work. Instead of changing physical properties, he’s reforming

1. This image of a tiled GIF was made using a circuit-bent video enhancer. The video source was Katamari Damacy on Playstation 2. In a bizarre turn of events, Zach’s original GIF was briefly replaced with a DMCA (Digital Millennium Copyright Act) notice on Zach’s Tumblr. In 2015, Zach was one of a few artists that dealt with inexplicable takedowns of their original work. Darryl Anka or Bashar Communications signed each takedown. On Anka’s official website, it says that he has been chosen to channel Bashar, a being of extraterrestrial origin. An employee of Bashar Communications theorized that some of the works accidentally got swept up in other DCMArelated complaints and thus removed for a brief time. Zach says, “It’s really interesting that this guy who used to be a model maker for movies I like (Star Trek 2: Wrath of Khan, for one) has his alien cult thing take down one of my GIFs.”

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1979. In Digital TV Dinner, Jamie Fenton, Raul Zaritsky, and Dick Ainsworth used a Bally Astrocade console game to produce unusual visuals. This particular device allowed the artists to remove cartridges when pressing the reset button. Their intentional removal of cartridges resulted in memory manipulation patterns set to early Super Mario Bros.–esque music. Visually, it’s as if the mushrooms have been Wonka Visioned into smithereens of unpredictable pixels. A Fast Company article, “Inside The Bizarre Phenomenon Known As ‘Glitch Art’,” notes that the Midwest’s own Chicago has been a large breeding ground for glitch art over the years. The nature of Chicago’s DIY art gallery trend has helped create a similar DIY glitch atmosphere. Most notably, Chicago artist Jon Cates coined the term “Chicago Dirty New Media,” which encompasses the ways digital tech can “elevate experiences.” The term can refer to artistic practices and subcultures that include hackers, cyber artists with a punk aesthetic, and even some who practice piracy. Stearns notes in the Off Book documentary that punk music and its aesthetic can be compared to glitch art. “In the way that punk music was a reaction against this hyperpolished, commercial rock and roll at the time,” he says, “glitch art is also a reaction against the hyperrealism that is portrayed in contemporary media.”­

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the digital weaves of info within a file. Though Zach went through four sketchbooks last year, he’s not altogether drawn to physical art. He enjoys the freedom of working with digital files. “I never have been attracted to physical art,” he says, “because you can’t just take control and undo a mistake or anything. It takes a lot more dedication.” Zach’s glitch art specialties involve circuit bending, ROM edits, data moshing, and dual-input work (see images 1–4). These methods of creating glitches often culminate in looping animated GIFs that he posts to his Tumblr. Many of his creations contain material from older video games. Some of his pieces are also are full of vivid color, due in part to his having mild deuteranomaly, a form of color blindness that makes it more difficult to see lighter colors and gradations. His processes may sound daunting, but Zach manages to create works that not only give him a creative outlet but also speak to the satisfyingly gritty nostalgia of

old video games and classic VHS vibes. The work, while not a blatant commentary on today’s digital media, can make one think more about the mutability of technology and, in turn, modern human interaction. Glitch and the Future When asked about his thoughts on the ferocious evolution of technology, Zach sees reasons to fear a more impersonal society, but he’s also energized by the progress, and this energy is evident in his glitch work. “I think there are reasons to fear [impersonal communication]. There’s always a balance needed with technology. There’s a reason to go outside and get a walk every now and then,” he says. “But I have been excited about it, because I remember being a kid and having to take down the phone line to get on the Internet […] There’s going to be things we aren’t thinking of right now ten years from now. I love it. I’m overly optimistic rather than worried.” Zach notes that another great thing about glitch art is how collaborative it can be. He enjoys collaborating with fellow Tumblr users across the globe. Sometimes, a fellow GIF maker will grab one of Zach’s GIFs, rework it, and thus, friendly remixing commences. “It’s interesting to think that I can make an animation loop

2. Zach’s ROM editing creations are made when certain values are changed in a ROM file used by computer hardware to update data stored in its system. The manipulation results in an image from a video game rendering differently than originally intended. Stemming from his love of the art behind video games, Zach enjoys taking original NES (Nintendo) games and “throwing ‘em through a text editor on the computer.”


and just post it [on Tumblr] at under two megabytes, and it can be in front of the eyes of someone across the world,” he says. “I think Tumblr is a really cool concept for a platform, and I think that’s why I’ve made so many GIFs. It’s so much fun to share with everybody.” At once nostalgic and hopeful for the future, Zach encourages readers and viewers to seek out and embrace the glitch in our cultural landscape. To him, these everyday flickers, freezes, and snags in the digital world around us are exciting and fascinating. He reiterates that it’s great to be a nerd about these things. “The great thing about now is that there are so many things you can be a nerd about,” he says. “It can be overwhelming at times, how many ways you can divide your nerd.” Find Zach on Tumblr at zwian.tumblr.com. (“Zwian” aptly stands for “Zach Willard is a nerd.”)

4. Zach’s dual-input work is made using multiple video feeds, often two female RCA splitters to one male. These splitters are primarily used for converting stereo (a sound reproduction method that creates an illusion of multiple audible perspectives) to mono audio (when audio is heard coming from one position). He captures video feeds on VHS or via a camera that is recording the TV. This is one of his GIFs combining moving images from Dark Souls II (on Xbox 360) and Super Smash Brothers (on Wii U). During a video game session with a friend, Zach used a VCR to record the session onto a tape. He had the RCA splitter connected to the Xbox360 and Wii U lines in. He played back the tape and recorded the GIFs on a phone app called Gif Me! Pro.

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3. Data moshing is a practice that involves intentionally using compression artifacts (noticeable distortions of media) in digital video and animated GIFs. This is a photo of Zach’s TV as it plays a VHS of his data moshed remix of the animated film Interstella 55555. It is set to Daft Punk’s album Discovery. Only one copy was made of this creation. This project stemmed from Zach’s and his friends’ “Omaha VHS Club,” a format appreciation club that would gather to pick and vote on movies to watch in the VHS format.


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SHARING ENCAUSTIC WORKS MARRIOTT HOSTS MARGARET BERRY LORI McALISTER

eginning in April 2016, Lincoln’s Cornhusker hotel will host Margaret Berry in a studio and gallery space being constructed there. This work space is open to the public for Margaret’s year-long residency. Margaret will be at the hotel creating pieces, hosting gallery nights, and networking with guests to create an enriching experience for local visitors and guests of the hotel. Margaret was one of six finalists for the program. A lifelong Nebraskan, she is a studio artist and teacher in

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For more about Berry’s work, visit her website: margaretberryart.com.


each year, accepting applications in the fall and beginning each new residency in April. The hotel artist-in-residence program was created by Marcus Hotels & Resorts in 2009 at the Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The program encourages the public and guests to interact with a local artist, improving the overall guest experience during their visit as they are able to connect with the artist and see the evolution of the pieces created. The Lincoln Marriott Cornhusker Hotel is located at 333 South 13th Street in Lincoln. For more information or to reserve accommodations, please call 1-800-228-9290 or visit www.marriott.com/lnkfs. The Lincoln Arts Council gives our thanks to the Lincoln Marriott Cornhusker Hotel for their commitment to our community. We are grateful for their desire to include an artist in their space and are excited to watch the ways that Margaret will create community and impact lives during her residency. Let’s visit often and be part of the process! Lori McAlister The Lincoln Arts Council lori@artscene.org | 402-434-2787

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Lincoln, specializing in encaustic painting and mixed-media work. Actively involved in the Lincoln community, she previously served as executive director of the Lincoln Arts Council and was the first education director at the Lux Center. Her artwork is part of a long painting tradition which melds beeswax, damar resin, and pigment. Used by ancient Greeks, Romans, and Egyptians, “encaustic” means “to burn in,” and she uses a variety of torches to fuse wax layers of dreamy color and bold texture, sometimes incorporating oil paint, collage, and photography into her work. Her passion for encaustic has led her to exhibit coast to coast, teach innovative Hot Wax/Cool Art workshops across the U.S., and produce professional videos on YouTube. Susan Madsen, general manager of the Cornhusker, says “Having Margaret Berry as our first artist in residence will be an exciting experience. She has so much energy and positivity, and her encaustic work is amazing! We’re enthusiastic to have her as part of the Cornhusker team, and look forward to her interaction with our hotel guests and staff.” A legacy piece will be created during her year of residency to be permanently on display within the hotel. This new, annual program will feature a new artist

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NEBRASKA & MEMORY POETRY BY BEN CLARK Nebraska Sonnet For Ed Dadey and the Art Farm

Nebraska, you walkway for ghosts weighted

Ben Clark grew up in rural Nebraska and now lives in Chicago, where he writes and works as an editor for Muzzle Magazine. His first book, Reasons to Leave the Slaughter, was released by Write Bloody Publishing in 2011. In 2015, his second collection of poetry, if you turn around I will turn around, was published by Thoughtcrime Press.

down with sky, you prairie fire and lightning bugs, you town square and brick birds dyed oxblood. You quiet old thing, you barn collapsing, you don’t care bar and olive saloon. Oh Nebraska, there are raccoons in these walls, half the windows boarded over, the snow storms in winter are just as terrible

For more information and links to his work: benclarkpoetry.com and thoughtcrimepress.com.

as the thunderstorms in summer. You hail, you drought, you infestation. You welcome home tornadoes like family. You foxtail,

Whitney Seiler is a California native, poet, and photographer currently living in Brooklyn, NY. More of her work can be found at whitneyseiler.com.

you goldenrod, you bluestem, you beardtongue, you must be buried in the earth of me, a perennial place, all I can see.

5:09 with eucalyptus oil burns From if you turn around I will turn around Cowritten with Whitney Seiler Previously published online at pioneertown lit

Eventually we must accept each death for what is left: unspooling thread, orbs of color released from the body then

unraveled

into

collapsed

brick

birds.

Once

thread

now memory stacked heavy and oxblood red. Not stacked like unexplainable clearings in the woods or dusty attic rooms or a looming barn like the barn you grew alongside. This strange new act, this retrieval of string and stacking of stone we will call acceptance. Or we will name it faith. But why allow life to become a frail bone you settle on until it snaps. Why not eat what you can and carry the rest in

salt, paper, and

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through

the

twine. Why

undergrowth,

toward

not the

clearing you remember and trust to still exist.

walk

with

moon

of

purpose forest


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TRUE-CRIME NARRATIVES MURDER & SCANDAL ON THE PLAINS

A R T M O V E M AG A Z I N E

VICKI WOOD

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With the publication of Truman Capote’s In Cold Blood in 1966, a new genre was born. The true-crime narrative has become a staple, with its unique mix of storytelling, forensic detail, and legal drama. True-crime fascinates because it allows us to look below the surface of everyday life to see the hidden machinations and intrigues that exist alongside the prosaic lives of the average citizen. What we see there is shocking, yet often unsurprising. That seemingly ordinary people become twisted and tangled in crimes both petty and grand is accepted. But the way that people fall never fails to intrigue us. Those unfamiliar with the Cornhusker state may imagine miles of limitless prairie, dotted by quaint small towns, ranches, and family farms populated by salt-of-theearth characters living upstanding lives. The following books puncture that idealistic picture, pulling back the cover to reveal that something sinister exists in the heart of every state, city, and small town. James Hewitt’s In Cold Storage: Sex and Murder on the Plains explores the bizarre killings of a middle-aged couple in McCook, Nebraska. Most of the facts of the case are not in question: a local couple was convicted of the killings, and they’ve served time in prison. The real mystery is the motive.

Hewitt is a lawyer who gained special access to a file containing the 1974 confessions of the convicted couple, Harold and Ena Nokes. More than twenty years after the murders, Harold Nokes agreed to an interview with Hewitt, in which he told a completely different story about the whys and wherefores of the case. It’s in the gaps between the two stories that the intrigue in this case resides. What is known is that Nokes and his wife were involved in a love triangle with the daughter of the murdered couple—Kay Hein, a woman fifteen years Nokes’s junior. When Hein tried to end the affair, Nokes appealed to, oddly enough, her parents, Edwin and Wilma Hoyt. Their dismembered bodies were later found in a nearby lake. In the foreword, Hewitt admits that he finds neither Nokes’s original confession nor the account he gave in the later interview to be convincing, leaving the reader to draw their own conclusions. The Face of a Naked Lady: An Omaha Family Mystery, by Michael Rips, is not a murder mystery, but instead an exploration of mistaken identity. Rips, a lawyer and Oxford grad, leaves New York for Omaha to deal with his father’s affairs after his death. He discovers a hidden portfolio of paintings of a naked woman, each signed with his father’s initials. Nick Rips was a classic conservative, midwestern business owner, and an utterly predictable and aloof presence in his sons’ lives. He was given neither to conversation nor connection; Rips writes of him: “With his sons growing up, Father assumed an amiable apathy that he would maintain without interruption for the rest of his life. At no point did he think to play with his sons, take them out in the yard, teach them

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famous Starkweather vertical file box, containing laminated copies of articles about the crimes and the trial, and other related clippings. Caril, by Ninette Beaver, B. K. Ripley, and Patrick Trese, is a full look at Caril Ann Fugate, the young teen who was an accomplice to the Starkweather murders. The authors recount her grim childhood and early adolescence, explore the issues related to her culpability in the crimes, and give a true picture of what was known about the woman in 1974, as she waited for the chance at parole, having spent half of her life in prison.

Caril A. Fugate getting booked into the Scottsbluff county jail in Gering NE., Jan. 30, 1958.

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a sport, attend school activities, or, as we grew older, inquire about our jobs or even the women whom we dated or married. He was there with us but was transparent.” The author’s journey into his father’s secret life reads a bit like a David Lynch screenplay. Rips discovers that his father spent a lot of time in a brothel his grandparents ran in South Omaha, drawing their clientele from the workers of the then-flourishing stockyards. In his younger years he kept company with gamblers and bootleggers, and later hired an assortment of eccentric characters to work in his eyeglass factory. Rips the author has his own oddball sense of humor and, clearly, an eye for the absurd. As is often the case, the journey proves more interesting than the destination. The private detective he hires to uncover his father’s secrets claims to be a clairvoyant, and he meets a cast of unexpected characters, including a homeless man with millions in the bank. What’s really being discovered here is the weirdness that underlies the placidity, the glorious disconnect between what we perceive and what lies below the surface. Eventually, the identity of the woman in the painting is revealed, but the son is no closer to reconciling what he has learned about his father with the persistent image of him as the utterly complacent and conventional man who inhabited his childhood. Another Nebraska story of murder and mayhem is William Allen’s Starkweather: The Story of a Mass Murderer, based on interviews, court records, and newspaper accounts. The library has dozens of other sources on Charles Starkweather and the murders he committed in the late 1950s, including microfilm and the

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Wikimedia Commons

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ARTISTS & THEIR PETS OSWALD & THEO GENE VIE VE R ANDALL

A R T M O V E M AG A Z I N E

Genevieve Randall creates using radio waves, enriching our lives and warming our homes with unique classical-based music on her NET shows, The Verge and Morning Concert. She produces and hosts the weekly show Friday Live from The Mill, transmitting great conversations about the arts and humanities across Nebraska. Holding a degree in flute performance and playing flute, piccolo, and recorder, Genevieve performs regularly with several ensembles, including Marshall Trio, Noteworthy Ensemble, Lincoln Early Music Consort, Ciqe Sasquatch, and Coro di Flauti. In this issue she shares her love for her two dogs, Oswald and Theo.

up at me with his brown eyes and I could swear he’s trying to send me a telepathic message that everything will be okay. He really loves walking around Pioneers Park with me, or walking anywhere, for that matter, but he’s not so keen on riding in cars. In the car, Ozzie is very talkative, barking I got Oswald from Hearts United for An- and whining—it’s very distracting! When we imals when he was six months old. He were going to regular obedience practices, hadn’t been there long; he’d been found we used to drive by a tattoo shop, which had at three months old wandering in a park. a big gorilla sculpture in front of it. Oswald Surprisingly, I’ve known two other people would bark at that thing every time. He with dogs of the same mix—half pug and seems to recognize animals and shapes on half Labrador—and both of them rescues TV, too. Oswald is used to my crafting and music making around the house. When I was of the same age! Oz is nine years old now, and he has teaching, he listened to many flute lessons. been an unbelievable companion. We’ve He knows to be careful around my knit and been through thick and thin—and there’s crochet projects, and will just sleep on my been lots of thin. Maybe because of the lap while scarves and yarn brush him and thin, he is very sensitive to people’s drape his body. Poor Oswald is also terribly frightened emotions; if I start crying, he gets very alert and moves in next to me, leaning on of thunderstorms, or even loud rain and as much of my body as he can. He’ll look wind outside. He is allowed on the bed,

Sara Kovanda

http://www.hua.org


but not through the whole night—there just isn’t room. When he gets scared, though, there’s no making him go to his bed; he presses himself against me and

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Learn more at songbirdsos.com just shakes, poor baby. He’s kind of a big baby about retrieving balls from under chairs too, and if there’s something he’s suspicious of, he’ll bark and bark and bark—such a vocal boy! Oz recognizes the sound of my car, and will bark and alert my husband when it’s at the end of the block. In turn, my husband tells our other dog, Theo, “Mommy’s home,” and Theo will go to a door or a window to wait for me. We got Theo from MidAmerica Boston Terrier Rescue when he was three months old. My sister Elizabeth went with me to pick him up on a day when snow started falling. When the woman I was meeting opened her van door, I couldn’t believe how small he was! Then I couldn’t believe that I was entrusted with this tiny little life-form! Theo is seventeen months old now, and it has taken Oswald a little while to get used to him. Even now, it’s clear that Oswald thinks Theo is an annoying little

http://www.adoptaboston.com


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trouble maker. But he’s his little annoying trouble maker, and Oz misses him when he’s gone. Theo is very quiet—he can bark, but hardly ever does; when Oz is barking about a motorcycle that went by the house Theo is looking at Oz like he wonders what the problem is. Theo’s a climber, often leaping up on our laps, scaling our chests, and plopping down on our shoulders like a short stole. He loves to play tug-of-war and fetch, and currently his favorite thing is a spiky green rubber ball that he could probably chase and fetch for six hours straight. He also has no fear. He has been easier to train than Oswald— maybe that’s partly me, and maybe it’s partly that Theo looks up to Oz. But even though he clearly loves Oswald, he also loves tormenting him, nipping at his face, batting at him with his paws, and generally being a puppy. Theo trusts us completely. We can hold him in our arms like a baby and tilt him with his head hanging down—totally relaxed. He’s well-behaved on walks, and will go anywhere with us. He does get cold, though, so I sometimes have to put shirts and sweaters on him. He loves to lie under our wine rack near where the heating vent is. He also loves to be a lap dog, often shoving his face into your arm or lap—so funny. We tried to have children for two years and we were unsuccessful. I do have two step-children who are wonderful, but are with us only occasionally. Dogs are not children by any measure, and in fact, the night before I got Theo, I cried and cried because he wasn’t a baby. But after we got him, I was so absorbed in potty training, cute puppy antics, obedience training, crate training, people coming over to see the puppy . . . I was distracted for a while

in my sadness over being childless. I love my dogs, and even when I still get sad, they cheer me up. They are so in the moment—“Hey, mama, don’t cry! Throw me this ball instead!” or “Hey mama! Let’s go outside!” They listen to me play flute and ukulele; they listen to my voice on the radio when I’m not home. And I smile more, because I come back every day to absolute, wiggle-butt joy.

I cannot imagine my life without either of my dogs. I had been through a particularly traumatic year before I got Oswald, and he really changed my life. I remember walking him as a puppy, looking down at his happy little paws prancing along beside me and thinking “I can’t believe he’s mine!”


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Lindsey Auten

BOGUSMAN’S MUSIC HITS AT EVERY LEVEL

A R T M O V E M AG A Z I N E

GREY CASTRO From the start, Bogusman have been turning out heavier songs than most bands that give you as much to think about, and more thought-provoking music than most bands that play as heavy. The Lincoln band came together in 2012, out of vocalist and guitarist Nate Luginbill and bassist and vocalist Andy Pederson’s previous project, Palaver. Guitarist Lee Lohrberg had played a few shows with them, and at their final concert with their then drummer, a house show hosted by Jackson Trover, they asked if Trover would take over on drums to form a new group. He assented, and the four got to work. Luginbill and Pederson had originally sought to play straight-ahead hardcore, and the straightforward compositions

the band started with reflected that. But as they all wrote together, their interest in progressive music came to the fore, and their compositional choices became more complex, with uncommon song structures and time signatures diversifying their catalog. They now describe their style as progand math rock-influenced post-punk and don’t speak from a place of hubris when they say they sound unlike any of their Lincoln contemporaries. But to say that they know themselves to sound different is not to say that they think themselves superior. It’s with a spirit of community and respect that they speak of sharing influences with fellow Lincoln bands like Powers and Dirty Talker. Those influences center on noise rock


and post-hardcore bands—Slint, Drive Like Jehu, Fugazi, and The Jesus Lizard, among others. Speaking specifically of Slint, they cite unconventional song structures and melodies, lyrics that deal with heavy emotional material, and music meant to be appreciated mentally more than physically among the things they seek to incorporate into their own work. Other sound influences include thrash, doom, and sludge metal; for Lohrberg, jazz, particularly Thelonious Monk and his thinking on rhythm; and, for Trover, black metal. Luginbill associates elements of Bogusman’s sound with the Midwest’s bleaker side—barren landscapes, freezing rain, and the sun trying to make its way through grey cloud cover. The band’s primary lyricist, he speaks of writing about alienation, nihilism, and existential angst and says they seek to “match the tone of the lyrics with the tone of the music.” The band describes that tone variously as “visceral,” “cathartic,” and “stimulating,” and Lohrberg notes “adding weirdness to rock” as a goal. The broad range of artists and styles that inspire them is easily audible in their songs, shifting fluently through unexpected arrangement choices and juxtapositions of sonic textures. Describing each other’s strengths, the four agree that Luginbill and Pederson bring strong compositional and lyrical foundations to each song, freeing Lohrberg to pursue experimental guitar leads. Unifying it all is Trover’s precise and energetic drumming. Their live shows are heavy but rarely brutal, abrasive in a way that feels like solidarity with the audience rather than antagonism toward them. Their sound is musically complex, but void of empty showing off. It’s clear that they care about what they do and have a good time doing it, and their audiences respond: the four consistently draw some of the most energetic crowds in town. The band aims to push further, expanding to regional recognition, touring beyond the Midwest, and eventually nixing day jobs that distract from music. When we interviewed them in January, they spoke of the future with a mix of guarded optimism and mild frustration. They felt good about where they were, they knew where they wanted to go, and they could see a path forward, but work, school, and other logistical hurdles loomed large. The next step as a band was to record a full-length album to follow up their already-released EP. On the bitterly cold evening when we spoke, it sounded like recording was a dauntingly distant prospect. Maybe it was just that night’s weather talking. The album is finished now, and it’s set to be released in late spring or summer. The path looks clear.

Vocalist and guitarist Nate Luginbill

Bassist and vocalist Andy Pederson

Drummer Jackson Trover

Guitarist Lee Lohrberg


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MADE BY HAND THREE LINCOLN FASHION DESIGNERS HONE THEIR SKILLS GREY CASTRO

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Vedrana Dziko, Michael Degenhardt, and Emory Blazek haven’t been sewing long, but the quality of their work belies the freshness of their skill. The three Lincoln designers learned their craft together, and have each taken quickly to it, bringing their personal styles to one of humankind’s oldest forms of expression. All three share a long-held interest in clothing design, and Dziko and Degenhardt are longtime jewelry designers, but it’s only been in the past nine months or so that the three have turned their hands to sewing. They work together at the Black Market—a local secondhand fashion shop in Lincoln. Their boss there, Jaclyn Tejeda, taught them to sew. Tejeda has wanted the Black Market to be more than a clothing store since its founding eleven years ago. She’s long created clothing to sell with a sewing machine kept in the store, but her goal from the start has been to use the shop to teach others to craft garments of their own. The store recently renovated a space adjacent to their sales floor and installed sewing machines and work tables,

creating a classroom space in which to learn garment construction and alteration from the ground up. It’s a venture called Black Market Sustainable Eco-friendly Workshop, or BMSEW. To prepare for BMSEW teaching, Tejeda needed some test students, so she chose a few of her employees: Dziko, Degenhardt, and Blazek. The quality of their work speaks to the quality of her instruction. But she didn’t stop at teaching them: she also pushed them to enter Project Funway. An annual Lincoln fashion show, Project Funway is a fundraiser held by Fresh Start, a residence for women transitioning out of homelessness. Each autumn, area designers enter their work to be judged on the runway. Ticket sales and the accompanying auction help Fresh Start in its mission. The garments pictured here were Dziko, Blazek, and Degenhardt’s entries, and despite a strong field of roughly fifty other designers, at night’s end Dziko’s crop top and high-waisted pencil skirt were the judge’s favorite ensemble. The show required that garments be made of recycled materials. Dziko deconstructed a jacket, dress, and collar, Degenhardt repurposed material from a lace-and-silk dress for his bralette-andskirt dress, and Blazek’s hooded cloak is made of jean denim. The three note that, as


they’re just beginning their clothing work, it may be too early to clearly define their individual design styles. But in their recent work for Project Funway, styles and interests may be starting to emerge (see photos 2-4). It’s little surprise, after seeing their work, that the three agree on the importance of quality of craft. While they were learning together from Tejeda, their friendship fostered a productive frankness: they were all willing to comment on each other’s pieces bluntly, not letting subpar work slip through. As they speak on holding each other to exacting standards, Dziko says “I totally think the collaborative environment helped us tremendously, because not only do you get to bounce ideas off of each other, but you have people who critique your work and critique your work honestly.” A single designer hand sewing their own pieces one at a time is not the norm in

American clothing today. The three talk with conviction about the importance of this kind of small-run, handmade work. They praise the beauty and personality of clothes designed and brought to life as art, but lament the popularity of “mass fashion” chains like H&M and Forever 21 that rely on low production values and exploited laborers to sell clothes that are more easily affordable, but that lack artistic integrity and lasting value. The designers note that these chains are a dire threat to local shops that can’t compete at the artificially low price points offered by huge stores. But those small shops sell clothes, Blazek says, of such excellent quality and enduring artistic merit that you could buy them now and keep them until you pass them on to your children, still wearable and still beautiful. (There are some serious questions about class that come up in a discussion like this one; for more thoughts on the matter, see the sidebar that accompanies this story.)

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1. (Opposite top) From left: Emory Blazek, Vedrana Dziko, and Michael Degenhardt. 2. (Opposite bottom) Dziko’s ensemble repurposed material from a dress, collar, and jacket, and was chosen as the winning design at Project Funway. Dziko appreciates sophistication and sexiness, but a sexiness that’s not in your face, and notes that she prefers to create separates, so that pieces can be combined and recombined to fit the wearer’s taste. 3. (Above) Blazek’s denim hooded cloak, crafted from deconstructed jeans. Blazek works in a street fashion aesthetic, currently interested in baggy forms, denim, and intentional tears—the first two being defining features of his voluminous and angular cloak. He notes that the particulars of his work are likely to evolve with currents in international street style.

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4. (Right) Degenhardt’s outfit, made out of fabric reclaimed from a dress. Degenhardt says he strove for glamour and boldness, in parallel with daintiness and prettiness, in his elegant pieces, contrasting smooth stretches of silk with Lindsey Auten textured lace.


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Dziko, Degenhardt, and Blazek talk fashion.

Given the unsteady support local designers experience in Lincoln at the moment, Dziko says making any significant income selling clothes here is an unlikely proposition, and that selling online, potentially

to a customer base more likely to be found on the coasts, could be a more productive path to making money. While Lincoln may not provide a good living for a designer, Blazek appreciates the sartorial creativity that can be found here, saying that, despite times when he’s seen “ten dudes that are all wearing khakis and boat shoes” while he’s out walking, he also sees people dressed so personally and expressively that “you can tell if you strike up a conversation, how that conversation is gonna be, based off of how they’re dressed” and how much it communicates. The full scope of what’s to come in these friends’ work will take years to be seen, but in the near term look for a jewelry collaboration between Degenhardt and Dziko and a line of embroidered denim pieces from Dziko and Blazek. Going forward, all three are eager to explore their personal aesthetics and refine their technique, and judging by their creations so far, the future holds much promise.

A note on wealth and purchasing choices:

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The argument that high-quality handmade clothes—like many handmade goods—are too expensive for many people to afford is accurate, and to ignore that fact perpetuates classism. But part of why those goods are out of reach is because when multinational chains enter a local economy, they price out of business all manner of local shops that pay decent wages, leaving many people stuck with low-paying jobs at those same multinational chains. Thus, many people are only able to afford the sorts of goods those chains sell. The low cost of mass-produced goods, once a novel economic convenience, has become a self-propagating trap of economic necessity. Until we get out from under capitalism, we must try to make it harm as few people as possible, and one way to do that is by rejecting, whenever possible, stores that send our money out of our communities and into the pockets of a very few already-rich people. That said, don’t be hard on yourself or anyone else if your or their income doesn’t allow you to eschew those stores often; as Sepultura say, “It doesn’t matter where you are; do what you can with what you have.”


rock club | burger bar | event space | non-established since 2013

RO C K I N G T H E F R E E WO R L D W I T H C U LT U R E , C O M M U N I T Y, TA S T Y F O O D , & B E V E R AG E S

O PE N DA I LY AT 5 PM A ND F O R SPE C I A L E V E NT S | H A PPY H O U R 5 - 8 PM

C H E C K O U R C A L E N DA R F O R U P C O M I N G E V E N T S w w w. v e g a l i n c o l n . c o m


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BREATHING LIFE INTO A BLISSFUL VORTEX PIEDMONT BISTRO JON WEIRMAN

A R T M O V E M AG A Z I N E

The Piedmont neighborhood has always been special, and just before visiting it to review this restaurant we talked to someone close to us about their experiences there. The area seems to be a vortex of sorts, owning elements of a grand past with its majestic mansions and regal Moerheim spruce, it seems to gently remind us of a refined era. Proudly claiming the old spot that was Kay’s Restaurant years ago, the Piedmont Bistro has set out to provide great food and stellar upper-end ambiance, in a location with spacious charm. Simplicity in offerings is the name of the game here, and it works well. As my accomplice and I got ready to sample what is happening here, we relived some great stories about the surrounding area. While we tasted the wonderful cannellini bean soup, we noticed that the neighborhood elite and young foodies alike were flocking to this place. Many in Lincoln are going to be happy to see an establishment open up in this neighborhood, away from downtown and the crowded burbs of the south, and with as much charm as any Kansas City or Minneapolis counterpart. The starters here are the reason why many are raving about this place. You

can get the black-eyed pea quesadilla with fresh spinach and feta cheese, or decadent deviled eggs, one of the most tried-and-true appetizers of all time. Everything on the appetizer list is vegetarian, and the focaccia bread is a standout starter that we noticed many patrons at the bar partaking of happily—it’s made from sourdough, and baked daily. The sweet potato and red pepper hummus is another popular forte, as is the edamame: deliciously served in the pod with oil and a dash of salt. If you have others with you that are eager to snack and share, order up the camembert plate: Branched Oak Farm cheese with house sweet pepper jam; a great plate to indulge in with a frothy beer on tap, such as Zipline’s German-style Kölsch, a glass of vino from their impressive list of fine wines, or one of their specialty cocktails. I ordered the pork option off the “meat, greens, and grains” section of the menu. It is marinated tenderloin with cannellini beans and grilled artichoke; I was absolutely delighted with the presentation, texture, and reminders of many great dishes I had indulged in at other venues that prided themselves on the wonders of this meat. As I dipped in for the first taste, I was reminded that when properly cooked goods collide on your taste buds after a long week, you realize why artisanal cooking can always


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lull us away to a very special place. The staff here pride themselves on sourcing from local farmers, showing respect for Star City and its freshest offerings. My friend ordered the rib eye steak, and was very delighted with the herb-butter topping and the presentation of the carnivore’s ultimate treat: a wholehearted Nebraska succulent slab of meat with a fine salted slaw as its accompanying side. We’d like to add that many we’ve talked to have raved about the duck from the bistro: pan-seared breast with black lentils, bacon, arugula, and cherry demi. We

also saw many Bistro Burgers headed out from the kitchen to happy patrons. We didn’t opt for any dessert, but the caramel apple and pecan pies were coming out in droves and being eaten up rather quickly. The Piedmont Bistro is a recipe for greatness in a neighborhood with history enough to fill its own corner of the library, and we’re going to give this establishment a grade A overall: what they’re doing is healthy and happening, and it delightfully oozes large-urban-area charm.  1265 S Cotner Blvd #38, Lincoln, NE



THE NEW YORK STRIP IS EXCELLENT, AS IS THE DUCK! TRY THE CAMEMBERT PLATE FOR AN APPETIZER ̶ VERY TASTY!

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JERRY JOHNSON


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FROM GRAPHIC NOVELS TO RECIPES FINDING AN ILLUSTRATION GROOVE

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Vegetable Stock

2 PARTS VEGETABLE - 3 PARTS WATER

6 CUPS H20

2:3

180° for 1 hour

ANDREA DAVIS

I moved here to Lincoln on purpose quite a while ago now. I was simplifying my life, changing professions from my stable and secure jobby-job so that I could move into design. It turns out I’m a very specific type of designer: the kind that illustrates. I’m terrible at submitting to some sort of aesthetic authority, and at abstract imagery. My interest is in telling a story, so I’m pretty representational in my work. I have to scrap to chase the aesthetic I’m after. Every dollar “extra” goes into anoth-

er project; I get good stories to illustrate out of the experience. I used to show my silkscreened posters in small underground shows. Somehow, Gary Gabelhouse found my stuff and got a hold of me to illustrate one of his previously published novels as a graphic novel. We had a really successful collaboration, publishing Prophets Reborn. He could more easily pitch his stories to film, animation, and game companies with the graphic novel functioning as a storyboard.


These are simple recipes, with ingredients that can be found on foot or along bike and bus commuter routes. They’re not just simple to make—they’re also easy to visualize, as in “How many items do I need to pick up from the store?” I used to show at small cafés around town, and spent a year showing at as many local galleries as possible. I have recently decided to take work for sale and collection off my website and sell only from Lincoln’s Gallery9. I become an official member as of April’s First Friday show.

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In the last couple of years, I have gone from selling single-image prints to sequential art. The one hundred–page Prophets Reborn grooved a nice productivity routine. As a digital illustrator, I have been able to print image-dominant covers and posters, build novels, and move into cartoon-like infographics. I’m really happy with the diversity of content that I can make distinctly my own. An important part of my routine is walking. It’s made me and my work very local. I print with local silkscreeners and digital shops whenever possible so that my prints are limited editions and a little more valuable. I got really into local foodto-table cafés and producers as a result.

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HUMANOIDS


SARA KOVANDA

Justin “TheLepard” Lepard in Lincoln, NE.

He uses what he calls “access points,” such as lights, visuals, and scripts, adding elements to make classical performances more three-dimensional, and thereby giving the audience more to engage with. “Music is a really great way to try and transcend the artificial barriers that we create between ourselves,” says Lepard. “It’s pretty clear that if I’m going to do something significant with my life, it’s to do something new. For me that new thing is integration.” He hopes his access points and integration ideas will bring the music he loves to people who haven’t been around classical music. “My goal is to slowly invite people in, invite people in through example, invite people in by making small changes, because I have a lot of big changes in my head.” And the world can’t wait to see what’s next.

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We owe much of our progression as a species to the innovators, the pioneers who bravely push the boundaries of convention and make way for change. They are virtually intrinsic to the arts. The world of classical music bears a heavy wax seal rich with formality and pure tradition, yet it too has its vanguard, as seen in Lincoln’s young star cellist, Justin “TheLepard” Lepard. This international performer is deeply thoughtful about music, and is just as passionate about playing with classical musicians around the globe as he is about performing with jazz musicians at a local bar. The cello is not commonly used in jazz, but learning to play different styles of music has been part of his quest to broaden his horizons and further his knowledge, and it allows him to push the limits of his instrument. “The cohesion behind my artistry is this idea of ‘integration,’” says Lepard. “Art is a reflection of who somebody is, so from a very early age, I had this sense that the best way to go about being a musician would not be to limit myself to one medium or style.” By learning to play many musical styles, he has acquired different approaches to his ultimate goal of navigating both the intellectual and intuitive sides of playing. Lepard also stretches his boundaries by listening to a wide variety of music. If he happens to hear something he doesn’t like, his immediate assumption is that he hasn’t figured out how to listen to it the right way. “If I hear something and don’t like it, my initial response is ‘Oh, I need to figure out how to like it, how to listen to it so I understand.’ If I don’t connect with it, I need to learn how to connect with it.” As a performer, connecting with the audience in new ways is also important to him, and goes along with his theme of integration.

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PUBLIC RESTROOM CONFESSIONALS BEHIND THE STALLS IN SANTERIA CLOACA

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DOROTHY BOOR AEM

It’s the summer of 2010. My crew and I are in the women’s restroom on the ground floor of Nebraska’s capitol building, getting ready to shoot a scene for my short film Santeria Cloaca. We’re shooting here because of the unique layout of the space: almost fifteen feet from stall door to opposite wall, very different from the space-saving, narrow layout of most modern restrooms. It’s perfect for the wide shot I need for this scene. The lights are in place, the actors are in

costume, and the camera is in position. But the bright overhead lights in the restroom have been left on and can’t be turned off without a special key. The Capitol Commission representative supervising the shoot has the key we need. Unfortunately she’s gone to her office to make a phone call, so we’re waiting until she returns to start shooting. As we wait I think about how proud and excited I am to be here. Proud because I worked hard to be


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allowed to shoot in the Nebraska Capitol. I filled out forms, created information packets about the project, and interviewed with the Capitol Commission team to reassure them that our production wouldn’t cause any damage to the historic building. Excited because I love Nebraska’s capitol building. I love the architecture, the art incorporated throughout the building, and the story of how it was frugally built one section at a time. The state might have been careful not to overspend when

they built the capitol, but they were very generous when it came to art in and on the building. Just having the chance to create here, surrounded by the work of other artists, made me feel a little bit special. Especially because the Santeria Cloaca project dealt with some unconventional subject matter. Based on my observation that women’s public restrooms, outside of fulfilling their obvious function, were often used by women as private places to experience

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intense emotions they didn’t want to express in public, I had decided to explore the idea of public restrooms as private confessionals. Finding the right story to wrap around the idea had taken a long time. After several rough starts I had discovered the character of Santeria Cloaca. She became the patron saint of women’s restrooms, acting as a guide into the idea and a witness to the emotions that women might privately express in the stalls. I had envisioned the final project as a stylistic blend of educational films, commercial tours, and music videos. The scene we were getting ready to shoot in the capitol restroom was a movement

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and spoken-word montage in which three characters acted out different emotions and stories in bathroom stalls. To add to the quirky music video feel, the characters in the scene represented the three items I felt could be found in any women’s restroom: lipstick, toilet paper, and feminine hygiene products. The costumes for these characters were influenced by Lady Gaga, so the accessories were appropriately bold and fashion forward. For the feminine hygiene character, “Tamp,” I had created a necklace of tampons dipped in red glitter, an eye patch made of a sanitary pad dotted with red paint, and redtipped tampon hair clips. Humorous television commercials about “periods” notwithstanding, I knew the taboo around menstruation was a strong one. It’s a socially embarrassing subject that is considered publically inappropriate. Which meant that bringing the “Tamp” costume into the capitol would be a production risk. But I was committed to the character and her costume and I was hoping that once we were set up in the privacy of our restroom location, we wouldn’t be judged for it. My hopes are dashed when the Capitol Commission rep shows up accompanied by an unsmiling security guard. She tells me that after seeing the costumes for the project she’s concerned that it will reflect badly on the capitol and perhaps even the governor. I try to reassure her, but she isn’t convinced. She

Want to see how the final project turned out? Watch Santeria Cloaca on my Vimeo channel: https://vimeo.com/49574179.


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finally tells me that even though my project was previously approved, it is now being shut down. I will not be allowed to shoot here after all. The guard has been brought in to make sure we pack up our equipment and leave immediately. I’m disappointed and frustrated and it’s my own fault. I’ve wasted the time and effort everyone spent prepping for this shoot by not fully considering the contrast between the visuals I wanted to create and the context of the location.

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But as we pack up our equip­ ment and leave the building, the representative takes me aside and tells me she hopes I can find another location for this scene. She even has a few suggestions. I’m stunned and genuinely grateful. A few weeks later my cinema­ tographer, Greg Kubitschek, finds another restroom location for the scene. It doesn’t have as much space for the wide shot we wanted to capture, but its public profile is much much lower. With Greg’s excellent lighting and shooting skills we make the location work and shot the scene. I learn something on every project I take on. Sometimes the things I learn are new. Often they are the same things in a different form. The Santeria Cloaca shoot taught me that failure can be just another obstacle, not the end of everything. It also taught me that protecting or challenging social conventions and taboos doesn’t mean you’re a monster; it means you’re a human being. And that embarrassment, disappointment, and shame will pass. The work is what stays with you.


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