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α-Pinene FIGURE 3 Coriander seed flavor wheel. Ten key terpene compounds extracted via distillation from coriander seeds.

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Ten key terpene compounds determined to be present in gins.

The molecular structures, written and pictorial descriptors for ten key aromatic flavor components are shown. The percentage composition of all these essential oil-derived compounds, as found in various gins, is not reflected here — see Table 2 and reference 6 for more on this. However, α-pinene (#1 noted on the outer circle) is the second most abundant component from this study (11), and Linalool (#2) is the main fractional component (highest concentration) in the tested gins (11). More details on descriptors appears in Table 2. Pictorial descriptors aid in memorization of the flavors when assessing gins. Note the differences between the compounds α(alpha) and (gamma) γ-terpinene and the associated flavor nuances. There exists also a molecular form (beta) β-terpinene. Flavor in gin is exceedingly complex.

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FIGURE 4 Gin flavor wheel.

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terms, including those listed above plus a few others, and illustrates how the volatiles — the essential oil chemicals derived from juniper berries, orange peel, coriander and orris root — project out to those flavor terms (16). Effectively mapping out their contributions and the intensities of the

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Trained sensory panels evaluate products based on more specific and defined flavor terms. These trained evaluators then provide numerical values representing the intensity of perception of the various components based upon their understanding of the detection threshold concentrations of such species. Such data are then translated into flavor maps known as radar plots or spider diagrams, based on how they appear visually (see Figure 5). Figure 5 shows the breakdown α-Pinene (1) into specific descriptive l

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Understanding and Interpreting Gin Flavor Part 2: Bring on the spiders

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The molecular structures, written and pictorial descriptors for ten key aromatic flavor components are shown. The percentage composition of these essential oil-derived compounds is not reflected here — see Table 2 and reference 11 for more on this. Though Linalool (#1 — noted in the outer circle) is the main fractional component (highest concentration) in the coriander seed essential oil. More details on descriptors appear in Table 2. Pictorial descriptors aid in memorization of the flavors when assessing gins. Note similar compounds and differences between Figures 2 and 3.

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Artisan Spirit: Summer 2018  

The magazine for craft distillers and their fans.

Artisan Spirit: Summer 2018  

The magazine for craft distillers and their fans.