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CURATORIAL

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ANNUAL PUBLICATION

Featured RACHEL LINDSAY |”By Way of Dallas” Designer HANCE TAPLIN

TOP 25 EMERGING CREATIVES OF DFW + WHERE TO FIND THEM

THE POWER OF COLLABORATION

Cover Artwork by MAGDIEL LOPEZ | Photography by DAVID PORCHÉ PHOTOGRAPHY

WHEN NATIONAL INFLUENCERS EMBODY LOCAL DESIGN

THE DALLAS ISSUE


Dedicated to the artists who inspire our culture, form our city, and push towards the greatest goal of reminding humanity that there is always more gold to discover from within. Special thanks to our families, to our Artist Uprising tribe who has stuck with us through all the wins and turbulence of a startup year, to our close friends and supporters, to the talent we manage on a daily basis, and to all our corporate clients who give us the joyful opportunity to source talent every day. You all make our lives richer!


+ words from editor-in-chief LEE ESCOBEDO

/ / M ER R I C K POR C HÉDDU + A N GEL A R OSS CEO + COO of Artist Uprising

+ EDITO R’S NOT E

As an arts city, Dallas is at a crossroads. The major arts media publications are either eliminating or merging editor positions within their publications. This occurs at the same time city funding available for artists has never been higher, while still not enough. The political climate for making artwork is tense, turbulent, and full of uncertainty, which also makes it the perfect time for a new voice to emerge within the media landscape— one operating against nepotism, exclusivity, and preference. This is an arts publication serving the arts community through coverage of the complicated milieu we live and make within, because it is our artists who will tell our stories—the story of now; the story of Dallas. Now, more than ever, the current media echo chamber needs a new channel because this city has never been richer with talent or contained a more diverse pointof-view. Dallas deserves a publication that fosters dialogue around what it means to be an artist and how that craft defines and shapes a city’s cultural identity. When Merrick Porchéddu asked me to serve as editor-in-chief for this publication, I was already aware of her work ethic and vision. It was the first time since my work with my own arts publication that I wanted to serve a position of leadership for a new magazine. It had everything I was looking for: integrity, expertise, and a fresh approach It is a joy to honor yet another twenty-five creators from Dallas, to arts coverage. During this a city rich with uprising talent—from emerging musicians that crucial point in our city’s arts are tipping the scene nationally in every way, to illustrators history, I am thrilled to be on and photographers, filmmakers and storytellers, designers, the side of honest journalism. entertainers, makers and more. Dallas creators are starting This publication is only the to make a ripple effect throughout the nations in such a way genesis of the Artist Uprising that we had to give them the platform they deserve. It is our brand, yet it contains the vocation as a company to find emerging/“tipping point” stories of the artists, musicians, talent and showcase them to the world in hopes that the designers, and creatives that right person will see what we see and choose to open more make Dallas great. I am proud doors of opportunities to these ones deserving of such favor. to be a part of this new chapter To our Top 25 (Round II), we see you, esteem you, and are of Dallas history. behind you as you push toward greater things this year.


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+ meet the founders MERRICK + ANGELA Artist Uprising is spearheaded by Merrick Porchéddu and Angela Ross, two female entrepreneurs who are artist activists, fashion & brand enthusiasts, and avid sushi lovers. While Artist Uprising lends itself to uncovering the most exciting emerging talent from any creative field, the duo personally specializes in curating perfectly matched talent with major brands, businesses (from startups to Fortune 500 companies alike), and non-profit organizations across the United States. Porchéddu (left) founded Artist Uprising with the intent to efficiently bridge the gap between creatives and commerce, while also providing the right business tools artists need to grow their careers in arts and entertainment. Ross (right) partnered with Porchéddu upon the debut of the first issue of Artist Uprising: Top 25 Most Influential Creatives of DFW in 2017. Ross’ background in artist management and corporate sales brought a dynamic to Artist Uprising that took the company to a new level—more recently even with the launch of N. Park Ave. Management, Ross’ talent management company. Today, the two tag team to build an authentic company that heralds a mission to abolish the term “starving artistry.” Porchéddu and Ross not only curate some of the best talent for businesses, but the partners are dedicated to training and encouraging talent in their careers, connecting creators with strategic partners, and sourcing lucrative opportunities for all artists everywhere.

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Photography by MIKA MATIN (@MIKA.MATIN) 05


FOR CRE ATO RS

ADVANCING ARTISTS’ CAREERS. WE TRAIN AND SUPPLY RESOURCES TO CREATIVES FOR THE PURPOSE OF PUSHING THEM TOWARDS A TIPPING POINT. WHATEVER THE TALENT NEEDS, WE HELP.

CONSULTING | PUBLIC RELATIONS | MARKETING | DESIGN | ACCOUNTING | BOOKING | NETWORKING


F OR B U S IN E SS ES

CURATING TALENT FOR PRETTY MUCH ANYTHING. LIVE MUSIC | MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKERS | ARTISTS | PHOTOGRAPHERS | VIDEOGRAPHERS | DESIGNERS | INFLUENCERS + CELEBRITY BRAND AMBASSADORS

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TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S

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for your eyes

MAGDIEL LOPEZ KYLE STEED JEREMY MCKANE ARTURO TORRES


TASTEMASTERS for your taste buds

SPACEMAKERS for your lifestyle

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for your perspective

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MAX KÃœTZ HENRY MARTENS FELA RAYMOND JEREMY BIGGERS

BODY FASHIONERS for your form

HANCE TAPLIN AMBER VENZ BOX BEAU BOLLINGER JEN COLEMAN

ADVOCATES

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VISUAL STORYTELLERS

for your city

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+ in times of WAR, THEY WERE THE ONES WHO STEPPED ONTO THE BATTLEGROUND FIRST. \\ + BEFORE ANYONE ELSE.

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THEY PREPARED THE WAY FOR THE OTHERS TO FOLLOW SUIT. WHO WOULD HAVE THOUGHT MUSICIANS WOULD GO BEFORE THE CALVARY? IT WAS BELIEVED THAT A SOUND CARRIED A UNIQUE MAGIC; A METAPHYSICAL MYSTERY THAT WOULD TERRIFY THE ENEMY. / / OR DESTROY A FORTRESS. OR PREVAIL A WALL. SOUND HAD A WAY OF HERALDING TO THE CULTURES AHEAD THAT A NEW SONG WAS EMERGING AND WOULD SOON BE SUNG IN ITS STREETS. AND SO THEY ADVANCED— MARCHING TO THE BEAT OF THEIR OWN ANTHEM, WHICH WAS THE SONG OF DEVOTION TO THE CITY FROM WHICH THEY CAME.

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Written by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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SYDNEY COOPER

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rowing up hasn’t been easy for talented singer, Emma Oliver. Despite a tough life without a father and a lifelong battle with anxiety, the young artist hasn’t let these trials hold her down. If anything, it has fortified a resolve for the musician who embodies the “do-ityourself” mentality of her favorite singers. While struggling in a single-parent household in Waxahachie, Oliver turned to YouTube as her personal music teacher. At her desk in her room, she would shut the door and search songs by Etta James, Yebba, and Kevin Garrett. Oliver made YouTube the platform for her vocal lessons, while the muses she followed became her vocal coaches. She found refuge from the anxieties of life by escaping to a place she could control: her voice.

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“I WOULD RETREAT TO MY ROOM AND WATCH SEVERAL ARTISTS I LOOK UP TO PERFORM TRULY INCREDIBLE SONGS, AND I THOUGHT TO MYSELF, ‘WHY CAN’T I DO THAT?’ SO, I LEARNED TO SING...TO REALLY SING MY GUTS OUT.” Oliver’s vocal abilities matured with each YouTube sitting. So much so, that when the time came to release a video of her own cover renditions, the awkward small-town homegirl went viral on Twitter overnight. One of Oliver’s cover songs, “Say You Won’t Let Go” (originally performed by James Arthur), gained one million views on Twitter and was featured on @6SecondSongs. Oliver, known on Twitter as @its_emmaoliver, also released a cover of “Think Before I Talk” by Astrid S, in which the artist herself retweeted with, “WOW.” Since, Oliver has appeared on both The Voice and American Idol and has been working with several major writers and producers in Nashville to release her first EP, scheduled to debut this year. Oliver’s R&B/soul/pop vibes are abnormally mature for her age, yet are undoubtedly authentic to her nature. Battling severe anxiety is a daily reality for Oliver, but when it comes to her music, she is unapologetically confident in her sound. Music has helped her discover her identity as both a person and as an artist, which grows with each song she records, new video she releases, and new venue she performs. You can find Oliver performing or watching other artists at Deep Ellum Art Co. and House of Blues. Catch @ITSEMMAOLIVER on Instagram.


Emma Oliver

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Photography by BREE MARIE FISH (@BREEMARIEFISH) | Artwork by JACQUELINE BEER (WWW.JACQUELINEBEER.COM)

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BOBBY_ SESSIONS // THE LEGEND FROM DALLAS Written by LEE ESCOBEDO

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There has been a wealth of talent from Brain Gang, a seminal group which set the stage for many of the city’s most well-known hip-hop names, such as Blue, The Misfit., who has worked with Kendrick Lamar, Sam Lao, and Justus. Sessions signing with the greatest hip-hop label in the world is the culmination of Dallas’ support for its own during the past decade, building up its name as a hip-hop mecca capable of sustaining a record-label market ripe with talent. “I have called myself ‘The Legend from Dallas, TX.’ I speak about The Law of Attraction and the power of manifestation—calling something to be before it’s anything.

NOW, MY NAME HAS TO BE MENTIONED IN DALLAS MUSIC HISTORY FOREVER. IT HAS A LOT OF SENTIMENTAL VALUE TO ME. I WANT TO ADD TO MY OWN LEGACY AND SHOW OTHER PEOPLE YOU DON’T HAVE TO MOVE AWAY FROM YOUR CITY NECESSARILY TO ‘MAKE IT.’” You can find Sessions hangout at his two favorite Dallas hotspots: Vitruvian Park for long walks and in Deep Ellum for nights out. Catch @BOBBYSESSIONSTX on Instagram.

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allasites who have been following the rise of rapper Bobby Sessions to recent Def Jam Recording signee have heard the legend. If they haven’t, here’s how it goes...In 2015, Sessions quit his construction job with $50 in his pocket to pursue rap full-time. He had recently embraced a positivity philosophy dubbed “The Law of Attraction” (or “LOA”), which he would also name his 2015 debut album later that year. Branching out as a solo rapper after a successful stint in the punk-rap group Brain Gang, Sessions put everything he had into his craft, honing his lyrical skills into blistering barbfilled bars tackling social injustice, race relations, and cultural inequity, foreshadowing the state of America just a few years later. Earlier this year, the investment paid off when new CEO of Def Jam, Paul Rosenberg, hand-picked Sessions as one of his first new additions to the label, marking Sessions as a top success story in Dallas hip-hop history. “He feels like the new music I am working on fits the musical mold of what Def Jam represents,” Sessions said. The connection to top label Def Jam was made possible through Sessions’ management: Dallas-based record label and management firm HIGH STANDARDz, run by Vince Chapa who has managed Frank Ocean and Jeremy “J Dot” Jones. Jones used his industry connections to get Sessions’ music in front of Rosenberg, leading to him being signed to Def Jam and thus his LOA coming true. “We were always focused on building from the ground up—the proper way. Def Jam took note of the work we’ve put out.”


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Meet Little Image: Dallas-based indie band tours the national scene, bringing a fresh wave of energy and muse.

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TELL US ABOUT YOURSELF: WHO IS LITTLE IMAGE AND HOW DID THE BAND ORIGINATE? It all kind of started when Jackson wrote an EP. He wanted to be able to portray the music in a live setting, and that’s when all the dudes came in. We wrote Musings as a group shortly after all coming together.

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HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN MAKING MUSIC? WHAT KIND OF SOUND COMES FROM LITTLE IMAGE? We’ve been writing together for about three years. I feel like that’s always a tough question for any artist. We just really like to make music that people would want to listen to now and 10 years from now. Bands like Bombay Bicycle Club, mewithoutYou, and Radiohead are definitely some inspirations of ours who have achieved that timeless sound.

AS AN INDIE BAND, YOU ALL HAVE TOURED QUITE A BIT. HOW MANY CITIES WOULD YOU SAY YOU HAVE PLAYED SHOWS IN? WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE CITY/SHOW AND WHY? We’ve played about 20 cities. One of our favorite shows for sure was in NYC at a super small 100-cap venue. It was one of the most inspiring moments for us, being in one of the biggest cities in the world and hearing a full room of people singing our songs. Even though it was a small venue, it was a great memory that we will cherish forever.

WHAT HAS BEEN THE HARDEST THING YOU HAVE FACED AS A BAND AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME IT? Creative differences are always a struggle. A good way to get past it for us is to be as open-minded with an idea as possible and not to hold on too tightly to what we personally want. It’s made our music turn out more unique and different with everyone’s ideas and insight being poured into the songs.

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WHAT DOES “STARVING ARTISTRY” MEAN TO YOU? WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO PUSH PAST THE STRUGGLE OF NOT HAVING THE FUNDS TO DO WHAT YOU LOVE TO DO? That’s a super great question. I think we can totally relate. Being an artist is really difficult and risky when you’re putting everything into something you’re creating but nothing comes of it. I think that “starving artistry” becomes very real at those times for us. The best motivation for us is to remember why we do what we do. We want to love people as well as we can. We want our music to be relatable to people who need it. We genuinely love making music—it’s a privilege even. It’s special to us no matter how many people listen.

WHAT’S IN STORE NEXT FOR LITTLE IMAGE? We have recently started writing our next full-length record—very excited to see what comes of it! We also are already booking a national tour. We can’t wait to get back out and meet more people.

WHERE ARE YOUR TWO FAVORITE DALLAS LOCATIONS TO HANG? Our favorite coffee shop to hang out at is Houndstooth Coffee. You meet several of Dallas’ creatives at the location off Sylvan Ave. and I-30. Our second favorite hangspot is Tacos Mariachi—best tacos in Dallas. Catch @LITTLEIMAGETX on Instagram.


REMY_ REILLY // THE TRANQUIL VOICE OF YOUTH Written by SYDNEY COOPER

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Edited by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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ith musical influences like The Cure, Norah Jones, and ZZ Ward, you would never imagine Remy Reilly is only 14 years old. Her ability to fuse jazz, indie, and pop genres to create a fresh sound leaves listeners lost in the space of throwback beats and current vibes. Raised by musical parents in Frisco, Reilly began singing at the age of two and grew up attending concerts and studio sessions. Her father, John Nicholson, is a Disney Music Group executive who has worked in promotion for over 15 years—not to mention also a huge influence in his daughter’s life. Amy (Reilly’s mother) is a former radio DJ. By age 11, the young musician became passionate about learning to play the drums. “When I went to concerts, I was enamored with watching the drummer; no matter what, my eyes were always on the drummer,” Reilly said. Learning the drums was the foundation for her understanding of rhythm and timing, thus preparing her to also play the piano, ukulele, and guitar. Fans are captivated by her raw tones that effortlessly dance over the smooth and tasteful piano chords during her shows. Reilly’s long golden hair and natural beauty mimic her relaxed sound—easy on the eyes, easy on the ears, easy on the soul. “When I visited the Musical Instrument Museum in Phoenix, Arizona, a quote caught my eye that I have never forgotten since: ‘Music is the language of the soul.’ It was a simple statement, but it has resonated with me.”

Reilly may be young, but the girl puts her game face on when it comes to playing shows. Last year, she faced the challenges of venues not giving her a chance because of her age. But after hearing her play, it was a totally different story. “Once they saw what I could do, then they let me in. Now, I’m getting booked regularly at several venues. Beyond recording new music, my goal is to expand my bookings this year and continue to convince people that my sound doesn’t match my age,” Reilly laughs. Reilly’s first single, “26,” landed instantaneously on 91.7’s The KXT Local Show, the most well-known local radio station for indie-pop in Dallas. It became easy to see that fans wanted more, and fast. On March 23, 2018, Reilly released her selftitled EP, which was recorded with producer Jason Burt at Dallas’ Modern Electric Sound Recorders. The studio is responsible for producing some of the top up-and-coming names in local music, including Leon Bridges, Reverend Horton Heat, Nikki Lane, and Medicine Man Revival, along with Jonathan Tyler, Paul Cauthen, Quaker City Night Hawks, and The Texas Gentlemen (who were named as one of our “Top 25 Most Influential Creatives of DFW” in 2017). Needless to say, Remy Reilly has been set up for a successful first step into the horizon of a colorful music career. You can find Reilly hanging out at Opening Bell Coffee and Deep Ellum Art Co., two of her favorite local spots in Dallas. Catch @REMYREILLY on Instagram.

“I HONESTLY BELIEVE MY SOLE PURPOSE FOR CREATING MUSIC IS TO MAKE OTHERS HAPPY. MUSIC IS MY LANGUAGE, AND I WANT TO MAKE PEOPLE FEEL WHEN THEY LISTEN TO IT.”


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Photography by WILL VON BOLTON (@WILLVONBOLTON)

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// FINDING SOUL IN AMERICA

Abraham Alexander

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Photography by RYAN LITTLEFIELD (@LITTLEFIELDPRODUCTIONS) | Artwork by JACQUELINE BEER (WWW.JACQUELINEBEER.COM)


Written by SYDNEY COOPER Edited by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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Catch @ABRAHAMALEXANDER on Instagram.

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rowing up in Athens, Greece, Abraham Alexander’s early life was filled with interracial tension amidst a failing economy. Wanting to find new opportunities in the States, the Alexanders moved to Fort Worth where they were able to raise their family surrounded by friends. Thus began the first chapter of Abraham Alexander’s American journey. Both of Alexander’s parents had musical backgrounds—his mother a singer and his father a guitar player. Attempting to repair a broken relationship with his father at a younger age, Alexander tried his hand at playing the guitar which unfortunately failed as a bonding moment. It took tearing his ACL playing soccer at 25 years old to fall back to music and find the personal salvation it would bring. “I had friends that kind of encouraged me to keep going,” Alexander said. “One of them was an artist himself. There were Leon Bridges, Brandon Marcel, and a good buddy, Jonathan Bell, who is also an amazing photographer. They always encouraged and pushed me. In that whole process, I found that creating new music brought what I felt to life.” It was the influence Alexander needed to not only pick up a guitar again, but take music seriously as a career. “My music is an outlet for me to speak my mind,” Alexander said. “It’s an outlet for me to help others. Maybe people don’t know how to express what they’re feeling, and hopefully my songs can evoke emotion or put language to how they feel.” America’s current socio-political arena has inspired much of Alexander’s songwriting. He tries to distill the pain and tension of the current social strife into his music, which works as a healing alchemy. The inspiration for his debut single “America” stemmed from the murder of Trayvon Martin in 2012. The Dallas police shooting and 2016 presidential election sparked the remaining emotion to finish the song. “I love this country, but at times it doesn’t love me back,” Alexander said. “But I do feel like this is the greatest country in the world, and I wouldn’t want to live in any other place.” You can find Abraham working on his creative processes at Common Desk or at the Belmont Hotel alongside other Dallas musicians.

“Music brought my emotions to life.”


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+ in times of CHAOS, A GLASS HALF EMPTY VERSUS A GLASS HALF FULL. \\

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I SUPPOSE IT’S ALL IN THE WAY YOU LOOK AT IT. WHEN CHAOS IS FORMING ALL AROUND, IT’S ONLY NATURAL TO SIDE WITH FEAR AND CONFUSION. CHAOS, THOUGH, HAS A WAY OF AWAKENING THE ARTIST— FOR THE ARTIST SEES CHAOS AS A CANVAS. THE ARTIST MOVES WITH THE STROKES OF ENLIGHTENMENT, COLOR, AND GRACE. THE ARTIST BREATHES INTO THE FIERY FURNACE OF THAT WHICH THEY HAVE NO CONTROL OVER, AND YET MOLDS GLASS FROM THE FLAMES. + THE ARTIST SMIRKS AT CHAOS, AND INSPIRED BY THE OPPORTUNITY AT HAND, / / BEGINS TO MAKE BEAUTY FROM ASHES.

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Artwork by MAGDIEL LOPEZ (@MAGDIELLOP)


MAGDIEL _LOPEZ / / L AY E R S I N A B S O L U T E S Written by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU Interview by JADE BYERS

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uriosity, authenticity, imagination, and zeal are the perfect blend of character traits one could possess to not only inspire culture, but shape it for the better. Sixty seconds in the presence of Magdiel Lopez and his curious eyes and warm heart would tell you a story that would last you a year. Maybe this is why his series titled A Poster Every Day drew fans in overnight, making this Dallas-based graphic designer “instafamous” across Instagram, Pinterest, Behance, Society6, YouTube, and Creatnprocess tutorials. His surrealist designs have been featured by top brands like Nike, Adobe software, Cosmopolitan, and MTV.

SOMETHING YOU CAN PROVOKE AND MAKE HAPPEN. ALL YOU HAVE TO DO IS PUSH YOURSELF,” LOPEZ SAYS WITH A SMOOTH SPANISH ACCENT. Magdiel’s childhood was a far cry from the digital world we are so accustomed to today. He spent much of his time etching stories with pen and paper from his quaint cottage home in Havana, Cuba. “When I was growing up in Cuba, we went to church religiously. So, I would draw whatever the sermons were about to keep myself engaged,” said Lopez. Lopez recalls the hours spent outside his grandma’s house, staring at the sky and making shapes artistically that recounted the mystery of the breadth of the universe. The magic of the sky hasn’t left Lopez. Many of his posters illustrate the beauty of the heavens. Rich baby blues and puffy white clouds serve as a backdrop against a telling graphic. Extraterrestrial elements and exoteric icons develop the poster series beyond earthly imaginings into a world that Lopez explores in his personal artistry. “I use the sky often. I love how it’s peaceful, powerful, and—when in my artistic hands—it’s moldable.”

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“CREATIVITY ISN’T SOMETHING THAT COMES AND GOES; IT IS


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As a teenager, Lopez bartered cartoon drawings for a bootleg copy of Photoshop. Without the luxury of the Internet, he taught himself every element of digital art; however, the excitement of new pursuits was cut short at age fifteen when his family fled Cuba for the United States. They traveled through Mexico where he was detained in a Mexican immigration prison. Lopez recalls his time in the prison camp and how his brother was kidnapped. Months later, Lopez and his brother were reunited in Florida at the airport. Lopez, the proverbial positive thinker, saw the experience as a means of evolution and personal progression. “Adapting to difficult situations you go through is a lot like design— it changes so quickly, forcing you to discover something new.” While Lopez’s past has guided his steps to the present, one thing is for sure: Dallas has become more than home. Dallas is where Lopez has discovered more of who he is as a person, as a husband, and as an artist. And now, Dallas has discovered him. Lopez currently serves as the creative director at Fellowship Church Dallas campus. You will also most likely run into him at Magnolias: Sous Le Pont and Mudsmith. Catch @MAGDIELLOP on Instagram.

“It’s like when you think you found something that is absolute, but then you realize there’s another layer to it. That’s life. That’s art.”


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Artwork by MAGDIEL LOPEZ (@MAGDIELLOP)

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// THE PHILOSOPHIES O F L I F E BY WAY O F A RT

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Artist _ 07 KYLE STEED

Written by JADE BYERS

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hilosophy and art—the two have been intertwined for centuries. Renowned illustrator Kyle Steed sits unassumingly on a picnic bench at Houndstooth Coffee as he slowly and intricately defines the lines of his typography, spelling out the phrase: “Are You Who You Are?” The drive for introspection is something so imperative that you’d be hard-pressed to leave his presence without a little philosophy lesson. Through illustration and spirituality, Steed is finding a means to answer the maddening questions of life. Maybe this is why on November 4, 2017, he received a missed call from an unlikely candidate looking for an illustrator for his next book. “Hey, I’m looking for a fella named Kyle. My name is Rob Bell…I would love to talk to you. Much love and peace.” (For context, Rob Bell was featured in The 2011 TIME 100, Time magazine’s annual list of the most influential people in the world. This was primarily due to his thoughtprovoking teachings and writings, several of which are on The New York Times Best Sellers.) #NBD. The luxury of searching for “what it all means” didn’t always come easy for a young Steed. Like many of us, he was lingering through early stages of college trying to find something that could engage him. Looking back, Steed thanks his father for not letting him slide through life and challenging him to make hard choices—the kind that mold you for the better. The pressure of self-worth and independence came to a head at age 21 when he joined the U.S. Air Force and was stationed in Japan for three years. “Serving in the Air Force took me away from living at home and dropped me into a whole new way of life. The experience as a whole was difficult. It is only in retrospect that I realize the value and importance of how my experiences overseas in the military helped shape me tremendously.” He throws a bottle cap in the direction of an interrupting bird. Steed despises disruption. It’s part and parcel of the energy he requires for simultaneous focus and muse. His illustration series, Patience, is totemic to life’s preoccupation with disruption. The composition of twisted forms packed into defined spaces—the stark contrast of heavy black lines on natural canvas—narrates the incredibly long time it takes to feel comfortable in one’s own skin. Steed resumes, “Early on in my art career, I was constantly searching for inspiration. The most notable way I found an outlet was with my hand-lettering by way of quotes or Bible verses, but at some point those things become too topical.

WHEN EXPERIENCING EXTREMELY DIFFICULT MOMENTS, THOSE WHERE YOU FEEL YOUR SOUL BEING CRUSHED UNDER THE WEIGHT

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OF IT ALL, WE ARE TAUGHT TO MOVE ON; TO MASK THE PAIN BY PURSUING HAPPINESS. WE DON’T LEARN TO DEAL WITH INNER RESISTANCE, SADNESS, OR LOSS. It’s not popular within our ‘modern’ human behavior to lean into those things. Therefore, we wake up years later realizing we are not truly whole, because half of us was unattended to.” It’s difficult to be real and honest in our own work until we accept that inspiration isn’t “out there” to be sought after, but rather always beckoning inside us. Steed’s gray eyes are pronounced under his baby blue, metal-framed glasses; his beard is speckled with wiry white whiskers, slightly revealing wisdom gained through the lens of his craft—or maybe, it’s more so the beautiful struggle caused by raising two toddlers. Eternally meditative and grateful, it’s obvious Steed is answering one of his own life questions: “Do I fit?” Since the incarnation of his Texas-sized illustration, Dallas City Mural, Steed continues to help define a new way of looking at the world by leaving just as many questions on the walls across DFW as he has about himself. The mural, a play on borrowed words “Ask Not What Your City Can Do For You But What You Can Do For Your City,” provokes independence and freedom—something Steed spends his life pursuing and helping others do the same. You will find Kyle hanging out at his aesthetically inspiring home in Oak Cliff working on his current biggest project: building a playhouse for his girls. He also frequents Davis Street Espresso, Jettison, and Weekend Coffee at The Joule Hotel. Catch @KYLESTEED on Instagram.


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// OCEAN IN MOTION

Jeremy McKane

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Written by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU Interview by SYDNEY COOPER

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with his boundless, imaginative sensationalist-side struggled to find real purpose and poise when it came to his freelance work. It wasn’t until he was in his 30s that the tech geek with an eye for beauty found his real passion: shooting stills and videos of 47-foot humpback whales. McKane decided to incorporate his interaction with whales into the LUCiD experience for the rest of humanity to encounter from anywhere in the world. Today, LUCiD participants on the other side of the world can see what McKane videos in real-time off the shores of Tonga. As a videographer, photographer, artist, and programmer, McKane uses his multi-talents to herald a message that has brought on collaborations with global partners, such as Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, The Explorers Club, and the G7 Summit by way of the German Ministry. The message is simple: stop the use of single-use products. “I believe that when we say we throw away something, we have this idea that it’s gone forever. Well, news flash…away doesn’t exist. We need to realize that our passive, everyday actions are taking an active role in the ruin of our earth. We are all guilty and it’s irresponsible to think someone else will just fix it for us when we are the bad tenants.” Having an abstract art piece reflect a global issue allows for all humanity to unite for the common good. You can find McKane posted up at his office at WeWork Thanksgiving Tower in Downtown Dallas. Interested in experiencing the magic of LUCiD for yourself? Visit oceanplasticslab.net to see tour dates for the next three years. Catch @JEREMYMCKANE on Instagram.

“LUCID STANDS FOR ITSELF TO SHOW US THAT WE ALL HAVE A CHOICE. THE WORLD HAS ENOUGH ACTIVISTS; WE NEED MORE ACTIONISTS.”

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I was in a dark cave along the shores of Tonga with a crew. To make it to the other side of the cave, we all had to freedive and swim up underneath the rock in pitch dark. You train for this kind of stuff, but when the moment hits you, you realize you have to drown out your fears if you don’t want to die.” The power of the mind is an incredible thing. Dallas native, Jeremy McKane, is one of the most unparalleled artists of our city, probably because his playground happens to be in the most remote diving areas in the South Pacific islands. Or it’s because this artist uses mind-controlled virtual reality to take us to his underwater studio, a project McKane calls, LUCiD. LUCiD is an interactive art installation where participants use their brain power to alter a reality for ocean life, visualizing the effects that humans have on the marine environment and the substantial difference that is made when we are actually aware of the amount of plastic and waste dumped into the oceans. It may sound like something straight out of a science fiction novel, but McKane and two other innovators, Aliaksei Rubanau (neurofeedback engineer) and Vasyl Skrypij (programmer), have designed the exhibit that even ArtPrize took notice of last year. Growing up, McKane showed interest in building computers as early as eight years old. In his early 20s, he branched out into fashion photography for runway and print as well as shooting for Global Fashion News. He later found a niche in photographing models wearing gorgeous flowing gowns—while underwater. Needless to say, McKane’s hard-pressed, intellectual tech-side woven


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Written by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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hen Arturo Torres was nine years old, his father was escorted out of his home by the police after an attempt to murder his mother. She put a restraining order against him and his family for the years of abuse she endured and held her three boys close. From an early age, Torres found solace within the pages of his favorite comic books (particularly their characters) and developed a knack for illustrating, inspired by the heroes who never let him down: Spider-Man and Hulk. By the time Torres became a sophomore in high school, he began to dream about being an artist. The idea seemed impossible—illogical even—especially for a family surviving on minimal, with no room for the celluloid creations of Marvel and DC. No mother wants her child to live in poverty, and here was her middle son (with more talent in his pinky finger) facing yet another generational cycle of “bare necessities”—the starving artist. A decade later, Torres punctured the ceiling when he became a two-time New York Times bestselling illustrator with the 2015 release of The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song From Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed and, in 2017, Basketball (and Other Things): A Collection of Questions Asked, Answered, Illustrated—both by Shea Serrano. Torres’ fanciful cartoon illustrations of famous sports icons and musical sensations gained him the attention of Nike. In 2017, Nike commissioned Torres to illustrate the entire backdrop of all five Nike Hyper Courts in Manila, Philippines, each one depicting a different basketball superstar. For Torres, being an illustrator is more than a job; it’s a calling. “There are so many kids in the world that have my childhood. I was fortunate to have a loving mother, but not every kid has even that. My art is my inspiration. I stay inspired by what I create, and I hope to inspire kids that feel they have no hope.” Every aspiring artist, at some moment in time, will face the first inevitable struggle: making the leap from a full-time job to becoming an “artrepreneur.” For Torres, the leap was a feat; at the intersection of fate and faith, the right connections presented themselves worthy for Torres and his art. Artists face the hard facts everyday that entrepreneurs face all the same: risk. Do you love what you do enough to risk security for something sensational? It seems dreamy and for many artists like Torres, it’s the only reality to choose. A seed was planted in the heart of a teen to do art for a living someday. Now, that seed is growing into a tree of life for Torres and his newlywed, Susan, a talented artist and architect. You will find Torres cozied up with earphones while sketching away his next masterpieces at either Common Desk or his crib. Catch @ARTURODRAWS on Instagram.

“No child should have to make important adult decisions for a family. Children should have a childhood—one that is full of heroes, color, life, and dreams.”


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+ in times of FAMINE, THE LOST BOYS KNEW IT WELL. \\ THEY HAD MADE A HOME FROM A PLACE THAT, IN SOME WAY, SEEMED DESOLATE, BUT THEY WERE HAPPY. THE DINNER BELL RANG AND ALL THE BOYS CAME FLYING DOWN THE ZIP-LINE, WHICH CONNECTED THEIR TREEHOUSE TO THEIR PLACE AT THE DINNER TABLE. I SAT NEXT TO PETER.

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THE SMELL OF DIVINE FOOD WAS COMING FROM THE KITCHEN. MY SENSES WERE TRIGGERED TO OVERDRIVE. BY THE TIME THE TRAYS ARRIVED, I WAS SHOCKED BY THE STAUNCH REALITY THAT MY SENSES PLAYED AN EVIL TRICK ON ME. THERE WAS NO FOOD. NO DRINK. THE SIGHT OF EMPTY PLATES JUST MADE MY EMPTY STOMACH ROAR WITH EVEN MORE FURY. + THEY GAVE THANKS, ANYWAY. ONE OF THE LOST BOYS LEANED IN AND WHISPERED, “OPEN YOUR EYES.” CALL IT A PARADIGM SHIFT. CALL IT MAGIC. CALL IT A MIRACLE. / / BUT I WEPT AS I BEHELD THE GREATEST FEAST EVER SET BEFORE ME.

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// FARM TO FAMOUS

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Written by NATHAN WELLS MERRICK PORCHÉDDU Interview by NATHAN WELLS

WHAT MAKES YOU DIFFERENT…YOU BE YOU.” You can find Chef Lyford hanging with the butchers at Local Yocal Farm to Market or having a cocktail in the back bar of Rick’s Chophouse. Catch @PATINAGREEN on Instagram.

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he fragrance of flowers fills the air at the entrance of farm-to-table bistro and restaurant Patina Green Home and Market, located in the quaint square of downtown McKinney. The restaurant has been lauded by foodies from all over the country, particularly praised by Food Network for their famous Texas Ham & Cheese—a sandwich layered with hickory smoked ham and smoked cheddar, delicately smeared with jalapeño peach jelly between two slices of jalapeño cheddar loaf—a menu item that placed in Food Network Magazine’s “50 States 50 Sandwiches.” For the past eight years, Market Chef Robert Lyford has been crafting locally-sourced, farm-to-table meals, insisting patrons search for the story in every bite. “My food is full of stories,” he says, which is particularly evident in their monthly Market Dinners where narratives are crafted over a Chef’s Tasting of five courses with additional snacks. But it’s more than the food: “It’s about the experience you have the minute you walk into the door and everything in between until you leave—completely satisfied.” Patina Green is a family affair; Chef Lyford, his wife Kaci, and her mother Luann have operated a successful restaurant for eight years. Chef Lyford cooks, Kaci curates the vintage items that embellish the restaurant (nearly everything is for sale; the space changes daily), while Luann greets each and every visitor that walks in. The boutique eatery carries a small-town, local feel with a national recognition and premiers goods sourced from around the globe. Patina Green aims to partner with local farms. It’s rare to sit down someplace that can give names and directions to the locations their ingredients came from. For Chef Lyford, it once again circles back to the story: if a farm has a bad year and produces fewer peaches than usual, he’s going to strive to make something beautiful out of each fruit. The story is written in the food; it’s the story of home. Appropriately, these farm partnerships helped earn Chef Lyford and Kaci a spot on Farm Aid’s Development Advisory Council. When it comes to cooking, Chef Lyford references tradition and eschews it entirely. This work ethic stems from overcoming his share of difficulty while passing through some of Dallas’ toughest and most esteemed kitchens. He even left the restaurant industry for a time, putting family ahead of his career. His father-inlaw’s passing and a desire to be close to his family fostered the creation of Patina Green. After eight years in business, he says, “the only way we survived was being able to lean on each other.” Their dedication has paid off, with acclaimed reviews and awards such as D Magazine’s “Best Sandwich Shop” of 2014 and “Best Sandwiches” in 2016 and other newsworthy features in Country Living, The Dallas Morning News, and HGTV. Despite the long road to its creation and success, Patina Green really knows what it’s doing. Chef Lyford turns his experience into advice for anyone in his shoes still trying to find success:


D E E _ T R AY LO R // A TRIBUTE IN EVERY CUP Written by SYDNEY COOPER

#ARTISTUPRISING

Edited by LEE ESCOBEDO

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ee “Walt Deezy” Traylor’s late grandmother, Rosalind, introduced him to his first cup of coffee at Carnival. The experience left him with a lifelong love of coffee, so when it came time to name his own Garland coffee shop in 2015, he naturally chose Rosalind Coffee Company. “I remember telling her, ‘One day I’m going to get us out of the hood and I’m going to get you a mansion.’ She passed before I could do that,” Traylor said. “Now, I just carry on her legacy, still working hard at something I am very passionate about: coffee.” A world champion barista, Traylor has worked in the industry for seven years but his competitive career didn’t start until three years ago. Baristas from all over the country come together once a month in New York to compete over latte art. In a competition, you are only allowed to use your coffee pitcher to create—etching is considered cheating. “At first, most people took it very seriously, so they didn’t really have fun with it,” Traylor said. “That’s why I started wearing black gloves and earphones to try and make a gimmick out of it.” Traylor’s dedication to his craft is no joke. He has been crowned champion in multiple nationwide events: the 2016 New York Coffee Festival, Barista Guild of North Texas Latte Art in March 2017, and April 2017’s Victrola Latte Art, just to name a few. He finds the styles in New York and Texas to be polar opposites.

“THE BARISTAS IN DALLAS ARE VERY WELCOMING; IT’S A MUCH MORE TIGHTKNIT COMMUNITY.”

On the contrary, “It’s not as close in New York. The opportunity in New York probably triples or quadruples the opportunities available in Dallas. It’s just amazing how many baristas are so passionate about the craft or want to learn. The entry-level is very low in most areas, so even if you don’t have a good grasp on the craft, other people will teach you.” Besides mastering the barista role, Traylor is also a roaster. The coffee beans used at Rosalind Coffee Company are personally roasted by Traylor himself. He goes out of his way to perfect each cup, flying to his other location in New York to roast Rosalind Coffee blends before taking them back to his Texas shop for purchase. This is because he hasn’t yet built a roaster in Garland, so his roasting factory and all other supplies remain in New York. Traylor’s goals for the future are to build a roaster for the Garland location of Rosalind Coffee Company, while opening up two more locations in New York by the end of the year. Rosalind’s impact on her grandson can be felt in every cup of coffee her namesake shop brews, revealing the effect that small gestures can have on a future artist. Catch @ROSALIND_COFFEE on Instagram.


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Artwork by JACQUELINE BEER (WWW.JACQUELINEBEER.COM)

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+ in times without VISION, THERE GOES A SAYING, “WITHOUT VISION, THE PEOPLE PERISH.” \\

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TO OBTAIN CLEAR VISION WAS THE SECRET TO THE SUCCESSFUL REIGN OF THE GREAT KINGS, THE RULERSHIP OF THE MATRIARCHS, THE LAWS OF THE EARLY JUDGES, AND THE LEADERSHIP OF APPOINTED PRIESTS. THOSE WHO OBTAIN VISION KNOW IT TAKES GREAT FOCUS. AS THE LIGHT REACHES THE LENS OF YOUR PERSPECTIVE, YOU MUST DIAL IN AND WAIT FOR THE CONTEXT TO DILATE PROPERLY BEFORE CAPTURING THE IMAGE IN YOUR MIND’S EYE. THE TENSION MUST BE JUST RIGHT BETWEEN THE SPY AND THE SUBJECT. + WITH THE TICK OF EACH MOMENT, THE VISION SLOWLY TRANSFORMS FROM A STILL LIFE IMAGE INTO A MOTION PICTURE… / / AND THE PROTAGONIST ALWAYS WINS.

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“I believe that everything you are is channeled into creating something that resembles what you carry inside.”

ax Kütz captures the world with striking editorial, fashion, portrait, and lifestyle photography. It’s easy to see that the young photographer values a precise taste for minimalism, texture, and raw humanism. “If I had the best camera skills but no eye, I might be able to make money but would gain no respect from people in the industry. On the other hand, I know people who have no idea how to use a camera yet their work is mind-blowing. My goal is to master both the eye and the skill.” Kütz is drawn to the paradox of muted vibrancies. “It’s not about the gear. I mean, having expensive camera equipment helps, but gear should help create a vision. Vision is king; it always has to rule over the equipment.” Much of Kütz’s early work is unreleased, including photos he took at a refugee camp in Greece. Children chase one another with emergency blankets as capes. They are surrounded by filth, rubble, and a muted backdrop— yet in their joy lies vibrancy. It was in these moments that Kütz found purpose by way of his craft. “To me, art is about ourselves and others,” he says. “It’s naive to say that our personality and our taste doesn’t show up in our work; or that what defines us doesn’t show up in our work. What’s inside a musician shows up in their music. What’s inside a writer shows up in their writing. What’s inside of me shows up in my photographs.” Several years ago during a trip to Munich, Kütz left the camera behind and instead took pictures using Snapchat. He shows a photo of an elderly man crouched in a chair while playing a saxophone in front of a battered wall, begging for spare change. This is just one example of Kütz’s personal portrayal in capturing humanity at its finest. While there is nothing overtly Christian about his work (no crucifix; no Madonna), Kütz says no matter what photo he takes, he hopes the viewer will experience the presence of Jesus—an authentic desire that stems from the deep wells of his heritage being the grandson of Kenneth Copeland, world-renowned author, speaker, musician, preacher, and evangelist. Kütz is not a Christian photographer, if there even is such a thing. Rather, he is both an artist and a Christian. He maintains his identity outside of possession: “I could lose all accreditation. I could lose every photo. I could become a worker on an assembly line or clean a pool for the rest of my life, and I’d be okay with it because my identity must be found in something greater than my craft.” You will find Kütz connecting with other creatives at Houndstooth Coffee or editing some of his finest work at The Adolphus. Catch @MXKTZ on Instagram.


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Photography by MAX KÜTZ (@MXKTZ)

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HENRY_ M A RT E N S // THE L-O-V-E T H R I L L E R Written by KEVIN RYAN MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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“WHEN TIMES GET HARD FOR OUR COUPLES, WE WANT THEIR FILM TO BE THE THING THEY WATCH OVER AND OVER AGAIN BECAUSE NOTHING MAKES THEM FEEL MORE IN LOVE THAN THE MOMENT THEY COMMITTED THEIR LIVES TO ONE ANOTHER.”

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he film fades in to a bride and a groom alone in a meadow, Martens said. “Well, relationships and luck.” Last year he filmed under an endless sky. The couple moves in silence as an 35 weddings, but he plans to do fewer in the future so he can E.E. Cummings poem appears over a gentle symphony. devote more time to his process. “I’d like to scale it down to This could easily be a scene from a Terrence Malick film, about 15 weddings a year that are all mind-blowing masterpieces.” but it’s not—it is a wedding video; a testament to how serious Working alongside his brother makes all the difference. “When we filmmaker Henry Martens takes his craft. Martens runs The work together, it’s always magical,” Martens said. “We have the Brothers Martens production company alongside Bradford (his same aesthetic. It’s not even intentional; we just have similar vibes brother) and filmmaker David Le. Martens watched many movies and tones. On a wedding day, you’ll never see us in disagreement as a child, drawn to each film’s score. Once older, he became a about where to take portraits. We just look at each other and we know, self-taught musician and wanted to have a career in film scoring. ‘Oh that’s the dopest light.’ We are very cohesive together.” The He and Bradford—a skilled photographer—decided to collaborate Brothers Martens abide by a sleek minimalism, a four-person team their talents by applying high art techniques to a genre in desperate where nobody is expendable because everyone brings something to need of artistic experimentation: wedding videos. The two brothers the table. For three years, the Martens brothers and David Le have successfully combined elements of European art cinema, capturing done the filming, but Martens does the editing alone. “Editing is authentic love stories communicated through soaring scores and where the story comes together.” He searches through 700-800 beautiful cinematography. “I didn't even own a camera until four clips, looking for the right moments (both big and small) that tell years ago; nor did I know how to turn a camera on,” Martens said. each love story. For Martens, music selection is especially crucial. “I It all started when Martens found himself browsing on eBay take a lot of risks with editing,” he says. “You have to take risks when one day. On a whim, he placed a bid on a Blackmagic Cinema you’re doing something that’s non-traditional, which is why couples Camera—which he won. “I started shooting random stuff around love hiring us to shoot their heirloom love stories. We're different.” Dallas, asking videographers for technical and creative tips.” The Martens views the films they make as reminders to hold onto the advice must have paid off because after three short years, The love that got you there, especially during the rocky moments that Brothers Martens wedding videos were featured on Love Stories occur in any marriage. You can find Martens and his brother at the TV (where they won "Best Destination Wedding Film") and Houndstooth Coffee on Sylvan Ave. and I-30, drinking cappuccinos Junebug Weddings. Their talent also landed them a winning spot and dreaming up their next legendary love story masterpiece. in two Rangefinder Magazine photography competitions. “Like most things that lead to success, it’s been a lot about relationships,” Catch @HENRYWEDDINGS on Instagram.


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Edited by LEE ESCOBEDO

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hen Nigerian-born photographer Olufela “Fela” Raymond speaks on his art, you are compelled to listen. “I was 10 years old when I got the news that I had won the visa lottery, giving not just me but my entire family permission to move to the United States,” he said. Now, as an adult, the multi-talented photographer, filmmaker, and creative director takes nothing for granted, using his art as a tool for unity. “My main focus is bringing people together, bringing art together, and bringing vision together.” When his family arrived in Texas, his uncle had been pastoring a church in Arlington. Raymond’s family moved in with his uncle, hoping to start building a new life. The growing pains of being a young immigrant in a foreign land came swiftly to a head when he entered middle school and came face to face with bullying. “Transitioning from Nigeria to Texas was a very difficult time for me; it was not easy. I was mocked for my thick Nigerian accent. I was definitely considered an outcast.” It was during college at Texas Tech University where Raymond received life-changing advice from his printmaking professor. Raymond was encouraged to speak his mind through his art—to look beyond the assignment and into what he truly wanted to say. It was an opportunity for Raymond to finally be heard, on his own terms, by using his creativity to speak about humanity, culture, and politics.

“I’M INSPIRED BY CAPTURING BOTH THE BEAUTY AND PAIN IN HUMANITY BECAUSE IT HELPS CONSTANTLY REMIND ME OF HOW MUCH I CAN RELATE TO SOMEONE I DON’T EVEN KNOW. IMAGES TELL STORIES THAT SOME WORDS CAN’T TELL ABOUT PEOPLE. THAT’S WHAT I LOVE TO CAPTURE.” Raymond is gearing up for a busy 2018. Coming full circle, he will be returning to Nigeria—this time to film a three-week long documentary series for Austin-based non-profit The 234 Project—an organization which focuses its efforts on Nigerian arts and education. Raymond also plans to open up a studio at Dallas coworking space GoodWork with new collaborative partner and photographer Franco “Kid the Explorer” Perry. You can find Raymond spending his time at GoodWork in South Dallas or at Photographique where he develops film. Catch @FELARAYMOND on Instagram.


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Photography by ADRIENNE FREEMAN (@IIMOUTO)

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Artist _ 15 JEREMY BIGGERS

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ith Dallas artists signing to major labels (Bobby Sessions to Def Jam), working on Grammynominated albums (Justus on Dr. Dre’s Compton), and joining legendary rappers on tour (hip-hop artist -topic opening up for Flying Lotus), it’s a peak in our city’s history worth documenting. Multi-hyphenate visual artist Jeremy Biggers is way ahead of you. The filmmaker, designer, muralist, and painter has been making avant-garde music videos on the Dallas music scene since the city’s renaissance began in 2013. “Being able to work with these people has definitely allowed me to grow as much as it has because of the caliber of talent I am working with. Being able to work with Blue, The Misfit., Sam Lao, Sarah Jaffe, and Bobby Sessions has pushed me to grow as well and hone my own craft. As much as I have been documenting their growth visually, it has also helped me grow as a creative as well.” Biggers believes the hip-hop community is gaining momentum, with Sessions’ recent signing to Def Jam leading the way. Biggers and Sessions have been collaborating for a while, but their recent work on the music video for “Like Me” brought Biggers national attention for his visual direction. It’s the type of national attention Biggers is now focused on. While he acknowledges the city’s growth, like any hungry artist, he’s hardly satisfied with staying in Dallas for long. “The music industry in Dallas (as with all creative communities) is growing, albeit at a snail’s pace. It’s hard for people like me who have been working day and night for years honing in on my craft, yet the city can’t always fully support the impact of emerging arts because Dallas is still trying to figure out it’s own identity.” Outside of a minority within major markets, videos for “local” rappers stay in a standard, boring lane. They tend to rely on street tropes flashing stacks of $1 bills made to look like $100s, tire shops, chicken shacks, and visits to dark and gritty strip clubs. Biggers is more interested in reflecting on the art form in threeminute films. His work balances the surreal with minimalist subtleties. “I hate for it to look like a typical Dallas music video, where I know exactly where the scenes are shot at. I want people to feel like my videos are not necessarily from Dallas; I want them to compete on an international level. I try to make sure creativity is at the forefront of what I’m doing so I don’t fall into the trap of shooting downtown Dallas from the Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge.” One of the artists he frequently collaborates with is rapper and

singer Sam Lao—who also happens to be his wife. He describes their collaborations as “special.” Lao has a degree in graphic design and is a creative in her own right. “She comes to the table with ideas; I come to the table with ideas; and we figure out how to mesh them to make sense of what we want to do creatively together. She is very particular and very specific with what she wants to do. It’s more like two creative directors working on one project.” While Biggers has been busy documenting the rise of Dallas hiphop the last few years, he rarely rests on a single medium. He is also an accomplished painter, having shown at {neighborhood}, The Public Trust, and held an artist-in-residence at the Fairmont Hotel. While he has gained opportunities, he cites an oversaturation of nepotism in his lack of gallery representation or landing largescale solo shows. “I think the gallery scene (as with a lot of scenes) is a cosign community. If L.A. or N.Y.C. hasn’t discovered you, then Dallas doesn’t care. It doesn’t go out of its way to show Dallas artists. Other cities have to give you a show first. Once that happens, your phone is ringing off the hook. I find it annoying. We live in an Internet age; we don’t need the galleries to have people view our work. It’s kind of like gallery representation compared to the music industry and record labels. It helps to be affiliated, but you don’t need it to get your work seen,” Biggers says. As in all his artistic endeavors, Biggers embraces a forward-thinking approach. If Dallas won’t pay attention on the level he seeks, he’ll look internationally, using the Internet to network and build. “As time progresses, that distance will grow. The galleries are still operating on ‘this is how we have always done it,’ although media and how we consume it is changing. If galleries are not careful, they’ll go the way of Blockbuster: something as simple as Redbox or Netflix will make it more convenient. There are so many other ways to view artwork (like ArtMail—read story on page 94). Galleries will put themselves out of business with an elitist attitude.” For 2018, Biggers is currently putting together a large body of new work he will pitch to galleries outside of Dallas. As always, he will continue to document the city’s rising hip-hop scene. While Biggers has given Dallas his blood, sweat, and tears, he can’t stay the city’s most underrated artist for long... You can find Biggers either at Beauty Bar when DJ Sober is spinning or at Off the Record when Blue, The Misfit. or Taylor Rea are spinning. Catch @STEMANDTHORN on Instagram.


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“I like that I’m the cornerstone of what’s going on in terms of what’s being built creatively in Dallas—music videos or otherwise. Hopefully, all of us artists can give Dallas a little more steam each year.” – JEREMY BIGGERS, Artist

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+ in times of WANDERING, A DESERT LAND IS NO PLACE FOR FRESH AIR, DESPITE WHAT NATURE TELLS YOU. \\ IT’S BEEN 10 LONG YEARS SOJOURNING IN THIS BARREN SPACE. THE SAND IS MY FOUNDATION, CRUMBLING BENEATH MY FEET. THE SUN—MY TORMENTOR— DRIVING ITS WHIP ACROSS MY HEAD AND SHOULDERS. IT IS EVIDENT THAT WHAT LITTLE HOPE I HAVE LEFT IS STOLEN WITH EVERY MIRAGE, WHICH REVEALS ONLY MORE OF THE DESOLATION AHEAD. + I STOP TO TAKE A BREATH. [

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+ I DECIDE WHAT I STILL HAVE IN MY FAVOR: THE AIR INSIDE MY LUNGS. WITH IT, I BREATHE A SIGH OF THANKSGIVING. [

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IN THE FOLLOWING MOMENT, SOMETHING SHORT OF A MIRACLE TOOK PLACE. THE BREATH IN MY LUNGS TRIGGERED MY VOCAL CHORDS TO VIBRATE. WATER WAS SCARCE THESE DAYS—I HAD ALMOST FORGOTTEN THE SOUND OF MY OWN VOICE. THROUGH MY BLISTERED LIPS, MY WITHERED TONGUE FORMED THREE SMALL WORDS THAT AWOKE MY SOUL: / / “I STILL BELIEVE.”

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// LIFE OF THE MODERN BOHEMIAN MOM

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Lauren Williams

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Photography by JAMES WILLIAMS (@JWILL.I.AMS)


Written by JADE BYERS ANGELA ROSS Edited by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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wooden towel, buckets of dye, a portable fan, and a timer—these are the elements that Lauren Williams, now a mother of three, used to create unique tapestries to hang in her home. A little home décor for the modern, creative mom quickly became an enterprise for the Williams’ household in just a few short months. Catching the attention of Chip and Joanna Gaines, the colorful home accents of Williams’ were premiered on the last season of Fixer Upper, positioning the company for exponential growth both online and on the social channel it all started on, Instagram. Williams grew up in a home where being a female was empowering. The idea that she couldn’t do something simply because she was a woman was not a part of her worldview. In fact, her favorite thing to say as a kid when trying something new was, “Watch me!” After graduating college, the marketing major uprooted her life in Texas and ended up in L.A. where she worked producing events. It was there that she met James, now her partner in business and life. The two moved to Dallas in 2010 after their first son was born to work and grow their family. Empty space troubled Williams. A bare wall in one of the many rental houses they lived in after moving to Dallas seemed to stare her in the face, as if to personally challenge her to draw out what was deep inside all along. “I wanted something with texture; something to pop off the wall. I wanted a big piece of art.” And so her first piece was birthed in 2014. Her wanderlust for something original and all her own took off. A few years and several more inspired walls later, the family has settled into a quiet neighborhood in Frisco, Texas. It’s hot and the breeze is barely felt in the garage (a.k.a. the design studio) at the Williams’ home. The boys are inside playing in a blanket fort in the living room. A saw interjects as Lauren shows off pieces in various stages of production. James, who oversees every project, is trimming a piece of walnut wood, preparing it for the wool strands that will soon be suspended and ready for Lauren to dye. James became her sounding board and sanity as the business progressed. Eventually, they designed a website for functionality. Only two years after Lauren debuted her first Canvas with Movement® fiber art, she launched an online store. Within 10 minutes, the tapestries sold out. Pretty impressive for a mom of three young boys. Yes, you read that right. As if that’s not enough, Williams was named one of five artists worldwide who are redefining art forms, according to Interior Design. It’s safe to say that the life mantra she held onto so tightly at a young age was a self-fulfilling prophecy. Williams is doing what she never knew possible—and everyone is watching. You can find her drawing inspiration for her next pieces at either The Joule Hotel or Dallas Arboretum.

“I like to think that my tapestries are a canvas, but with movement.”


MICHAEL GOODEN // MODERNIST BUILDING BY THE MELODY Written by SYDNEY COOPER MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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ocated in a two-story office space in Deep Ellum lies Dallas’ homes while finding his niche in residential architecture. “I was most exciting design firm, M Gooden Design. The firm has much more interested in creating spaces where people could three projects to look forward to in 2018: a 14,000 square- come home after work to relax and enjoy themselves,” he said. foot project in Preston Hollow called Taula House (meaning Gooden went on to enroll in Baylor’s inter-university architecture “balance house”), which should wrap up in late summer; another program with Washington University, where he received a full was just completed in Little Forest Hills; while the third is breaking academic scholarship. While there, he experienced isolation since ground in Denton. Past projects include the Perch Haus with its he was the only student on the path to architecture at the time. But vanishing point entry stairs in East Dallas and the PV14 House—an his resilience paid off—after his experience at Baylor, he was able to award-winning icon for Dallas residential real estate—which sits learn how to integrate his design talent and passion for architecture. on one of the highest elevations in the city, overseeing the sunset Later, he worked for nine years at the prestigious architecture firm behind the skyline amidst the glassy waters of White Rock Lake. Corgan, where he focused on residential towers, office buildings, The creative behind M Gooden Design is Michael Gooden, a and hospitals. “I loved it there,” Gooden said. “It’s where I found welcoming and soft-spoken Longview native. Before he became my design point-of-view and aesthetic: modernism. I kind of fell into the founding principal of his own firm, he grew up interested in it. One of my mentors was really into being efficient with design; playing music as a guitarist. Gooden moved to Denton where planning and making sure things were organized to make sense.” he attended high school. That was where he fell in love with With his experience piling up in the corporate world, Gooden architecture after signing up for a drafting class. “Denton opened launched his own firm, M Gooden Design, in 2015 with an emphasis my eyes to possibilities, culture, and art,” he said. “My high school on advancing residential architecture. He compares his approach had a great architecture program. Honestly, I credit that to where to architecture to another art form he still has love for: music. I am today.” He soon found himself competing in and winning “I didn’t realize how strong the similarities are between creating state competitions for architecture. While he was advancing as music and architecture,” Gooden explained. “In songwriting, a young designer, Gooden was still creating music and going on you may have an intro and then that same melody or element tour during the weekends and summers, thinking he would be a will show up later on in the song. Similarly within a space, you full-time musician. He describes the time with his band as “playing may walk in the front and see a type of material or texture, and music at theatres and bars for peanuts and the cheapest of beer.” it may show up throughout other places in the house as well.” Once he graduated, Gooden decided architecture was where he Today, Gooden’s advice to young architects is minimal, much belonged and how he could build a life for himself (no pun intended). like his aesthetic direction: “Discover who you are as a designer Gooden developed his architecture résumé at a small firm and let that influence the architecture.” You will find Gooden located in the Denton Downtown Square. The company focused enjoying tacos at Pepe’s & Mito’s or sipping an Old Fashioned on houses, which is where he learned to document and draft at Dot’s Hop House & Cocktail Courtyard in Deep Ellum. Catch @MGOODENDESIGN on Instagram. “WHEN WRITING A SONG, YOU WANT TO CREATE A THEME SO THERE IS CONTINUITY, WHETHER IT BE THE RECURRING MELODY OR LYRICS THAT TELL A STORY. WE TRY TO FOLLOW THESE CLEAR THEMES IN ARCHITECTURE, ALL THE SAME.”


Photography by ROY AGUILAR (@ROYAGUILARPHOTO) | Artwork by JACQUELINE BEER (WWW.JACQUELINEBEER.COM)

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Kathryn graduated from Baylor University in 2011 and began her real estate career. She was hired on as the executive assistant to the top luxury realtor in Austin and helped her close over $100 million in sales in just three short years. In 2015, Kathryn moved to Dallas and launched her real estate career. She works with experienced investors, sells luxury listings, and guides first time home buyers through the purchasing process. Kathryn has the expertise to market, negotiate, and close deals efficiently with your real estate goals in mind. Whether it’s your first real estate transaction or you are a seasoned investor, the market in Dallas can be tiring and competitive. Having a knowledgeable yet trustworthy real estate agent representing you is crucial. Kathryn makes the process of buying and selling simple yet successful.

Making your realty dreams a reality.

Photography by FELA RAYMOND (@FELARAYMOND) 069


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+ in times of NAKEDNESS, VULNERABILITY CAN BE PERCEIVED AS WEAKNESS, BUT I MET A MAN ONCE WHO SHOWED ME THAT WASN’T THE CASE. \\

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WE WERE ON A TRAIN, TRAVELING ACROSS THE MONGOLIAN FLATLANDS. HE DRANK HIS COFFEE BLACK AND STARED OUT THE WINDOW IN DEEP THOUGHT. WHILE HE SEEMED TO HAVE A LOT ON HIS MIND, HIS POISE WAS AIRY AND FREE. I FELT MYSELF PULLED TO SIT NEAR HIM. HIS PEACE WAS MAGNETIC. CURIOSITY GOT THE BEST OF ME THAT DAY—I DECIDED TO TAKE THE SEAT ACROSS FROM HIM. I DIDN’T SAY A WORD; HE DIDN’T EITHER. WE WERE JUST TWO STRANGERS ENJOYING EACH OTHER’S PRESENCE.

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HE DIDN’T TRY TO HIDE THE MARKINGS. HE JUST LOOKED BACK AT ME, SMILED, AND NODDED. I SIPPED MY COFFEE AND CONTINUED TO STARE OUT THE WINDOW, KEEPING HIM IN MY PERIPHERAL VISION. THE TRAIN BEGAN TO SLOW DOWN AS IT APPROACHED THE NEXT STOP. HE BEGAN TO SHUFFLE ABOUT. THEN, HE STOOD UP WITH A GREAT PRESENCE. KNOWING THE MOMENT WAS ABOUT TO PASS ME BY, I ASKED HIM WHERE THE SCARS CAME FROM. HE TOOK ANOTHER SIP OF HIS COFFEE AND REPLIED, “SON, IT’S NOT ABOUT WHERE THE SCARS CAME FROM AS MUCH AS IT’S ABOUT WHO THEY WERE FOR.”

+ HE OFFERED TO POUR ME A CUP OF COFFEE.

PERPLEXED AT HIS RESPONSE, I GLARED BACK INTO THE BOTTOM OF MY CUP.

AS HE PASSED THE HANDCRAFTED MUG MY DIRECTION, I NOTICED DEEP SCARS COVERED HIS HANDS. I LOOKED UP AT HIM.

/ / AND FOR THE FIRST TIME, I SAW MY TRUEST REFLECTION.


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// BY WAY OF DALLAS

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Catch @BYWAYOFDALLAS on Instagram.

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allas has long been known for cowboy hats, football, and Big Oil money; however, Hance Taplin is uniting the city to change those tired stereotypes. Taplin has a love for design. But, even more than design, he has a unique gift for tapping into the heartbeat of a city, a person, or a brand and designing something that captures the very essence of who they are. When he launched his 2015 line, By Way of Dallas, the first black varsity jacket was quickly embraced on the backs of Erykah Badu, Jeremy Biggers, the Sour Grapes Crew, and Blue The Great. While in college, Taplin found inspiration in the hip-hop news magazine, XXL. He was intrigued by the typography, the images, and the photos. His college counselor suggested he try his hand at graphic design—the moment, he recalls, that changed everything. After graduating with a degree in graphic design, he packed up a van and moved to Dallas where his family had relocated. What he thought would be a temporary move proved to be long-term. He got his first big job at Simmons Design Associates and began getting to know this new city as his second home. In 2007, Taplin helped launch (and served as Creative Director for) Dallas-based men’s clothing store Centre, which specializes in progressive streetwear apparel, shoes, and accessories. Taplin was responsible for the brand’s logo and started to design Dallas-specific apparel for the shop to sell exclusively. When he saw how well Centre’s apparel sold, he learned a lot about local consumers: the people of Dallas wanted to represent their city with something original. Through the brotherhood he formed with By Way of Dallas co-creator, Jordan Rogers (who also serves as North America Brand Manager for Nike), Taplin landed his first freelance design job with Nike, where he was given the project of creating a logo and t-shirt for a DeSoto High School track event. He nailed it. Taplin continues to work on special projects for the hugely successful sportswear brand, including his most recent design venture—a collaboration between Nike and the NFL Draft that Dallas is hosting this year. Taplin’s newer “Dallas Made” jacket was recently cosigned by Dwight Powell of the Dallas Mavericks and Rachel Lindsay, ABC’s most recent “Bachelorette.” Taplin, along with local photographer and designer Reid Glaze, also had the opportunity to collaborate with the Dallas Mavericks on the “Dallas For Dirk” t-shirt design, which was given away at the final home game of the season. He will continue to add color options for the original “By Way of Dallas” jackets and now has t-shirts with the classic smiley face logo that features Dallas’ area code, 214. What’s in store for Taplin’s future? Collaboration and scalability. He’s already got plans for New York, Toronto, and Los Angeles. You can find Taplin at Lounge Here for a drink or Barnes & Noble, where he loves to reference and research.


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HANCE TAPLIN

“I’m not from here, but I appreciate what Dallas has done for me. I hope people realize the opportunities this city has to offer and take full advantage of it.” – HANCE TAPLIN, Designer


Photography by REID GLAZE (@REIDGLAZE)

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Meet Amber Venz Box: President and Co-Founder of rewardStyle and LIKEtoKNOW.it, a digital platform that has forever changed the course of history for the modern lifestyle blogger.

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Photography by MINDY BYRD (@MINDYBYRDLEGS)


WHY HAVE YOU CHOSEN TO GROW YOUR BUSINESS FROM DALLAS?

I started my fashion blog, VENZEDITS.com, in April of 2010. It was initially developed as a marketing tool and portfolio for my offline businesses: my jewelry company and personal shopping/ styling services. I launched the blog with a clear business plan and was posting three times daily, had a professional photographer, and was investing significant resources into the development and production of the site. But I quickly realized that it was more than a marketing tool for my other businesses—it was a business in itself and therefore needed a revenue stream of its own. After several months of struggling to generate income from the site, my co-founder (then boyfriend/now husband, Baxter) and I started brainstorming about a monetization solution for this new venture. I wanted to be able to earn money online in the same manner that I had offline with my personal shopping business—if I drive a sale for a retailer, I get paid a commission on the sale. We decided to take that offline model online, providing a performance-based monetization solution for me and my peers (other premier lifestyle bloggers). Baxter and I walked to our local coffee shop to brainstorm, and we came up with the very literal name “rewardStyle” and purchased the domain.

Dallas has all of the right ingredients to be a world-class technology hub: non-stop flights to nearly everywhere in the world, a consistently healthy economy, low cost-of-living, great food, business-friendly laws, and an environment that has attracted Fortune 500 companies across all industries—aviation (American Airlines), oil and gas (ExxonMobil), and telecommunications (AT&T). Baxter and I are proud Dallasites and our ability to contribute to the growth of the tech sector here in our home city is top of mind for us.

HOW IS IT WORKING ALONGSIDE YOUR SPOUSE, BAXTER?

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO TAKE CARE OF BLOGGERS, AND HOW DO YOU PERSONALLY PROMOTE BLOGGERS AND INFLUENCERS THAT YOU FIND ARE REALLY IMPACTING CULTURE? RewardStyle’s mission is to empower the world’s premium lifestyle influencers to achieve maximum economic success. Of more than 200,000 applicants, we have accepted 25,000 influencers from more than 90 countries into the rewardStyle platform. Over the past few years, we have been able to quadruple the average earnings of our influencers. In 2017, we empowered 83% more influencers to earn more than $100,000 annually than the year prior. Content creators come to rewardStyle to become business owners and entrepreneurs. RewardStyle has empowered a new generation of creative entrepreneurs, and as one myself, I am so grateful for what the rewardStyle team has done to make my passion a viable business. Catch @VENZEDITS on Instagram.

I think that being a woman in tech is a blessing. We are in high demand and we deeply understand the consumer (in our field, the vast majority of online purchases are made by women). I know that I am given opportunities simply because I am a young woman in tech— and I take advantage of being that token representative. It gets me into conference rooms, on television, on lists...We all have a unique set of assets, so it only make sense to use those strategically. GO GIRLS!!!

WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO SAY TO PEOPLE WHO ROLL THEIR EYES AT SOCIAL MEDIA INFLUENCERS? If we are talking about rewardStyle Influencers—those who have become small business owners—then I would say: What is it about a self-made, multi-hyphenated (photographer, stylist, social media strategist, sociologist, makeup artist, etc.) entrepreneur that upsets you?

HOW DO YOU OVERCOME DISCOURAGEMENT AND NAVIGATE THROUGH BUSINESS AFTER BEING TOLD “NO?” I have found that the answer is never really no, it is just not right now. For a business relationship to work, both parties have to be engaged and committed to the success of the project—much like in a personal relationship. In business, just as in life, you want to find the right partner. Baxter and I make decisions with the goal of being the infinite player, and sometimes that means that we are the ones saying “no.” The yes’s and no’s should not ever dictate your path. They can help inform your decision-making, but you should create a clear plan and move forward on your vision. It took five years before we started hearing “yes” more often than “no,” and we are only a seven-year-old company.

FIND VENZ BOX AROUND DALLAS DRINKING HER FAVORITE MARGARITAS AT JAVIER’S OR SHOPPING FOR GIFTS AT ELLIS HILL.

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In the beginning, it was horrible. We were two years into dating when we started a company together and our relationship was not mature enough to set boundaries. As our company grew, our roles became obviously differentiated. I oversee all of the branding, while Baxter handles everything related to technology and finance. We respect each other’s expertise, and together we are quite like yin and yang. I believe our matching skill sets are the secret to our success. Now, I am so grateful that we work together. If we didn’t, I’m not sure when I would see him!

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE A SUCCESSFUL WOMAN IN THE TECH SPACE? WHAT ENCOURAGEMENT WOULD YOU GIVE TO OTHER WOMEN WHO ARE ALSO IN THE BUSINESS OR STARTING THEIR OWN COMPANIES?

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WHAT WAS YOUR DRIVE BEHIND STARTING REWARDSTYLE?


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www.hairstorydallas.com | 1906 North Henderson Avenue, Dallas, TX 75206

NEW HAIR HERE

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MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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B “It’s about getting to know them, allowing them to take control, and then really catering a haircut to that person—not just to their face, but to their lifestyle.”

efore he picks up his scissors and starts cutting hair, stylist Beau Bollinger learns about the person sitting in his chair. His demeanor is calming; he’s witty, smooth, and pleasant to be around. Bollinger’s chair works as a therapy couch—a place for him to connect with his client through empathy. “The consultation is everything,” he says. “I ask myself this question daily: ‘How can I translate somebody’s personality and bring out the best of them with a haircut?’ It’s quite simple. I start with the parameters of finding out who they are, what they do, what they are passionate about, and what music they listen to. Then, as they tell me about their life, I tell that story with their hair.” Maybe this is why Bollinger was the perfect candidate to head up the first brick-andmortar salon in Dallas of New York-based Hairstory. The e-commerce company, whose owners started Bumble and bumble (one of the biggest hair care brands in the world), creates breakthrough styling products for hairdressing professionals and their clients. In March, Hairstory Studio Dallas made its debut, taking on an innovative approach to minimalism at its finest. “Even a smooth-running salon has so many processes for the client to interact with the hairdresser. We’re using technology to cut those steps out and essentially minimize the booking, the time at the studio, and the process to order our products.” Bollinger, an entrepreneur in every way possible, remains a stylist himself. He allows Hairstory Studio Dallas to be a collaborative platform, encouraging stylists to develop their own businesses. “When you build a space to be open, innovative, and collaborative, you get the right people to curate and cultivate new talent. At Hairstory Dallas, we allow the stylists to have their own space to do something special.” You can find Bollinger at his studio salon off Knox-Henderson next to Houndstooth, a coffee shop he frequents on the daily. Catch @BEAUBOLLINGER on Instagram.


Beau Bollinger

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Photography by BLISS KATHERINE (@BLISSKATHERINE) | Artwork by JACQUELINE BEER (WWW.JACQUELINEBEER.COM)

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Meet Jen Coleman (left): Co-Owner of Target Does It Again (the most-followed blog for discovering all things cool at Target and Ascot and Hart, personal lifestyle clothing shop with partner, California-based Laura Wiertzema (right). The duo has been proudly featured by Business Insider, CNBC, and DFWChild.

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Artist _ 21 JEN COLEMAN WHAT IS THE STORY BEHIND YOU AND YOUR BUSINESS PARTNER?

HOW DO YOU BALANCE BEING BOTH A MOM AND BUSINESS OWNER?

Laura and I met online—everyone thinks we are sisters! We crossed paths in the blogging world and when Instagram started, we would comment on each other’s stuff all the time. We just had so much in common! We exchanged phone numbers (this was before DMs on IG), started texting and chatting, and the rest is history! Now we run three businesses together and talk everyday! I feel so lucky that we met and have such an awesome friendship. We just get one another and have each other’s back no matter what. It’s pretty amazing!

Haha! I just take it one day at a time, and I’m a serious multi-tasker! I try to get as much done while Cove, my son, is in school so I can be totally present when he is home! It’s very hard because I love what I do so much—my mind is always on work and new ideas! Plus, I have an awesome husband and mom who are always there for me!

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WHERE DID THE IDEA FOR “TARGET DOES IT AGAIN” COME ABOUT? WHEN + HOW DID TARGET ACTUALLY GET INVOLVED? Laura and I would text each other our Target finds regularly and say: “Target does it again! Look what I found!” We started posting outfits on our personal Instagram pages back in 2012. People couldn’t believe we were wearing Target clothes and how great we could style them. We decided to make a separate page devoted to our Target finds (@TargetDoesItAgain). The night we launched it, we got 10,000 followers and knew we were onto something! Target took notice four weeks in. The next thing you know, they’re flying us to NYC and we are hanging out with Nate Berkus and Rebecca Minkoff at a Target event. We didn’t monetize for a while (this was all before affiliate programs and sponsored posts). Our husbands thought, what are you guys doing?! We just knew it would turn into something! Soon the sponsored posts started rolling in and we have made some great partnerships with some amazing brands. It’s really cool to help smaller brands get noticed in such a big store. We work with Target occasionally, but the majority of our work is directly with the brands that are sold in Target.

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WHEN DID YOU AND LAURA START YOUR BRAND, ASCOT AND HART? We launched Ascot and Hart after seeing how many brands would reach out for us to plug their products. We thought we should sell our own merchandise instead of everyone else’s and also just wanted a space to share the stuff we loved! We were always going to flea markets and estate sales. When Target flew us to our first event in NYC, we went to a flea market and bought all this awesome vintage jewelry with the little money we had. We listed it online to see what the reaction would be and sold out in 10 minutes! We knew that, once again, we were onto something!

WHAT DID YOU DO BEFORE STARTING YOUR BUSINESSES? Before Target Does It Again, I was a stay-at-home mom and before I had my son, I worked in retail as a buyer for a store. I also did personal shopping and was an assistant/nanny for a very cool Dallas family, the DeLaughters (of The Polyphonic Spree and Good Records). They were the coolest and so creative and inspiring! Catch @JENLOVESCOVE on Instagram.

WHAT KEEPS YOU SANE ON A DAILY BASIS? My husband! He’s my best friend, calms my nerves, and makes everything better. I just love him so much. He’s always so positive and makes me laugh. We have fun!

WHY DO YOU CHOOSE TO LIVE IN DALLAS? Dallas is home! I was born and raised here; my family and friends are here. There are just so many good memories and more to be made.

WHERE DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION? A big source of inspiration has been the idea of not working for someone else and having the creative freedom that comes from being my own boss. Also, wanting to provide things that I am proud of. I am inspired by the people I surround myself with—especially my boys— and I love my friends and people with an effortless vibe and creative passion!

HAVE YOU EVER FACED BEING A “STARVING ARTIST?” After I had my son, I was starving. I was craving a creative outlet so badly and also struggling financially. I just manifested every single day until I made my dreams become a reality. Cove helped me see what I wanted in life, and I hope he’s inspired by me one day.

WHAT DO YOU SEE AS THE FUTURE FOR TARGET DOES IT AGAIN AND ASCOT AND HART? We would love to have Ascot and Hart sold in Target. That would be the coolest! I just see the business growing and evolving. And hopefully Laura moving to Texas! ;)

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO OTHER CREATIVES WANTING TO TURN THEIR PASSION INTO A BUSINESS? My advice is: stay true. Project who you are and what you want in life. Anything can happen!

COLEMAN’S FAVORITE PLACES TO FREQUENT IN DALLAS ARE REVEL WORKSHOP—A HAIR SALON IN THE DESIGN DISTRICT WITH THE MOST ADORABLE PUP—AND THE SKATEPARK WITH HER SON, COVE.


DAVID PORCHÉ

FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER

Dallas | Los Angeles | New York

www.davidporche.com


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+ in times without JOY, 086

SOUND WAVES RIPPLE ACROSS THE WATERS. \\ LIKE A SUBSONIC EMOTION ENCROACHING UPON ELEMENTS THAT TREMBLE AT THE REVERBERATION OF FREQUENCIES ECHOING INTO THE DISTANCE. SOUND HAS A WAY OF SPEAKING FORTH LIGHT...TRUTH. TRUTH HAS A WAY OF ADJUSTING THE BONES AND ALIGNING THE SOUL, ULTIMATELY STRENGTHENING ALL FROM WITHIN. + A BELLY LAUGH ERUPTS WITH PRAISE AT THE FEELING OF SOMETHING REAL: JOY. / / FROM THIS JOY, REJUVENATION OCCURS AND A CHILD IS REBORN.

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Written by SYDNEY COOPER

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MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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magine waking up and realizing your life just went from being a single woman working as a civil defense attorney to suddenly having one million followers and on the cover of People, celebrating your newfound love with prince charming, “Jerome” (a.k.a. Bryan Abasolo). So has been the life of 32-year-old Dallas native, Rachel Lindsay. Most people know Lindsay as the first African-American woman in the history of ABC’s The Bachelorette. However, what many have yet to discover is her journey beyond “Bachelor Nation” and into an exploding career in sports broadcast entertainment. The spirited (and opinionated) TV personality has already appeared on numerous media outlets, such as ESPN, CNN, DIRECTV Fantasy Zone, Access, Entertainment Tonight, Good Morning America, The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, Dateline, Chat Sports (Facebook Live), Sports Illustrated, and many more. Needless to say, the name Rachel Lindsay (soon to be Abasolo) is becoming known among a new demographic: sports fans. “Sports have always been a passion of mine from a very young age, as I grew up playing basketball, volleyball, and track. In college, I learned I could combine my passion with my education and majored in sports management at The University of Texas at Austin and got my law degree at Marquette University Law School,” says Lindsay. Somewhere between graduation and appearing on The Bachelor (Season 21), Lindsay found herself feeling “stuck” in the rhythm of life. “At that time of my life, I would say I was far from being a risk taker. I chose the safe path and followed in my father’s [U.S. District Judge, Sam A. Lindsay] footsteps into law. That safe path led me to a stable job, good friends, and a life… but I always felt like there was something missing,” expresses Lindsay. “I still carried a fiery passion about sports, and I was finally at a place in my life that I really desired to find true love. I had no idea that within one year, I would find both.” Popping champagne bottles atop a sunset-filled sky in Spain wrapped up a season of discovering who Lindsay will be spending her future alongside. Now, the two are already building their lives together.

“SPORTS ARE MORE THAN A GAME; THEY EXTEND BEYOND THE FIELD AND COURT INTO FASHION, POLITICS, BUSINESS, LAW, ENTERTAINMENT, AND HISTORY. SPORTS HAVE BECOME A LIFESTYLE

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THAT IMPACTS EVERY FACET OF OUR LIVES. THIS IS WHY I AM PASSIONATE ABOUT SPORTS AND HOPE TO BE A VOICE OF POSITIVE INFLUENCE IN ALL THESE AREAS.” While Lindsay has shared her witty opinions with Michael Smith and Jemele Hill on SportsCenter and chatted with Juliet Litman on Bill Simmons’ podcast, The Ringer, the bombshell broadcaster also walks the red carpet at the ESPYS. “I think it’s hard to put me in a box because I feel there is so much I can offer. I’m a woman, black, in my 30s, and a lawyer who loves sports. I can talk the game but with a sarcastic tone and be a little witty at the same time. I bring in this whole pop-culture world to sports from being on The Bachelorette. I have a following of people that don’t normally follow sports, but they follow me, and they’re interested in what I’m doing. I can bring something very creative into the sports world,” emphasizes Lindsay. Her goals for 2018 are to launch her own podcast, partner with Maria Taylor (analyst and host for ESPN and the SEC network) on a co-podcast project, become an on-camera ESPN sports journalist, and last but certainly not least, marry the love of her life, Bryan. When Lindsay is asked what advice she has for our readers, her answer is a defining mantra for us all (and a reminder for her own life): “Take the risk. You never know what dreams will come true on the other side.” You can find Lindsay and Bryan often working side-by-side together at Halcyon, their favorite coffee shop in Dallas, or enjoying sushi at Uchi Dallas in Uptown. Catch @THERACHLINDSAY on Instagram.


Rachel Lindsay

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Photography by DAVID PORCHÉ PHOTOGRAPHY (@DAVID_PORCHE) | Artwork by JACQUELINE BEER (WWW.JACQUELINEBEER.COM)

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Meet Amy Miller: The radio personality of KXT 91.7’s The KXT Local Show—introducing and promoting the best of local music to Dallas.

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Photography by KIM LEESON (WWW.KIMTAKESPICTURES.COM)


HOW DID YOU GET INTO WORKING IN RADIO?

WHAT IS ONE CHILDHOOD MEMORY THAT HAS SHAPED YOU TODAY?

I’ve always loved radio. When I was a teenager, half the concerts I would go to were shows my friends and I won tickets to by calling into our local radio station. I remember getting autographs from a couple of my favorite DJs in the San Francisco Bay Area at one of these shows. I went to college in Santa Cruz, CA, and the campus station (KZSC) was the first station I set foot in. It was in the middle of the redwoods and I hosted a show from 2 to 6am. I played a lot of vinyl and it was your typical college station—the programming would include a jazz show, followed by a metal show, followed by an indie rock show. It was great. My first part-time radio job was at KFOG in San Francisco and that was really my first introduction to radio programming and all the moving parts of a successful radio station.

I think discovering music that went beyond what I was exposed to through my parents was a big turning point. My parents actually have pretty great taste in music that I didn’t appreciate until I got older, but discovering artists like Jimi Hendrix and Nirvana were a big turning point for me. In hindsight, I was kind of an odd-bird in that a lot of girls my age at that time were into the boy bands or new country music. I was 13 or 14 and really into Aerosmith records from the 70s and buying any music magazine with a photo of Kurt Cobain or Hole on it (yes, I was a fan of both).

I love discovering new music and have so much pride for the wonderful music community in North Texas. It’s really great being on the ground floor of a band’s career and seeing them play to 30 people at a house show in Denton or a club in Deep Ellum to selling out large venues and getting national recognition. We saw that happen with Leon Bridges a few years ago—the first time I saw him play was in front of about 20 people. Now he’s selling thousands of tickets at his shows here. It feels really good to be even a small part of that story. At KXT, we archive all of our in-studio sessions on our website and it’s so cool to go back and watch sessions from artists that have gone on to do some big things. If you dig deep enough on our website, you can find a session from Maren Morris when she was just 19 years old, and now she’s playing huge amphitheaters.

The closest I came to that was when my bandmate and I first moved to Philly from Virginia. We didn’t have full-time jobs yet and were putting all of our money back into the band. There were a couple times where we’d write each other checks to cover rent if needed, but it was more like: “Here’s a check; don’t deposit it until Friday when I get paid.” Followed by, “Cool, I’ll pay you back next week when I get paid.” That was really living paycheck-to-paycheck for a while. When you’re not playing in cover bands, you really can’t rely on music to pay your bills until you get to a certain point. And playing in cover bands never really appealed to me.

WHAT IS IT ABOUT DALLAS THAT MAKES YOU WANT TO STAY AND SEE IT THRIVE?

AS A MUSICIAN YOURSELF, WHAT KIND OF MUSIC DO YOU LIKE TO WRITE OR PERFORM?

WHERE ARE YOUR TWO FAVORITE DALLAS HOTSPOTS YOU FREQUENT ON THE REGULAR AND WHY?

I’ve played both guitar and keys in bands in the past and have done a little bit of touring over the years. I spent a good portion of my 20s on the East Coast playing music in bands. I still play with friends sometimes and have been writing more than anything lately. I graduated from college with a degree in classical piano/ composition, but it would be embarrassing to sit down at a piano these days and attempt to play something—plus, playing the simple stuff on guitar with your friends is just way more fun.

I live in Oak Cliff, so I spend a lot of my free time there. I’m at Spinster Records a lot—not only do they have a great vinyl selection, but their staff is really great and they have free shows all the time with touring and local bands. I like the Texas Theater a lot, too. It’s such a historic place and I love their programming with both the movies they show and the bands they book. Catch @KXTRADIO on Instagram.

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Oh, I don’t like to play favorites—there’s so much talent coming out of the area, I don’t think I could pick a favorite even if I tried. A few artists I’ve been listening to a lot lately though are Acid Carousel, Danielle Grubb, Garrett Owen, Pearl Earl, and Little Image. I think Ashleigh Smith (a jazz/soul singer from Carrollton) has such a beautiful voice. And The Texas Gentlemen’s musicianship is insane—if you’ve ever seen them live, you know what I mean.

Well, I moved to Dallas to work at KXT. It was a station I admired, and it was still young enough where I could see a lot of potential for growth and opportunity. As someone who has always lived on a coast, I had a lot of stereotypes of Dallas that were just not true once I had a chance to visit. I was blown away by the music and arts scene here. I think the music scene just keeps getting stronger. Labels are starting to look at bands from the area since there have been a few major artists to break in the past few years. Sometimes, I’ll be on the phone with a label and they’ll ask me if there’s anyone they should keep an eye on or anything I’m liking. There are a ton of recording studios here producing great music, and it’s really cool seeing all these indie labels releasing solid material and doing some big things. Dreamy Life Records, Field Day Records, and Idol Records are all labels that I always keep an eye on.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL MUSICIAN/BAND RIGHT NOW?

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AS A RADIO PERSONALITY FOR KXT AND THE HOST FOR THE KXT LOCAL SHOW , WHAT IS IT ABOUT HIGHLIGHTING LOCAL TALENT THAT MAKES YOU PASSIONATELY COME ALIVE?

HAVE YOU EVER FACED “STARVING ARTISTRY?”


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+ in times of HARDSHIP, HUSTLE.

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IT’S NOT A WORD TO DESCRIBE THE WEAK. PURSUIT AND DILIGENCE TAKES GREAT PRECEDENCE OVER SURRENDER AND SELLING OUT. HARDSHIP CAN BE FOUND MORE AUTHENTICALLY IN THE ONES WHO KNOW THE HUSTLE ALL TOO WELL.

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THE STREETS OF DALLAS ECHO THE CRY OF THE GREAT HASTE. THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT IS AT AN ALL TIME RISE, AND CORPORATE HQS ARE HONING IN TO A HUNGRY CITY BURSTING AT THE SEAMS OF INNOVATION AND SCALABILITY. THIS CITY HOLDS UNIQUE INDIVIDUALS— ONES THAT KNOW “ANYTHING WORTH ANYTHING GOOD” BRINGS HARDSHIP AND BEAUTY. + DALLAS MADE—WE ARE A CITY FILLED WITH DIAMONDS WAITING TO BE DISCOVERED. / / CHEERS TO THOSE WHO SEE THAT THE “ROUGH” WAS ALWAYS WORTH FIGHTING FOR TO GET TO YOUR MASTERPIECE.

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Advocates

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TESS_ CLARKE // SEEK THE PEACE Written by SYDNEY COOPER Edited by MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

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“In fact, even having the freedom to be creative is an answer to lifelong prayers for many of these people.”

ne of the most troubled intersections in the heart of Dallas is called Five Points, located in the Vickery Meadow neighborhood—a densely populated area of over 25,000 foreign refugees who have been displaced in our city by global circumstances. About 10 years ago at this very intersection, Tess Clarke and her husband Jason were robbed at gunpoint. Most people would be traumatized from the incident; but not this couple. Instead, the Clarkes decided to make Vickery Meadow the home base for a non-profit they always desired to start that would focus on aiding, training, and stabilizing foreign refugees. Seek the Peace was founded in 2009 as an answer to a refugee crisis that has since kept increasing due to the Syrian war and unrest throughout the Middle East. The organization works alongside the International Rescue Committee and the Refugee Services of Texas to provide what they need to adapt to their new home in Dallas. “Refugees are ordinary people in extreme circumstances,” Clarke stated. “We are most moved by the people we meet daily. Next, we are motivated to present solutions when we see who these people are and what they are up against when it comes to governmental services currently being offered to them. These people have become our friends and our family. We fight for them.” One particular focus of Seek the Peace is to work with young girls by helping them identify their innate gifts, talents, and value they bring to society—a difficult task for women who have been neglected, ostracized, or looked down upon. For women who live in the refugee community, Seek the Peace has a special creative program: candle making. The candle making program came from noticing the differences in religion and how it was becoming an alarming conflict. “The women may all be Muslim, but they come from different parts of the world where there are different sects of the religion. You have all these women wearing hijabs, but that doesn’t mean they all agree with one another,” Clarke said. The purpose of the candle making was for the women to sit together and learn from one another in a safe environment. The candles are also a way for the women of the refugee families to have income to support their families, or in some cases, themselves. Seek the Peace encourages their volunteers to immerse themselves in the community and to get to know people. This process breaks down the walls and opens a gateway to trust and to find commonality. “I would love to see Seek the Peace partner with more emerging artists from marginalized places. The arts are a huge avenue to bring about healing and transformation in the lives of people who need it most right now.” One of the greatest accomplishments (according to Clarke) is building trust in the community, which has created space for people to encounter a sense of belonging for the first time in a long time. Trust also creates opportunity for friendships to develop between people that would never culturally be friends. Another achievement for Seek the Peace was partnering with First Aid Arts to create the Resilience program, an art therapy solution to major psychological trauma from war and torture. Learn more about Seek the Peace at www.seekingpeace.org or by visiting their offices in Vickery Meadow at 7225 Fair Oaks Ave., Dallas, TX 75231. Catch @TESSCLRK on Instagram.


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Photography by LAUREN WILLIAMS (@LIFEASADECONSTRUCTIONIST) | Styling BRANDI HOWARD (@BRANDIBROWNLEE)

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Photography by SAID ABUSAUD (@AFTERGLOWGALLERY)


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S O V A // THE REVOLUTIONARY ARTIVIST

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Artist _ 25 EKATERINA KOUZNETSOVA

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magine a service that revolutionizes the way you purchase and collect art—one curated to your taste and providing the option of purchasing a print or original piece from an array of artists. It’s exactly the idea 24-year-old Moscow native and Dallasite Ekaterina Kouznetsova had in 2016 when she created ArtMail. It’s a simple premise: as a buyer, you identify multiple pieces of art styles you like (mood, color, shapes, etc.), then the technology’s in-house artificial intelligence algorithm (created by Michael Lockyer) and real-person art curation source multiple styles of art tailored to your taste. Once you select an artist, shoppers have the option to order works individually or subscribe monthly to have curated art pieces mailed directly to your home each month. Kouznetsova provides interviews with the selected artists on ArtMail’s website to enhance the buying experience.

“IT MEANS A LOT MORE WHEN PEOPLE CAN MAKE PERSONAL CONNECTIONS WITH ART BY LEARNING ABOUT THE PERSON BEHIND THE WORK. YOU LEARN ABOUT THE STRUGGLE, THE SUCCESSES, THE

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BEHIND EACH PIECE.”

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HEALING

As a senior at the University of Texas at Dallas, Kouznetsova asked herself what she was going to do once she finished her undergraduate career. She saw a niche in the market when many of her artist friends received a “measly” amount for what they sold. She wanted to create a service where artists got the commissions they deserve. “That was definitely some of the inspiration for placing higher value on art and prints as a whole, to where you can’t go to Walmart and get a $3 discounted poster of something an artist did and they probably didn’t get paid per print on it,” Kouznetsova said. Kouznetsova invested all of the money she saved working different jobs in college into ArtMail and used social media as a platform to launch the brand. “The biggest qualification to become a seller on ArtMail is that you definitely have to be an emerging artist,” Kouznetsova said. “Right now, that’s what I want to focus on. We do have a wide range of artists in their careers; we have one from South Korea that’s in one of the contemporary museums there, and he is one of our higher priced artists. But we also have some artists in different parts of their career that have only been in a few exhibitions, so they’re just getting started and learning a lot.” Kouznetsova hopes to expand art and its education by putting the prints on ArtMail into retail stores and establishing new business partners through ArtMail with hotels, restaurants, and other hightraffic places. You will find the stylish Kouznetsova at her two favorite local spots: the Dallas Contemporary and Dallas Arboretum. Catch @CZARINA_EKATERINA on Instagram.


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CONTRIBUTORS

#ARTISTUPRISING

MERRICK PORCHÉDDU, Founder + CEO ANGELA ROSS, Partner + COO LEE ESCOBEDO, Editor-in-chief JACQUELINE BEER, Lead Designer

ADVERTISERS

FEATURED

44BUILD BELMONT HOTEL COMMON DESK CREATE CHURCH DAVID PORCHÉ PHOTOGRAPHY HAIRSTORY STUDIO DALLAS KATHRYN SHARROCK (FOR BRIGGS FREEMAN) THE LOOK (BY ARTIST UPRISING) MODERN ELECTRIC N. PARK AVE. TRUSS UPPERROOM

RACHEL LINDSAY, Broadcaster + Entertainer MAGDIEL LOPEZ, Artist HANCE TAPLIN, ”By Way of Dallas” Designer

ARTWORK

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JACQUELINE BEER MAGDIEL LOPEZ ARTURO TORRES

DESIGNERS JACQUELINE BEER MERRICK PORCHÉDDU

EDITORS + WRITERS JACQUELINE BEER JADE BYERS SYDNEY COOPER LEE ESCOBEDO MERRICK PORCHÉDDU ANGELA ROSS KEVIN RYAN NATHAN WELLS

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PHOTOGRAPHERS SAID ABUSAUD ROY AGUILAR WILL VON BOLTON MINDY BYRD DAVID PORCHÉ PHOTOGRAPHY BREE MARIE FISH ADRIENNE FREEMAN REID GLAZE HENRY WEDDINGS BRANDI HOWARD, Stylist BLISS KATHERINE MAX KÜTZ KIM LEESON RYAN LITTLEFIELD MIKA MATIN JARED MEDEIROS NIKOLA OLIC MARTY OLIVO MELINDA ORTLEY TREVOR PAULHUS FELA RAYMOND JAMES WILLIAMS LAUREN WILLIAMS TYLER WOLFF

SYDNEY COOPER IS A SENIOR DIGITAL AND PRINT JOURNALISM MAJOR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS. SHE IS PASSIONATE ABOUT INTERVIEWING CREATIVES AND WRITING ABOUT THE ARTS. HER ULTIMATE GOAL IS TO CONTINUE WRITING FOR NATIONAL ARTS MAGAZINES, ALL WHILE HIGHLIGHTING LOCAL, EMERGING TALENT ALONG THE WAY.


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@ARTISTUPRISING ARTISTUPRISING.COM

Photography by NIKOLA OLIC (@NIKOLAOLIC) 0101


+ we have started a MOVEMENT, CALL IT A REVIVAL FOR ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT. CALL IT A RENAISSANCE OR A UNITED BELIEF... \\ THAT CREATIVITY SHOULD BE UNDOUBTEDLY EXPRESSED IN A WAY THAT SHAPES CULTURE FOR THE BETTER. THAT ARTISTS SHOULD HAVE THE RESOURCES THEY NEED TO DO THE WORK THAT RUNS THROUGH THEIR VEINS. + WITH THE GATHERING OF RESOURCES, WE WILL ONE DAY ABOLISH THE PHRASE “STARVING ARTIST.” DAY AND NIGHT, THE MOVEMENT DOES NOT CEASE—FOR CREATIVITY NEVER SLEEPS. WE ARE THE ARTISTS THAT MAKE OUR CITIES ONE-OF-A-KIND. WE ARE THE ARTISTS BEHIND ALL THE BEAUTY, EVEN IN YOUR HOME. FROM THE ARCHITECTURE THAT DEFINES THE PLACE WHERE YOU REST, TO THE SPACE IN BETWEEN LINED WITH FINE ART, HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE, AND VINTAGE FINDS, THERE WAS AN ARTIST WHO GAVE YOU A PRICELESS GIFT:

USD $30 CAD $38.64

/ / A PIECE OF THEMSELVES.

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Use #ARTISTUPRISING if you agree.

Artist Uprising: Dallas 2018  

Top 25 Emerging Creatives of DFW

Artist Uprising: Dallas 2018  

Top 25 Emerging Creatives of DFW

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