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March 2014

SPECIAL EDITION

Adriana Soares, Italy/Brazil


SUMMARY

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IN THIS ISSUE

Adriana Soares

(Italy / Brazil) Adriana gets in herself and her works determination of each day she lived and wish to comunicate to others for giving emotions like an invisible hand that comes with us. A circle getting closed, the child and the artist, a woman now, in a same body, in a same language.

Krista Nassi

(Iran / USA)

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Krista Nassi is best known for her installations and paintings. Her paintings are evocative with an impressionistic approach, truly reflecting the character and sensitivity of the artist. The wrenching subjects of her installations are thought provoking while reflecting the issues of modern times.

Peter Foucault

(USA) Peter Foucault creates works on paper, videos, and installations that are fueled by his love of drawing and mark making. He has created a series of Drawing-Projects, which utilize systems developed by the artist that produce complex abstract compositions.

Nicolas Renard

(France) “Contemporary art represents a break with modern art, it offers new experiments and conceptual ideas. I think there is a dichotomy between tradition and contemporary art. We could indeed find an aca-demic difference, which is primarily based on realism and objective representation.

Andrea Pekarkova

(The Netherlands) “ art, objects, videos and graphics since 2009. My work is mostly very colorful and my videos range from abstract graphics to collages of real scenes."

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SUMMARY

(Germany)

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Hanno Phenn

“The scenes in my works are pieces of personal universe, sights of spiritual and emotional space. At the same time I wanted to convert an observer in to a witness of a lucid dream or oniric state, and of course to remind him of his active participation in our collective subconscious.”

(The Netherlands) “Mr. & Mrs. Gray is about possibilities, chances and new adventures often to be found in the smallest and most trivial things. They do not believe in complaining and despairing over everything that's wrong, but in focussing on what there is to work with and figure out how to turn it into something better.”

(France /Brazil)

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Mr. and Mrs. Grey ...\MarieKazalia

Catherine Chantilly

“I paint in acrylic I do not use oil –not yet - in Brazil it is very hot and humid is too long to dry, the creation of a work of art is mysterious, we do not know where the inspiration really comes, we must accept, we do not know all the mysteries, but we are able to know, just be sensible awaken”

(Japan)

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Ayoko Kobayashi

“My work is inspired by everyday- life situations and paradoxes of contemporary society and world we live, that strange place saturated with the media, with an exaggerated production and exaggerated consumption.”

(USA)

99 “My longest enduring fascination is to capture the human form and psyche utilizing multiple media. Often my interpretation of the female form is anatomically exaggerated, emphasizing the curves that distinguish women as well as define feminine beauty and fertility.”

(Turkey)

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“ My artwork is based on personal history, on relationships and memory (dreams, space, geography, land). It is broadly related to memory, dreams, space and connotations. These topics are drawn from daily life as much as from unconscious thoughts. Essentially, I’m attempting to create images according to my own psychological needs. “

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Jana Charl


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Adriana Soares (Italy/Brazil)

Adriana Soares’ Biography written by the poet Alessandro Vettori

Adriana Soares photography smells the life. An itinerary that starts when she was a child, begining on the instinctive pleasures for painting, from the sacrifice, thanks to her model work she travels all over the world and giving her the opportunity knowing photography, she falls in love for it, may be because she notices that an image, even if apparently static, can tell a whole life. The image interruption of an instant opens the mind to what's before and after, and leads the observer to a search achieving a little miracle that only art can realize: being an incentive for the others creativity.Life moments for individuating the most important detail.The search of the children who was playing combinig colours suddenly achieves these same colours, with the same energy and instinct, being more aware, return and fuse with the photograph creations showing new and fresh images that sometimes keep and other times release great emotions. Joining or better the fusion between those faces apparently restless with city corners or by the nature, appears like a sort of soul's Dna and not only by who creates but above all who takes advantage of it. Adriana gets in herself and her works determination of each day she lived and wish to comunicate to others for giving emotions like an invisible hand that comes with us. A circle getting closed, the child and the artist, a woman now, in a same body, in a same language.

Inside 2013 Mixed Technique

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An interview with

Adriana Soares Hello Adriana and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? And moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

A work of Art is a confession in my opinion ......that creates a common feeling a silent communication between who realized the work of Art and the spectator who looks it. Each one will appropriate of the work and will belong to it. The work of Art is universal a common tale. It does not have to be a self-analysis. Art is an instrument of awareness and at the same time a metaphorical activity that plunge its roots into human sensibility. Work of Art mustn't always be made of provocations, market and business, but still real and concrete for finding what art history teached to us till nowadays,from signs to writings, from symbols to graffiti, starting from incisions to sculpture, from photography to digital graphic. Would you like to tell us something about your background? After a long career as a Model, you have moved to Italy and you studied Photography at Istituto Superiore di Fotografia of Rome, where you also specialized in photo editing: how has this experience impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

Each one is the result of what he has seen and lived… living implies learning and assimilating experience, that comes up once creating. Thus, due to elaboration of the works is the emission of his own unconscious, all experiences contribute to the final result. Shouldn't I have had my own way, I probably would not have created some works realized till now… Shouldn't I be as I am I would not have reassessed my life in the way

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I'm able to create. What I realize today has real origins and is the result of years of study and work. Training even whether important risks cutting off this unique and personal id, it could happen being influenced by the master... Therefore removing the purity of the artist. It is necessary being provided of a great ego for not being overpowered or influenced. Education has to be considered like a starting point, an experience and not like something being emulated, otherwise the artist does not feel himself being sufficiently capable. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your works? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

What I have to affirm is that each work has got its own way, a long interior way, a combination of impressions, memories and emotions. I look for in my mind a predominant image that interlaces with other ones like dancing and searching a collocation. This process can go on for many days because it is spiritual and must be spontaneous. Then, I proceed by digitizing my thought, my sensations, my memories my frustrations... In my mind I know what I will obtain. It is a long work but once terminated I bring the result for printing and I personally control the all; it happens my works are printed many times. Once this fetus generated I carry it at home for giving a soul by offering colour, form, depth with such different more or less common materials. Finally, it takes more than a month of a continuing and daily work for each work till when I'll feel the work breathing in autonomy. Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with your recent and interesting series Soul PhotoDigiPainting Art that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: would you tell us something about the gegnesis of this project? What was your initial inspiration?

This project was born accidentally due to I look for, at7


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tempt, study… my search is continuous. I enjoyed fusing my images, inserting it in familiar environments, strange, abstract theatrical… subsequently, I published on my fb profile… and it was incredible the warm that those images that envelopped me suddenly made me being aware at this moment that I was capable generating emotions, I had striked many persons who gave me the courage hazarding more... From a technical point of view, my works are photographic fusions which images are mine. The way I join and fuse my images is the digital technique, subsequently I print it over a metal frame. Once printed I paint this image with no depth.....giving colour, soul… depth through different materials like soil, glass dust, iron cream. With regard to the meaning, by inspiration, what pushes me creating a certain image... This is not so easy explaining, when I start with the photographic production, I know what I would aim

Silence 2013 Mixed technique

to, I got in my mind the final result, sometimes I dreamed it, sometimes instinct drives me. Probably, what I do is the result of my all life composed of emotions, either positive or negative experiences..... A confession that I realize with myself , sharing with all world, that probably finds common things with what I do. In particular, some works from this series on which I would like to spend some words are entitled Inside, Finestre, Prigioni and Geo-

La finestra aperta 2013 Mixed technique 8


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Geometrie Riflesse 2013 Mixed technique

plines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

All what I realize is the result of a great study, run by a huge curiosity and by the passion for my art that is not a work. Work is something mechanical. Art and photography are something different, they are magic, earth...

metrie Riflesse... A feature of these works that has particularly impacted on me is theeffective way you have been capable of achieving amazing results using a mixed techinque, which is establish a synergy between the tradition of painting and moder-nity of digital photography... By the way, I noticed that your art practice tends to be fairly diverse, from conceptual to narrative to emotive and anywhere in between... by the way, while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disci-

Like previously affirmed photography is Magic, Fantasy and Earth. Photography and art are strictly connected to Earth, the world Earth indicates perpetual movement of things. It doesn't only indicate the movement of my arms, the arrival of the train or the rumble of a motorbike, but also evokes the memory of maternal bosom, home, a familiar noise... mortal things that die. Photography and art remain. All belongs to Earth, sentiments, air, the voice, all what occurs is earth. All belongs to a magic time. Man is perfect, his fantasy is unique 9


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From the

Adriana Soares

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From the

because what he has in his mind has been. We are the place where appears destiny of truth. His fantasy illuminates the legendary sense of the world, gives light to this terrible phenomenon that is life with its twine of pain, pleasure, life and death. This clarified I experience and due to I like painting and have always done it either via oil painting or via acrylic method, I willed fusing what I love mainly, photography, what I realize and painting when I was a child.

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ween new and existing. What seems apparently unapproachable is for me really complementary, because belongs to myself and to my history. Furthermore, I love great artists like Magritte, ration from them too. And I couldn't do without mentioning another couple of stimulating projects of yours impacted on me: in my opinion it creates such a dialogue between the human element and the environment we live in.. a feature that I can recognize in another ongoing project of yours entitled "Corpi"...How would you describe the message and the narrative behind these projects — that is, the idea you would most like to convey or the story you are trying to tell?

Two opposite disciplines but complementary... like man and women. An oscillation between classic and contemporary compensates each other. The contemporary presence of differences inside the same work, as a result of the use of instruments and materials coming from tradition and innovation, is the outcome of the necessity promoting a dialogue between opposition of material and language aiming to integration bet-

Till recently I had never ventured photographing

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starting from photography and digital fusion that can be realized through digital softwares. Technology helps simplifying a certain work but will never be able substituting intuition, instinct and this impulse that leads to emotion as to clic and freezing an instant and giving eternity to it. Even simple photography is related to technology‌ today like in the past technology and chemistry, helped us before 1827 with Niecpe, who managed combining silver salts and image of the pinhole camera, there was painting. This incredible invention, its rapid development and the comparison between painted image and photographic image determined an immediate criticism by painters and critics, and generated above all at the beginning violent polemics. Those polemics or incapacity giving to photography its right connotation, qualifying it as an art are continuing still today time. I notice it daily and this is the fault of the quick technological process, that has exchanged the automatism of the shutter click with the art sketching an eternal instant. We must remind that the meaning of images is magic. Therefore, once deciphering an image, we have to consider its magic meaning, its essence the fleetFrom the

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bodies, but only faces but indeed body like face has his language his history his own plasticity his beauty that has to be sketched stopped and exalted. As affirmed by the historian and critic Maria Grazia Todaro : “Adriana Soares summarizes on this subject combination of a simple form like a spinal column enveloped on the loaded axis of all image construction, with the aspect of a vibrant body exalted for his own sinuous protrusions , emblematic and seductive�. Since many of the readers of our review are artists too, would you like to tell us if digital technology as post-editing has impacted on your creative process? All in all, modern technologies allows us not only to make possible what was once hard to make, but are also and especially capable of helping us to conceive new kind of works...

My work is strictly related to digital technology

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From the Corpi series Mixed technique

By the way, since your previous model work allowed - or I should say in a certain sense "forced"- you to travel around the world, I was wondering what is the role of travelling in your art practice... moreover, I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

ing moment that has to be caught. It is therefore wrong viewing in the images a frozen moment. Instead, photography is freedom, the photographer is free choosing how measuring and dosing the automatic camera without being possessed by it. In conclusion, painters paint with colours, the photographer paints with light, I’m both and I am not afraid by criticisms. Courage is necessary for venturing and breaking a tradition that be-came unsatisfying.

Trip theme comes up with my all life and what I 12


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Washing Machine, from the Volti series

Saggezza, from the Volti series

create, either by a real point of view or metaphorical, a way that goes on a whole life, like a long river that crosses our experiences. Journeys have been crucial for me when I was a model I was experiencing marvelous places lodging in magnificent hotels and fashion shows were suggestive. I was shocked in India by the terrible reality of poverty that was opposite to fashion environment of luxury. This conflict and duality represents a powerful inspiration spring in my creative process. During these years your works have been exhibited in several occasions and moreover you have been granted as well... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or just the expectation of positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think

Way, from the Volti series 13

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La Nascita

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Lo Specchio

Since you are both a fine art and a commercial photographer -involved into fashion photography as well- I question, but all in all, an important one... what are in your opinion some of the challenges for a sustainable relationship between the business and arts?

Art does not always lead to money….Art is hidden in soul, inside an emotion, energy coming up by a pulse of wings of a hummingbird that a few persons can appreciate. Many artists became famous after their death but today it is easier as the net and communication technologies ran easily accessing a wide audience. Those instruments have to be used, fortune can be favored. Thank you for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Adriana. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Hamburg, Moscow and New York exhibits are important for me and then the solo show at San Paolo…for me are likewise important the next exhibits at Ronciglione – Viterbo nearby Rome where I will bring works sized 180x 200cm; this exhibit will be organized by a friend of me, the poet Alessandro Vettori. Grabbie

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Krista Nassi (Iran / USA) an artist’s statement

Krista Nassi is best known for her installations and paintings. Her paintings are evocative with an impressionistic approach, truly reflecting the character and sensitivity of the artist. The wrenching subjects of her installations are thought provoking while reflecting the issues of modern times. Krista Nassi is a Persian-American artist who was born in 1970 in Tehran, Iran. Her work can be found at Tehran’s museum of modern arts as well as a selected number of galleries throughout Europe.After graduating from high school, Krista entered Tehran’s Institute for graphic design and architecture, where she received a diploma in graphic design. She later received a Master of Art degree in painting from the prestigious University of Art, in Tehran. Krista has resided and participated in arts exhibitions in Italy, France, Austria and Iran. In 2002, she entered the “Triennale Internationale D’Art Contemporain” in Paris, where she received an honorary diploma for her paintings. Also in 2002, she participated in the “Site + Sight exhibition” in Singapore, and later received an award from the Lassalle.Sia Art University for her installation. In 2001, she participated in the 10th Asian Art Biennial in Bangladesh, and received the Gold Medal, and an honorary diploma from the Shilpakala University of Art in Bangladesh. Today, Krista resides in Los Angeles where she is pursing her love of the arts, and continues to create work that is unique in style, and reflective of the modern times. She has shown her art in California since 2005. Krista Nassi

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Gold, (background detail) Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

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An interview with

Krista Nassi Hello Krista, and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

and potential as well as the injustice, horror and corruption of the world as the artist understands it. In the technical sense of the word, yes there’s a difference between contemporary and traditional art, yet the desperation and urgency in the message remains consistent. My work, for example, is considered contemporary for its inclusion of various medias, bold experiments with color and flagrant allusions to modern politics and feminism. Yet in my work I also pay homage to the “traditional” by including classical Persian calligraphy, symbolism and ancient motifs.

A work of art, to me, is a campaign for a certain truth, no matter how small, significant, glamorous or inglorious the revelation. In its most basic interpretation, it’s a tangible manifestation – visual or otherwise – that divulges the beauty, wonder

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Gold I, Figurative, 55 x 91 inches, Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

times leads to spontaneous techniques and ideas I wasn’t expecting. Time and preparation depends on the piece but on average I spend 6 months to one year on a work I feel especially passionate about. It goes without saying I spend a lot of time in my Los Angeles studio. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from White Tree and Gold that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: I would suggest our readers to visit your website directly at http://kristanassi.com/galleries/ in order to get a wider idea of your artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this piece? What was your initial inspiration?

First, it’s important for me to have something to say. I ruminate a lot over the subject and how I want to express it. There’s a lot of research and reflecting before I come to a conclusion. Then I start rough sketches and I take a lot of photos of people or relative objects. I transfer the photo to canvas and give meaning to the piece using various tools from pencils, pastels, acrylic, oil color, watercolor, to using a Stanley knife or other sculpting tools to blemish. This process often

White Tree was inspired by my recent visit to Iran. 21


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Gold, (background detail) Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

I participated in an exhibition inspired by Don Quixote the same day as the 2013 elections which would end Ahmadinejad’s presidency and begin Rouhani’s. What was important until this day was the Green Movement launched in protest to Ahmadinejad’s second term of presidency back in 2009 and a cause for which women were the most vocal in their protestations. In White Tree you see this woman who’s grasping with all her might a leafless and rootless tree. The only visible green is in the background. Her story is one of utter hope in the face of uncertainty on this day election day.

What those depictions said to me was that Iranian women are deprived, desperate, ugly and worn out or veiled and censored. I wanted to bring the beauty inside out. I wanted to show a narrative of the mother, the lover, beautiful, faithful and generous. Gold is very symbolic in the Middle East and I wanted these women to embody their value in gold. A feature of your installations as [#5] and [#6] and especially of the stimulating "The Mannequin" that has mostly impacted on me is your capability of creating a deep intellectual interaction, communicating a wide variety of states of mind… even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif, I have to admit that in a certain sense it unsettles me a bit... it's an effective mix between anguish and thoughtless, maybe

The Gold is a larger series I began in 2012 and hope to finish by 2015. It’s an elaborate work of mixed media and genres. The genesis for The Gold was an answer to the globally grim depiction of Iranian women in art and media. 22


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Gold I, Figurative, 55 x 91 inches, Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

hidden happiness... I would go as far as to state that this piece, rather than simply describing, pose us a question: forces us to meditation...

close up they are a sad and broken spectacle. Living in the States there is a sense of guilt and responsibility I feel towards each of these 7 women.

The Mannequin was inspired by the empty promises of Khatami, the president before Ahmadinejad. This was around 2000 and everything was beginning to change for women, for better and for worse. Women had made much progress academically, professionally and even in sports and science. But there was a huge gap between them and the women who ignored mandated social laws, or were poor, defenseless and left in the streets without support.

One of the features of Lock that have mostly impacted on me is an intense contrast between dark background and the bright tones, which seem to reveal such a struggle, a deep tension and intense emotions... I can recognize such interesting feature also in The Birth an earlier series of yours...By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

My palette is directly related to my theme. The Green Movement, for example, obviously influenced my choice of color and shades in the Lock. It’s safe to say that my palette has changed

I divided the mannequins to 7 types of women I observed from that time. They are characters who when observed from afar are perfectly serene. But 23


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along with the revolutions in my home in Iran, the brightness and darkness often reflecting the volatile political climate. Yes, there’s definitely a struggle in the Lock. These women, romantically adorned in their sheer veils to a backdrop of again green and gold are actually wishing desperately for release. This was again inspired by Rouhani’s empty promises which famously goes as “I have the key to solve all our problems.”

Golden Dreams, 2013, Installation, 24 x 38 cm , Mate Exhibited in Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco, 2013

creative process. How artists choose to illustrate their understanding of their environment is a different story. For example, you mentioned Crimson Roses and Golden Dreams, both of which were inspired by my role in a society whose current political practice is to impede women’s potential but historically has embraced the feminine allure and intelligence, especially in the form of art and literature.

Another interesting pieces of yours on which I would like to spend some words are Crimson Roses and especially Golden Dreams which I have to admit is one of my favourite works of yours: in particular, in Crimson Roses I can recognize some letters of Persian calligraphy... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

And it’s this legacy that I choose to convey in these particular pieces by employing ancient calligraphy and the iconic imagery of the crimson rose and audacious gold, which in the Persian culture symbolize beauty, pride and freedom of mind and body.

I believe direct experience – whether one is conscious of it or not – immensely influences the

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White Tree, Mixed Media on Canvas, 2013

rials: Plater Cast, Cotton , Wool, Laser Lights

In Crimson Roses, the woman’s face is hidden by a remnant of a classic Persian rug which adorns my home and every Iranian living anywhere in the world. These rugs are predominantly weaved by women and this crimson color and paisley shape is prevalent in Persian culture. Every time I walk on this rug, I remember that it’s a product of a woman’s imagination. She’s given the rug life, color and meaning. Similarly, in Golden Dreams I look to my own experience under the chador, where to the outside world we women seemed homogenous, underneath was a rabid rage and passion for life and spirit. Don Quixote (detail) Mixed Media on Canvas, 2013

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to navigate a piece is that more often than not our experiences are not unique to us. The circumstances may be but the feelings are not. I think the reason my work resonates with so many is not because I’ve disconnected myself from my experiences but precisely because I’ve wholly embraced and interpreted my relationship with my surroundings. And by doing so, I’ve spoken on behalf of others who directly or indirectly relate with its universal message. So far your works have been exhibited in several occasions, both in Asia and in Europe and USA... and moreover you have been awarded several times... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

I believe there’s a lot of misunderstanding between Iranians and Americans that’s not brought on by language necessarily. I wish for my work to help bridge a gap between these two cultures I call my own.

I think this concept of reconciling art and business has always and will always be a struggle for artists! For me, who’s relatively new to the American art scene, feedback from my audience is important.

My best and most considerable work has been a product of my detachment from such incentives as awards and recognitions.

Gold, 55x91 inches, Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

I believe awards and accolades are not as important as the feedback. Some awards actually hurt the artist by placing a certain kind of pressure to mimic the success, making it more difficult to take artistic risks.

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Krista. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of

Thank you! I’d like to continue creating works with a social and political message. My first priority is to complete my Gold series by 2015. Meanwhile, I will be featured at the Shulamit Gallery in Venice, California as well as in Europe and the Middle East coming up. I’m also channeling the classics and giving them a modern spin with my current project working with paisley and an installation. The inspirations are endless and I’m looking forward to exploring and creating. Lock, 48x60 inches, Mixed Media on canvas, 2013

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The Birth Series 28x48 inches, Mixed Media on board, 2004 6


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Peter Foucault (USA) an artist’s statement

Peter Foucault creates works on paper, videos, and installations that are fueled by his love of drawing and mark making. He has created a series of Drawing-Projects, which utilize systems developed by the artist that produce complex abstract compositions. At the root of these projects is a constant tension between control and the loss of control. Viewer interactivity plays an integral part in his drawing installations, large-scale artworks in which participants influence the outcome of a drawing that is created by a small robot over the duration of an event or exhibition. His work is concept driven, and often utilizes objects that reference printmaking and multiplicities. Foucault has participated in numerous exhibitions nationwide, with recent solo shows at Center (Richmond, CA). His work has been included in group shows at the Torrance Museum (Los Angeles, CA), Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco, CA), Marine Contemporary (Santa Monica, CA), Smithsonian Institutes’ Freer and Sackler Gallery, Kit Schulte Contemporary (Berlin, Germany), The University of Salford (Manchester, England), and The Orange County Center for Contemporary Art (Los Angeles, CA). Between 2007-2011 his artwork was included in the Art Now Fair Miami Beach, the Bridge Art Fair New York and Miami Beach, the AAF in New York, and the Scope Art Fair Miami Beach. His interactive robotic drawing installations have been presented at The NASA Aimes Research Center, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (San Francisco), The Lab (San Francisco), Robert Berman E6 Gallery (San Francisco), the Seattle Next50 (Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Seattle Worlds Fair), and the Zero1 Art and Technology Fair (San Jose, CA). In addition to his own practice, Foucault is the Co-Founder of the Mobile Arts Platform (MAP), a Bay Area based artmaking and curatorial team that creates interactive “pop-up” mobile exhibitions. The MAP project was included in the American Association of Museums 2012 annual reports’ “Trends Watch”. In 2010 Foucault received funding from the Creative Work Fund, and a grant from the City of San Jose Public Art Program, in 2012 he was awarded grants from the City of Oakland’s Cultural Funding Program, US Bank, and the Seattle Center Foundation, and in 2013 he was awarded a grant through the Zellerbach Family Foundation. Foucault has recently presented lectures at Stanford University, City College, San Francisco University and the SETI Institute (Mountain View, CA). Foucault’s work has been reviewed in The San Francisco Chronicle, The SF Weekly (Pick of the Week), ArtWeek, Wired Magazine, Stretcher Magazine, and Artnet Magazine. In 2009 his drawing Four Square was featured on the Cover of California Home and Design Magazine. Foucault’s work is represented by Room Gallery in Mill Valley, CA, and selected works are available through the SFMOMA Artists Gallery, and Micaela Gallery in Alamo, CA. He lives and works in Oakland, CA.

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Four Square Squared #2, 2011 drawing created by Attraction/Repulsion, ink on paper, 48"x48"

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An interview with

Peter Foucault Hello Peter, and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? And moreover, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork?

An artwork to me is an object or interaction created or intentionally placed/positioned by an artist that leads a viewer’s mind to a different space than it would have gone to if the object wasn’t encountered. A successful artwork can evoke really strong emotions and connections, or an absolute dislike or disgust. A contemporary artwork should respond in some way to what is happening today. This could be through content, materials, criticism, or allusion. Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any experiences that particularly impacted on the way you produce your art nowadays? In particular, besides a BA in Art History, you hold a MFA in Printmaking that you have received from the San Francisco Art Institute: since you have also recently presented lectures at Stanford University, City College and San Francisco University I would like to ask your point about formal training... Sometimes I ask to myself if a certain kind of training could even stifle an artist's creativity...

While in graduate school at SFAI I wanted to challenge myself in terms of what mark-making systems I could create to achieve the type of drawings that I hoped to make. I was looking at a lot of work by John Cage, On Kawara, David Ireland, and Marcel Duchamp at the time and was interested in finding ways that more chance elements could enter into my work. Coming from a printmaking background (especially intaglio) I like to explore processes that are inherently chance oriented. You over etch a zinc plate for a few more minutes than desired and the line and tonal value can be extremely different than you expected. What would happen if you etched a plate over night or until the acid almost entirely ate it away? I was always setting up questions like these and testing outcomes to see how I could, in a sense, collaborate with a medium to obtain “happy accidents” that I would later incorporate into my work. For about six months towards the end of art school I tied to make work where my hand never directly touched the paper. 30

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Jennifer Sims


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I affixed pens to remote control cars, the branches of trees, anything that relied on an outside motion or kinetic system that could produce a mark. Ultimately many of these drawings weren’t very successful from an aesthetic viewpoint. But being in a grad school “thinktank of sorts” allowed me the time to explore, expand ideas and take processes that did work out and incorporate them into my artwork postacademia. These initial tests were what lead me to develop Attraction/Repulsion, an interactive drawing machine where the public interacts with a small robot to create a large-scale composition. My BA in Art History from the University of Washington was focused on Chinese Dynastic Landscape painting, specifically the Northern Sung Dynasty. I was fascinated with the rough craggy brushstrokes, balance between positive and negative space, monumental scale and how you could almost step into and travel within the composition. In my professional career I have not chosen to pursue this study any further but it certainly has informed how I make an image. Also, giving lectures has been a great opportunity to talk though my ideas with the public. Being in the Bay Area is great as it allows for a very diverse audience. Since much of my work incorporates technology in some way, often questions brought up by an engineer or mathematician can allow me to see a different and more complex set of questions and observations about my work than I could have arrived at through my own training and background. I don’t believe that formal training is necessary for every artist but my time at SFAI allowed me space to develop and shape my ideas as the school is prided on working conceptually rather than formally. Being at the SFAI also connected me to many colleagues with whom I am still in touch and work with today. However, many of the so called “art academies” are overpriced scams that don’t properly prepare students for what it takes to be an active artist once school ends and are primarily interested in enrollment numbers rather than quality of work being produced or what curriculum they are teaching. Also there are many talented people out there that can find their own way to achieve their vision rather than through institutional guidance. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Currently I am working with several different mark-making 31


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Parallax Series #1, 2013

systems that I call “Drawing Projects”. Set up can range from super simple, as in the case of my “Whip Drawings” where I place a piece of paper on the floor and whip different custom made brushes (with long strings dipped in ink) across the surface, to much more elaborate as in the case of Attraction/Repulsion which involves patching in quite a few electronic/sound components and carefully considering the space where it is installed to create the best scenario where the public can interact once it is up and running. In the past I have also collaborated with other sound, video and performance artists who have “plugged” into the piece to create a composition. This extra choreography can take extra time to make sure everything will be running smoothly for the performance/installation.

Ellipse Series #1, 2013, 20''x 30'' blown ink, collage, hand drawing on Archespaper

hand enters into the composition at the final stage and completes the system. The time spent on each drawing in my studio can range from hours to weeks depending on how built up I want the drawing to be. I have also begun incorporating collage into this final process as well by using small pieces of antique USGS maps and engineering diagrams. I view these works as collectively built through the interactions of viewer/participant, the small robot, and myself, resulting in a drawing that is a communal mapping of the geography of the paper itself and alluded to through the inclusion of the USGS collage elements.

The Attraction/Repulsion drawings are built up through a layering process. The first marks on the surface of the paper are created by the public interacting with the sensor-driven robot for durations of one to six hours. I then take the drawing back to my studio and respond to the marks. I see this as a decoding process where my 32


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Drawing” marks, some are made by blowing ink across the surface of the paper, and some of the marks are “Shake Drawings” where once a pool of ink is placed on the paper I viciously shake and drop the paper on its edges to create chattery distorted marks. I also suspend ink in beer which creates really subtle tonal values and gradations similar to an aquatint when it is blown across the paper. My creative process starts by working with a blank sheet of paper and then overlapping these different processes until the composition is to a point where I am satisfied with it visually.

Ellipse Series #2, 2013, 20''x 30'' blown ink, collage, hand drawing on Archespaper Now let's focus on your artworks: I would like to start with the interesting Parallax and Ellipse series, that our readers have started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article, and I would suggest to visit your website at http://peterfoucault.wordpress.com/new-artworks2011/ in order to get a wider idea of it... in the meanwhile, could you take us through your creative process when starting these stimulating projects?

wing” marks, some are made by blowing ink across the surface of the paper, and some of the marks are “Shake Drawings” where once a pool of ink is placed on the paper I viciously shake and drop the paper on its edges to create chattery distorted marks. I also suspend ink in beer which creates really subtle tonal values and gradations similar to an aquatint when it is blown across the paper. My creative process starts by working with a blank sheet of paper and then overlapping these different processes until the composition is to a point where I am satisfied with it visually.

The Parallax and Ellipse drawings are made through incorporating a number of different “Drawing Project” techniques into the same composition. Some of the marks are drawn by the sensor-driven robot, some are “Whip Dra-

At many stages of the drawing I also add in hand drawing and collage. Generally I work on a series 33


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of drawings at the same time and work across all of them in stages. This can range from three to ten sheets of paper being developed simulta-neously. At many stages of the drawing I also add in hand drawing and collage. Generally I work on a series of drawings at the same time and work across all of them in stages. This can range from three to ten sheets of paper being developed simultaneously. Another interesting project of yours on which I would like to spend some words is entitled Attraction/Repulsion which I have to admit have really impressed me... and since I have a scientific background I cannot do without asking you what's your point about the relationship between Art and Technology: I personally would go as far as to state that these days Art and Science are going to assimilate each other...

Being from the Bay Area has allowed me to be exposed to many different types of collaborations between art and science. There are so many amazing things happening here that celebrate that overlap. I am also inspired by contemporary artists who explore this intersection such as Jesse Houlding who makes these gorgeous minimalist abstracts on paper that are created through a kinetic system he designed where over time small graphite filings are slowly rotated across magnets placed underneath the paper. Also Lee Walton’s Angry Bird series, drawings that are developed by tracing and erasing moves in the video game Angry Birds are also pretty incredible. I view my work as having kind of a low-fi/hi-fi aesthetic as I often re-purpose toys and “low-tech” devices into drawing machines and objects that can be incorporated into a performance or video piece. In the past I have collaborated with Jonathan Grover, a Brooklyn-based artist and designer who has helped me to modify some of these objects (including the robot used in Attraction/Repulsion) as he has a much deeper understanding of electronics. Attraction/Repulsion fits into this low-fi/hi-fi mash up because although some of the components such as a modified toy robot and sharpie markers are paired up with transducers, devices used by the Air force to turn a solid surface into a deep vibrating speaker (installed in flight simulators), and high-end audio gear. One of my favorite installations of Attraction/Repul sion was at a solo show I had at the Richmond Art Center in 2008. I collaborated with artist/curator Justin Hoover who created rubber vests that had wireless microphones installed inside of them. Justin, a Black Belt in Taekwondo, 34

Embryo #3, drawing created by Attraction/Repulsion,

Jennifer Sims ink on paper, 63”x48”, 2012


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sparred ten rounds with his sparring partner in the middle of the gallery. Feeds from the wireless mics were fed into the Attraction/Repulsion table and the robot created a drawing based off the sounds created from the punches on the vests.

External Influences, solo exhibition at the Richmond Art Center, 2008

One of Foucault’s recent Drawing-Projects, Attraction/Repulsion, is an interactive drawing installation where small sensor driven robots are influenced by audience (or artist) participation in the creation of a large-scale abstract composition. With each new iteration of this project the circumstances change to create an entirely new situation and have included collaborations with video, sound and performance artists. Each time Attraction/Repulsion is presented a new drawing is created collectively by audience participation. The drawings are then re-visited in the studio by Foucault who adds additional hand drawing elements. Foucault views this as the decoding process where he can further translate each work on paper into a finished composition. Recent drawings have also included collaged in USGS maps which correlate to the idea that this is a drawing space/geography that has been collectively mapped through both audience and artist participation.

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Longwave, 36"x36", 2011

Looper, 80''x42'', 2013

drawing created by Attraction/Repulsion, ink on paper,

ink on paper

Your works are capable of establishing a deep involvement with the audience, both on intellectual side and on a physical aspect, as in Four Square ... So I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indispensable part of a creative process, both for conceiving an artwork and in order to enjoy it...

vernacular shouldn’t be necessary criteria for a successful work to be read. On the other hand art can also be disconnected from direct experience as in the case of Sol LeWitt’s pieces that essentially are a set of instructions to create a drawing. LeWitt writes the “script” to complete the piece but another person is tasked with completing the drawing itself.

Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience? By the way, how important for you is the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think about who will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

To me audience feedback is very important to gauge the success of an artwork, especially my interactive pieces that rely on text to instruct participants how to engage with the work. Are the instructions clear enough? Are people having meaningful interactions with it? Does it make sense? Viewing how people are interacting with my projects has been essential in fine-tuning them to create a more involved connection for the audience. I try to make artworks that can be viewed by a wide range of audiences from extremely diverse backgrounds.

I think personal experience is essential to both conceiving and enjoying an artwork because it defines what you bring to the table in terms of understanding an art object. Your unique set of experiences governs how you approach and understand an artwork and what visual and emotional resonance it has to you. Although helpful in understanding some contemporary artworks, formal academic training and artspeak

If I have been asked to choose an adjective that

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mental forces at hand twisting and breaking them apart. There are elements of both creation and destruction within the works like a tiny universe being born, swirling through the course of its life, then being torn apart at the seams and re-born into some other tableau. Allowing for a synergy between different disciplines has enabled me to stretch the boarders of these different artmaking systems so they can continue to grow and evolve, and hopefully not get stuck in the same formula. Depending on what an artist chooses to make this may not be essential, as in the case of a ceramicist or traditional printmaker, but for my practice it has been key to helping me grow as an artist. I think that it's important to remark that you have co-founded the Mobile Arts Platform, a Bay Area based artmaking and curatorial team that creates interactive “pop-up� mobile exhibitions... I personally find absolutely fascinating the collaborations that artists can established together, especially because this often reveals a symbiosis between apparently different approaches to art... and I can't help mention Peter Tabor who once said that "collaboration is working together with another to create something as a synthesis of two practices, that alone one could not": what's your point about this? Can you explain how an artwork demonstrates communication between several artists?

could sum up your art in a single word, I would say that it's "kaleidoscopic": in fact, as our readers can view directly at your website http://peterfoucault.wordpress.com/ your Art practice ranges from works on paper such as Looper and Longwave to videos and installations ... while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

The Mobile Arts Platform (MAP) has been an amazing incubator for ideas and a tremendous opportunity to collaborate with many talented visual, performance, culinary, and sound artists from around the country. I have been working on MAP with Bay Area artist Chris Treggiari since 2009 and it has given us the freedom to go out into the community to realize projects that wouldn’t always be successful if just presented a white cube gallery.

Kaleidoscopic is a great adjective to describe my work, especially some of the larger more colorful and looser pieces such as Looper and Longwave. In these works I want to give the viewer the opportunity to get lost in the piece for a while and hopefully evoke a personal reaction that is generated by traveling through the small components and details that stitch together the composition as a whole. In a weird mad scientist way I want to instill the drawings with a life of their own, with momentum, gravity and environ-

One of our goals through this project was to bring art into the community and create temporary non-traditional exhibition spaces. We try to create programming that responds to specific issues in partner neighborhoods and set up projects that can engage and empower the public. We incorporate interactive strategies into many of the pieces and structures we create to turn participants into active producers as opposed to passive 37


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viewers. One of our current projects is the Mobile Screenprint Cart which is inspired by the design of a classic teardrop trailer pulled behind a vintage Vespa scooter. Once the cart arrives on site the trailer unfolds into a screenprint station and the public is invited to pull the print themselves and create a free takeaway interactive poster designed by a local artist. It is amazing to see ten year olds working side by side with seventy year olds to create their posters and learn a little bit about printmaking. Over the years MAP has been set up at a wide range of sites, including large street fairs, community gardens, and even museums. We create unique content for each installation to best fit the needs of the individual spaces and communities. Tabor’s statement is right on relating to this project as it takes the strengths of all the components and artists involved to make a successful event as a whole. During these years your artworks have been exhibited in several important occasions: and moreover you have ben recently awarded from Zellerbach Family Foundation... it goes without saying that positive feedbacks are capable of providing an artist of a special support... I was just wondering if the expectation of a positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

Whip Series #4, drawing and blown ink on paper, 12''x3

who will be enjoying my artwork while I am creating it; I get pretty absorbed in the making process. Once my artwork goes to the gallery I usually don’t get to see how it is experienced. I can only hope somebody makes a personal connection with it and will enjoy it in their home.

At the end of the day I just try to work hard and keep my practice growing. I have been extremely fortunate over the last few years in receiving positive feedback, generous funding and the opportunity to exhibit in some wonderful locations. My goal is to sustain the momentum and engagement I have with my work even through the thin times. I’ve learned to never expect positive feedback, exhibitions, etc.

Thank for your time and for sharing with us your thoughts, Peter. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I just keep up the discipline to keep producing and believing in your work. So much in the art world happens behind the scenes and you never know what is percolating or what opportunities may come up. I don’t have a particular vision of

Thank you for inviting me to interview and share my work. I am excited about a few projects that are coming up. One of my projects this winter involves working on a collaborative animated/print drawing series with Lucas Jennifer SimsFilms artist Matthew 38


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Parrott. Also this summer MAP will be setting up a series of temporary installations at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles and creating programming that responds to their exhibition “The Scandalous Art of James Ensor�. For more details on upcoming projects and exhibitions please visit my website at peterkfoucault.wordpress.com and mobileartsplatform.wordpress.com.

An interview by articulaction@post.com

Membrane,

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Nicolas Renard (France) an artist’s statement

Nicolas Renard est un artiste peintre français, issu du street-art et de la ride culture. Né en 1980, il grandit et évolue au sein de son groupe, ATF. Pratique très rapidement skateboard et graffiti. Son inspiration quotidienne : la rue, les gens de la rue. Sa peinture, empreinte de sensibilité et d' émotion, conjugue la radicalité du trait et la douceur des individus. Libre expression, coups de pinceaux, lâchés de couleurs, fougue maitrisée, radieuse ardeur. Reproduction personnelle d' un instant T, dans la vie d' une identité, un lieu commun, banalité absolue devenant intensité dans sa représentation. La brèche fragile, un moment fébrile où la figuration bascule. Les voyages deviennent rencontres, les rencontres deviennent peintures, les peintures redonnent vie et parfois espoir. La réalité devient luminosité. Attiré naturellement par la condition humaine, ces principaux sujets sont des femmes et des enfants. Portraitiste curieux, rêveur, chaque détails devient précieux, chaque couleur unique.

Nicolas Renard

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Gold, (background detail) Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

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An interview with

Nicolas Renard Hello Nicolas, and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artwork as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

A work of art for me, must be above all, sharing a feeling, an expression of thought reflected in the shape and color. Appropriate space for communion in harmony, call the look to stir the mind. Contemporary art represents a break with modern art, it offers new experiments and conceptual ideas. I think there is a dichotomy between tradition and contemporary art. We could indeed find an academic difference, which is primarily based on realism and objective representation. Nicolas Renard

Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any experiences that have particularly impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Otherwise a quick bio on me. I am a young Parisian painter, born rather alternative crops. I started painting in the street early in the early 90s.

About my process, I think at first size, which I bring important. Then I choose my range of colors. Doing my background with three or four colors fairly anarchic, while having already a very representative picture of my project.

Practice skateboarding, surf and winter sports forever. I am passionate about travel, beautiful pictures, the oceans, the big boss, “ma poule d’eau”, and people I loved and who inspire me. My painting is a condensed of sensitivity and emotion, impacted by the softness of individuals encountered.

Then I realize the outline of shadows portrait and works with the principle of superposition and enhancement of the background. I focus mainly on the eyes, nose and mouth. I use acrylic and spray paint. My tools brushes, brush, sponges, knives.

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers

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look forward, details, technique, year, dimensions

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Thinging and Look Forward, a recent piece that our readers have already admired in the starting pages of this article: I would suggest our readers to visit your website http://www.artmajeur.com/fr/artist/nicolasrenard/co llections in order to get a wider idea the series of whom it's part of. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this piece? What was your initial inspiration?

Contemplation is an essential point in these children who swim between heaven and earth. They are attached by grains of sand in the hair sunlight eyes. I noticed that most of your pieces are focused on "human" subjects, that - as Protect and Airfraid- often reveals such an inner struggle and intense involvement... I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

The origin of these paintings is a very inspired in the clear waters of St. FĂŠliu Italy swim. Turquoise covers a succession of graffitis.

I think subconsciously each creation is closely re-

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Missing captions, details, technique, year

Kakisun, details, technique, year, dimensions

ated to his own experience. Share'm springs in each brush stroke. Color, thickness, emotion of course is a close collaboration with the artist. Sometimes it reveals some events very buried. Explains the shameful feelings or decrypts the facts of elusive life. A feature of #2 that has mostly impacted on me is your capability of creating a deep intellectual interaction, communicating a wide variety of states of mind : even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif, I have to admit that in a certain sense it unsettles me a bit... it's an effective mix between anguish and thoughtless, maybe hidden happiness... I would go as far as to state that this piece, ra-

Sans titre, details, technique, year, dimensions

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red Love, details, technique, year, dimensions

ther than simply describing, pose us a question: it forces us to meditation...

Each subject may be forced to either reflection or meditation on yourself and what surrounds us. The expression of each portrait is significant in that it in fact and not what she seems. It must return each of us a personal sense, a question, an action.

While admiring Kakisun and Sans Titre I have been struck with the way you have been capable of merging delicate and thoughtful tone of colors with an intense, almost flooding red, which turns to saturate the canvas in Red Love, a wonderful piece that I ave to admit it's one of my favourite work of yours... By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

Meditation does allow us then to understand what we are? This can also be a spiritual exercise preparing for contemplation.

My choice of palette is very oriented according to my moods and depending on how I feel a certain period of my life. She is very inspired by my daily choices, my adventures, my explorations. How I

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Missing captions, details, technique, year, dimensions

sleep, the direction I took, the choice where my eyes fall, love that makes me high. I take every element of my life that I brew with each other to create a colorful alchemical eruption.

is for you the feedback of your audience? Doyou ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

Now let's talk about exhibitions and audience's feedback... it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important

About my approach between business and art, let's say I find it rather unhealthy. I never paint in that sense, saying he must like it for this seller. I'm just trying to express myself with my ability, trying to make me the most pleasure possible. Greed will not change my approach in how I create. I am more in the moment and instinct.

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Airfraid, details, technique, year, dimensions

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Nicolas. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Ok, thank you very much ARTiculation Team. I would also like to thank all the crew ATF (they recognize) my son loved Noah, my whole family and TTriss the woman of my life. Let's keep in touch.

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Andrea Pekarkova (AKA47) an artist’s statement

AKA47 and I make art, objects, videos and graphics since 2009. In 2013 I absolved the Atelier of Visual Communication on FAUTAUL and since 2010 I run a gallery called 3x3 in Liberec with Helena Krasova. I’m also a member of an audiovisual crew Lightning Glove, Lunchmeat label and as a video performer I cooperate with a few various musicians. My work is mostly very colorful and my videos range from abstract graphics to collages of real scenes.

Andrea Pekarkova (AKA47)

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Andrea Pekarkova (AKA47)

An interview with

Andrea Pekarkova (aka AKA 47) Hello Andrea, and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Hallo and thank you for inviting to this interview. The ice breaker is a good, but a difficult question. For me as an artist, the process is the most important part. Firstly I have a vision which transforms throughout the process with regard to the medium used. I often feel that personally I am not the one creating but the energy inside of me is and it then becomes almost a spiritual experience.

Andrea Pekarkova (aka AK47)

even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

From the perspective of the viewer, an art piece for me is something that openes a new channel of perception in me. I call a thing a piece of art in the moment when I start to think about its creator and his life. It is an ungraspable idea.

The achievement of getting the academic degree was one of the main milestones for me in my life. In 2009 I failed my bachelor's thesis on the textile faculty in Liberec, but even though it in that time seemed as a disaster to me it was a blessing in disguise.

I admit the artistic value to the art pieces which activate my sixth sense. The contemporary art is contemporary because it is based on the current experiences of the author and it reacts on the current problems. I feel the conflict between the tradition and the contemporary as I live in this world and therefore it is easier for me to align with the contemporary art which comunicates with me through a clear voice.

Because of this I found out about the studies of visual communication on the faculty next doors and I applied. The atelier was led by a pioneer of the kinetic arts in the former Czechoslovakia Stanislav Zippe. This persona in his life faced political restrictions and his work was censured by the comunist regime. He has helped me to find my way throughout the years of my studies and throughout those years he became a Guru for me and because of that I have learned to uphold and trully vindicate my works. one of the reasons why I developed this way was the way he teached me. It helped me to fight my way up and live through. After all this I graduated the magister studies with the best grades, the price of the dean and then I

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You hold a MFA in Visual communication that you received from the Technical University in Liberec: how has this experience impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes wonder if a certain kind of formal training could

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My Diploma Work, audiovisual performance, 2013

work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

also had the opportunity to show off my diploma work on the graduation ceremony of my year. This was very a satisfaction for me of course and therefore it inspired me and it gave me courage for my then upcoming works of art and my life in general.

Recently I devote my time to creation of music videos predominantly with the method of collage. I frequently listen to the music given to me by the producers which helps me to define the theme in which I then work in.

The experience which I gained throughout the long years of studying helped me to trully find myself and therefore I certainly do not think, that it stifles the artists creativity.

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Space Love an interesting series of yours that our readers have started to admire in the introductory pages of this article and I would suggest our readers to visit your website at http://portfolio47.blogspot.com/ in order to get a wider idea of it. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your 51


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Akar Hard, object, 2012

Jungle, music video, 2014

Love is just about love. It consists of me and my partner who calles himself Voodoo. We met on the internet and therefore we keep sharing the love through the internet further to our friends. After three months and literally houndreds of thousands of messages we couldnt live without each other anymore and decided to start living together therefore I moved from Prague to London. We believe, that we complete each other and that is also why we started collaborating on creative stuff together.

discovering an hidden side of our inner world... I would go as far as to state that this piece, rather than simply describing, pose us a question: forces us to meditation...

I must agree. The video ''Neboj Se'' for example is for me quite shocking. I feel the same way as you. By working openmindedly I discovered a new place in my mind in which I feel safe.

I believe in his music into which I dont interfere because of that and he does the same to me while I create the visual part of the project.

If I have been asked to choose an adjective that could sum up in a single word your art, I would say that your it's "kaleidoscopic": besides videos, you also produce objects and graphics works and I wouldsuggest to visit http://portfolio47.blogspot.com/search/label/Graphics in order to share your ideas with the world... while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that

5) A feature of these stimulating works that has mostly impacted on me is your capability of communicating a wide variety of states of mind: even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif, I have to admit that in a certain sense it unsettles me a bit... it's an effective mix between anguish and thoughtless, maybe a strange kind of happiness while 52


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Sleeky, music video, 2012

ce is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process...

Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience? For me it is inconceivable opportunity. I must once again go back to the first question regarding the contemporary arts - The experience is needed undoubtedly, but I do not mean the experiences brought by the arudition and age. Each experience has its own value and it is determing for the final physical and psychological form of the artwork

a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

Yes it is the best way for me to express myself. Mostly i feel which medium I need to use to express my feelings but I dont avoid any other. The work itself says how it wants to be work with and what else it needs. It has trully paid off to me in life to listen to my heart. As your works The Positive Eye and Neboj se! clearly show, your art practice, as is based on a deep involvement both on intellectual and -I daresay- on a physical aspect: the vivid colors that you use seems to awaken us and have been very impressed with the intense nuances of red that I can see in Sleeky... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experien-

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Andrea Pekarkova (AKA47)

Dans Les Bars, music video, 2014

I think that it's important to remark that you are running a the 3x3 gallery in Liberec in

place for other artists to present their works came. We focused especially on young and tallented artists from Czech whos work we admired. It was great to meet and talk to them in person and watch them work especially.

are also a member of the audiovisual crew Lightning glove... I personally find absolutely fascinating the collaborations that artists can established together as you did, especially because this often reveals a symbiosis between apparently different approaches to art... and I can't help without mention Peter Tabor who once said that "collaboration is working together with another to create something as a synthesis of two practices, that alone one could not": what's your point about this? Can you explain how an artwork demonstrates communication between several artists?

We began to support each other which expanded the web of the freelance gallery system in Czech a bit more. The gallery was non budget and all of the artists who displayed their work in 3x3 used almost no money at all, but even so, we met and collaborated with some amazing people. Some of them eventually became laureates of prestigious awards. Lightning Glove is a group of musicians with which I collaborated with over two years and therefore I had the opportuinity to witness a different process of making.

3x3 Gallery has risen from our need for freedom and we also needed a place where we could present our works of art. In the beginning I myself was the only person exhibiting my works in this gallery, but then the idea of the gallery being a

The boys are very active and I believe that they are currently one of the main upcoming musical groups of the Czech independent musical scene and it was an honor for me to be their VJ for so l

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Superskin, music video, 2014

ong. I was lucky to collaborate also with other artists such as some good contemporary dancers which allowed me to see another different world which then affected my own.

need the audience. It is more of a personal meditation than anything else. I believe that if you think about your audience too much it is counterproductive as it will sooner or later lead you to self-censorship.

It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or just the expectation of a positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

I often tell myself, that I should work as I was alone in this world and then focus on getting my work to be seen by the viewers. There are two sides to this and both are important equally. It is important to know when to switch from the creator mode to the manager mode and honestly, to make money while listening to your inner voices is quite hard, therefore at some point I had to start working comercially too.

I have discussed this questions with mister Zippe and he always used to tell me ''You should be glad when you have a one viewer''.

I believe, that it is important to feel where the line is and to stick to what you believe.

He teached me, that one should keep distance from feedback and even from sucess. Yes it does make sense, because you as an artist dont actually

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Andrea. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything 55


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coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

After I moved to England I began to face a situation where I could work manually for other people for money and have no time for my own art creations or could focus on my own stuff but earn no money at all. After I experienced the first I couldnt stand it as I couldnt express what was inside of my mind which I love and live for and therefore I decided to switch to the second choice. I am currently working hard on making of videos, graphics and getting better in photography and Im quickly gazing around and exploring how the English art environment works. I am currently focusing the most on Space Love and I am trying to attain to play publicly with this project in front of a live audience. Im also hoping, that I will get an opportunity to get a postgradual fellowship at a gallery based in London called the RED Gallery and while Im doing that, I am also involved continuously in art competitions and open calls. I made a definite choice of working creatively at all costs as it is not me without me being creative.

The Journey To Planet Phobos, music video, 2014

An interview by articulaction@post.com

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Hanno Phenn (Germany)

I am a Fine Art Painter, Digital Artist,Writer, Cook and Cat Lover. I enjoy life as it is.The Daily Influences are in my Work reflected. Photography is something I really enjoy doing and I intent to do forever. I find all the time Interesting Objects, Places and People to photograph. It makes me happy to capture this special moments in a Picture. So I enjoy my work.

Troubled night Acrylic on Canvas, 40x50cm, 2014

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Hanno Phenn

An interview with

Hanno Phenn Hello Hanno I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

A work of Art is a two or three dimensional art piece. It can be photo graphically, digital or manual created on a surface, like paper or canvas for example. It is although possible a combination of two or all three of them. Contemporary Art for me is a work of Art, that is created in the now timeframe, which is influenced threw the reality of the right now. Not to forget to use the technically possibilities of today. In my humble opinion is the traditionally Art the contemporary art of its time. I think that the great masters of its time would today create there work of Art different as in there time, just because the influences of the now and here would change there view of things and circumstances. Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any experiences that particularly impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, what's your point about formal training? I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

My professional life started with studying Visual Communication and later then Fashion Design.I have to admit I lost interest in both fields after a while just threw personal experience. I had to put my career in Fashion on a hold when my Mother became seriously sick and I decided to become her carer and in my spare time I started to paint. Last year my Mother passed away and I started to paint in a totally different way very dark and quite serious. In Autumn 2013 that changed dramatically, just because I found my life partner. Formal training can stifle a young

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artist. For me it has opened my eyes into what I do now,so for me it was a starting point in the right direction. I wouldn't say it is a general rule, it depends on the individual becoming artist. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

I usually start with collecting thoughts and ideas, sometimes sketches , sometimes paper clips or pieces of music or even links from the World Wide Web. When I decide then, what I want to produce, I decide which way of creating this piece of Art will go. The idea tells me , if it is more for digital art for digital painting or for real painting on Canvas or Paper. I choose the way to create the work of Art very late.First I create the Art piece in my head and then I produce the actual work of Art. The time I need to create my work of Art depends on the idea. Some ideas I can put into Art very quickly and some can be a quite long process. It all depends on the basic Idea and the technique I use. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Ballet Dancer and Landscape of Dreams that our readers can admire in these pages : would you like to tell us something about the genesis of these interesting pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

The Ballet Dancer was a work of art I created for a online Exhibition called People are People on the page http://www.artisttableonline.com/ actually is was not accepted, but two other pieces of mine. I have it still on display in my lounch. Landscape of Dreams is inspired threw the changes in my personal life. In mid November I realized, how much the fact, that my life partner had moved in with me, had changed everything around me, a dream came true and my life was before that moment like wandering threw different valleys and over hills and mountains

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Landscape of Dreams Acrylic on Canvas 40x40cm 2014

of difficulties and sad moments.The sketch, I posted first, was much simpler than the painting. During the process of creating the painting I started to get the feeling for colour and form, so it changed a bit and has much more emotional input than the sketch. You are a very prolific artist, and I would like to spend some words about your recent pieces: in particular I have been impressed with Colour Pairs... is painting like a release for you or is it emotionally draining? By the way, does your process let you to visualize your pieces before creating? Do you know what it will look like before you begin?

Painting is for me a release when it is about issues out of the reality of the daily life and emotionally draining, when it is about topics, that are very close to my heart or very much so personal.It depends on the topic and the concept, if Belly Dancer

I visualize my pieces. Conceptual pieces I do visualize and the pieces I call short Art, I paint in the moment,

Details, technique, year

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that are mostly digital paintings, in digital oil and acrylic on canvas, sometimes digital watercolors. Short Art are quick ideas and quick painted pieces, that I create out of the moment.The short Art pieces I do not visualize, they come together during the painting process . Another interesting pieces of yours that have particularly impressed me and on which I would like to spend some words are Dancin' Exhibit Two, Colours of India and especially the Alive series that I have to admit is one of my favourite project of yours... one of the features of your pieces that has mostly impacted on me is the effective mix of colors that gives life to the canvas... moreover, as in the interesting Two life’s become one life

Colour Pairs Digital Oil on Canvas, 2014

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Hanno Phenn

Colours of India

Dancin’ exhibit two

together, spared but intense tones of red seem to reveal such a struggle, a deep tension and intense emotions... By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

its last stage from the finished wet painting in the dried and finished work of art. I have used a string of photos of details, to show much more of the painting itself as you can see in one photo on my website.

First of all, I have to thank you to like one of my latest art pieces in the moment. To start with Dancin' Exhibit Two, the color mix in this one is completely related to the music I listen to at the time of creating the painting.I listened to Madame Butterfly and music from David Sylvian and Chris Isaak.

This kind of presentation you will find although with my two latest works of art you can find on my website the title are mesh of colours and obelisk.Maybe I will continue to present works of Art in that kind of way more often if I think it is right to do so. Before I say something about the Two life's become one life together painting,the palette of color is creative concept specific. If I feel it is right to use very bright colours, I use them and in the moment I use often just black, grey and white and some bright Hanno red. To Phenn come now to the painting Two life's become one life together.I created this

The colors of India is related to the TV programs I have seen about this fascinating country and the colours I could see in this programs and I have to admit, I enjoy the Indian food in it varietys and it is although so very colorful. The Alive series is about the way how a work of art is developing in

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could be disconnected from direct experience?

I can only speak for myself.For me is personal experience vital and essential for the creative process. Without these experiences, in my point of view, would be my work of art hollow and without signification. Let me say a few words about the piece Crime Scene Art. We all see an a quite regular bases crime scene pictures in Newspapers the News or in Crime Series on TV. My intention for this painting was to show, that even a horrible image like a crime scene, can have aspects of aesthetic and art. For me it would be quite difficult to create a work of art without personal experience. Out of experience I can say, that it is different in other creative disciplines like for example Fashion Design, the creative process has different rules, like lifestyle, trends, in colors and so on.

Alive

painting in a particular and special moment, actually a pivotal moment in my personal life, it is a very much personal and emotional painting.It took me three weeks to paint this painting, actually I needed the time to think about it and created it in my head first the actual painting process was quite strait forward a line in black and one in very dark violet and the sprayed spots of red. But the emotional work behind it has taken quite a lot of time. Exception made for some very stimulating pieces as for example the recent Crime Scene, your artworks are almost all abstract: still, I can recognize in them a deep inspiration from our reality... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process: do you think that a creative process

Crime Scene Art

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Hanno Phenn

Pressure Point

Red Lion in the dark

It is much more market oriented than my work of art and even in Fashion Design you use your personal experiences for creating garments.I have created bespoken garments but commissions work of a art would be quite difficult for me.

works, for instant in Pressure Point. In Pressure Point I created the basic painting in digital oil on canvas, then I used a different app to double the image of the basic painting and blended it over the basic one, to create the effect you can see in the end result.

It's important to mention that you are a multidisciplinary artist: as our readers can discover directly at your website http://hwphenn.wordpress.com/, besides acrylic, you are also produce digital and Mixed Media works as Pressure Point, Colored Light Projection on Stone Wall and Angry Man... while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

I had although to alter the brightness,the contrast and the saturation as well as the transparence. I use a variety of different application to work with and sometimes I use some of them after each other just for creating one work of art. It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award or better, the expectation of an award could even influence the process of an artist... By Phenn the way,Hanno how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think

I think that you find this synergy in some of my

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to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

I value feedback and awards very much, but I think I can blend it out of the process of creating my work of art.As I just said, I value the feedback especially from my life partner and family and friends. The feedback from my audience is very much appreciated even the one you can smile about,for instance quite a while ago someone asked me, if that art piece come in different colours as well, like a pullover or shirt and someone was criticizing my color choice in an autumn painting, I just finished after a walk outside and just had experienced these colours. This person wrote to me these are not autumn colours, these are summer colours. I think there is a relationship between business and Art, a very fragile and loose one.

Angry Man

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Hanno. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

It might sound a bit dull but my next Work of Art. I am planing a few exiting new paintings and some other projects.To keep inform about my work is just follow my website http://hwphenn.wordpress.com/ and my Facebook Artist Page https://www.facebook.com/ArtisteHannoPhenn and you should be up to date about my projects.

colored light projection on stone wall

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Mr. & Mrs. Gray (The Netherlands) an artist’s statement Mr. & Mrs. Gray Art is about life. Sometimes it's a mirror-world for reality, another time it's a moment of reflection or a dream of the future. Life is full of diversity, and definitely not just black and white, either misery or joy. There are numerous beautiful shades of grey between black and white, and these nuances are the source of inspiration for our work and the origin of our artist's name. Mr. & Mrs. Gray is about faith in the possibilities that these nuances have to offer. It symbolises looking from different angles, discovering possibilities and our love for diversity. That does not mean our optimism is blinding us. We do see the eminent dooms of our times, but we do not want to linger on these thoughts longer than necessary. It's so easy to complain and be critical, but to see possibilities and act when everything seems hopeless is far more difficult. The work we make as Mr. & Mrs. Gray is therefor about possibilities, chances and new adventures often to be found in the smallest and most trivial things. That's why we are fascinated with DIY (Do It Yourself) a concept or movement with the optimistic believe that you can make anything yourself. It's about hope, empowerment and creativity. DIY demonstrates that we do not need to depend on governments, multinationals or heaps of money to improve our lives, but that we can do something ourselves. In this time of economical crisis, when financial funds evaporate and governments focus blindly on budget deficit and retrenchment, we have to depend more than ever on our own creativity and resourcefulness. Disregarding everything that's not working and simply change it for something new is not possible anymore. But we can focus on what we do have and figure out how to turn it into something better. That's why we are interested in historical and forgotten stuff. Upcycling or recycling them to us is the logical next step. We share Leonardo da Vinci's curiosity for the world around us, and like him our main objective is just to wonder about what was, what is and what will be. We believe that there is always something worthwhile, and that there are always cheerful, optimistic and inspiring moments to be found if you care to look for them, without being paternalistic. You do not have to tell others what to do or what to think, they are perfectly able to do that for themselves. We do not pretend to have the solution. We just have a dream, a passion and a lot of naive enthusiasm, and we hope that this enthusiasm inspires others to discover and use their creativity and resourcefulness. It's not about the destination but the journey and the people who are willing to accompany us on this fantastic voyage! We are Jeroen van der Linde en Carmen Hutting (J+C) aka Mr. and Mrs. Gray. We work and live together in Den Haag, the Netherlands. We use different techniques from performances to collages to share our ideas with the world. Mr. & Mrs. Gray 68


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A still from 50 Shots Sitting Down Movie, Duration: 0: 00:38 September, 14th 2013

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Mr. & Mrs. Gray

An interview with

Mr. & Mrs. Gray Hello Mr and Mrs Gray, and a warm welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Thank you, it's great to be a part of this issue of ARTiculAction! We think art is about life. We feel that a work of art should have expressiveness outside the white cube. Our aim is to study the relationship between our work and the environment within its created, and what its significance could be. The question what defines art isn't relevant in our working process. The timeframe and context in which the work is perceived will eventually determine wether or not others define our work as art. It's simply because we live in the now and are trapped in our time, it's logical that we can only see the world from within the context of our contemporary society.

Mr. & Mrs Gray

dent, and later on we became teachers at an art school ourselves. So we have a pretty clear picture of the up-and downsides.

Therefore we do not bother with theorising and rather focus on experimenting and creating work with our gaze on what lies beyond the horizon, then to determine the framework beforehand and use it as a limitation to work in.

To make a work, may it be a painting, movie, sculpture or whatever, it's not necessary to have had an art education. Francis Bacon thought art schools were rubbish: In his opinion the only thing you learned there was doing what the teacher liked, and that the best way to learn something was by doing it. And he does have a point here.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? Besides a BA Fine Arts you both hold a MFA Interactive Media & Environments that you have received from the Frank Mohr Institute in Groningen, the Netherlands where you are currently based... How have these experiences impacted on the way you currenly produce your artworks? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

On the other hand, an art school does offer the opportunity to be influenced by new ideas, new materials, and to meet new people. An art school is also useful for learning technical skills: it's easier to learn to do something by watching, then by reading the theory in a book. Of course you could find a mentor yourself, to teach you something you want to know, but an art school where all the

We have experienced art education first as a stu-

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are open for new ideas and experiments so that there is an interesting cross-fertilisation, only then is an art school something worthwhile. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

When we start a new project we like to emerge ourselves fully in the subject. For instance, our current obsession is making live-sized paper boats from used paper which are fully functional and can actually float. We call it the Paperboat project, and so far the project has resulted in numerous drawings, collages, movies, objects and performances. The Paperboat project started on a cold and rainy January day in a remote part of France. It had been raining for days, the whole area was flooded. Confined indoors with nothing but a stack of old magazines we decided to fold an armada of paper boats and set them asail in the drowned land. But with the first boat we released, we wanted to sail away ourselves. So while we watched our little armada float away, the idea formed to build a life-sized paper boat. knowledge is accessible and brought together. On the other hand, an art school does offer the opportunity to be influenced by new ideas, new materials, and to meet new people. An art school is also useful for learning technical skills: it's easier to learn to do something by watching, then by reading the theory in a book. Of course you could find a mentor yourself, to teach you something you want to know, but an art school where all the knowledge is accessible and brought together under one roof does offer a convenient solution.

So in this case we started with a stack of magazines, from which we made sketches, drawings, collages and little objects. It's a kind of experimental phase. That leads to more elaborate ideas, like movies, performances or objects. One of these more elaborate ideas is the build of a big paper boat. We then start with targeted research to our subject: were there other attempts to build working paper boats, what is the significance of such a project in our timeframe and society, and what is its artistic value. We discovered for instance, that in the former century a Dutch barber from Bergum in the Netherlands came up with the luminous idea of building a boat for people who were less fortunate in the financial department. In his spare time, he constructed a boat in a totally unconventional way, with smaller and cheaper pieces of wood.

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Although the upper class laughed at his attempts to make a boat out of 'firewood', he continued anyway, and in 1928 he launched the first boat, the BM. And in the end, the joke was on them, because nowadays you can’t imagine the Dutch waters without a BM. The BM inspired us to see the paper boat from a different perspective. The BM gave more people the opportunity to go boating, because of the use of cheap materials. Since recycling is an essential part of our work, and paper could be considered as a sort of wood, there’s a lot of cheap material fur us to recycle and make paper boats. And after a grand day out on the water you can just throw away the paper boat if you want to, together with all the other waste paper. So we boldly set out to construct paper boats. First out of cardboard, later cardboard with a layer of 10 minutes of Plastic Debris, Part 1, November 23rd

glue. The first attempts unfortunately went to Davey Jones Locker, but our latest version, the Paperboat 3, is still afloat.

http://gulali.com/mmg/?p=1226

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from 10 Minutes of Plastic Debris and 54-Shots Sitting Down, a couple of interesting works that our readers have already started to get to know in these pages of this article... and I would suggest them to visit directly your website at http://gulali.com/mmg/ in order to get a wider idea of these stimulating pieces... in the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these artworks? What was your initial inspiration?

We often ask ourselves the question 'Why?' As artists we look at our environment with curiosity and question everything, especially ourselves. We notice that there is so little attention and devotion for the world we create for ourselves. We're wondering what causes the phenomenon that people can live their lives without really noticing what's there. How come they do not see the beauty and the riches that surround them? And can't they see the the effect their behaviour has on their environment?

Paperboat 1: Float away, Performance, June 7th, 2013 Registration of the Performance 'Float away' at the Houtzagersingel in Den Haag, the Netherlands.

We feel we live in a world that is dominated by restrictive thinking. In our opinion we let negative

http://gulali.com/mmg/?p=689

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But we do not want to be paternalistic. We do not want to tell others what to do or what to think, but we hope to inspire them to change their behaviour. With 10 Minutes of Plastic Debris or with our Paperboat project we hope to create awareness for our environmental situation. We hope that people will reconsider the worth of that which they throw away, where they dispose it an what effect it has on their environment in a playful and inspiring manner. You can repeatedly tell people about the Atlantic garbage patch, but that's an abstract concept. But to see the amount of plastic rubbish you can gather on a field in 10 minutes makes the mountain of waste we create more tangible. As you have remarked in your artist's statement "Mr. & Mrs. Gray is about faith in the possibilities that these nuances have to offer. It symbolises looking from different angles, discovering - I daresay, hidden- possibilities" I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

2013 Fabric, plastic waste, textile spray can and sand

values determine the framework through which we see the world. A new design, may it be a piece of furniture or a social concept, is often determined by what it shouldn't do and by the limitations, and after we've eliminated all the hazards and risks we try to make something nice with what's left.

Personal experiences can be valuable as a starting point to make a work, but during the creative process you have to be able to detach yourself from this personal experience.

We do not believe in letting ourselves be restricted by the limitations we encounter, and complaining and despairing over everything that's wrong. We do believe in focussing on the possibilities, appreciate the value of what we have and figure out how to turn it into something better. That's why our work is about those possibilities, chances and new adventures often to be found in the smallest and most trivial things, the things we see when we look at the word with rapt attention.

For us a creative process is like making a 3-dimensional object, like a sculpting with a piece of marble. All the sides of the object have to be equally interesting, so you have to approach the subject from multiple perspectives. Working from a singular personal experience is like only working on the front and neglecting the backside. And just like with a block of marble, you keep subtracting more and more from the block until you're left with the essence of the work, and there's nothing you need to subtract anymore.

10 Minutes of Plastic Debris and 54-Shots Sitting Down are about the decay of our society, the apathy, the numbness. The works address this carelessness and the inadvertence. 54-Shots Sitting Down for instance is saying: The nails in the public benches are beautiful!

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Another piece of your earlier ones on which I would like to spend some words is entitled Hakama and it was part of the Shelterwear project: "how to survive in a hostile world". Even though I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif, I'm sort of convinced that Art these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion about socio political issues: I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can even steer people's behavior... I would take this chance to ask your point about this. Do you think that it's an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in our society?

Art can open doors, and provoke new thoughts, it can raise questions and covey emotions. Therefor art could have an influence on our society. But art in general cannot be interpreted literally and the influence a work of art has differs per individual. We think art reflects the soul of a society, and therefor cannot dictate something explicit as a new opinion, or provide answers for social-political problems. And personally, we do not want to dictate or judge. 'He who is without sin, cast the first stone.' We favour a positive approach and grant the spectator the freedom to make up his own mind.

Hakama, Wearable object, Fabric, 200 x 40 x 100 cm

We can only hope that we're able to engage people with our enthusiasm and inspire them to have new thoughts and ideas. If I have been asked to choose an adjective that could sum up in a single word your art, I would say that your it's "kaleidoscopic": you use different techniques from performances as Media Luna and to collages as Strange Tides, in order to share your ideas with the world... while crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

We believe that 1+1 is more than 2. That applies to our collaboration, but also to the media we work in. We work from a concept, and not from a me-

Media Luna Performance, Exhibition at the at the Kunstrand

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Strange tides, Collage, November 17th, 2013 Paper and acrylic, 30 x 40 cm

Working in public space is an essential part of our work. If you work in a studio and afterward transport the work to a white cube, you're able to plan and prepare everything and thus eliminate (almost) all eventualities. But when you place a work in public space the unknown becomes a significant part of the work.

February 5th, 2005 http://gulali.com/mmg/?page_id=769

Elements like the public, the weather and the scenery are all contributing to the work, and together all these elements compose something new, something more interesting than the work in itself. That makes working in public space so exiting, and maybe even more real.

dium. Each medium has its qualities and its limitations. If you work from a medium you challenge the boundaries of that medium. We are pushing the boundaries of our concept. The synergy for us isn't as explicit in our work as it is in our work methodology. In our process we embrace all experiments and all media to deepen our concept. But at the same time we treat all our studies and sketches as a work of art, because only through this equal treatment the experiment will be able to relate to the initial concept and become a valuable addition to the process.

I personally find absolutely fascinating the collaborations that artists can established together as you did, especially because this often reveals a symbiosis between apparently different approaches to art... and I can't help without mention Peter Tabor who once said that "collaboration is working together with another to create something as a synthesis of two practices, that alone one could not": what's your point about this? Can you explain how your work demonstrates communication between two artists?

The drawings and collages like Strange Tides are in fact studies for a more elaborate work such as performances, movies and interventions which are often situated in public space. By placing the work in the world, we place it within a context.

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Autumn Tree part 2, Performance, October 20th, 2013, http://gulali.com/mmg/?p=1179

tion is that there's always a leader who determines what to do and a follower, which isn't a collaboration but a monologue, or a clash between two equally strong entities, which is more like warfare. True collaboration is a dialogue with changing currents and propositions for ideas, like a dance. In such a dialogue you're surprised by the course of the conversation, the input of the other, and that stimulates you to rise above yourself.

dience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

David Bowie once said in an interview: 'I just do what I like, and if I like it, there has to be someone else who can appreciate it.' We do not take a target audience into consideration when we conceive a new work. It's our ambition to surprise ourselves every day and to overcome our own boundaries and prejudice. This uncompromising nature of our work tends to lead to extreme reactions. Sometimes the works is pulverised by critics, and sometimes it's awarded. That uncompromising nature is the distinction between art and business. De essence of art is to

From 2001 to these days, your works have been awarded in several occasions and moreover you have been awarded: it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist... I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your au-

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Not Necessary

Waterworld

follow its own path, even if it's not an acceptable one. Commissioned work and applied arts is something different. If you work for an commissioned or applied project, you have to take certain limitations and conditions in consideration, like a client's wishes or a target audience. That isn't per definition something evil, just something else. And there certainly could be a mutual benefit in a collaboration between business and art, especially when the industry is looking for creative or innovative ideas. Artists do have the ability to make even the most boring data look exiting.

We often work in commissioned projects and present our work in a business or science orientated environment, and partake in brainstorm sessions as creative advisor. The Paperboat project is an example of a project that borders on science and innovative business, especially when talking about sustainability. That makes the project eligible for presentations during congresses, it reaches a bigger audience and therefor has commercial spin-offs like a DIY kit to make your own Paperboat. So as artists we get a lot out of these collaborations too, we learn from this experiences, meet new people and it's great fun. Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Mr and Mrs Gray. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

We have started the build of a paper sailboat, as a next step in our Paperboat project. We do not know where the currents may take us, but it's going to be a great adventure! So if you would like to keep track of our progress, check our website, or find us on Twitter!

Paperboat 1: Float away

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Catherine Chantilly

Gold, (background detail) Mixed Media on canvas, 2012

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An interview with

Catherine Chantilly Hello Catherine, and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art?

A work of art should not be indifferent, it can give question, it may disturb, can enchant, it may to dream, a work of art awaken the soul By the way, what could be the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's an inner dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Contemporary art asserts independent, anyway all art must be independent, contemporary art differs from art called classical it wants to assert his independence, contemporary art breaks the classic codes of art (installation performance ...) Contemporary art does not need painting, traditional medium are not the only values ​that define contemporary art, you can make contemporary art without paint without sculpting drawing ... And yet when we see a painting of jÊrome bosch we may wonder if it is not a contemporary painting, a great artist is beyond time, he is not a prisoner of classification, and art movements, the artist is by definition free, it does not create to be categorized, it creates to be alive, he feels he sees worlds others do not see so subtly and translated into art, this art can be painting sculpture video photo installation performance .... there is always an act of creation,what matters is there something that arises.

Catherine Chantilly

way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

I studied fine arts later , I had another life before I worked in Paris (temporary work) and I did not understand I was young, after my degree in hight school, I try to work like everyone else, earn money and play the game of society, for me I was not ready and I did not understand, artists in general are very sensitive, but I believe that all human beings are artists, they must be the creators of their life, art is a medium access to the beauty, the truth, the love.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You degreed at the Ecole Des Beaux-Arts de Bourges and moreover you hold a Master of CIvilization and Literature that you have received frm the University of Nice. How have these experiences impacted on the way you currenly produce your artworks? By the

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For me the fine arts were a school a place to learn, there was a very large library, a place to experiment, of course there may be formatting, there is a movement to respect according the policy of the school, sometimes it's heavy and it's also a game, but there is a place wich allows to experiment, it's good it exists, it can provide key, reference, confidence, it depends on the school, a school is a school, it is a place where we learn, after this is not because we are admitted to the Fine arts we are artist, artist is a state of being in the world, I stay three years I spend the first degree DNAP National Diploma of Visual Arts, and after that I go to usa california live the nice wonderful life with a man, my lover, I travel I live I love I do not specially Art I have to live before experiment the life, what is living, what is love, how to love, how to live, it was more spiritual and experimental, And I come back to France and I still go back to school, University of Nice, I wanted to learn, study, understand, I studied literature and cinema, I read a lot and I wrote, I write again, but the creative process of writing is not the same as painting, for me, write is more cerebral I worte in french, paint is more free and happier, paint is outside language I create with color, energy and vibration of color, write is deeper in the bowels, currently I prefer paint, Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

I work one year and I decided to change my life and follow my dream, I want a nice wonderful life since childhood, I do not exactly know what is a beautiful and wonderful life but I feel that the human being has the opportunity to live wonderfully , in fact it is a spiritual quest I am looking for the truth, the joy, the love, and it is the only art which for me can save me, I pass the competition of school of Fine Arts in Bourges, I was a little out of system, I was not a candidate formatted, I had a whole world inside of me that wanted to live, I had not done preparatory school to take the examination, but it worked, I am admitted.

I paint in acrylic I do not use oil –not yet - in Brazil it is very hot and humid is too long to dry, the creation of a work of art is mysterious, we do not know where the inspiration really comes, we must accept, we do not know all the mysteries, but we are able to know, just be sensible awaken, I like to paint over large areas, my paintings are often large between 1.50 m and 1.30 m,I also paint on the walls in the city in Rio de Janeiro but I did not do much, it was my first cosmic fusion I needed 81


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From the Cosmic Fusion series, details, year

From the Cosmic Fusion series, details, year

to do for everyone in the street near a church, on wall, where people burn candles in the street, I needed to do as a fingerprint, to act with my gesture, it descends from the sky and incarnates on earth, and I also paint on the walls of houses or hotelssometimes- I like to paint on a wall, it no longer limits or at least they are wider, when I paint a canvas I need 2 or 4 or 5 days, it depends, I draw primarily on note book, I note the ideas that get, I do not know if the ideas are ours or if they are out there somewhere and I can perceive, it is the creative process and it comes from the stomach and the mind, it is organic and spiritual, my way of life is the love, I'm looking for love, the true love, what is love, how to love, in fact, to love is not so easy, my painting is an expression of love, love of live, to be alive alway, I try it.

to visit your website directly at the following https://sites.google.com/site/catherinechantilly/cos mic-fusion in order to get a wider idea of it: in the meanwhile, would you like to tell us something about the genesis of this project?

Cosmic fusion is the thankfulness, thankfulness for life to be alive, a work of art does not come all of a sudden one, there life before, my life, the life. Cosmic fusion is an expression of my faith in life despite hardships despite the pain despite errors, cosmic fusion is the sky falls on our heart, this is the awakening cosmic, explosion of joy, colors, the color is light, light is love. I work in series,10 paintings in general 10 is a very powerful strong number like 12, 7 … I gave titles to my paintings – in this case - first there was the title and then I paint, arvore da vida (tree of life) coraçao de mae ( heart of mother) holly mary 1,2, and 3, l’homme ange, ( angel man), éternel amour (eternal love), corcovado, love abacaxi (love pineapple) my love parrot, each

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Cosmic Fusion, an interesting series that our readers have already started to get to know and admire in the introductory pages of this article, and I would suggest to our readers

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From the Cosmic Fusion series, details, year

painting expresses a human story, maternal love, nature, animals, divinity, love, knowledge.

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velling, I usually rest between two to four months and then I travel but I always come back to rio, brazil is a very strong country with a very strong energy, I found the hidden parts of my childhood, innocence, purity, simplicity, spontaneity, joy, love, the nature is very strong very present, the colors the sun the sky the trees flowers animals, is very tropical and giant, this is different from europe where nature is domesticated, in brazil life seems more alive more intense than in europe nature imposes, I can feel it and I like it, I'm away from my culture of my education although I feel French but something moved, I'm more in touch with reality and para-doxically my paintings are not so realistic, in Brazil I found my soul, the soul free of culture education standard and conventions, I have direct access to a living reality, I'm more awake, I think that places have different energies, Another interesting works of yours on which I would like to spend some words are from your series All My Woman and Holly Mary: I have been struck with the way you have been capable of merging intense -but at the same time thoughtful- tone of red with delicate nuances... By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

My inspiration depends on the life, I'm living, life is movement, it is never fixed, we must constantly recreate the world, everything goes good or bad, my palette, the colors changed when I went to russia, moscow especially, I preferred moscow to pettersbourg, moscow is very energetic, I saw a lot of icons in the museums especially in churches , and I cried a lot these beauties, it was so strong for me, I can feel it, I felt a lot of energy telling me, I was very impressed, the function of art is affected the soul, the sensibilty, the heart, being outside the language, and I was deeply touched. The series all my women is a serie on women, the eternal feminine (l’Êternel fÊminin) transcended, queen woman, women goddess, divine woman, the woman who has access to the secrets of nature we forgot, it is not against the man,it is a re-balancing, I think men and women are divine, we need to bring out the light in us,

From the Holly Mary series, details, year

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only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

Art is life, is not it Duchamp who said? everything is art creation whether literary painting cinema photo and many more, life is creation, what matters is the spirit how it is embodied and insufle us to live, as I said write is different from paint because the medium is different and,this is not the same energies working, but in the end it is being, it is creating

From the ll My Women series, details, year

crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the

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of human existence... I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

I do not think the creative process is disconnected from direct experience, life is an experience, life is constantly creating, never the same always different but we have access to inner states, pures states present world, the artist attempts to capture these moments translate these fugitives states which are a part of the reality, of course visual art is different from the literary or poetic art, musical art, it is not the same body parts that work, and it is very interesting we can not lock the spirit, the spirit is free, unlimited, and it plays with the medium that suits him, sometimes writing, drawing, singing, dancing, photo, video, painting .. So far your artworks have been exhinited in several occasions, both in Europe and in America: it goes without saying that positive feedbacks are capable of providing an artist of a special support... I was just wondering if the expectation of a positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

when I create I am free, I no longer exist, my ego has disappeared, it is a wonderful feeling, that's all the world's gold, my joy is my salary,I do not paint to please or satisfy a requirement of fashion market, I paint because I am joy,I am sincere, I believe in the sincerity of the heart to the true the good, well on my paintings can not please everyone for some one they are too naive too colorful too much ... in europe in france sometimes – maybe- it is too much I think – I do not know exactly, but I can feel, but I am very happy if my painting please, the artist is not an isolated being in the world, he must confront, show, exchange , Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Catherine. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Thank you very much for your attention, I prepare several exhibitions : in march in Lyon in france with the zonta Club july and august 2014 in a castle in France château de la mothe à Vicq in july in with the pianist Marc Vella and two projects in 2015 in san diego California and Mexico

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Ayako Kobayashi (Japan) an artist’s statement

I'm a woodblock artist. I love Japanese traditional woodblock works because it has very beautiful, sensitive and original colors. What I want to express is "human feelings." And the watercolors can express delicacy of feelings. And the grain of woodcut sometimes expresses flow of feelings. On the basis of my experiences, I've tasted various feelings such as anger, sorrow, struggle and jealousy and then come back from those feelings and faced forward. I want to express the human power to walk through your life by yourself. Suffer, struggle and look for the light. I believe that it is the human joy of living. I aim at creating a woodblock work that expresses full of the joy of living! And I always think how to reflect my unique idea on my print works. I'm pursuing to develop very unique and cool original print expressions.

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Dive into Blue

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An interview with

Ayako Kobayashi Hello Ayako, and welcome to ARTiculAction. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

I think art is all that an artist have experienced in his life. Personality and feelings and the way of thinking, all the experiences expressed the art as energy. And I think that it moves the audiences’ heart. Contemporary art has unprecedented novelty and uniqueness. In addition, it has a message to appeal to people living in the same time. There is "truth" and "harmony” between tradition and times. Whatever it is, a novel thing or a universal thing, if it appeals to the audience’s heart, it remains to be worthwhile. Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any experiences that particularly impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks? By the way, what's your point about formal training? I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

I repeated failures and learned the importance of thinking and recovering my life. I want to express that in my work, in my recent work, "Canaan" features the theme of the death of my young friend. I was in deep sorrow in those days. In that my work I am asking her "What is your place like?" And my work "GO ON" expresses myself who is going to begin to walk again after the sorrow, with the memory like treasure that I spent with her. As for a point of the training of my artwork is that at first I am excited at the work of my teacher and my heart is moved. Because I sincerely respect a person who made a splendid work and want to learn from such a teacher. The teacher whom I learned from was very

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nice and flexible. She respected my will in the first and let me make it freely. And she advised me on the part which is difficult for me to express due to my short experience. She led me to a better direction. There are still many technical things that I should learn. But I think that my inspiration for creation takes precedence to those technical things. In that point, I think that I was very lucky. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Things that I saw in a town, impressive people whom I met and my favorite music give me inspiration for creation. And motif partially comes up and broadens my imagination. I draw sketches many times until I am satisfied. I think sketching is the first important part. Most of my works are an abstract. So I put my energy to make my imagination exist practically. And the next step is to carve a woodcut. I think about an effect when a color is combined. So I first roughly make it and adjust it while making it. And I also take care of grain of wood which can express “flows” like flows of feelings and flows of water or air. I like grain of wood so I always try to use it effectively. The final step is to print. I print it strictly following my first image. And I check the first print. I review it many times and adjust the color balances. I always seek if there are more suitable colors for my work. The sketch becomes vital only after being printed and colored. After a work has been completed, I always ask myself what this work means to me. I mean I always ask my subconscious. Preparation time for a work depends on how long I take time to make the first sketch. I usually create it for about a month. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Newborn and Dive into Blue that our readers have already admired in the introductory pages of this article: would you like to tell us something about the genesis of these interesting pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

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a photographer Emi Naito, my friend. At first, I received some pictures from her. And I chose the picture of the underwater in Hawaiian sea which seemed to fit to my print. I wanted to make a work utilized each other's art. So I widened imagination without preconception after I watched her photograph. As a result, I created this work which expresses a butterfly and a dragon as "Yin and Yang" in myself. I made “Newborn� under the theme of "the moment when a new thing was born". Creation, delivery, change and growth, these are new birth in all. I think that a new thing is born when light and darkness, a negative and positive, prayer, thanks, an effort and passion, these elements are put together. And the will power to continue it is also quite important there. I wanted to see a lot of such moments and made this work for me. I am satisfied so much with this work because it is calm but also powerful. Exception made for some very stimulating pieces as for example the recent and interesting Sun Ra Tarng, your artworks are almost all abstract, as the wonderful Code of Birth: still, I can recognize in them a deep inspiration from our reality... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process: do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

I always see things from my experiences and express them in a work. Because my work is a message which expresses a truth I felt in a moment. This is a strong attraction for an artist. I sometimes produce a made-toorder work by an offer from my friend. And when I express the image of my friend, the information that I have about the friend always contains the information that I experienced. I used to dislike reflecting myself on my work bringing a theme of delusion or fantasy. And now I see those works, I feel they seem empty. I believe when a work contains reality and emotion, it can make its audiences moved. So I think it is an absolutely necessary element for my creation. Newborn

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Sun Ra Tarng Dive into Blue

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Canaan

Nocturne

cially Canaan that I have to admit is one of my favourite project of yours... one of the features of your pieces that has mostly impacted on me is the effective mix of colors that gives life to the canvas... moreover, as in the interesting My Hope, suggesting tones of green seem to reveal such an inner struggle, a deep tension and intense emotions... By the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

as gray or flesh color when I find there are some colors which are hard to match each other. These intermediate colors are also quite effective to express complicated feelings. I used to use colors which came up to my mind following my inspiration. And in most cases it worked well. But I came to try various possibilities because woodblock is a technique to be able to enjoy various atmospheres of various colors. I often imagine that I exist in my work. And ask myself what color is best fitting if I were in my work. Temperature and feelings, I also ask myself what is the message which the picture appeals. I feel and imagine colors from my body.

“Nocturne” was a challenging work to me. In this work I wanted to strictly reproduce the gradation of the night sky of Bali as a print. And “My Hope” and “Canaan” express my mind scenery. My works use many colors and my favorite colors are green and violet because they have mysterious, unique mood. And also I often use intermediate colors such

In my works there used to have the colors which came from the real world before. But when I chan-

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Divine

ged myself to feel colors from my body, the world of the color became free. As for the choice of the colors, in creating “Sun Ra Tarng”, I had a hard time most. I tried all the combinations of colors as much as I could think of. However all didn’t work well. Finally I added yellow to all colors and it became quite unique. This work taught me the usage of a new color.

the code of birth

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My Hope

You are a very prolific artist, and I would like to spend some words about your recent pieces as well as your earlier ones: in particular I have been impressed with Dune Chronicle...

nally draining? By the way, does your process let you to visualize your pieces before creating? Do you know what it will look like before you begin?

Is painting like a release for you or is it emotio-

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Dune Chronicle

I took a trip to the Tunisian desert. However, as a result, it became the work which reflected the inside of me. I had had an image of "death" from the desert. But it had very mysterious vitality when I actually saw real desert. It seemed to me that the desert reflected me who was stagnated and couldn’t go out anywhere. And that was a condition to hold big energy to progress. It has a partial visualization. But I can’t always see the entire picture. And I do not know what it means first. After the completion of a work I sometimes feel it has more profound message than I firstly expected.

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It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or better, the expectation of an award- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

As an artist, it is a great pleasure when my work is recognized. And I think the prize is the symbol. However, what I feel the greatest pleasure is the existence of people who shed a tear and feel hopes and talk their impressions seeing my works. It is a great happiness for me that there are people loving my works ardently. Whenever I create a work, I always take good care of myself. Even though my work which didn’t express me but got a good evaluation, I think that doesn’t make any sense. I thinks I should make myself to be the biggest fan of me. Thanks a lot for your time and your sharing your thoughts, Ayako. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you?

On my next theme, I would like to express my vivid feelings. I want to focus on splendid senses such as anger, jealousy, writhing and pains. All of them are what only human beings can feel. The theme with my interest is “human beings.” In various points of view, I will continue expressing human beings living in this time now. Thank you !

KATARIBE-Lorekeeper

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Articulaction Art Review March 2014  

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