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Kintsugi

Spring 2021


Letters from the

Masthead W

e finally made it through the end of the school year! The mere fact should be a cause for celebration (a COVID safe one, of course). This year has truly been a year of change, not only throughout the world but here too on our campus, and in our lives. Through the rubble and disaster that may plague us, I am very happy that at least in Artistry, I was able to put some of the pieces back together. I am very happy to have at least a small community of passionate people dedicating so much time to working and creating this very magazine you read before you. I am very grateful to Drefnie, Audrey, and Tara for our weekly meetings and all the endless work you all put in. My sincerest appreciation for Lauren, Michelle, Cali, and Ruchi, for your hard work and dedication to creating the beautiful visuals that help Artistry stand out, and for building a community of artists to express themselves. My highest gratitude to all our designers and photographers who take time out of their day to illustrate, photograph, and design our magazine. Finally, thank you, to our readers. Thank you for supporting our magazine and issue and caring so much about the stories we want to share. So thank you, and everyone involved. We hope to share more stories in the future! Norman Zeng, Creative Director

A

s this school year ends, so does my time with Artistry. It is hard to believe that this semester is over already! Not to reiterate what we all know, but it’s been a hard semester. I have missed seeing you all at meetings and on campus, I have missed hanging out. Kintsugi is the Japanese art of putting broken pieces of pottery back together with gold. It is meant to symbolize creating a new, stronger piece of art from something that was once thought to be unsalvageable. I like to imagine that this semester is our own Kintsugi. I have missed gathering in person, but it was in no way an absence or a missing piece, just a streak of gold in our Artistry history (detailed with a lot of Zoom meetings). With all the work put into this semester, it is impossible not to thank our incredible e-board. Every single person has put so much work into this issue. I am immensely grateful to have been the editor-inchief for a year at Artistry to such an amazing and hardworking team. This position has given me so much in life and made such a lasting influence in my college experience. I thrill in imagining what the future holds for Artistry!

I

want to thank my communications team for their hard work and creativity this semester. Lucas, CJ, and Patric have been instrumental in Artistry’s mission to promote arts and culture at Northeastern. They have each played a crucial role in expanding our vision to a virtual space, especially through our new monthly newsletter. And we could not have gotten through the semester without Ruchi. Her imagination and graphic design skills have captured Artistry’s undertakings. It has been a wonderful experience witnessing the creative power of Artistry’s contributors this semester. Tara Powell, Communication Director

I

t’s hard to believe that when I walked into my first pitch meeting for Artistry, I would end up writing as the President of the magazine. It feels like just yesterday I was walking along Columbus Avenue at the Beantown Jazz Festival with a notebook in hand to write my first article. Through my years at Northeastern, Artistry has remained a fixture in my undergraduate experience by allowing me an outlet to engage with the arts in the Northeastern community and greater city. This time, one year ago, I accepted the position of President of Artistry Magazine. I remember the day because while I was excited to accept the position, it also happened to be the same day Northeastern announced that Spring classes would be moved online as a response to the pandemic. While so much has happened since that day in March, Artistry has still remained a constant through a remote co-op and a hybrid semester of classes. I have learned so much about navigating the ins and outs of leading a club almost completely from my bedroom desk. I’d like to personally thank my Administrative Director, Sasha, for all the hard work she’s put in assisting me and helping the e-board flow better, and of course, for all the laughs during our weekly update calls. I’d also like to thank my fellow masthead members Audrey, Norman, and Tara, who dedicate so much effort into running Artistry— without their direction and commitment to the club and their teams, none of this would be possible. I also want to show my appreciation for the teams that work for them— the editorial team which comes up with and edits stories to fill our magazine, the design team which creates the amazing visuals for each article and for our print issue, and the communications team which continues to ensure our communications on social media and with our members. Finally, I want to thank all of the members of Artistry who contribute their creative talents to our club— you are the backbone of the magazine. While the city of Boston and Northeastern campus begin to adjust to a “new normal,” I know that the arts community will come back with a renewed force and Artistry ready to report on it. I can’t wait to see what’s in store for Artistry in the coming months. Drefnie Limprevil, President

From the bottom of my heart, thank you all, and we hope you enjoy our Kintsugi Issue. Audrey Wang, Editor-in-Chief

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1

Kintsugi

Spring 2021


Letters from the

Masthead W

e finally made it through the end of the school year! The mere fact should be a cause for celebration (a COVID safe one, of course). This year has truly been a year of change, not only throughout the world but here too on our campus, and in our lives. Through the rubble and disaster that may plague us, I am very happy that at least in Artistry, I was able to put some of the pieces back together. I am very happy to have at least a small community of passionate people dedicating so much time to working and creating this very magazine you read before you. I am very grateful to Drefnie, Audrey, and Tara for our weekly meetings and all the endless work you all put in. My sincerest appreciation for Lauren, Michelle, Cali, and Ruchi, for your hard work and dedication to creating the beautiful visuals that help Artistry stand out, and for building a community of artists to express themselves. My highest gratitude to all our designers and photographers who take time out of their day to illustrate, photograph, and design our magazine. Finally, thank you, to our readers. Thank you for supporting our magazine and issue and caring so much about the stories we want to share. So thank you, and everyone involved. We hope to share more stories in the future! Norman Zeng, Creative Director

A

s this school year ends, so does my time with Artistry. It is hard to believe that this semester is over already! Not to reiterate what we all know, but it’s been a hard semester. I have missed seeing you all at meetings and on campus, I have missed hanging out. Kintsugi is the Japanese art of putting broken pieces of pottery back together with gold. It is meant to symbolize creating a new, stronger piece of art from something that was once thought to be unsalvageable. I like to imagine that this semester is our own Kintsugi. I have missed gathering in person, but it was in no way an absence or a missing piece, just a streak of gold in our Artistry history (detailed with a lot of Zoom meetings). With all the work put into this semester, it is impossible not to thank our incredible e-board. Every single person has put so much work into this issue. I am immensely grateful to have been the editor-inchief for a year at Artistry to such an amazing and hardworking team. This position has given me so much in life and made such a lasting influence in my college experience. I thrill in imagining what the future holds for Artistry!

I

want to thank my communications team for their hard work and creativity this semester. Lucas, CJ, and Patric have been instrumental in Artistry’s mission to promote arts and culture at Northeastern. They have each played a crucial role in expanding our vision to a virtual space, especially through our new monthly newsletter. And we could not have gotten through the semester without Ruchi. Her imagination and graphic design skills have captured Artistry’s undertakings. It has been a wonderful experience witnessing the creative power of Artistry’s contributors this semester. Tara Powell, Communication Director

I

t’s hard to believe that when I walked into my first pitch meeting for Artistry, I would end up writing as the President of the magazine. It feels like just yesterday I was walking along Columbus Avenue at the Beantown Jazz Festival with a notebook in hand to write my first article. Through my years at Northeastern, Artistry has remained a fixture in my undergraduate experience by allowing me an outlet to engage with the arts in the Northeastern community and greater city. This time, one year ago, I accepted the position of President of Artistry Magazine. I remember the day because while I was excited to accept the position, it also happened to be the same day Northeastern announced that Spring classes would be moved online as a response to the pandemic. While so much has happened since that day in March, Artistry has still remained a constant through a remote co-op and a hybrid semester of classes. I have learned so much about navigating the ins and outs of leading a club almost completely from my bedroom desk. I’d like to personally thank my Administrative Director, Sasha, for all the hard work she’s put in assisting me and helping the e-board flow better, and of course, for all the laughs during our weekly update calls. I’d also like to thank my fellow masthead members Audrey, Norman, and Tara, who dedicate so much effort into running Artistry— without their direction and commitment to the club and their teams, none of this would be possible. I also want to show my appreciation for the teams that work for them— the editorial team which comes up with and edits stories to fill our magazine, the design team which creates the amazing visuals for each article and for our print issue, and the communications team which continues to ensure our communications on social media and with our members. Finally, I want to thank all of the members of Artistry who contribute their creative talents to our club— you are the backbone of the magazine. While the city of Boston and Northeastern campus begin to adjust to a “new normal,” I know that the arts community will come back with a renewed force and Artistry ready to report on it. I can’t wait to see what’s in store for Artistry in the coming months. Drefnie Limprevil, President

From the bottom of my heart, thank you all, and we hope you enjoy our Kintsugi Issue. Audrey Wang, Editor-in-Chief

1

Kintsugi

Spring 2021


THE

Drefnie Limprevil

PRESIDENT

Audrey Wang

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Norman Zeng

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sasha Shrestha Tara Powell

ADMINISTRATIVE DIRECTOR COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

Lucas Cooperman

COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE

Patric Song

COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE

CJ Logue

COMMUNICATIONS ASSOCIATE

Mélanne Ghahraman

MANAGING EDITOR

Nora Holland

ART EDITOR

Scout Gullick

SCREEN EDITOR

Sanya Mittal

MUSIC EDITOR

Rachel Erwin

STAGE EDITOR

Cali Cardenas

HEAD OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Lauren Aquino

CO-HEAD OF DESIGN

Michelle Musili

CO-HEAD OF DESIGN

Ruchi Patel

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TEAM

COLLATERAL DESIGNER


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Dusk Shows How the Night Goes On

06

Monet and Boston: Lasting Impressions at the MFA

08

BE Captures the Totality of Life Amidst Lockdown and Inspires Hope

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One Night in Miami

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Remembering SOPHIE

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Why RENT Is Still Relevant 25 Years Later

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Student Showcase - Azra Schorr

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Student Showcase - Briana Gil

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Student Showcase - Kaitlyn Wang

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Student Showcase - Maya Lucia

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Rules of Play: Theatre for Radical Change

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beabadoobee: Fake It Flowers

28

Valkyrie Mumbet at the MAAM

30

Samia, The Baby

32

Beyond the Entrance Ticket: Virtual Museum Hopping

34

Spruce Is Growing and Branching Out One Jam at a Time

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Discover Endless Possibilities at SoWa’s Artists Guild

TABLE OF

CONTENTS 3

Kintsugi

Spring 2021


Dusk shows how the night goes on Written By: Norman Zeng Design By: Caroline Logue Illustrated By: Ayla Dursun

T

he 20-year-old singer mxmtoon, also known as Maia, released the second part of her EP, Dusk, in late 2020. As hectic as the year may have been, Dusk has come to show Maia’s capabilities and range over the past year. Best known for her hit song prom dress, mxmtoon has slowly built a name for herself in the world of indie and bedroom pop, a subgenre of music created by artists who write, produce, and create their own music in their homes. As she grows in the music industry, she’s also been gaining traction in the digital world, from Twitter, TikTok, and Twitch. All of her newfound fame online and on social media comes up in her latest EP and contextualizes Dusk in both Maia’s life as well as 2020 in general. Dusk starts off by reminiscing through bon iver, as mxmtoon reflects on past memories and past love. “Every passing minute is a thought of you not in it” starts the song and listeners immediately reminisce about

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simpler times and better memories. For mxmtoon, these fond memories take her back to listening to bon iver. However, as mxmtoon looks at the possibilities of the ending, she also considers the start of a new beginning. In the bridge she explains, “Time waits for no one but there’s beauty in the moments and the spaces in between.” bon iver convey themes of sadness, yearning, and optimism beautifully and emotionally. The next song, ok on your own, gives us a look into the themes of endings and beginnings established in the last song. Featuring Carly Rae Jepsen, the duo convey a somber sadness of a breakup, yet at the same time, bring to light an optimistic insight about how to keep moving forward. Anyone can feel the strength of these lines “You can find how to be okay on your own I just can’t be the one that makes you feel at home,” on either side of a breakup.

The feeling of yearning and reminiscing remains present in the next track, myrtle ave. As mxmtoon sees the chaos and confusion of the outside world, she finds solace inside and in her memories – something many of us now probably feel. Listeners are able to connect to the struggles Maia has faced, especially in wallflower. She opens up about her shyness and willingness to blend in and almost disappear into the crowd. This may come from Maia’s own shyness, or maybe it comes from her newfound internet fame. It is solidified in asking for a friend, as she’s become lonely in trying to process her new internet celebrity status. A year of change may not always be how we imagine it, and certainly, Maia is finding that success does not come without its own problems. show and tell cements this idea as she struggles to deal with what she wants to say about herself and her music.


This is not to say these feelings of loneliness are unique to mxmtoon, yet they convey this idea of isolation and lack of understanding that we can all desperately relate to. However, even in the middle of the struggle, Maia conveys her sense of strength to continue what she loves, despite it all. Finally, the last track of the EP is first, a subtle reminder that the end of one thing is only the beginning of another. Tying together all the themes of the EP, from sadness to loneliness and a lack of understanding, the main idea is to keep moving forward. Throughout 2020, Maia has been growing and learning, both as a person and as a musician. While for many, 2020 has been a year of turmoil, Dusk understands that endings do not necessarily mean the end of the journey, but instead, the start of new possibilities if one so chooses. Through pain, sadness, and yearning, we may also be able to find hope, optimism, and growth in places that may be encouraging. It’s okay to be a little sad, but Dusk shows how we’re not alone in this and that good things are coming on the horizon. The night is still young.

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Kintsugi

Spring 2021


O

n the second floor of a newly reopened Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) lies a collection of Claude Monet’s oil paintings that have not been shown together in 25 years. Monet and Boston: Lasting Impressions not only brings viewers through a journey of Monet’s art and life, but also pays tribute to those collectors and friends of the French Impressionist that made it possible for America–or more specifically Boston–to be able to experience Monet’s work. When spectators first enter, they are greeted by overblown black and white footage of the artist in his later years. There, with his long white beard, Monet beckons viewers to explore his life. The viewer follows the painter through his life in a series of four rooms, with the initial room exhibiting his early work, apprenticeships, and influences. First, viewers are exposed to the origins of Monet’s interest in outdoor paintings. However, when they walk into the next room, the atmosphere changes into a space

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filled with color and abstract brush strokes. Here, the exhibit highlights the Japonisme effect that Monet experimented with. With the rise in popularity of Japanese art and woodblock in the 1860s after the opening of trade channels, Monet was influenced by this unique and never-before-seen style. The influence of Japonisme is very visible in the color, brush strokes, and composition of Monet’s work from this time and on.

As a trailblazer in painting nature, Monet captured the beauty of the world in a digestible and inspiring way which is still ever so beloved today. The third room takes a slight turn and focuses directly on Monet’s relationship to Boston, and all of the collectors, artists, and investors that have connected the two. A huge timeline takes over a majority of one wall, and viewers can check out artifacts, including original letters and photos in

addition to Monet’s work. Boston and Monet share a surprisingly lengthy and full line of connections through the people that have encountered both. This room lists a full collection of links on the wall. Although Monet himself never got to visit the city, the MFA says in absolute certainty that he would have loved it. Finally, the exhibit concludes in a grand room filled with Monet’s most well-known work and location studies. From his home in Giverny to Normandy and London, his artwork gives people the chance to experience the natural world through Monet’s eyes. A few familiar paintings pop up, including his studies of the lily pond and bridge to the haystacks near his residence. As a trailblazer in painting nature, Monet captured the beauty of the world in a digestible and inspiring way which is still ever so beloved today. Especially in modern times, where we might lose sight of the enchantment of our environment and the scenes around us, Monet reminds us what there is to see.


Monet & Boston:

Lasting Impressions AT T H E M FA Written by Avital Brodski

Designed by Lauren Aquino

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Kintsugi

Spring 2021


captures the totality of life amidst lockdown and inspires hope WRITTEN BY SASHA SHRESTHA DESIGNED & ILLUSTRATED BY LEIA CHAO

I

n their most hands-on album yet, global sensation BTS not only reflects on the anxiety and depression caused by the pandemic, but also the determination to overcome it. BE is the story of us exploring both the highs and lows in this existential journey. The trim, 28-minute album packs so much musical diversity, displaying the group’s obvious skill and unique fingerprint. The album is far from escapist, compelling listeners to face the idea that it is okay to just exist, to feel those feelings, and to simply be. The album opens with Life Goes On, a sincere song that perfectly captures the uncertainty and helplessness felt during the recent pandemic. The song is weighted with sentimental, mournful lyrics balanced by a light acoustic guitar. The first verse includes lyrics “Spring didn’t know how to wait / showed up not even a minute late.” A reference to their 2017 hit single Spring Day, in which they use the metaphor of an eternal winter to describe the pain of missing a friend so desperately, before singing that the morning will come again. The same message of hope BTS imparted three years prior in Spring Day, that “No darkness, no season is eternal,” is relayed in the album’s theme and the band’s reassurance that life goes on. With its impactful message and catchy beat, it is

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unsurprising that the song debuted at #1 of Billboard’s Top 100 List, making history as the first non-English song to do so. Following the lead single is Fly to My Room, an upbeat unit track, a track with certain members, sang/rapped by Jimin, V, Suga, and J-hope, and co-written by Suga, J-hope, and RM. The track is groovy with a sound distinct from any of BTS’s previous discography. With its smooth laid-back tune and lyrics centering around wishing things were different, it’s one of the more subtle songs on the album. Rappers J-hope and Suga discuss how even though their rooms are the safest place right now, they are not big enough to hold their dreams and plans. The song ultimately climaxes with a lush harmony from Jimin and V. Blue and Grey is the heart of the album. Originally written and composed by V in English for his own mixtape, the ballad conveys heartfelt raw emotion with simplicity and specificity.

The composition of the introspective lyrics mimics a stream of consciousness as each artist meditates on themes of fear, depression, and burnout.

A heartbeat echoes throughout the track and is coupled with fingerpicking on the guitar, resulting in an air of wistfulness and longing. Their confession in the chorus, “I just want to be happier” is somehow so candid and vulnerable, while still maintaining nuance. The burden and anxiety present in the lyrics are balanced with the levity of their voices, resulting in a tender song of solace. BTS provides a different type of consolation in Blue and Grey than the cheerful sentiment listeners may be used to hearing. The song acts as reassurance that all feelings, no matter how blue or grey, are valid and most importantly, it reminds listeners that they are not alone in their experiences. BE takes a musical break with its spoken word interlude, Skit. The members celebrate their success with their first all-English single, Dynamite, granting them their first #1 on Billboard’s Top 100. This achievement made them the first all-Korean act to do so in history and the first Asian act to chart at number one since 1963. Despite language barriers, listeners can easily feel the excitement in this surreal moment for the group and history. As the track fades out, RM asks, “Isn’t this what happiness is?” The inclusion of this moment on the album feels like a reminder to celebrate the good— even during the bad.


Following the complex emotions of grief, guilt, and loneliness expressed in the first half of the album, there is a tone shift with Telepathy. With a funky retro rhythm and skillful use of autotune that animates the song, Telepathy is a vibrant disco track about connection regardless of distance. Co-produced and co-written by Suga, RM, and Jung Kook, the production is dynamic with its use of ‘80s synth and features intricate layering that makes this bouncy track especially addicting. BTS addresses the reality of the pandemic separating them from their fans, and reassures that after seven years of mutual love and appreciation, the connection between them and their fans transcends the need to meet face-to-face. Jungkook sings, “Even if I’m not by your side, you know we’re together.” Comforting messages like this that are directed towards their fan base are not new for BTS, but in the context of this year, Telepathy proves the bond between BTS and their fans is unparalleled.

Dis-ease is definitely a standout track on the album with its infectious old-school hip-hop sound and ingenious word play. The song, alluding to unease rather than an actual disease, is cleverly styled with an upbeat funk guitar and record scratches that make it fresh and fun. J-hope sets the stage with a powerful opener, his midnineties style and charisma perfectly suited for the vibe of the song. It’s followed by a hooky pre-chorus and a honeyed yet hard-hitting verse from RM with flawless rhythmic timing. RM is known to be a genius in songwriting and he showcases

his skills in Dis-ease with the use of “ill” as a double entendre. In the time of a global pandemic, the lyrics ask whether the real illness in the world is the inability to take a break and pause productivity. RM uses the word “ill” which means “sick” in English, but also sounds the same as the Korean word meaning “work.” He raps “I’m ill, yeah I’m the job itself,” revealing he works so much at the expense of his own health, that he’s now defined by what he produces. Suga jumps in straight away, turning heads to an impeccable rapid-fire verse that condemns society for putting so much pressure on young people during a time they’re supposed to be “at-ease.” He raps, “is it the world or me that’s sick?” reflecting on if his guilt from not being productive is because the world is obsessed with hyperproductivity and consumerism. Without warning, the song is injected with new life in the bridge. From the masterful key change and surprising change in tempo, to Jungkook, Jimin, V, and Jin’s harmonious vocals, this bridge is truly transcendent; a masterpiece in the triumph that is Dis-ease. After a deceptively calm introduction, Stay is a pop-EDM track with twitchy drum kicks. In this unit track, RM, Jin, and Jungkook remind fans one last time to hold on, even if they can’t meet right now. Jin and Jungkook’s sweet-toned vocals are incredibly well-matched and captivating in this song of yearning. RM balances the vocalists with interspersed verses that are both assertive and melodic. The track is exhilarating, climaxing at a euphoric level drop. Stay cascades into the dance-heavy throb of Dynamite.

with Dynamite, which feels like an homage to a brighter and more colorful future. The pastel-colored disco track is truly pop perfection and acts similarly to that of end credits to a beautifully crafted film. BTS have stated in the past that this single, released only six months after their last full-length album, is a gift from them to give their fans energy and hope.

The song debuted at the top of Billboard’s Hot 100, Global 200, and Global 200 (Excluding U.S.), making BTS the only artists in history to chart at number one on all three charts at the same time. The music video broke Youtube’s record for most views within 24 hours of its release, raking in 101.1 million views (currently 795 million views) and two other Guinness world records. Along with many global awards, Dynamite has secured BTS their first Grammy nomination for Best Pop Duo/ Group Performance. The group’s success comes as no shock to fans; they consistently make music that empowers listeners and encourages love and acceptance of oneself. BTS challenges the mainstream of the American music industry and continues to open doors for other non-Western artists.

After exploring so many complex and difficult emotions in BE, the album closes

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Kintsugi

Spring 2021


ONE NIGHT IN MIAMI WRITTEN BY MARTHA GAMY DESIGN AND ILLUSTRATED BY NORMAN ZENG

S

o, a civil rights activist, a professional boxer, a football player, and a soul singer walk into a hotel room. This seems like a setup for an age-old joke, but the talented Regina King’s engrossing directorial debut provides more than a sleazy punchline. One Night in Miami, at its core, is a conversation. It composes a powerful and relevant discourse that highlights Blackness in a racially-divided America during the civil rights era and today. Based on Kemp Powers’ play of the same name, One Night in Miami illustrates a fictional conversation between real-life best friends and Black superstars Malcolm X (Kingsley Ben-Adir), Muhammad Ali (Eli Goree), Jim Brown (Aldis Hodge), and Sam Cooke (Leslie Odom Jr.), who, over the movie’s runtime, help showcase the hopes and fears of Black America in a single night. February 25th, 1964 marks two important events in history: one that was highly publicized, the other which was scarcely known. On that day, 22-year-old Cassius Clay (who would later take on the name Muhammad Ali) surprisingly emerges victorious, defeating the once-unstoppable Sonny Liston. It is the day that reigns him as the heavyweight boxing champion of the

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world, so naturally, there is a call for revelry. Not a huge, lively party for the champion, but rather a small get-together in a Miami hotel room with his close friends who just so happen to be legendary icons. Since no one knows what happened inside that room, Powers lends a hand in fantasizing about the night’s events. There are only fragmented reports that barely scratch the surface about the

These four stand as Black icons at the forefront of a predominantly white background, being superficially judged by the white audience. ongoings in the hotel room. And yet, Powers still pushes through by incorporating the research he found to develop an enriching and complex story about these four completely different men from completely different lifestyles. King and Powers expertly capture a true friendship between the men, allowing them to express their individuality (warts and all) proudly during the height of the civil rights movement.


One Night in Miami opens by spotlighting each man before the big night. Clay stands confidently inside the Wembley Stadium in London, facing off Henry Cooper as white announcers speculate on the former’s worth. At the Copacabana in New York, Sam Cooke displays a pitiful performance in front of an all-white, apathetic audience. Jim Brown goes back home to Georgia, visiting a white family friend who first praises Brown for his NFL fame, then unashamedly refuses to let Brown inside because of his skin color. Elsewhere, overhearing white news anchors report on Malcolm X and his deeds, we see Malcolm return home to discuss his plans to leave the Nation of Islam with his wife, Betty. These four stand as Black icons at the forefront of a predominantly white background, being superficially judged by the white audience. One Night in Miami dismantles the caricaturist superficiality to showcase the real depths of these powerhouses. It is not often that we get to see the monumental Malcolm X as a socially awkward, lovable dork who fails to be a proper party host amongst friends. It’s this and other earthy depictions of these figures that truly highlight the film as we get to see

them as hilarious, everyday people who get to take off their masks for themselves for one night in February 1964. However, the night is not just a celebration. Amongst the (hilariously-noted) vanilla ice cream and good humor between friends, the night turns into a philosophical debacle when it is revealed that Clay plans to

Even though they are individuals, because of notability, there’s so much weight they have to carry to serve their community.

because of notability, there’s so much weight they have to carry to serve their community. Their fame gives way to better their community and prove to their oppressors that they still have a voice. They question their role in society; however, even as the night comes to an end, there is still uncertainty if they are making the right decision for themselves and their community. King and Powers transform One Night in Miami into a beautifully well-crafted conversation about Blackness. It is a conversation about what Blackness is in America, if not, as Cooke’s A Change Is Gonna Come suggests, a long-time hope that true “change gon’ come” for every Black American, one day in the bright future.

announce publicly that he is joining the Nation of Islam. As Malcolm has his full support, Brown and Cooke strongly oppose, opening up the issue of how to handle their lives as prominent Black figures living in white America. The four debate how their image can affect the Black community. Their masks might be a burden, but they are a burden with power. Even though they are individuals,

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Kintsugi

Spring 2021


REMEMBERING

WRITTEN BY CHRISTIAN KWOK DESIGNED BY LEIA CHAO

S

OPHIE, the Grammy-nominated producer whose hyperkinetic productions redefined the boundaries of pop and electronic music, passed away this January following a sudden accident at her home in Athens. She was 34. Those close to her at her label exclaimed how, “true to her spirituality she had climbed up to watch the full moon and accidentally slipped and fell. She will always be here with us.”

Born and raised in Glasgow, the self-taught Sophie Xeon grew up around electronic music.

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Her father brought her to raves, and played cassettes of electronic music in the car. In an interview with Lenny Letter, she explained how “I spent all my time listening to those cassette tapes. I’d steal them from the car.” Spending her teenage years producing music in her bedroom, SOPHIE emerged onto Europe’s club scene in the early 2010s, having previously played in bands and collaborated with other artists. She began cultivating her own sound with Bipp, an austere and ethereal dance anthem, which garnered attention from music critics, as well as promotion from the media and fellow artists. In 2014, SOPHIE released

singles Lemonade and Hard – an addictive set of brash, yet tidy mechanical sounds layered with poppy and catchy choruses. Well-received by critics and placed on numerous charts, these singles were packaged in PRODUCT, a compilation released in 2015. Finding her own way in the music industry, SOPHIE began to work with a variety of other performers – notably Charli XCX, Vince Staples, Cashmere Cat, Flume, and Kim Petras among others. These collaborations allowed her to experiment and gain further insight into forming her sound and personal identity.


In 2017, SOPHIE released the single It’s Okay to Cry, the first new material released in two years.

Having remained anonymous up to this point in her career, It’s Okay to Cry was the first time where SOPHIE used both her image and voice in the release. She subsequently came out to the public as a transgender woman.

On April 3rd, 2018, SOPHIE released Oil of Every Pearl’s Un-Insides. Characterized by intimate vocals, playful hyperkinetic energy, and a vast array of identifiable influences from industrial, glitch, dance, and dream-pop, to name a few, the album was nominated for best dance/electronic album at the Grammys, where SOPHIE was the first openly transgender artist to be nominated in the category. When asked about SOPHIE in 2019, Charli XCX stated: “There are very few artists who make me feel something up my core

and make me wanna cry. Justice and Uffie made me feel something when I was 14, and I didn’t really have that feeling again until I met SOPHIE. I felt this rush of: ‘F---, this is the coolest s--- I have ever heard.’” After receiving news of her death, artists from all different genres expressed their grief and condolences. Sam Smith put it best: “The world has lost an angel. A true visionary and icon of our generation. Your light will continue to inspire so many for generations to come.”

Illustrations by Michelle Musili

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RENT

Why

is still relevant 25 years later Written by: Rachel Erwin Designed by: Michelle Musili

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rowing up, my dad always played the same three musicals in the car. I would hop in, buckle my seatbelt, and wait for the first notes of either Chicago, Wicked, or RENT. Now I know what you’re thinking: RENT is not exactly a kid-friendly creation. But for five-year-old Rachel, that didn’t matter. I was too young to understand the suggestive lyrics, but I would tell everyone I saw that there were 525,600 minutes in a year.

of RENT’s leads have HIV/AIDS, reflecting the time period shift from the 1800s to the late 1980s and early 1990s. It premiered on Broadway in 1996, where it ran for 12 years and won four Tony awards, including Best Musical. In 2005, it became a movie. The question is, why was it so groundbreaking?

Now, I have the words “no day but today,” – the most famous lyrics from the show – tattooed on my hip. I’ve seen the show and the movie a million times, and I listen to the songs weekly. RENT has always had a grip on my soul. This year, during its 25th anniversary, I am reminded of the impact it has had on the theatre industry as whole.

RENT is a raw look at what life is like for the impoverished in Lower Manhattan’s East Village. It does not shy away from the harsh realities, including the death of a main character. It talks about AZT –the drug used to treat AIDS–in plain terms. It features relationship conflicts, LGBTQ+ characters, and an unforgiving landlord. Most importantly, however, it is a celebration of life in the face of death.

RENT, which is loosely based on Puccini’s opera La Bohème, is a story about poor artists struggling to survive and thrive in New York City. Instead of the characters having tuberculosis, like in the opera, many

Characters like Collins and Angel, who have AIDS, are depicted as hopeful and joyous rather than hung up on the idea of death. Collins sings about moving to Santa Fe and opening his own restaurant, and the two fall

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RENT is a raw look at what life is like for the impoverished in Lower Manhattan’s East Village. It does not shy away from the harsh realities, including the death of a main character. in love despite the knowledge that they may have little time left together. The song “La Vie Bohème” is another great example of this. Its lyrics are a toast “to people living with, living with, living with, not dying from disease.” Emphasizing the arts in a world that tries to claim they are unimportant, the song is a call to live life to its fullest. RENT also opened the door for a greater focus on LGBTQ+ characters in the theatre. Angel, Collins, Maureen, and Joanne all fall somewhere in its spectrum, yet their sexual


orientation or gender identity is not the sole focus of their trajectory in the musical. Some may argue that it is a classic example of the overused “LGBTQ+ character has a tragic ending” trope, and that is entirely fair. However, I see it more as an honest look at and a wake-up call to how widespread and horrific the HIV/AIDS pandemic was, especially for LGBTQ+ folks.

The whole time, all I could think was that Jonathan Larson, RENT’s composer, would have been so proud to see that his vision lived on. I had the pleasure of seeing the 25th anniversary tour prior to the COVID-19 pandemic in Fall of 2019. This was the first time I had experienced the stage production in-person, and I recall crying multiple times, which is something I don’t typically do.

The whole time, all I could think was that Jonathan Larson, RENT’s composer, would have been so proud to see that his vision lived on. Larson passed away the morning of the 1996 Off-Broadway premiere due to an aortic dissection. I like to think that every performance of RENT is still a nod to his memory and legacy. In March, the New York Theatre Workshop Gala featured performances from the original cast of RENT, including Idina

Will RENT always be relevant? I say yes. Though many shows have followed in its footsteps and improved upon the precedent it set, I don’t think the spirit of the show can be replicated.

Menzel, Adam Pascal, Anthony Rapp, Daphne Rubin-Vega, and more. Cast members from other productions and revivals came together as well, celebrating a night full of Larson’s work and the longlasting impact RENT has had on the world. Will RENT always be relevant? I say yes. Though many shows have followed in its footsteps and improved upon the precedent it set, I don’t think the spirit of the show can be replicated. Whenever I hear those opening notes to “Seasons of Love,” a sense of calming familiarity washes over me. I’m transported back to those long drives with my dad, and I remember why theatre is so beautiful.

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student showcase

AZRA SCHORR

Edited by Scout Gullick Designed by Lauren Aquino Bio Photo by Cali Cardenas

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Born into a family of photographers, Azra Schorr was given her first camera at the age of six. Growing up, her rotation of cameras rarely left her hand. She practiced every chance she got, taking pictures of everything and everyone around her. Now a first-year business and design student at Northeastern, Azra works as an editorial photographer and the communications association for The Avenue, NEU’s fashion magazine, along with some freelance portrait photography on the side. Throughout college she hopes to continue capturing her classmates and more on camera, celebrating them in an eternal format (a.k.a the jpg!).

Editor’s Note: This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity, with editors notes added in [brackets] to provide context.

It’s so interesting that you come from a background of photographers. When you were younger, did you think it was something you had to do or were you naturally inclined to pick up a camera?

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t didn’t feel like something I had to do. It was completely something I was interested in. I was very well supported. The second I expressed a little bit of interest, my grandparents handed me a camera; it wasn’t forced on me at all. Only my aunt is a professional photographer— that’s her career. All of my grandparents just do it for fun because they’re passionate about it. So, the second I showed interest, they all jumped on the opportunity to get me a camera and take me to classes. My grandpa in Turkey was the one who showed me how to use all the buttons, and he used to take me out as a kid to take pictures. Who are your inspirations, both professionally and personally? Well, I really like my aunt’s work. I don’t follow photographers, but there are a couple YouTube channels that I like to watch. They show challenges that they do, like one girl, Jessica Kobeissi, makes videos with her and four other photographers, and they shoot the same model. It’s interesting to see that they all have really different photos even with the same set and model. I like those because it’s interesting seeing how people play with the same space. That’s photography, but I guess career wise, any powerful women in business! Specifically, in the magazine industry, like women who work for Vogue, I find it really exciting. I grew up on Teen Vogue, and I remember when Elaine Welteroth took over as creative director and completely rebranded Teen Vogue. When I was younger, I wrote Teen Vogue an email

after they went fully digital, and I asked them to keep the print issues! So many things in the industry are changing… everything is digital! Has the pandemic influenced what you take photos of or how you take them? I mean it’s definitely made it harder. I played around with photography my whole life, and I didn’t take it seriously until high school when I took Photo 1 because everything was so structured. It was then that I figured out I didn’t like taking photos of things, but I love taking photos of people. That’s exciting to me. I love the interaction between the photographer and the model. I love seeing the process unfold, like when the models are kind of tense in the beginning and then they open up and get into it. So, I fell in love with portraits. And with the pandemic, it became impossible to take pictures of other people. Over quarantine, I took a lot of self-portraits because I didn’t have access to models. I learned a lot about the functions on my camera and about angles and even just myself through doing more self-portraits. With portraits as your specialty, if you could capture the portrait of any person, who would you want it to be? For the sake of my twelve-year-old self, Jennifer Lawrence! I would want to do a darker, edgier shoot with her—like her with a punk alter ego—because that tends to be my style. Do you have a dream photoshoot scenario? I really love the intimacy of a portrait, when it’s just me and one other person. So, I

can’t think of any amazing background that would require a set or a team because that level of professionalism isn’t fun to me. What’s fun to me is a more natural setting where we can just have a good time. For me, the perfect set is an environment where the model is comfortable, where they can feel beautiful and relaxed without anything that is super made up. How does your art embrace imperfection? How do you seek to deconstruct and reconstruct in your artwork? I have never been a perfectionist, despite it being a leading characteristic of my sign (virgo). You can’t be a perfectionist when shooting portraits, as no subject will ever be “perfect.” You have to learn to love each bump or wrinkle when taking pictures of people, and learn how to celebrate it. I never go into a photoshoot with the expectation of perfection, as I only see it as a hindrance to the creative process. In regards to deconstruction, I have always enjoyed playing with my work to find ways to make it more compelling. In my first spread for The Avenue, I created a variation of collages that broke down and mixed my pictures with inverted versions of themselves, layering them atop each other digitally. What message do you hope to get across with your work? Maybe because none of my models are ever real models; they’re just people— people in my life— I think I enjoy making “art” out of a normal person. If I could pick any message, it would be finding beauty in your next-door neighbor, a girl in your class, etc.

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You said you first started writing songs as a child. How did this begin? What was your inspiration when you were younger? I think that so many songwriters that I meet today have a similar experience with Taylor Swift as a concept. When it comes to writing, I think that she was one of the first people in the mainstream media within our age group that was genuinely paying attention and trying to create lyricism. I think that even while I was writing for a while, it was still something that I was an observer to, instead of somebody who contributed to it. Then I got to a point where I was like, “Oh, I like some of the stuff I’m writing.” From there, I started trying to take myself seriously with it. It’s hard to just because you don’t have a lot of connections, and it’s not something that is seen as a realistic career path. But in the past year, I’ve really started to take myself seriously and tried to get into that mindset of “I’m going to be a professional songwriter.” Tell me about your experience with the Husky Songwriting Club. What made you decide to join, and how has it allowed you to come out of your shell? It was a special thing when I first joined because everybody was there longer than me. I just listened to people submit stuff, and I don’t think I showed a song until my second or third time there. I think that you can still go into it and get really nervous about sharing songs, but they were really chill, and I forced myself to be like, “this is a safe place where you can share your music.” Even a year ago, I could not show people my songs. I needed a place where it was just people who are like me. I needed to show songwriters and people who make music, I needed that community, and that was a great place to start to create it.

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When did you first decide to start posting your songs on the internet? What has the response been like? From April to August, I was posting consistently on YouTube. Even though there was no real audience, posting made me feel like something was going on, like I was doing something. Then I wrote this song that I really vibe to. I showed it to my songwriting teacher, and she was like, “this can go somewhere.” Then, I posted on TikTok, and I was like, “Okay, I’m, literally not gonna check TikTok for hours.” I came back and it had 888 likes, which is an angel number, and I thought, “the universe is speaking to me.” That was amazing. It just kept on growing. I think it has 70,000 likes now. How would you describe your music? I don’t really care about labeling a genre. I think that it’s this blend of both alternative and pop. I just want to be vulnerable and raw with people. With my work, I’m literally just complaining. I don’t ever want to be making a statement. I think that a lot of the time artists are like “I’m gonna stand up and talk about this thing” that they don’t really know much about, and it just doesn’t feel right. I do want to support certain causes that are important to me, but I don’t want to do it through music. I just want people to listen and be like, “I feel that.” Describe your process behind writing a song. Where do you get your inspiration? I think if I have something that I know I want to write about, it’s such a good process. One of the songs on the EP is “Bad Role Models.” It was immediately, “Oh, I want to write a song about idolizing people that are bad for me.” Once I had that concept, I put it in my notes, and I didn’t really think about it. And then I was like, “I’m gonna write a song today.” It just happened super easily.

But, if I have nothing in mind, and all I have are emotions, sometimes it’s harder. I think that songwriting is definitely easiest when you have a concept already in mind and what kind of message you’re trying to articulate. The more specific, the better. Do you look to any famous songwriters for inspiration now? Who are they? I think that lately I’ve been really inspired by sounds, but nobody has been hitting me with lyrics that I feel like are so good. My cousin is super into Lil Peep. I think that the way he combines actual instrumentation with stuff that’s been produced and altered goes together so well, and I really want to emulate that with my production.

I just want people to listen and be like, “I feel that.” Bo Burnham also really inspires me. I draw a lot from the way he’s just sarcastic about things. I think that when songs are depressing in a way that’s not clever at all, it doesn’t intrigue me. But, when you write a song that is real and honest in a way that’s engaging, I think that’s so cool, and he does that. I love writing songs from the perspective of someone else, like a rich guy, for example, and I think that’s something I get from him, because when talking about real issues, he does it in a way where he’s like, “I am the issue.” Where do you see yourself in the future in the music industry? I would like to make a living off songwriting, and I feel like that’s a scary thing to genuinely admit to yourself sometimes. I hope that in however many years, I’ve got a bigger audience than I do now, and that they’re still obsessed with my stuff. I just want to have as many people listen to my sh-- as possible.


student showcase

Briana Gil Edited by: Rachel Erwin Designed by: Michelle Musili

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gilanares B

riana Gil, or Gilanares – her artist name – is a second-year student at Northeastern University. She has been writing songs since she was a child but only recently started sharing her work with others. The Husky Songwriting Club was the first place she felt safe enough to play her songs for people, and from there she decided to post them on the internet. In the last few months, she has gained traction on TikTok and released an EP called “There’s Not Much To Know About Me.” She is excited to continue pursuing her passion at Northeastern and beyond.

Photos provided by Briana Gil

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student showcase

Kaitlyn Wang Edited by: Nora Holland Designed by: Michelle Musili

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aitlyn Wang is a first-year student at Northeastern University from Pasadena, California with an intense passion for drawing. Although she is majoring in Behavioral Neuroscience and Design, art is a hobby she has kept close to her heart since she was three years old. She is currently working on pieces for the Art Blanche Club’s sustainable art show, as well as the NU Animation Club and Live Music Association. She specializes in traditional painting and drawing, bullet journals, and creating digital art using applications like Procreate.

Photos provided by Kaitlyn Wang

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Tell me a little bit about yourself! How did you get into painting and drawing? Well, I started when I was three and I took art lessons ever since. It started with my parents taking me, and then I just kept insisting to keep going. I started with traditional art, so I just stuck with it! What are your artistic goals for the future? Do you strive to combine your design major with neuroscience? I initially wanted to be a biologist, so I thought that if I can combine biology and art, that would be cool. But if that’s not possible, I would like to go into the entertainment industry and work for places like Disney Animation and other companies. What is your creative process like in making a piece? I just start by looking at inspiration on the internet, and pretty much go for it. I don’t really have a definite process; sometimes I make a rough draft, but other times I just

draw until I finish the piece. I usually draw whenever I have time, so whenever I don’t have school stuff to do. I usually like to draw on the weekends. How do you embrace imperfection within your work?

Sometimes art looks better when it’s messy or sketchy. Imperfection has become somewhat of a style on its own.

A lot of my art consists of small sketches or unfinished, abandoned drawings. I rarely create a finished piece that I like. It takes a lot of trials to get something right. I would draw something, then a month later redraw it because I didn’t like [it] the first time. A lot of the time I lose patience and motivation to finish because the outcome isn’t perfect. But I realized that it’s impossible to achieve perfection; there’s always something you can tweak. Sometimes art looks better when it’s messy or sketchy. Imperfection has become somewhat of a style on its own.

Some of my friends are also into art, so I get inspiration from them too.

Where do you typically find inspiration to create?

Editor’s Note: This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity, with editors notes added in [brackets] to provide context.

Tell me about your role in the Sustainable Art Show! What sort of pieces are you working on? We started on individual showcase pieces on the theme of Earth Day. I haven’t started mine, but it’ll be shown in April! I’ve only joined this semester, but it’s really fun. It’s just a bunch of people coming together to create art.

A lot of my inspiration comes from books and fandoms, or artists I find on Instagram.

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Edited by Sanya Mittal Designed by Lauren Aquino Photographs by Cali Cardenas and Provided by Maya Lucia

MAYA LUCIA student showcase Maya Lucia is a musician and fifth-year student at Northeastern University. She is the co-reviews editor and a content writer for Northeastern’s student run music magazine, Tastemakers Music Magazine. She’s also a member of NEU’s Songwriting Club which brings songwriters together to create and give feedback on their work. Her music mixes influences of indie, rock and pop. Find her at @mayaxlucia on socials.

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Cover art for “Lashing Out” (2019)


Editor’s Note: This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity, with editors notes added in [brackets] to provide context.

when I started. The people I’ve collaborated with through the club taught me so many things. Being in Tastemakers has also helped me find new music and even look at my own music through a different lens. Do you hope to go into the music industry after graduation? Yes! My freshman year of college I started at a school outside of L.A., so a majority of my friends live there now. My plan is to move there and continue working on music and start touring and such once the pandemic is over.

Where do you draw inspiration from for the music you make?

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y inspiration comes from my life and the people around me. It’s how I process my personal relationships and events. When I’m writing, I usually vomit things out and clean them up later. I realize a lot of things once I listen back to a song. It’s cathartic for me. Who are your biggest influences and how have they shaped your own music? I grew up in Minneapolis and local music has always been really important to me. Prince is our icon but there are a lot of “smaller” bands like Low, Bad Bad Hats, and Hippo Campus that were so cool to me. We have a festival called Rock the Garden that’s put on by our local radio station and that was how I was introduced to a lot of music. Mac Demarco was very influential for me as well. He’s someone that’s stuck with me ever since I’ve started listening to him. The Ramones, Shakira, Nelly Furtado, The Beatles – they all had a large impact on my desire to become a performer and musician. I’m getting into Shakira’s older music at the moment, so she’s definitely a lasting influence.

You’ve got an EP coming out soon— could you talk about it and the inspiration behind it? My band and I have been recording remotely during the pandemic. Our original intent was to make an album last year but we had to adapt to what we were able to do. The EP is a collection of songs I’ve written over the past few years and their sounds ended up being really cohesive. It’s a map of my own journey as a musician. A lot of the feelings I talk about are applicable to the feelings of isolation everyone is going through with the pandemic. The cool thing about recording remotely is you have the opportunity to send time adding in production and you’re not paying anyone for studio space. How has being involved in creative organizations on campus influenced the music you make? I’ve grown a lot from the creative organizations on campus. With the Songwriting Club, I’ve met a ton of creatives. I love seeing everyone’s process of writing and the styles they draw from. It’s helped me connect to different elements of the process of songwriting. I knew absolutely nothing about production

I want music and performing to be my career. It’s something that has always made me feel complete. I want music and performing to be my career. It’s something that has always made me feel complete. Has making music during the pandemic affected your creative process? If so, how? The pandemic has been so strange. I’m an extrovert and a lot of my creative process draws from interacting with others before turning inwards. I’ve had a lot of intense writer’s blocks, so I’ve been trying to look at new ways to write. I’ve started physically writing things down – usually I just keep songs in a Google doc but having the mappings on paper is a new way to look at things for me. Live music is also a huge influence for writing. A song changes so much when you play it live. You get to experiment with what works and what doesn’t. But that being said, I’ve also grown a lot on the production side. My bassist, James Duncan, is producing all of the new music for the upcoming releases. He’s guided me a lot with getting new equipment and techniques for recording. Honestly, the process of recording remotely has been one of my favorite adaptations in the pandemic.

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Rules of Play: Play Theatre for Radical Change

Written By Devon Whitney Photos Provided By Devon Whitney Designed By Danny Tran

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ules of Play: College Edition started brewing over a year ago, before Kate Franklin ever could have anticipated that she would be producing this performance piece during a global pandemic. Through a whirlwind of problem-solving, fifth-year theatre major Franklin has written, directed, and brought to life a filmed theatre piece seeking to enact change in frat and hookup culture, and on-campus sexual assault. Franklin describes the play as “a step-by-step guide of a typical night out on a college campus— from picking a bodysuit to blowjobs,” that sheds light on the “culture of abuse and inherent power differentials.” As a survivor, Franklin’s work seeks not only to cultivate discussions about the existing campus culture, but also to understand what a better future might look like.

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Rules of Play pushes the boundaries of activist performance and the existing canon of plays about sexual violence. Franklin says, “these narratives usually have one antagonist, allowing everyone else to be absolved of their complacency.” Told through the lens of a game, the play focuses more on the rules than the players, thus critiquing the systemic issues rather than individual choices. Furthermore, RoP was created in the style of Brechtian theatre. Rather than expecting the audience to step into the protagonist’s shoes,


Brechtian theatre keeps the audience at a distance, always reminding the audience that they are watching a play, often by exposing the mechanics of the play. RoP does this by having a “Stagehand” character, showing the crew on camera, and addressing the audience directly at times. This relative distance keeps the audience from abandoning their critical thinking and self-awareness. Though there is an assault in the play, Franklin’s team choreographed it as a dance, removing the element of an audience’s interpretation of ‘who was telling the truth.’ RoP partnered with Delta Tau Delta and Alpha Kappa Sigma, two fraternities that were invited to participate in a closed post-show conversation that discusses campus sexual violence and a healthier

hookup culture. RoP also partnered with the restorative justice advocacy group ReHumanize and the Every Voice Coalition, a grassroots on-campus organization against sexual assault. There were several post-performance discussions available, providing space to process the production and its message. “Survivor Circle,” led by Marlee Liss of Re-Humanize, was intended for survivors only, as a healing space to discuss the play, rape culture, and personal experiences. Every Voice Coalition led the talk, “Political Advocacy to End Campus Sexual Assault,” which was open to all audience members. There was also a talkback with the cast, which Franklin led.

drinking (heavy), swearing. Please note there is no simulation of any sexual or physical violence. There is no actual contact between any of the characters.” Franklin also notes that timestamps will be posted of “any content that could be disempowering to view,” giving audience members the agency to skip ahead. “The takeaway of the play is that there is not one person to blame for rape culture. We all contribute to the problem in some way or another, be it acutely or astronomically,” says Franklin. This play presents the opportunity to confront rape culture, even within ourselves, and to be in community and conversation with others as we begin.

The content warning on the play’s website reads: “CW: Mentions of sexual assault, r*pe, sexual coercion, disordered eating,

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BeaBadoobee fake it Flowers Written by Drefnie Limprevil Illustrated by Michelle Musili Designed by Sebastian Buckley

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n her debut album, Fake It Flowers, Bea Kristi, better known as beabadoobee, combines pop, rock, and alternative sounds to tell the story of making mistakes, growing up, forgiving the past, and learning to love yourself. After a year of being signed with Dirty Hit Records, opening in her first tour, and renewed interest in her 2017 song Coffee – after the remix became a viral TikTok sound – she released her album on October 16, 2020, all at the age of 20. beabadoobee is yet another artist who released an album during the pandemic. The appeal of her album is in the simple lyrics infused with familiarity topics, making the songs feel personal, yet universal at the same time.

The appeal of her album is in the simple lyrics about familiar topics, making the songs feel personal, yet universal at the same time. The album is laid out as a story, chronicling the process of reflecting on the past and looking towards the future, with short tidbits from beabadoobee accompanying each song on Spotify. The album opens with her lead single, Care, which carries the sound of a 1990s alternative song. She discusses trying to understand the difficulties she went through growing up, while also acknowledging that others may not understand. She uses the lyrics as a way to communicate and begin a dialogue with listeners that will last throughout the album, ending the song with the refrain, “I’m

still the same/ But are you the same?” The album continues on to showcase beabadoobee’s classically uncomplicated style, laying out simple lyrics across the twelve tracks. Though the lyrics are still uncomplicated, the album picks up on even more of a rock influence that she began to explore in her 2019 EP, Space Cadet, shifting from the Bedroom Pop sound apparent in her earlier work. She cites her sound as being inspired by bands like The Flaming Lips and Sonic Youth, which is apparent in the album’s overall rock sound. Contrasting the heavier guitar chords are her softer vocals. Her voice is versatile across the different moods of the songs, with the upbeat, passionate singing from Dye It Red becoming more mellow and slow-paced later in the album in Emo Song. Other songs such as Charlie Brown have a stronger rock influence and carry more bass and electric guitar-heavy melodies, while songs like Back to Mars are at a slower pace to enhance the more serene tones in her voice.

She cites her sound as being inspired by bands like The Flaming Lips and Sonic Youth, which is apparent in the album’s overall rock sound. Though the album has a strong rock influence, it also includes slower-paced, more somber songs. In one of her most personal songs, Sorry, beabadoobee talks about the pain that comes with

seeing someone you love struggling. In an interview, she talks about how some of her friends abused substances to the point where she had to distance herself from them. She uses the song both as an apology to them for distancing herself, an apology to their futures that are slowly being taken away from them, and also as a way of getting her feelings off her chest about everything that has happened between them. In How Was Your Day?, she sings a song about the strain that being away from each other has put on her and her boyfriend’s relationship. This song presents a more complicated and real side to growing up and being in a relationship with her boyfriend of five years, Soren, who was the inspiration for her first single, Coffee.

In an album heavy with stories about the past, this song offers a more hopeful look to the future. Towards the end of the album, beabadoobee provides a more hopeful tone that looks to the future. In the final song on the album, Yoshimi, Forest, and Magdalene, she writes about the names she wants to call her future children. This song is arguably the most reminiscent of 1990s alternative music, combining the distorted guitar-heavy music with bea’s carefree vocals. The song doesn’t take itself too seriously, using simple lyrics in between choruses with her repeating the three names. In an album heavy with stories about the past, this song offers a more hopeful look to the future.

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Spring 2021


Valkyrie M W

ith many Boston art spaces still temporarily closed for the spring, some museums like the MassArt Museum of Art (MAAM) are striving to give viewers their daily dose of art through interactive virtual exhibits. For MAAM’s newest exhibit titled Valkyrie Mumbet by artist Joana Vasconcelos, the museum offers a 3D tour of the art along with a tour guided by a curator so that visitors can experience Vasconcelos’ vivid and extravagant pieces without the health risk of physically walking around the exhibit. Joana Vasconcelos is a Portuguese contemporary visual artist from Paris, France. She was the first woman to be invited to exhibit her work at the Palace of Versailles in France, and had installations in many other well-known museums such as the Guggenheim Bilbao in Spain. Her specialty lies in ornate, large-scale sculptures that discuss topics like culture, history, identity, and feminism. In her installation at MAAM, she delivers a vibrant piece dedicated to one of Boston’s most historically inspiring women. Vasconcelos’ Valkyrie Mumbet is an artistic tribute to Elizabeth “Mumbet” or “Mum Bett” Freeman. Freeman was born as a slave and grew up on a plantation farm in Massachusetts who was determined to gain her freedom. She later became the first

Written by Nora Holland Designed by Lauren Aquino Photo courtesy of MAAM

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woman in Massachusetts to successfully file a lawsuit for freedom, and helped in the process of making slavery illegal statewide. After being set free, Freeman worked as a midwife, healer, and nurse until her death in 1829. This installation is part of a series called Valkyrie, named after a Norse word for female warrior goddesses, where Vasconcelos honors different powerful women. MAAM’s exhibit contains an array of different colors, shapes, textures, lights, and embellishments that are jaw-dropping to look at. According to the curator’s guide, all the components of the piece were created in Vasconcelos’ studio in Lisbon and then shipped to Boston to assemble. The entire installation weighs around one ton and was inflated in order to take the shape that it resides in at the gallery. Vasconcelos references Freeman’s possessions that were in her will to highlight her independence and wealth with velvet gold jewelry and lace adorning the piece.

The installation is an enigma to look at and is so intricate that viewers can spend hours staring at it and find something new that they hadn’t noticed before.


Mumbet at the

MAAM The yellow fringe creates a beautiful soft veil that surrounds the center and hides even more detail that is only noticeable when standing directly underneath the piece. It almost seems to glow through the millions of tiny beads and LED lights connected throughout the fabrics, as each branch is completely different in color and texture. It is an incredible piece to behold; however, the virtual nature of the exhibit may dilute the experience of Valkyrie Mumbet. Although this installation is very visually stimulating whether you are on a computer or in-person, some of the elements that make this piece so incredible to behold are slightly diminished by not being able to be in the same room as the art. One of the wonders about Valkyrie Mumbet is its size, which stretches throughout the gallery space while being suspended from the ceiling. Being able to look at the incredible scale of the piece and see the intricate details up close is a very valuable aspect in

this work of art, which is not available in the 3D tour. However, the virtual visit has perks of its own. MAAM’s 3D tour not only allows viewers to walk through the gallery, but it also gives the opportunity to look up, down, and around in the position the audience is virtually standing in. It also gives you access to the descriptions and details of the exhibit that were placed on the wall of the gallery so that visitors can read the meaning behind the piece while they walk around. Despite the museum being closed, Joana Vasconcelos’ installation is a beautiful interpretation of the courage and strength of Elizabeth Freeman that is definitely worth visiting. The exhibition is free and open to the public seven days a week, so viewers can easily access it from the comfort of their own homes. Although the installation cannot be admired in person, it is so magnificent that the museum’s 3D tour still manages to do it justice.

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SAMIA THE BABY

Written by Katherine Miner Illustrated by Isabelle Mah Designed by Sebastian Buckley

“I

only write songs about things that I’m scared of,” croons the voice of Samia Finnerty on the closing track of her debut album The Baby. This fear pervades the tone of the album, as Samia details uncertainty about the future, relationships, and the entertainment industry. Samia's selfexploratory record was written mostly on the road, as she notes “it was the most conducive environment to songwriting for me.” Samia has expressed that she didn’t quite understand what message she was sending with the album until it was done. However, she knew that it would highlight the struggle between the fear of being alone and the vulnerability that comes with taking part in a community. The fear of feeling needy is effectively encapsulated in her title, The Baby. The Baby opens with a voicemail message from Samia’s late grandmother, repeatedly singing “Samia” in Arabic a few days before her passing. The message is layered over an ethereal synth sound, an almost magical tribute to her jida. Samia’s soothing voice enters the track shortly after, with “I said loving you is bigger than my head, and then you dove in.” For the remainder of the first track, Pool, Samia solemnly questions the fleeting nature of relationships as her vocals, detailed lyricism, and instrumentation creates the all-encompassing metaphor of a pool. After dreamily analyzing how long she has before she can “move on,” she leaves the listener with an overwhelming feeling of drowning.

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Fit ‘n Full, the second track on the record, is a walking oxymoron. Samia explains, “the words ‘fit’ and ‘full’ have always felt mutually exclusive to me.” She confronts eating disorder culture head-on by being open and honest about her own struggles with her body. She writes hopefully about the confidence she wishes to have in the future. This body image conversation is one continued from her 2018 single Milk, where she discussed the personal guilt she felt as a result of her eating disorder. Both Fit ‘n Full and Limbo B*tch examine Samia’s longing for a more confident self, expressing what she hopes she might someday be able to do: “get fully naked,” and “dance like [you’re] the whore.” Samia’s openness about her struggles with body image is one example of the power she holds as a writer of honest music about the female experience. She writes about her sexuality, experiences with relationships, eating disorders, and her body in a way that rivals any artist in the indie scene. This honest vulnerability is what makes Samia such a unique artist.

It is also worth mentioning that while Samia’s lyrics are twisted in longing for more confidence, their content also gives her power. She reclaims her struggles with her body, speaking about them wittily, giving off a “fake-it-till-you-make-it” attitude which is sure to deeply resonate with female listeners.

She demands respect rather than pity, as she sarcastically references her strife in a matter-offact yet heart-wrenching way. Stellate and Big Wheel are juxtaposed with the futuristic hope of Fit ‘n Full and Limbo B*tch, as Samia analyzes her past relationships, expressing “everything she was too afraid to say in person.” Both pieces connect to her fear of being alone, which is one of the broader themes of the album. Stellate is a self-analytical piece, and we watch as Samia comes to terms with emotional trauma from a past relationship. She sings about how her neediness lead to a power imbalance, while Big Wheel details constant fear of confrontation and its impact on intimacy. Samia describes the fear present in releasing this album, specifically these two songs.


“I’m so intent on being honest about my own experiences, but I never want to exploit someone else’s.” In the simple act of releasing The Baby, Samia overcomes many of the very fears of confrontation detailed in the lyrics, furthering her own healing process. This makes the album deeply three-dimensional in an interactive sense. The Baby closes with the heart-wrenching ballad Is There Something in the Movies? (that’s better than my love). Samia satirizes love in the entertainment industry, subtly exposing its inhumanity in the lines, “everyone dies, but they shouldn’t die young/ anyway you’re invited to set.” Throughout Is There Something in the Movies, she longs for a genuine relationship untainted by expectations, entertainment, or ingenuity. Both of Samia’s parents had successful careers in the industry, her father as a songwriter and mother as an actress, this last track is Samia’s analysis of the industry’s impact on love. She also references family friend and actress Brittany Murphy’s premature death, expressing that she “died of attention,” and “lived an extraordinary life.”

It is understandable that Samia struggles with the ethics of the industry, as she has seen its extreme impact on people close to her. Additionally, Is There Something in the Movies represents her personal fears in her relationships. She fears that her partner looks toward a romanticized idea of perfect love, as she worries that her realism isn’t fairytale enough for the relationship. Samia’s disillusionment with the industry can be traced back to her early days as a musician in New York City, when she created the virtual identity of a middle-aged man through email in order to book herself gigs. This self-assuredness has remained constant throughout Samia’s career, and her opposition to large record labels is audible in this album. The entirety of The Baby was self-produced with the help of friends who aided in creating various tracks.

Samia is careful not to write distinctly for an audience and writes for deeply personal reasons— another reason she is ideologically divergent from other parts of the music industry. “I’m attracted to confessional honesty and passion. My thing with songwriting is I don’t really care what it sounds like as long as the person who’s singing it cares about what they’re saying. I’m really turned off by apathy,” said Samia when asked about her songwriting philosophy. Another constant throughout The Baby is the lack of typical structure. Samia doesn’t write music to fit in a verse-chorusverse-chorus box. She breaks outside of it, writing purely to express emotion and not to fulfill expectations by an audience. Perhaps Pool and Winnebago are the most representative tracks of this on the album. This is most likely a result of Samia’s songwriting strategy- she writes lyrics before melodies and sets the poetry to a tune after. Though the album is described as indie, Samia’s work is influenced by pop, rock, and folk among other genres. Her lack of a typical organizational structure, inspiration from different genres, and lyrical ambiguity reflect the uncertain and fearful themes in the album perfectly.

I was first introduced to Samia late one quarantine night, when a friend sent me the bitterly empowering girl bop Someone Tell the Boys, thinking I’d like the vibe. Many days of quarantine following that night were filled with Samia’s voice, and this album is the perfect pandemic soundtrack. Filled with well-framed angst and fear, listeners can find comfort and solace in not-knowing alongside Samia. The Baby is a beautifully genuine first album and tells Samia’s story expertly. Listeners are introduced to a complex, anxious, and uncertain young woman who sings with a sarcastic confidence. Samia reclaims her emotional trauma, finding strength, and healing among her desperation. Amidst a global pandemic, an unstable election season, everyday struggles with heartbreak, self-understanding, and growth, the uncertainty present in The Baby will resonate deeply with listeners and give some comfort in knowing that regardless of how much we worry, no one really knows what is coming next.

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Beyond the Entrance Ticket:

Virtual Museum Hopping mfa .o

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Written by Martha Gamy Designed by Mollie Harreys s art critics warn, there’s a difference between viewing art online as opposed to seeing it in person. We can examine the intricate details of each paint stroke, appreciate the full composition, be amazed by the art conversation — all from a relatively safe distance to not cause any alarms of illegality, of course. It’s the reason why people from all corners of the world travel to, for example, the Louvre to see the Mona Lisa despite knowing what the picture looks like through a quick Google search. Even in person, we still have to stand fifteen feet away from the painting to appreciate its beauty. That’s more than the CDC guideline of six feet; and yet, we’re still willing to take time and money to see this unhappy woman. But, what if that opportunity is completely taken away? In the Boston area, many art museums have either remained closed or adapted their physical spaces due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Some museums have come up with new and different ways for guests to engage and interact with the arts from the comfort of their own homes. These virtual platforms encourage museums to explore remote learning and appreciation of the arts — whether through Zoom-utilized events or at-home arts and crafts. Guests can learn all about the behind-the-scenes work and crafts no matter where they are. However, can we really appreciate fine arts

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from sitting behind the screen? Museum of Fine Arts (MFA) In September of 2020, as the pandemic had been going on for months, the MFA opened some of its galleries with limited capacity. They encouraged their guests to attend their virtual exhibitions or workshops that are tailored for students and the general public. Based on their popular exhibits, the MFA started hosting free live-streaming programs so guests can interact with the art from their own homes. They use Zoom, the video conferencing platform, to educate a range of students from elementary to college level. Guests are not visible and cannot be heard during the live streams, but they are encouraged to share their questions or comments with the MFA educator via the chat feature. This helps build a level of interaction and engagement between the host and guest despite being behind a computer screen. Some of their programs included Writing the Future: Basquiat and the Hip-Hop Generation and Contemporary Native American Art that are respectively for college and middle school audiences. One of their exhibits during the Fall of 2019, Women Take the Floor, has been repurposed into a virtual tour for those at home in 2020. This virtual tour showcases the exhibit in a 360-degree display. With its stark red and white walls, artworks

hung for guests to see, and individuals who accompany the digital space, the tour attempts to make the guests feel as if they are physically present. Guests can use their mouse to navigate through this space while listening to a short audio guide that details a news report about the exhibit. They can interact with the artworks, read about their background, or listen to the respective tidbits. The tour also offers educational resources for art enthusiasts, students, and families — all to enrich the experience. While engaging, this virtual tour does have some technical difficulties. Some of the links and features are broken, navigation itself can be tricky to manage, and it is not accessible to screen readers. But, it is currently in its beta version, so there is room for improvement. Yet, this virtual tour is incredible and accessible for most who always wanted to visit this exhibit — in a pandemic or not.

Yet, this virtual tour is incredible and accessible for most who always wanted to visit this exhibit — in a pandemic or not. Thus, there should be hope that the MFA recreates more of their popular exhibits within the virtual sphere for all to adore.


Harvard Art Museum Harvard Art Museums have temporarily closed their museums but have developed their own virtual platform called “Harvard Art Museums from Home.” They host free virtual events, such as Art Talk and Student Guide Tours. In these events, guests can join Zoom calls to hear from academics, Harvard undergraduates, or others talking on various subjects concerning the arts.

In these events, guests can join Zoom calls to hear from academics, Harvard undergraduates, or others talking on various subjects concerning the arts. According to Harvard Art Museums, these videos serve to “provide a unique, thematic view into [their] collections.” The museums also offer a couple of at-home tours, which are listed on their website. Some of the tours available include A History of Color: An Audio Tour of the Forbes Pigment Collection, an audio tour with a small collection of photographs, and Experience Painting Edo, part of the online platform Google Arts & Culture. Harvard Art Museums additionally provide family-friendly educational resources, which include arts and crafts that are inspired by their exhibits, an activity coloring book, and a presentation on a few topics.

MassArt Art Museum (MAAM) has also been temporarily closed during the pandemic, but features their own virtual platform titled “MassArt from Home.” They offer a variety of online content, such as videos and activities, for guests to engage in. Through their series, “Make with MAAM,” visitors can utilize materials from their homes to play around with arts and crafts inspired by MAAM’s exhibits. These activities are family-friendly with easy to understand guides for children. Some of the activities share the background information of the exhibits on their webpage or have links for redirects. Either way allows visitors to learn more about the exhibits while also learning how to make them. MAAM also has their “In the Studio” series, where guests can learn about the behind-the-scenes work from current and past exhibitions. They can see artists working in their studios, talking about projects, and sharing their inspirations, all posted on MAAM’s YouTube page. The videos are short and digestible for the viewers, being as unique as the exhibit it presents. One of the videos is based around the video game-inspired exhibition “Game Changers.” That video takes place in the virtual world developed by the creator, Skawennati herself. Skawennati interacts with viewers through her avatar and tells them all about the virtual world she created. In both series, guests have the opportunity to know more about the creators and to learn about the background of the creation of the exhibits and artworks. Although both lack the physical sphere of the museum, they make up for it with their creative presentations. These presentations are what make MAAM stand out from the rest in their virtual sphere. They showcase a more creative side on how to reach your audiences, offering both an educational and voyeuristic experience that

museums are known for. The virtual platform has always been at the disposal of many institutes; however, due to COVID-19, it now plays a pivotal role in maintaining them.

The virtual platform has always been at the disposal of many institutes; however, due to COVID-19, it now plays a pivotal role in maintaining them. The use of digital platforms is a reflection of where the future of the arts is moving. It changes the way the arts can be appreciated in the realm of zeroes and ones instead of the physical. Art enthusiasts could come to provide well-thought-out explanations behind the importance of visiting an artwork up close and personal. However, not everyone has the privilege to go out of their way to visit a scripture or mural. Museums cost money, time, and effort — barriers that people cannot overcome so freely. Thankfully, due to this pandemic, some museums have realized these barriers as we all must take precautions for our health and safety. The arts may now just be zeroes and ones, but at least people have the chance to appreciate them from everywhere well beyond an entrance ticket.

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These tours and activities, while informative and engaging, cover a smaller number of topics than what these museums offer. In addition, some of the activities have limited visuals; thus, it lacks the visual experience that a museum is known for. There is also an abundance of reading for the guests, which may seem daunting and possibly cause a lack of interest. Thus, the Harvard Art Museums should push more visual elements in their virtual exhibits to recapture voyeuristic experiences that many cherish…because who goes to a museum to just read?

MassArt Art Museum (MAAM)

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SPRUCE Is Growing and Branching Out One Jam at a Time

Written by Drefnie Limprevil Designed by Norman Zeng

S

pruce commits to creating a community for marginalized gender identities in the improv world and having some laughs along the way. Spruce, a spin-off of the No Jokes comedic improv troupe, seeks to create a “comedy community” for women, transgender, non-binary, and gender non-conforming members of the Northeastern community who are interested in improv. It serves as a more inclusive continuation of LadyProv, which originally served as a group for women in improv. Similar to No Jokes, which hosts weekly open jams alongside performances with a dedicated performance troupe, the group holds open jams for members to flex their comedy skills and integrates speakers to provide more insight into the improv and comedy world.

Photographs from Spruce

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Riley Cohen, a third-year Theatre and Media & Screen Studies combined major, is the group’s current president and oversaw the group’s name change while also facilitating its new focus. “Once we pivoted our focus, we had to find a new name,” Cohen said. “We came up with a new name in April, Spruce, which reminded us of a tree branching out.” LadyProv was created as a response to the potentially intimidating space that a male-dominated improv troupe can create for members. As the group underwent a leadership change, Cohen saw the importance of using inclusive language to foster a safe space for people of underrepresented gender identities to further explore their interest in improv. The group began transitioning in early 2020, with Cohen reimagining ways to create a more inclusive environment. Cohen is not only navigating fostering a supportive community but is also learning how to do so during the pandemic. As the entire country moved into the virtual world, so did the improv community at Northeastern, with shows and jams occurring online. Spruce has been no exception — holding monthly online jams open for anyone of any experience level to join. They have also hosted speakers that provide greater insight into the broader comedy world. Such guests have included Amanda Xeller, involved with the Moxie Sketch Lab, an opportunity at the Magnet Theatre in New York City for women, trans, and non-binary comedians interested in sketch writing and performing, as well as Meredith Dietz, a Northeastern alum who has worked at the satirical newspaper The Onion and is a part of the comedy circuit.

Tools such as online group chats and Zoom meetings have also allowed members to engage with the group. One member, Mitra Sharif, a third-year Communications major, speaks to the sense of community the organization has

Cohen saw the importance of using inclusive language to foster a safe space for people of underrepresented gender identities to further explore their interest in improv. provided during the past few months. After being introduced to the group while being a part of No Jokes, she cites the community the group provides, describing jams similar to hanging out with friends. “The pandemic puts your mind on so many things, [Spruce] provides a space to put your mind to creativity, laughing, and more positive things,” Sharif said.

The club recently partnered with Interrobang, a slam poetry group on campus, to co-host a group event. She also hopes that the group will be able to use established connections to the improv community in Boston to provide more opportunities for their members in a postpandemic city. Longer-term goals include inspiring improv troupes at different colleges to create inclusive spaces for their members with marginalized gender identities. Utilizing the skills they learned in fostering an online community, Cohen hopes that a Facebookbased approach to connecting with other colleges can help bring this club concept to other universities. “My ultimate dream is a Spruce conference, with cool speakers and keynote addresses from the likes of Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, and Issa Rae,” Cohen said. In the meantime, Spruce is continuing to connect women, trans, non-binary, and gender non-conforming members through improv, one jam at a time.

She also spoke to the value of representation and visibility, with each member in the group building each other up and also allowing herself to build up her confidence in improv, sketch writing, and more. While the group in its current form is relatively new, Cohen has big plans for Spruce. Short-term goals include expanding their reach across campus by connecting with other groups, and providing resources for members to connect them with the larger improv and comedy world.

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Discover endless possibilities at

SOWA’S ARTISTS GUILD Written by Sanya Mittal Photography by Avital Brodski Designed by Norman Zeng

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oWa’s Art and Design District in the South End – famous for its art galleries, food, and open markets – is home to the SoWa’s Artists Guild. At 450 Harrison Avenue, the heart of SoWa’s Artists district, you’ll find an eclectic collection of three winding floors of artists working in their personal studios. There is no limit on the media of art that exists here, with jewelry makers working alongside sculptors and painters. The SoWa Artists Guild celebrates diversity and individuality within the arts. Over 80 artists have studios in the guild, creating a deep sense of community. Maria Palkon, an artist whose medium is paper, comments on the comfort she’s found as a young creator in the community. “It’s a home away from home,” Maria Palkon said. “You can easily knock on each other’s door and stick your head in to see what the other artists are working on.” The artists residing in the SoWa Artists Guild are all talented creative minds, dedicated to the pursuit of making genuine and honest art. Getting a studio in the guild is difficult, and highly desired, given its prime location, publicity, and the connection to a community of artists it provides. Collecting artists of unique backgrounds and talents allows for distinction in the art that is on display, exemplifying the core value of the SoWa Artists Guild: to promote the diversity and individuality that exists in art. On the first Friday and second Sunday of every month, anyone from the public can visit the artists in their workspace as

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well as purchase artwork that is being sold. This immersive experience allows the viewer to not only see the art that is being created, but to experience the artists in their element. Each artist’s studio feels different than the next with small personalized touches in each room, working together to create a unique atmosphere. Many studios had pieces that were still works in progress, allowing a look into the creative process before the piece is completed. Artists, young and old, are able to share their art with the public and welcome visitors warmly and thrilled to have the opportunity to speak genuinely and passionately about their work.

it holds. Tom Stocker displays unique, unexpected pieces, with hints of pop culture and abstraction in the trompel’oeil paintings of oriental rugs he creates. Brian Murphy is a steel wire sculptor, whose pieces are lighthearted and often humorous. They tell a story that leaves the viewer amused as the tension in the wire gives it the appearance of a swaying movement, making the art come to life. Sophia Dubuisson displays painted self portraits, while also working with resin and creating miniature women figures and trays. The SoWa Artists Guild is a space for creativity to flourish and be shared. With three floors of artists to explore, there are endless possibilities of what can be found there.

This immersive experience allows the viewer to not only see the art that is being created, but to experience the artists in their element. “We can really make a mess in our studios,” Mary Fries, an acrylic and mixed media painter on the third floor of the guild, said. “We can be connected to other professional artists and get some natural publicity in the process.” One of the most incredible features of the guild is the breadth of the medium of arts

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Artist’s Guild Photography by Avital Brodski

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SoWa Open Studios Design by Mollie Harreys

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CROSSWORD 1

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Down Host of the MAAM Popular member of BTS Creator of Valkyrie Mumbet Type of Theatre used for Rules of Play to keep the audience at a distance from the events onstage beebadoobee’s 2019 EP What neighbor can you find the SoWa’s Artists Guild Samia’s The Baby’s track which includes a voicemail of her late grandmother Across Cassius Clay defeated this undefeatable opponent before the events of One Night in Miami Created in response to the male dominance within the improv community Subgenre of music that mxmtoon and beebadoobee are a part of Compilation of Sophie’s singles released in 2015 Setting of RENT Influence that Monet experimented with in terms of bright color, brush strokes, and composition

WATCH LIST TOP THREE MOVIES Sound of Metal Amazon Prime Video A heavy-metal drummer’s life is thrown into freefall when he begins to lose his hearing.

Soul Disney+ A middle school music teacher named Joe Gardner seeks to reunite his soul and his body after they are accidentally separated, just before his big break as a jazz musician.

Nomadland Hulu A woman in her sixties who, after losing everything in the Great Recession, embarks on a journey through the American West, living as a van-dwelling modern-day nomad.

Your Honor Showtime A respected judge’s son is involved in a hitand-run that leads to a high-stakes game of lies, deceit, and impossible choices.

Ramy Hulu Ramy Hassan is a first-generation Egyptian American who is on a spiritual journey in his politically divided New Jersey neighborhood.

TOP THREE TV SHOWS WandaVision Disney+ Living idealized suburban lives, superpowered beings Wanda and Vision begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems.

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST We made a playlist to go with the theme of this magazine. We hope you enjoy!

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Sensitive – Serena Isioma Know Myself – Justine Skye and Vory Windows – Still Woozy Some – Steve Lazy Where Are We Going – Marvin Gaye Telepatía – Kali Uchis Them Changes – Thundercat Come On In – Lady Wray Valleys (My Love) – Whitney The Night Has Opened My Eyes – The Smiths


CROSSWORD 1

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2

3 4

8. 9. 10.

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Down Host of the MAAM Popular member of BTS Creator of Valkyrie Mumbet Type of Theatre used for Rules of Play to keep the audience at a distance from the events onstage beebadoobee’s 2019 EP What neighbor can you find the SoWa’s Artists Guild Samia’s The Baby’s track which includes a voicemail of her late grandmother Across Cassius Clay defeated this undefeatable opponent before the events of One Night in Miami Created in response to the male dominance within the improv community Subgenre of music that mxmtoon and beebadoobee are a part of Compilation of Sophie’s singles released in 2015 Setting of RENT Influence that Monet experimented with in terms of bright color, brush strokes, and composition

Want more Artistry? Check out additional articles on our website!

Sibyl Distinguishes the Difference Between Self and Reality Writer: Joanna Kwiat Illustrator: Caroline Logue

Hidden in Plain Sight: Boston Street Art Writer: Joanna Kwiat Photographer: Norman Zeng

Queen and Slim Tells a Story of Black Love Amidst Struggles Writer: Drefnie Limprevil Photographer: Nadia Naeem

WATCH LIST TOP THREE MOVIES Sound of Metal Amazon Prime Video A heavy-metal drummer’s life is thrown into freefall when he begins to lose his hearing.

Soul Disney+ A middle school music teacher named Joe Gardner seeks to reunite his soul and his body after they are accidentally separated, just before his big break as a jazz musician.

Nomadland Hulu A woman in her sixties who, after losing everything in the Great Recession, embarks on a journey through the American West, living as a van-dwelling modern-day nomad.

Your Honor Showtime A respected judge’s son is involved in a hitand-run that leads to a high-stakes game of lies, deceit, and impossible choices.

Ramy Hulu Ramy Hassan is a first-generation Egyptian American who is on a spiritual journey in his politically divided New Jersey neighborhood.

Kamasi Washington at Big Night Live Writer: Levi Kaplan Photographer: Cali Cardenas

How the Digital Release of Hamilton has Revolutionized Theatre Writer: Rachel Erwin Photographer: Michelle Musili

TOP THREE TV SHOWS WandaVision Disney+ Living idealized suburban lives, superpowered beings Wanda and Vision begin to suspect that everything is not as it seems.

SPOTIFY PLAYLIST We made a playlist to go with the theme of this magazine. We hope you enjoy!

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Sensitive – Serena Isioma Know Myself – Justine Skye and Vory Windows – Still Woozy Some – Steve Lazy Where Are We Going – Marvin Gaye Telepatía – Kali Uchis Them Changes – Thundercat Come On In – Lady Wray Valleys (My Love) – Whitney The Night Has Opened My Eyes – The Smiths

Help us share our story! We are always looking for students with a passion for the arts to contribute to our publication! Whether you’re a writer, designer, illustrator, or photographer, we want YOU to help us share our story! Visit our website artistrymagazine.com, our Facebook Artistry Magazine, and our Instagram @artistrymagazine for more information.

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KINTSUGI|SPRING 2021  

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