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NO. 6

SEPTEMBER 2012

HOW TO SURVIVE FROSHPOCALYPSE

OUT OF THE BOX

ARTIST THAT PUSH BUTTONS

MAJOR SPEAK


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VISUAL ARTS

Finally, the new school year has arrived! Whether you’re brand new to York or a returning student, a new year ensures exciting adventures and daunting challenges. Know that you are not alone! This is where we come in; the Faculty of Fine Arts provides an excellent Peer Mentor Program for all Fine Arts undergrad students throughout the school year. The Fine Arts Student Ambassadors and Mentors (FASAM) are staffed by trained upper-year students from all Fine Arts disciplines, who are not only academically successful but active and engaged in their own creative fields. Whether it’s about resources and services on campus, questions about courses, advice for particular projects, or info about upcoming Fine Arts events, the FASAMs will be your go-to source. The best part about the Fine Arts mentoring Program is that you can have a FASAM in your discipline as a guide on the side for the year, AND you can also connect with other FASAMs who have areas of expertise and interests that

you are curious about. Take a look on the Mentoring web page at http:// www. yorku.ca/finearts/sas/mentors/fasam-list. htm and check out the bios of some of our FASAMs to find the mentor you’d like to talk to. You can also come speak to us in person during the year. We’re located at the Fine Arts Information Centre on the first floor of the Goldfarb Centre fro Fine Arts (CFA). Pop by and say hello—we’re a friendly bunch, and are always willing to be of assistance. You can also reach us at 416-736-2100 ext. 20838, or at fasam@yorku.ca. With that, I wish all of you the best of luck with your endeavors, and to remind you that support is always available. If you don’t know, ASK! On behalf of the FASAMs, I welcome our frosh with open arms to the Fine Arts family. Remember to keep your head up, your heart kind, and may you never stop creating. Joy Wong, Visual Arts FASAM


ARTICHOKE | ISSUE NO.06 | SEPTEMBER 2012

COVER FROSHPOCALYSPE

LIFE 09

ENTERTAINMENT

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HEALTH

WINTERS EDITOR’S LETTER EWAG BLURBS

YORK

GOAL SETTING FRESHMAN 15 SEXUAL HEALTH

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ISSUES

MAJOR SPEAK VISUAL ARTS FILM THEATRE

EDM PHOEBE FICTION FASHION COMEDY LIBERAL ARTS WHY ART?

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BODY MOD UNIVERSITY 4 LESS CHILD LABOUR

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EDITOR IN CHIEF Lindsay Presswell ART DIRECTOR Brian Cass ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Lucas Young DESIGNERS Brian Cass, Lucas Young, Jake Oliviera, Kyle Matthews, Kristine Planche, Scott Osborne, Jacob Colosi, Jennifer Zhang, Mauricio Galvez, Chelsie Grant, Heather McAlpine, Ramis Khawaja WRITERS Lindsay Presswell, Joy Wong, Alex Millington, Lucy Powis, Curtis te Brinke, Stefan Jabonski, Rielle Ullberg, Carmen Chen, Emma Beckett, Veronica Appia, Elli Waese, Shannon Marek, Shimona Herchberg, Laura Speare, Yousra Zaki, Nirusika Balamohan, PHOTOGRAPHY Brian Cass, Lucas Young, Haley Walton SHOUT OUT TO Austin Cheung of CASA, Copycat, Sandy Pearlman & Bones, Mikey Disco, Black Absinthe, Shintaro, Chris MacFarlane & Danyka Nadeau, Highway Lights, Streets Ahead, No King For Countrymen


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LETTER Salutations, Winters affiliates and fellow Yorkies! This issue of Artichoke Magazine marks the beginning of our second year as a publication and the end of a long summer of reorganizing, rebranding, and reworking. Last year we gave you an introduction to our Fine Arts themed magazine in its infancy, and now we present something that has been nurtured to maturity, ready to stand on its own and venture out into the world. Maybe you can sense my blatant ‘Artichoke-Magazine-is-just-like-a-first-year-student’ metaphor. Maybe you couldn’t. Regardless, I’ve spilled the beans and can now offer a hearty WELCOME to all incoming students. I can’t talk about what it’s like to be a first year without making a lot of assumptions about a lot of students that I’ve never met before, but what I can note is that just as every one of us paves our own unique road on the way here, each of us will experience a journey that will be incomparable to the journey of any other student on campus. It’s up to the individual student to decide what pit stops to make, how fast or slow to go, whether or not

to commit a few minor traffic violations along the way, or when to pull into a roadside motel to rest and collect themselves before continuing on to a destination. My advice to incoming students is advice I’ve heard tossed around a lot in my time here: personalize your journey to the fullest extent of your ability. Join clubs, go to free seminars, check out the writing lab at the Scott Library, get your Passport to Learning from the Registrar’s Office, learn how to expertly navigate the York Website… anything to make your trip through undergrad status more enriching. Anytime a student organization offers a free meal in exchange for an hour of your time, take it as an opportunity to grab a slice of complimentary pizza and learn about what your fellow students are up to. When the YFS offers academic amnesty for students that attend a rally in Queen’s Park, skip out on class guilt free and learn what it’s like the be a part of a movement… when an opportunity arises, take it. I don’t believe it when people say that university ‘are the best years of your life,’ mostly because it is up to you personally when you will have the best years

of your life. BUT that being said, during your time in University you should do everything in your power to make these years give the rest of the years of your life a run for their money. Luckily for you Winters affiliates, Winters College Council has tons of events and opportunities so that students can better their college and university experience. From acoustic nights, pub nights, Frosh and Frost Week, to evenings of Contra dance, belly dancing, and open positions on your friendly neighbourhood magazine, Winters College has a club or activity that fits any interest. Stop by WC rm003 during office hours (usually noon5pm each weekday) for more info on how you can get involved. Questions or comments about this letter or this issue of the Artichoke? Send inquiries, concerns, and love notes to wintersfreepress@winterscouncil.com. Lindsay Presswell, Editor-in-Chief.


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WCC

Eleanor Winters Art Gallery (aka EWAG) is a student-run art gallery located around the corner from the Winters College Master’s Office (rm. 129). It is a space dedicated to the talented and creative minds of the Fine Arts community of York University. The gallery exists to promote and exhibit the artistic and intellectual works of York undergraduate, graduate and alumni. We bring you a different exhibition of student artwork every week of the year. Come out to exhibition openings for a chance to meet the artists, and enjoy the free food! We like to keep EWAG interdisciplinary so we also host music, theatre, and dance

performances and workshops. If you would like to send us a proposal for an art show or for a creative event, please email us at ewag@yorku.ca Each academic year the gallery welcomes the new term with exhibitions by alumni artists from Winters. This year we are pleased to present: *Duncan Greene - September 3rd to 14th - EWAG (129 Winters College) *Simon Black & Robert Clements September 17th - 28th - EWAG (129 Winters College) And come and see us throughout the year for undergraduate exhibitions!


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WINTERS COLLEGE COUNCIL athletics There are many ways to get involved and show your Winters spirit! Intramurals are just one great way to start. Last year Winters Athletics did exceptionally well, especially in men’s basketball, indoor/outdoor soccer and hockey. We won Most Improved College for the 2011/2012 season, which was a great accomplishment for Winters. For the 2012/2013 intramural season we are looking to have an even better year than the last. We are welcoming all new and returning athletes to join us in our intramural sports and to show the other colleges what we’ve got. We encourage you all to get involved and it’s an awesome way to make friends, stay fit and to have a good time. There will also be events like the Athletic Banquet held at the end of the year, for all intramural athletes to attend. Even if you’re not interested in playing a sport, but have a lot of team spirit, we are encouraged people from the collage to come out and support our athletes. Your Vice President of Athletics, and Director of Athletics, will be working their hardest for you all to have the most memorable experience this upcoming season. We look forward to meeting all new and returning athletes. Sincerely, Taneisha + Christina

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social/cultural As an incoming student, you may be wondering what there is to do around this place called Winters College. Have no fear, your So/Cul team is here to facilitate events in which to socially and culturally enrich your life. That means, we host bad-ass events where you will have so much fun, you’ll forget the sock monster ate your socks, again. So, we trust you’re ready for a GUTBUSTING, ERUPTIVE AND EXCITING YEAR AT YORK UNIVERSITY! Throughout the year, we host regular bi-weekly events, such as Acoustic Nights in the Ab (Absinthe Pub & Coffee Shop) which you should look into signing up for now, little musicians, ‘cause spots fill up quickly. The Ab also homes wicked themed Pub Nights and Karaoke Nights that are sprinkled throughout the year. These nights will be the best memories. Especially our BIGGEST, BADDEST, MOST AMAZING and SEXY Winters events of the year... Start saving yo’ cash monz for our epic Winters Montreal Trip in February & CASA Formal in April! Each one of these epic events will knock your unmatched socks off, so make sure to take part and get ready for the ride of your life this upcoming 2012-13 year! Any ideas for events that would be awesome for Winters? Shoot us some love! We also work closely with Marie Rickard, our college Master as well as Mitch Burnie, our Residence Life Coordinator on all events. If we’re not in the WCC Office when you happen to walk by leave a message in our mailbox or simply email us at: harry@ winterscouncil.com, mila@winterscouncil.com and brigetta@ winterscouncil.com. Trust us: this year is going to rock your world! LOVE, 
Your So/Cul Team, 
Harry, Mila and Brigetta


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BLURB

HI EVERYONE,

WIN-WHAT? WINTERS! Whether you’re a first year student or a returning one, these words will follow you wherever you will go, even while you’re reading the Artichoke! Mahssa Chavoshi here, your College Council President. To start off, Winters College Council is a student government that is entrusted to enrich the lives and educational experience of our affiliated students. Through academic, cultural, political, recreational and artistic programs, we strive to make students’ experiences here at York both academically fulfilling and socially satisfying. If this sounds like something you want to be a part of then JOIN Winters College Council. Keep your eye out for our Fall/Winter 2012-2013 elections that are happening later on in September. If it’s not College Council and you want to get involved in something else, fear not and look forward to Thursday night pub nights, acoustic nights, jazz nights, and karaoke that happen in the Ab. We also have a trip to Montreal in February, and in April we dress up, eat a fancy dinner and dance our night away at Formal. There will be posters plastered all over the walls so you won’t miss a chance to purchase a ticket. The Winters College Council office is located in 003 Winters College. Stop by whenever you can! If you have any questions, concerns or you just want to chat email me at president@winterscouncil.com or find us on the web at winterscouncil.com. I can’t wait to meet each and every single one of you! Mahssa Chavoshi
President, 
Winters College Council

One of the first things new undergrads ask me when they hear the word “Master” is “what is that”? I’ll start by saying that a large part of my role is my commitment to enriching your experience here in the College. I plan great events for you during the year (concerts, performances, lectures), offer stimulating workshops on topics that range from life skills to study skills, and give you opportunities to meet creative professionals who are eager to share their work and ideas. Keep an eye on the Winters website for upcoming events, and always watch for the posters. And if you have an idea of something you’d like to do, please drop into the Masters’ Office and speak to me, or find me roaming around the college. I always want to hear from you. And get involved!! Winters has some wonderful clubs, a great College Council, its own A Capella choir, and a real student pub. And of course, the Artichoke, to which you should submit your work, ideas and opinions. All the best, Marie

Mahssa Chavoshi WCC President


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In preparation for our September Issue for Frosh Week, Artichoke Magazine got to spend a day with Donnell MacKenzie and Christian Esposito, the gents behind the much-anticipated 2012 Winters College Frosh Week. Artichoke Magazine: How has the summer been for you guys so far? Donnell MacKenzie: How has the summer been? Well, planning frosh week is kinda like being a child and getting ready for Christmas and your parents tell you what you’re going to get, but

you still have to wait a month to play with your toys. We know all the events, and the events are getting ready, and we just want to have fun and DO the events, but we have to wait. Christian Esposito: Yeah the summer’s been shooting by, we’ve been having a lot of fun just planning everything and it’s weird, because we’re having so much fun getting ready for everything. But at the same time, we’re learning the difficulties of growing up.

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A.M: Did you want to expand on that? What do you mean by difficulties of growing up? D.M: Christian and I came into this as best friends, and we already have a working relationship as well as a friendship. Now we’ve had to totally rely on nobody but each other, and Mahssa, our President. Mahssa’s been great. But I guess when you’re able to work with your friends and handle a huge budget and make compromises, it’s always a learning, growing experience.


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FROSHPOCALPYSE

CHRISTIAN’S TIPS

- Always bring a bandana - Stay hydrated - Get weird - Metal spoons > plastic spoons - Designer sunglasses - Don’t sign up for anything - Go to everything - Be efficient on laundry - Wear your frosh shirt all week (bonus points for not taking it off) - Mozart makes you study better, Steve Aoki makes you party harder

A.M: There have been some big rumors about the kind of stuff you guys have planned… some new traditions, some old traditions. Do you want to give us a little taste of what to expect? D.M: We don’t want to give away too much but I guess the main tradition that we’re… I wouldn’t say resurrecting, but trying to put emphasis on this year is like… Winters has always been the college to innovate, and to never try to do the same thing more than twice. I think one of the biggest things our old guard had was this sense of urgency for something new, something that the other colleges aren’t doing. So I guess if we are bringing back any tradition it’s just going to be really exciting.

A.M: Very elusive! D.M: Winters has a tradition of being very elusive! C.E: Also, you could consider this a tradition: just allowing the frosh to come into it not knowing what to expect. That’s always been kind of like how we’ve run frosh week just so that there’s that element of surprise behind everything that we do with them. D.M: Exactly! C.E: And there’s going to be a lot of that this year! D.M: It’s interesting because I’ve been watching some of the comments on the

Frosh Facebook group, and they are all already understanding the Winters’ mentality before they even get here. I don’t know who’s been telling them about us, but they’re already going to bring the crazy. One of the frosh is calling Winters like… ‘an asylum’ The Winters Asylum. [laughter] So basically I think we should just change our name to the Winters Asylum. A.M: It even kind of goes along with the theme of the whole week. What has it been like planning this week along with Orientation Chairs from other colleges? D.M: This year they’ve been trying to rework how YODA is formed. YODA is a group of all the Orientation leaders, so a committee of all the O-chairs and all


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DONNELL’S TIPS

- Wear versatile footwear - Stay true to yourself - Party like it’s your last day - Be happy to be alive - Wear a condom (don’t catch a virus) - Keep your wits - Enjoy a sunrise - Don’t be a fool - Make your parents proud - Drink water all day everyday - Meet new people

the Presidents from each of the colleges. It’s really interesting working with them. We’ve learned a lot more about Winters through our experience with other colleges.

you’ve made here… we really all are doing this for the same reason. And that is that when we came here, somebody really made OUR experience worthwhile, and we all want to give that back.

C.E: It’s been good though, there’s a lot of really interesting people there who have already done this experience so you know, whenever we do come across a problem we can utilize these people and get information from them.

A.M: What advice can you give to first years who are nervous about come to school and participating in this week?

D.M: It’s great to have a bunch of minds working towards the same goal. We’ve realized that one of the things that binds all of the colleges together is that we all really love York University. Whether that means that you really love your college, or you really love all of the friends that

C.E: Straight up not to worry about it at all. After the first day of Frosh week at Winters, they will… well that’s just not a problem with us you know. We’re always inclusive, no matter who you are or what you do. You’re always accepted here. A.M: What was your favourite memory when you were a Frosh?

D.M: When we were Frosh? [to Christian] What to you think? C.E: Ooh, okay - I got one. There’s a certain tradition, that I’m not going to say because I don’t want to give anything away, but the year that I came in as a Frosh there was this one Boss named Borna who was normally a quiet guy, real nice… and when he went up to do this tradition, he just yelled and just raged all over the place and went nuts. He made such a big impact on me because he was this really solid, stoic boss and then coming out and going wild just for a Winters tradition showed me that there’s a lot of strength and power and good vibes that come from Winters spirit. Continued on next page >>


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D.M: I think my favourite moment as a Frosh during Frosh week… See like, I can’t talk about my favourite moment because I don’t want to give away anything! And like even listening to you [Christian] answer that question about Borna, that was such a vague answer man, [laughter] I guess my answer to that question is that my favourite Frosh week moment was every one of them. And me elaborating might take away from their experience during Frosh. It’s one of those things. You have to be a part of it to really get it. A.M: Ultimately when this week is over, what are you going to take away from this experience? What is the most valuable lesson learned or the biggest impact being Orientation leaders has had on you?

D.M: The best learning experience, not even just as O-chair or as a member of Winters, but during my time here and growing up at York University is that what makes a good leader, what makes a good person is like being willing to admit when you’re wrong; picking up where you may have made a mistake or two and moving past that to overcome your faults. There is room to move forward and room to progress. C.E: I don’t really know how to put this but what I’m taking from this is the best closure ever. Being a part of this from the beginning, just being with all these amazing people, doing all these amazing things, and welcoming people into this community and watching it flourish. To experience all that, and then to take all of that positivity and make something

of my own… it’s like coming around full circle. I’ll be able to look back and always smile. D.M: I think I’ll be able to look back and smile too… Christian and I decided we wanted to be O-Chairs in 2008 when we both arrived at Frosh Week. We looked at each other – we never met each other, didn’t know each other – but a couple days in we were like… “You and I. We HAVE to be Co-chairs together.” So really, Froshpocalypse isn’t just trying to play up the End of Days, but truly for us this is our last time doing Frosh Week, this is our last hurrah. It’s an amalgamation of our time here at Winters.


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A ACOUSTIC NIGHT Come out to the Ab for some acoustic live music performed by local talent!

11th & 25th

PUB NIGHT tight & bright Come out to the Ab for our first themed Pub night of the year! Wear your tightest and brightest clothes!

20th


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PRESENTS

MAJOR SPEAK MAJOR SPEAK IS THE section of Artichoke that allows the different fine arts majors to speak about their major. This information can range from different events and activities happening within the program communitity or just general interesting articles written with that particular area of fine art in mind.

MAJOR SPEAK is also new this year, and we have only had response from the following majors: FILM, THEATRE, and VISUAL ARTS. If you are in a fine arts major that hasn’t joined our team yet and likes writting, shoot us an email at wintersfreepress@winterscouncil.com

GET INVOLVED


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VISUAL ARTS

The

VISUAL ARTS Section

OUT OF THE BOX by alex M

THEY SAY THAT for every gallery a proverbial pedestrian ignores, an artist dies from either heartbreak or starvation. We’ve lost countless unknown Picassos, Blakes and Basquiats simply from a lack of publication. A multitude of Dalis stay half-hungry all their lives. Batemans are left to fight off the cold, alone, in the dead of winter. Bob Rosses just waiting for that cable television deal to come through… And so, with this danger in mind, it is my responsibility as a journalist and humanitarian to prevent such a largescale tragedy from continuing its course any longer. I must introduce you to the galleries of York University. Merriam Webster defines the gallery as “a room or building devoted to the exhibition of works of art.” Personally, I find this definition to be rather accurate because it doesn’t state what type of building or room these exhibitions can take place within. One of the beauties of exhibition is that there are a myriad of ways

one might take place. Though for the sake of this article I would like to hone that list down to two categories: the permanent (museums, the AGO and other places whose sole purpose is to display and sell artwork) and the temporary (single night spectaculars, Nuit Blanche and that guy selling watercolours on scraps of cardboard outside of the Eaton Centre). The first permanent gallery I would like to mention is one that a great number of CFA-situated students will unfortunately pass by on a regular basis: The Gales Gallery. The Gales is basically a giant, pristine, eggshell white room with a ceiling high enough to house a live giraffe and a floor area wide enough to house a dead giraffe. This gallery exhibits the work of student, artists and collectives on a weekly basis. Unfortunately though, all exhibits taking place in the current year are booked one year in advance, so any artists who are interested in this opportunity to bulk up a resume and have their work displayed to

the masses must contact the Visual Arts Department with a righteous portfolio ready to go and wait patiently for a callback to exhibit next year. The Joan and Martin Goldfarb Centre is home to the Special Collections Gallery, which periodically exhibits the work of select class assignments, personal showcases and themed presentations. They can also be contacted through the Visual Arts Department with any questions or proposals. The AGYU in Accolade East is surely most notable gallery on campus, which its staff has generously and beautifully credited as being “…a public gallery serving both the on-campus and off-campus communities that offers research and educational resources alongside exhibitions of Canadian and international contemporary art.” Though this gallery does not display the work of student artists, they offer an array of curatorial positions that allow students to gain the hands-on


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experience needed to advance comfort- strange crannies in between these galably in the creation, administration and leries. There is a movement in the visual organization subdivisions of the arts. arts that strives to destroy and discount Often on the opening night of a new the “white cube” of private gallery space: feature, the artists involved will accom- that unusually clean and exclusive club pany the exhibit and will hold question, for wine-sippers. They do this by hosting answer and advice periods afterward with exhibitions in contrastingly rugged social the attendees. This might very well be the settings to prove that art isn’t for rich, but case with the AGYU’s current exhibition: rather the everyman. And seeming as how Imaginary Homelands, which was pro- York U has taught many aspiring artists duced by a group of international artists about this movement, it is only natural in residence. that they’ve supported temporary exhibiThe last major gallery on campus was tions that share this Dadaistic ideology. bequeathed to the very college associOne of the most prominent examples I ated with the arts and shares its name can think of is the King Octopus of 2012. with the wife of the formidable Robert Near the beginning of spring, a giant strip H. Winters, whose tireless efforts made of paper roughly nine feet wide and 30 or this school what it is today: Eleanor Win- 40 feet across was pinned to the wall beters, who also worked tirelessly and whose side Starbucks as a community art projgenerosity also ect. For two days contributed or so, passers by to the general The Gales is basically a giant, pristine, were able to pick today-ness of up a can of paint York. (GASP!) eggshell white room with a ceiling high and go wild - the In other words, result being a the gallery is enough to house a live giraffe and a floor massive, hectic named the Elexcitement of eanor Winters area wide enough to house a dead giraffe. forms with a king Art Gallery octopus as its – EWAG for poster child. short. This primarily student-run space, March 2012 marked the month of the which is just a tad smaller than The Gales, Psychopomp Visual Arts Open House: can be found down the hallway next to possibly the most extravagant exhibithe Office of the Master in Winters Col- tion of artists since Nuit Blanche, but lege. The EWAG houses the work of stu- at a school-sized level. Picture all of the dent artists and encourages all interested prides and joys of practitioners from each patrons to email them regarding submis- specialization displayed by the hundreds sion proposals at: ewag@yorku.ca. They in just about every room of the CFA. are also known to host the odd modest And scattered about every hall of the gathering, be it a suave midnight portrai- CFA. And hung from every ceiling of the ture session or wild 24-hour collaborative CFA. Now that I’m recalling the event, I installation. remember the atmosphere being someThere are, as if equalizing with the what on the oppressive side – but imprespermanent galleries mentioned above, sive nonetheless. many other mysterious and transient There happens to be a group of artists events that can be located in all sorts of known as the Exhibitionists on campus as

well. Despite what their title might suggest, they do not flaunt their genitals in public, but rather showcase the work of local artists for a single night in unusual environments that appropriately reflect the theme of the exhibit. This is agroup that truly basks in the glory of post postmodern, unadulterated, unframed, antiwhite cube, kibosh-the-general-guidelines-for-conventional-curating… art. On that note, I must bring this article to a close and allow you the chance to explore York’s vast plains of artistic opportunity, rescuing those struggling Bob Rosses and Reniors in the process.

GALLERIES AT-A-GLANCE The Gales Gallery 105 Accolade West M-F 10:30am-4pm Open Sept - May Only Admisson is FREE The Special Collections Gallery Joan and Martin Goldfarb Centre Main Lobby Admisson is FREE AGYU Accolade East M-F 10am-4pm W 10am-8pm Sun 12pm-5pm Sat Closed Admisson is FREE EWAG 129 Winters College M-F 12:30pm-5:30pm Admission is FREE


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YORK

The FILM

Section

TIFF

PICKS

The summer has merely been a warm up for film fans this year with the latest projects from Paul Thomas Anderson, Quentin Tarentino, Andrew Dominik, Terrance Malick, Peter Jackson, The Coen Brother’s, Judd Apatow and Sam Mendes all still to come. (Just looking at that list makes me slobber like hyena on salvia). One might ask how they could possibly refresh any anticipation they held before getting drunk off the back to back blockbusting epics we we’re treated to this summer, but the year is far from over and TIFF offers much to look forward to

for movie lovers. To help with the movie hangover we acquired after the summer, we have the Toronto International Film Festival. TIFF is the shower beer we can now enjoy before sobering up for the Oscar rush beginning in the fall when we’ll all want to be at our sharpest and most judgmental. Here are 3 picks worth getting excited about playing at TIFF, along with some honourable mentions.

ARGO Argo takes writer/director Ben Affleck out of Boston for the first time on screen, and audaciously brings him into the world of political relations between Iran and the United States circa 1970. The film follows the story of a C.I.A exfiltration specialist who, during the Iranian revolution and under the guise of a Canadian film production company, goes in to Iran to free American citizens who have taken shelter at the Canadian Embassy. Why you should be excited: It was no fluke when Ben Affleck won the Acade-


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my Award for screenwriting with his first feature length script Goodwill Hunting. The man is a wonderful story teller and is shaping up to be a rock solid director. If that doesn’t convince you to see Argo then consider the following: Starring alongside Affleck in Argo, is the man who has ironically, made Breaking Bad more addicting than actually smoking meth. We’ve all loved Bryan Cranston since we knew him as our dad, Hal on Malcolm in the Middle, and sometimes I can’t help but see his perturbed suburban vulnerability, even if he’s getting his wrists slashed in Drive, or cooking up that sweet, sweet Christina on AMC. Cranston is first credited in Argo, and we’ll get the to see if his television prowess can transcend onto the big screen in a lead role.

to television lately, and will be making a splash with huge roles in 2012. He’ll be showing up in the Coen’s Inside Llewyn Davis, as well as some other well known film-school-dropout-turned-huge-director’s Lincoln...yeah the same one starring Daniel Day Lewis.

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Much Ado about Nothing- Shakespeare from the man who gave us The Avengers... and Cabin in the Woods... and Buffy... and Toy Story... and Firefly. Actually with that record it’s probably about time he took on Shakespeare.

TORONTO INTERNATION FILM FESTIVAL

FRANCES HA! Despite having co-written Wes Anderson classics Fantastic Mr. fox and The Life Aquatic, as well as writing and directing the Oscar nominated The Squid and The Whale, Noah Baumbach has yet to become a household name in the indie film community...or maybe I’m just recently discovering his genius. Frances ha! follows the story of young dancer played by Greta Gerwig, (who also co-wrote this bad boy with Baumbach) who moves to new york and juggles a number of career setbacks while her bank account dwindles and her ambitions rise ...or something along those lines. Why you should be excited: Noah Baumbach behind the camera and script should be enough to get you stoked for this one, but if you’re ignorant to history you can start getting excited about Adam Driver now. Driver plays the hilarious Adam, (one of the most original characters in recent memory) on HBO’s GIRLS and is co-starring in Frances ha! Driver is one of the most important things to happen

SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS From the writer/director of In Bruges comes the story of a screenwriter (Collin Farrell), who finds himself caught up in L.A’s criminal underworld when his friends (Christopher Walken and Sam Rockwell) kidnap a mobster’s Shih-Tzu. Why you should be excited- Watching Walken, Rockwell and Farrell banter what will likely be a knife-like script back and fourth will make you wish your own conversations were that much fun. HONORABLE MENTIONS:

To the Wonder- Terrance Malick blurs the thin white coke line between film and yoga class...again.

John Dies at the End- It’s Enter the Void meets a Scanner Darkly from the director who brought you Bubba Ho-Tep. It will be nothing less than outrageous. Pusher- The British re-make of Nichols Winding Refn’s (Drive, Bronson) first film. Letting people who still haven’t seen the director’s first work skip all those annoying subtitles. Thanks for Sharing- The Hulk’s alter ego, Mark Ruffalo, joins a sex addiction support group with Gwyneth Paltrow. Rust and Bone- It’s Blue Valentine, from Belgium...except Marion Cotillard is probably going to break your heart much worse than Gosling ever could.

Looper- Joseph Gordon-Levitt wears too much make-up to pass for Bruce Willis. The story of what happens when a double dip recession cuts casting director’s budget’s while inflating the talent agent’s. A Late Quartet- Philip Seymour Hoffman. Christopher Walken. Violins. You’re probably going to cry a lot. You’re probably supposed to.

Individual tickets will be available at a student price of $25 on September 2nd, for a red carpet premier, and $15 for a regular screening. If you’re screening sells out, more tickets are released at 7AM the morning of the screening and you can always wait in the rush line 10 minutes before a screening at the box office to snag some last minute goods. Having a film scene this strong isn’t common for Canadian city’s and student’s should take advantage of everything TIFF has to offer while they can from September 6th to the 16th. -STEFAN JABONSKI


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The THEATRE

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8 to Know

YOU

Things

Need

A B O U T

1 YEAR ST

THEATRE

I’m Lucy, a second year studying Devised Theatre and Dramaturgy. When I’m not in the theatre, I’m usually watching reruns of Lost, trying to become a master chef, or taking photographs of cats. I’m also second year representative on the Theatre Student Association, so if you have any questions about life in the theatre program, feel free to ask! You can email me at lucy. tp7@gmail.com.

So it’s your first week of classes in the York University theatre program. Welcome! Whether you’re straight out of high school, another degree, or a year off school, things can be pretty overwhelming. I know I definitely had questions, so here are some tips!


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Update your iPod.

As stereotypical as it might sound, there are certain songs you just have to know the lyrics to. One of my more awkward frosh week memories is when an impromptu Disney quad party was started and there were a few songs from Tarzan and The Jungle Book that got played that I swore I had never heard before (because, really, who cares about The Jungle Book?). While everyone else was singing along enthusiastically, I stood there mouthing ‘watermelon’ over and over again. Knowing the lyrics to songs from Disney movies, Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog, and as many Broadway musicals as you can find will make you friends quickly.

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Update your wardrobe.

Especially considering the varied nature of the first year theatre program, you should definitely make sure that your wardrobe is well equipped for all occasions. Besides the required safety gear that you will be buying in early September, get your hands on some clothes you don’t care about for crew, movement clothes for acting, black clothes for backstage crews, a white collared shirt for ushering, and a semi formal outfit for company parties.

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Open spaces are your best friends.

Whether you’re working on a show for the playGround festival or rehearsing your collective creation for acting class, at some point this year, I guarantee you are going to need a large, empty room at your disposal. Common rooms in Winters fill up quickly, and first years can’t book studio space, so always keep your eye open for potential rehearsal spots. Bonus hint: if you find a really cool spot, keep it a secret so it doesn’t get taken (but tell me, of course).

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Listen to your professors.

Your professors are full of words of wisdom, and they really are worth listening to. Leaving your creative project to the night before it’s due will result in a craft supply nightmare, and not keeping up with your readings for Origins will come back and haunt you in the end. They also really mean it when they say that you can talk to them outside of class if you need help, so take advantage of it!

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Make connections.

Your TA, your crew head, and that person sitting next to you in lecture are all people who could potentially hire you in the future. A scene partnership that works really well could result in a larger partnership years down the road, so don’t burn any bridges! In addition, don’t forget to get to know people who are not in the theatre program. Winters residence is a great source of talent from across the fine arts disciplines that should definitely not be overlooked.

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Don’t forget your own community!

You will constantly be reminded about free tickets that are available for you to take advantage of, and you definitely should. Why pass up seeing free theatre around Toronto? At the same time, though, don’t forget about the theatre going on at York as well. The MFAs and each of the areas of undergraduate theatre have at least one showcase each year. I definitely regret not going to see more of them last year, and the ones that I did see were fantastic. Most of them are free too, so you have no excuses!

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Be open-minded.

If someone had come up to me when I was in grade 12, and told me that my degree would require me to learn how to use a sliding compound miter saw and an industrial sewing machine, walk around like a penguin for hours on end, and spend a week doing nothing but origami, I would have called them crazy. Being open to all the new experiences that the theatre program will throw at you is the best way to have the most fantastic first year possible.

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Don’t forget to breathe.

This tip comes straight from acting class, and it could not be truer. Have a fantastic first year, and I hope to see you around campus. -LUCY POWIS


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YORK

The THEATRE

Section

JOIN THE CLUB Emma here. I love theatre, and I hope you do too. If you don’t yet, maybe I can convince you. Theatre was my first love, and it is something that has always been a part of my life. I grew up in a school that focused on integrated arts as a learning style, and it has always been important to me as a way to express, explain, and understand the world around us. I have done it all; acting, writing, production, directing, even working as a stagehand a number of times. Any opportunity I have to be a part of a production, I take. Does this make me a geek? Absolutely. But I wear the name with pride. One of the best qualities of the theatre program here at York is that it completely debunks the idea of theatre being all about performance. Sure the actors are important, but they are just as important as every single other person contributing to the production, from the writer and director all the way down to the person sweeping the stage at intermission. It focuses on collaboration and appreciation of what each person has to offer. Because of this attitude York students tend to develop a strong sense of community, which goes a long way towards success in the theatre world of Toronto and beyond. The theatre program at York is one of the best in Canada. It is a major part of

the university, and I consider myself lucky to know many of the people involved in it. Even though I have only spent one year here, I already feel like I am part of something amazing. To any incoming freshmen that have made it through the audition process and are starting their first year in the program, congratulations. To anyone else in Fine Arts, or even if you have no connection to the program and are just vaguely interested, there is still a place for you. Come see the shows, talk to people, get involved, I promise you will be welcomed with open arms. Theatre is a place where success comes not just from talent, but care, hard work, and love. When I say see the shows, I don’t mean just the major 4th year productions. One of the things that make us so special is the diversity of the performances we produce. Some of the best include the shows put on by the Devised Theatre students throughout the year in smaller venues around campus, the playGround festival which gives an opportunity to a number of budding artists in the school to perform their own small pieces compiled by an artistic director, and Scenes by Design which showcases all of the production work and visual art that students in the theatre department create during the year. Even beyond that, many York students have already started their own production

companies, and are creating pieces that are being performed all over campus and the GTA. This is one of the best ways to support new theatre, so if you are at all interested I encourage you to go to these shows and help out your fellow artists. Some people have seen theatre as a dying art form ever since film has become widely available, but I see it as merely adapting and becoming something creatively unique. These young companies represent the future of theatre, and some of the work they do is absolutely unbelievable. In short, get involved. Theatre interprets all the inexplicable ways of the world and makes them beautiful. It can be anything you want it to be. We are lucky enough to be at a school with such an outstanding program and amazing amount of talent, and throughout the year I will be providing updates and information on opportunities for workshops and performances at York and in Toronto so you can see it for yourself. I hope I have convinced some of you to support and even participate in these opportunities, and that maybe you will love it as much as I do. -EMMA B.


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ARTISTS THAT PUSH PLAY

WRITTEN BY: BRIAN CASS PHOTOS BY: JAKE HEBSHER

Bodies are frisked, tickets are scanned, hands are stamped, IDs are checked, wrists are banded, for your average concert goer, raver, bro, or musician, the show that might be the best night of their lives has just begun. A night of movement, sweat, energy, euphoria, youth, bass, bright flashing lights and “drops,” sums up an experience that only the people who attend such an event will be able to truly speak about.


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ENTERTAINMENT

HE GENRE OF music is Elec- energy into one big “drop.” There is retronic Dance Music, or EDM for ally nothing else like it. An EDM show is short. EDM is a category of music a place where everyone can just dance that music bloggers, music journal- and enjoy the music with people who ists and fans use to classify the non-stop love it as much they do. The amount of evolution of a plethora of genres, styles movement within the crowd is unlike and sub-styles of electronic music. There any other type of performing artist, it’s are ridiculous amounts of sub-styles and subgenres out there that have people arguing on youtube for months whether a song is dubstep or house or electro or some“When I see the crowd, they look thing else entirely. From like this whole, throbbing heartbeat your 45 000 000+ youtube views for Skrillex to your local almost - everything moves together DJ spinning a few of his origiand that’s a good show or party!” nal songs at a house party, EDM is a huge contributor to - Skrillex our generation’s music scene. The popularity of EDM has skyrocketed in the past 5 years, making it one of the most popular genres of new music to- quite magical to say the least. Everyone day. The definition of EDM according to at an EDM show is moving to the beat, Wikipedia is, “electronic music produced dancing, doing their own thing and havprimarily for the purposes of use within ing a good time. As deadmau5 says, “you a nightclub setting, or in a environment know what makes the EDM show the that is centered upon dance-based en- crazy amazing show that it is? You guys tertainment.” It is the music that physi- do, the fans. The people who came to apcally makes people want to move and preciate the music, the lights.” It’s the atdance. The music uses beats and build- titude of the crowd that makes the show ups to bring a sense of joy and euphoria that much better. People seem friendto audiences. It is the ecstatic energy and bliss that is created as a song is brought up and down in tempo, escalating that

lier and more welcome to making new friends at EDM shows. The amount of people who attend EDM shows has been increasing, and that increasing number includes people from all over the musical population. The popularity is shown through these big EDM festivals such as Electric Daisy Carnival, Electric Zoo Festival, Toronto’s VELD, WEMF, Insomnia Festival, Ultra Music Festival, and recently dubbed ‘Favourite Festival in the World,’ Tomorrowland. These festivals average in the tens of thousands of people, all arriving in bright neon colours and crazy outfits. Also, EDM music is more than just at festivals and shows. It’s used in commercials, movies and TV shows. Even the producers of Breaking Bad used a Knife Party song in an episode the other night. When you stop to think about it, EDM is everywhere, it’s a growing genre that has producers around the world trying to find the craziest sound that will help develop that euphoric energy within the listener.


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Some argue that EDM is just a phase, a fad, a music trend that will soon be over, but there are thousands and thousands of people who live EDM as a lifestyle. The ‘haters’ usually believe that DJs aren’t really musicians, that DJs are ‘buttonpushers’ who get on stage and just dance around for an hour and make millions while each patron of the event is paying $50+ to attend this ‘performance.’ They believe that ‘real’ instruments should be played at a concert and people shouldn’t be paying money to have someone sit in front of a computer and turn knobs. Is there really that much musical talent to DJing? You probably have to have an ear for it but heck, even Paris Hilton is a DJ… it can’t be that hard, can it? Mixing one song into another with the same tempo doesn’t seem that hard, but what are they really doing up on stage? Do they just go up and push play? One of EDM’s most popular DJs, Deadmau5, writes in his most reblogged tumblr post, “We all hit play. It’s no secret. When it comes to ‘live’ performance of EDM... that’s about the most it seems you can do anyway... let me do you and the rest of the EDM world button pushers who fucking hate me for telling you how it is, a favor and let you know how it is.” It’s not much of a secret to what DJs actually do or claim to do on stage while performing yet thousands of young adults that will pay up to a hundred or more dollars to see some of these big name artists press play in a dark room. To a person that isn’t into EDM, this poses a few questions like, where is the draw? Where’s the attraction if

there’s no real performing going on? Where’s the skill? As Diplo (one of the hottest producers in EDM today) says in an interview, “We lost skill in DJing years ago, is there any left? It’s all about selection anyway. I mean, I still scratch but do you really wanna go see a DJ scratch for 2 hours? No, girls don’t wanna see it at least... I think it’s just about making good music now.” There’s a lot of truth in this statement. The best and most popular DJ artists out there always have the best production. They spend the most time on building the music they love. Anyone can stand on stage and push play but it takes a musician to create something that will make the crowd go wild. Big DJs like Dada Life and Skrillex put hours upon hours into producing their songs to make them sound like nothing else. These artists sit on their computers until the beat is just right, to get that ecstatic reaction from the crowd, something that brings the crowd together in one vibe. Skrillex says in an interview with WeSC, “When I see the crowd, they look like this whole, throbbing heartbeat almost - everything moves together and that’s a good show or party!” That’s the DJs goal; to make the best tune that connects the people into one feeling, one beat.

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So it’s not necessarily what the artist is doing on stage, it’s about the music they produce, the feeling that music gives you, and the environment of the event you experience when attending an EDM show. WHO CARES if the DJ is just pushing play, EDM is about the producers, the artists that sit in their basements for 100+ hours, looping tracks and synths over each other to get a sound that no one has heard before. It’s about the people who feel a connection with a complete stranger and are able to relate to each other over their mutual love for a certain song or certain “drop”. It’s magical, it’s a rage. It’s a huge party and brings happiness to everyone who attends. Even if the DJs aren’t doing that much on the stage, SO WHAT, they bring the party. Like Andre from RAC said, “Let’s let Dj’ing be what it’s always been about, the music.”


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ART

untitled. by Phoebe Todd-Parrish

i only have one regret in life. it’s not dramatic, or funny. it’s not even really touching or witty. if it was made into a movie, the librarians i work with wouldn’t know what genre to put it in. it would be miscellaneous. i hate that word. it’s too big, it’s too vague, but it’s also too small and too lonely. i hate that word, maybe because i feel like it is not only a descriptor of my regret but maybe the only one i can sort of come up with to describe me, like myself, in general. this person going around telling people their name is “Sheera McKnight” is lying. hi, my name is miscellaneous. but that’s harder to spell. people would get it wrong on my birthday cards, if they decided to send me one. my emails would be misdirected. even government institutions would probably mistake the name for a computer error. i might never get my taxes. it’s that i never had a pet rat. my regret, i mean stupid, right? well. maybe. but i like to think that this is the kind of regret you don’t even really know you regret. it’s more like, i dunno, a passed-you-bywish, or something, most people “regret” things they’ve done i regret things i never even thought about doing. it’s something you didn’t miss at the time because you didn’t know the difference, like if you never used salt. but then one day, someone hands you a french fry smothered in this magical mineral and your taste

buds go nuts. you suddenly can’t LIVE without salt. everything is bland. it’s like that, everything seems dull in comparison. all of a sudden you know what it’s like to be without, and you wish you could go back in time and just have lived in a salty, magical bliss in the past of forever. some might argue with me that you have to “have-not” to appreciate the “have” but i’m telling you: shut up, i just want a rat. why? i don’t know. i think because rats die. eventually i would have to learn your stupid lesson, but i’d want to do it in reverse, or rather, i’d want to do it on a small scale so when something big paral-

leled it, i would have already known what it was like. i would have known what it was like to have something i cared about die. something smart, something i held once, something that needed me. i think a rat might have helped. so, after she died, i got one. it was a little late, and i guess i did this all in reverse. so my life was like jeopardy or something, only instead of a pretty, eloquent, stand-up guy like alex trebec hosting, the guy running the show was me. i was giving the answers, and people around me responded with the questions. i always thought that was kinda offbeat.


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FASHION

Illustration by Brittany Edwards

BONJOUR, My name is Carmen, a selfproclaimed guru for fashion and beauty. I am currently a junior studying Theatre at York University. At heart I am a small town girl fulfilling my artistic dreams in the big T.O. My style can be described as versatile and timeless, because I love to incorporate contemporary pieces with vintage clothing (I have a love for fashion history!). My everyday life consists of: attending fashion shows (like FAT and Fashion Week), being a wardrobe stylist for photo shoots, acting, yoga, dancing, singing, and writing novels and poems. In grade 12, I studied abroad in England for writer’s craft and was voted “Most Likely to Write a Romance Novel”. Last year I submitted an article at York University focusing on “How to Cope with Heartbreak” which was inspired by the movie “He’s Just Not that Into You”. In the near future I would love to write a book about the “Psychology of Love” (the male’s perspective), to write for a fashion and beauty magazine, and travel to New York and Los Angeles. Coco Chanel once said, “Fashion is not something that exists [in clothes] only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, and what is happening.” Have any fashion and beauty questions? Follow me at @Sincerelyjoie on Twitter and Tumblr!

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LIFESTYLE

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By Carmen Chen Our body is a blank canvas constantly and tastefully painted with the palette of clothes and accessories. People often limit their imagination of clothes and accessories, when in reality they can use hair as couture clothing or makeup as body art (including prosthetics and tattoos). What we wear and how and when we wear it, allows us to convey a story, a mood, and a social situation. First- a fashion is approved

by others. Then- it is replicated because of competition. Finally- it is replaced as it becomes commonplace and has ceased to fulfill its function of being distinctive. First Love is a surrealist story that reflects the past and the present. I have always been obsessed with reading about the culture of European royalty, especially Queens like Queen Elizabeth, Bloody Mary, and Marie Antoinette. Queens strived to become independent while suffering against the male society--- tor-

tured, scandalized, and dehumanized. It was tragic. I intentionally structured the photograph with bold details, colours, lines, and shapes to capture the theme of independence and industrialism. There is definitely an element of melancholy and romanticism. Furthermore, I wanted the method of excess to exaggerate and compliment features in the piece. The photo above is my personal favourite because it defines the norm of beauty during the past. The modern princess


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Photography: Vai Yu Law, Model: Emily @ Spot 6 Management, Stylist and Hair: Carmen Chen, MUA: Katie Melanson, Accessories graciously provided by: Spontaneous Reality, Featured on Fashionising.com

is what I like to call it. I customized the vintage dress by adding an ivory ribbon and a headband to fulfill two functions: to emphasize the tiny waist and to compliment the black bold lines on the dress and the purse (from ALDO). In the past the tiny waist and wide stomach made a woman more marketable for marriage and children. What is unique about the dress is that the sleeves have an angelicwing effect, making it effortlessly feminine and infinite. The headband on the model is made of pearls and represents the crown. I wanted the shoes to be suede and dark green because it contrasts the dress perfectly and it is considered a royal colour. The model’s pose is statuesque and goddess-like in order to become a piece of art and blend into the background (a cunning technique used in the

romantic era). Her pose is almost distant and untouchable to the viewer. Moreover, the colours I used in this photo are gold, brown, ivory, black and dark green. The photo on the right depicts a contemporary businesswoman living in the industrial era: a life where times are stressful and fast-paced. I wanted to emphasize the current trend of thick groomed eyebrows, asymmetrical hair, dark lips and a healthy cheek blush to define the jawline. I am always fascinated with eyes because they really are the windows of the soul. Tyra Banks would call this “smizing” to perfection. The model is wearing a Forever 21 coral coloured dress with a laced dark blue jacket. She is also wearing a light pink rose necklace accented by white beads. Lady Gaga discusses surrealism based on her music video Marry the Night:

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“When you’re young your naivety works in your favour. Whereas when you’re older and wiser, being delusional tends to be not too great for you. But as an artist, I believe delusion is the greatest gift you can bear: How much can I get away with? How delusional can I really be?”

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ENTERTAINMENT

MORALITY OF

TWO SOCIAL FALLACIES BY ARIAN S.F. In this era, social pressure and excess of sensitivity towards morality in our society presses the audience of comedy to question the moral integrity of this genre of art. Along with this perception comes the idea that the offense caused by comedy is a form of hurt to the society thereby those of its subjects should be censored. I would like to reflect on how “morality of comedy” and “offensive comedy”, are social fallacies. Let us go through

a brief introduction to comedy and its function before addressing the problem. Comedy is an artistic and intellectual way of observing the daily life events using exaggeration and humor with the intent of making an audience laugh. Comedy is a subjective work which can be formed and shaped spontaneously without rules. The core element of this art that defines a comedian as funny and a nagging person as peevishly fretful, is sense of humor which

the former possesses and the latter lacks. Comedy (especially Black Comedy, Satire, Farce, Irony or Sarcasm) transcends boundaries, breaks taboos and crosses the social red lines. Your Should-nots or donots in a family get-together on a Saturday evening usually fill the salt and pepper shakers of comedians who turn raw ingredients into tasteful content served with great presentation just like food in fancy restaurants. In other words, com-


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edy delivers not “classified” but random messages that are visible to everyonewithout any preference, if the chosen message combined with humor results in funny, the work of comedy is fulfilled. If Comedy upsets, fascinates, hurts or heals it happens to do that as it’s mainly aimed to makes people laugh and deliver messages. Consequently, subjects such as accent, culture, religion etc. aren’t exempt from the willful eyes of Comedy. As if comedy is supposed to be the classroom, it is being underrated and judged unjustly on its ability to educate the audience instead of entertaining them. The purpose of comedy has to be identified before being criticized for containing harmful ideas. Recall that comedy follows no rules and is intended to make people laugh. Interfering morality, which is a subject only meaningful in the “realm of human vice, obscures the nature of comedy. Samuel S.B. Taylor in Catharsis and Morality in Comedy beautifully reasons the exemption of comedy from moral perspective: ….we confuse stage convention and comic stereotypes with real human behavior at our peril. The matrix of comic behavior is essentially distinct from that of real life. The audience response to comedy cannot therefore be compared to a rational appraisal of real human behavior, mirrored by die dramatist. In this, comedy is distinct from non-comic drama where the mimetic, representational function is clear and we may expect to see heightened portraits of human behavior on stage. Let me give you a vivid insight by providing a similar case example. Imagine a friend of yours has been offended by a painting of a naked woman in an annual painting exhibition. In the eyes of

your friend morality demands that there shouldn’t be paintings of a naked woman in an exhibition, first because of respect and second because of the bawdiness that may mislead the visitors. In this case your friend is making a fallacy by applying a correct theory to an idea that does not entail morality in the first place. She/he can choose not to attend such exhibition to avoid personal irritations since art has the least effects in perpetuation of immorality in any society. The fact that humans have moral obligations towards each other in the real life does not mean that morality should be intervened in all the aspects of life such as art. The same idea applies to subjects concerned with mockery of religions, beliefs, cultures and so on. We should bear in mind the truth that whether the style of comedy is black comedy, sarcasm or irony, it doesn’t create but it reveals facets of real life. In all forms of comedy, comedians usually don’t intend

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to save the audience or provoke their feelings and emotions, but they literally just present ideas as they approach the audience intellectually. “Comedy is an intellectual appeal. Comedy appeals to the intellect not to the emotional. As soon as you become emotional it stops being funny” said Ricky Gervais. Finally, let us assume that those who are offended by comedy are right and comedy has to cast off some of its materials. Then who is to determine the “boundaries” between offensive and benign? Who is to specify and distinguish rightly offended between wrongly offended? After all is “Art” going to look, feel, smell, and sound the same after being censored?


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ENTERTAINMENT

iberally PEAKING BY CURTIS TE BRINKE

I admit it; I’m guilty of making jokes about liberal arts degrees and those who pursue them. When someone says ‘liberal arts degree’ you may picture lanky hipsters squinting through Buddy Holly glasses, writing articles deconstructing Haruki Murakami on their Mac book pros while listening to Youth Lagoon. Sorry, I went a bit far there. Youth Lagoon hasn’t had a new album out in like, two years. Point being, liberal arts degrees have somewhat of a stigma attached to them. This year I am a first year theatre major in the Faculty of Fine Arts. When my family asks about my university education, their follow up question is normally “So… what do you plan to do with that?” That’s a good question, Great Aunt Bernice. You probably don’t want to hear “dealing third rate meth out of a rusted

out Chevy Civic”, do you? But, hey, it could be worse. I could be a philosophy major. Where do I plan on going with this degree? That’s a big question, isn’t it? I mean, buy a guy dinner first. If I were to go on record I would say that part of the appeal is in the discovery of the answer. It’s strange to think that we are expected to project the rest of our careers as teenagers fresh out of high school... you know, speaking as a teenager fresh out of high school. So yes, some of us like to have a general idea where we want to be and allow our degrees to reflect that. Astute enough for you? This clearly defined stance on being clearly undefined is less than comforting to the parents of those of us taking this option, of course.

“It’s strange to think that we are expected to project the rest of our careers as teenagers...” Personally, I started making jokes about living out of a cardboard box and selling charcoal etchings with a hippie named Clarence when I was eleven. I figured it would prepare my parents for the

less than exciting notion of me working underwhelming day jobs while I scrounge for auditions by the time I graduated. You will have to ask them if charcoal Clarence eased their anxieties at all, they haven’t said a word to me. These arguments of course beg the question; do we value our educations themselves, or the weight they pull once you actually have them? If you asked me I would be obligated to rush into a lengthy bit about how we have to value University for what it teaches us, and the experiences we have here, not as a status symbol. Otherwise I’m just a selfaware cynic too lazy to pursue a more long term rewarding degree. Then again there are those who would argue I am just that. I don’t see it that way (okay, the cynic thing non- withstanding). Actually taking a theatre degree and making a sustainable career out of it is going to take a lot of hard work, drive and determination. So, let’s all enjoy the education we get here for what it is. It’s going to be all we have to refer to while upping the price of our charcoal etchings. This abandoned Chevy didn’t come cheap, after all.


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BY HARRISON KOZAK Everybody knows practise makes perfect, but have you ever wondered how? Whether its a difficult guitar rift, or sketch of a human face, why is it after struggling with something for so long that we wake up one day and find we can do it perfectly? The answer has to do with this beautiful little aspect of biology called myelin. Stay with me now arts students: I know biology is a science, but this is pretty cool stuff. Besides I can only really explain it in layman’s terms anyway. Lets start out with a basic explanation of how the nervous system works. Brain matter is made out of two kinds of cells, neurons – the nerve cells that combine to do all the thinking – and glial cells, the kind that ‘babysit’ and feed the neurons. Myelin is produced by the glial cells, and wraps itself around the neural connections. The more myelin insulating a connection, the faster an impulse can be fired through it. Impulses fired through the brain create thoughts and recollection, while impulses fired through the body provide movement. The faster the pulse, the more control a person has. There is a proven link between myelin levels and intelligence. When they cut apart Einstein’s brain, they found an above average amount of it. Myelin is directly linked to the formation of skillslanguage, sport, music, memory - it improves them all. In fact, an increased amount of myelin is thought to be one of the advantages Homosapians had over the Neanderthal. The ability to adapt is hands down the most important quality when it comes to survival. Forgetting the nature/nurture argument, we know that our basic biological “instructions” come from our genes. Myelin allows the formation of skills that genetically our species might not have been prepared for.

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WHY IT IS YOU STUDY

ART

If the speed at which a person forms myelin is directly related to intelligence, I’m sure you are asking what the best way to form it is. That was the first question in my mind when I read about it. I wanted a cheat sheet to learning things faster, so I could get better grades AND spend more time at the Ab. Unfortunately, the fastest way to form myelin seems to be by struggling with your work. Not the kind of struggling when you spend 5 minutes trying to write your paper, then give up and spend the next two hours on your favourite website(s). To form myelin, one must focus your attention upon the task, and be aware of any mistakes that you’re making and then fix them. Every time you stumble as a dancer, paint over the lines, or hit a wrong note, slow it down and figure out the problem. What does this have to do with studying art then? The ability to notice your mistakes requires a minimal understanding of the topic at hand: whether its music theory, image composition or the English language. To properly develop and hone our craft, we

need to deepen both our understanding of the formal art itself, and then apply that to our own practise. The renaissance artists developed much of their skill by studying under those more talented than them. For years they would work as apprentices, grinding paints for their master, assisting with background brush strokes, etc, and while there were art apprenticeships happening before, this was the first time it happened on a wide scale. This gave them an advantage. Starting from a young age helped build their myelin levels. Look at your university education as the beginning of your apprenticeship. For perhaps the first time, you are working under people who’ve made their living as artists. Learn as much as you can from them, and then seek someone to learn more from. After all, apprenticeships in the renaissance could last for more than 20 years. That’s almost as long as Remy Sexsmith has been at York! Anyone looking to learn more about Myelin should look at the book The Talent Code by Daniel Coyle


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l a o G g n i t t e S e h t for s s e l m i A By: Shimona Herchberg

I have always found myself to be in the in-between categories. Not the smartest, not average, not the most athletic, not the most artsy, not the best writer, not the best friend, and the list goes on and on… I’ve struggled to find a place for myself. I spent a large portion of my life trying to make people happy by being what I thought they wanted but instead

being miserable deep down. Looking back I can see that I was happiest when I was free to be myself. Since the middle of high school I started to live my life the way I wanted to, and not how others wanted me to live it. Last year I got into the rhythm of balancing school work with my introverted self’s social life. I found that if I took others’ suggestions

into consideration but made decisions based on my own feelings and thoughts, I would ultimately be successful as well as happy. I decided to trust my gut. I decided to stop living for other people, I wanted to be my own person and thrive. I discovered that if I choose courses that I found interesting and at a time that worked for me, that I would work hard


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in it and do well in it. Luckily, a major in START EARLIER, jeez). I tried to block Communication Studies (and minor in off times in my phone’s calendar for speAnthropology) gave me opportunities to cific work, which didn’t work out for me pick courses that appealed to me. I know once in university. I tried using a planner others aren’t so lucky. I knew that if I to write out tasks that I could cross out didn’t like the material I wouldn’t pay at- once completed. I found that I needed to tention, or take notes, see it written out, so I or study hard, or recould refer to it. I use ally do anything but post-its now, writing complain and space “I decided to stop living on them smaller tasks out. I made it a reof what I needed to quirement in coursefor other people, I get done. I stopped picking that I would be trying to finish too interested the class. I wanted to be my own much in one day and made a deal with myfocused on less so I self, that during the person and thrive” wouldn’t get overfirst class I would see whelmed. Feeling if I liked the professor, overwhelmed led me if I liked the course to procrastinate since outline (material, I felt like I couldn’t when things were due, etc), and if so, do it in time…and then didn’t finthat I would work hard. I made it a goal ish anything, a crappy cycle to be in. for myself to do well in school. I wanted Setting specific goals for myself alteachers to be proud of me. But, even lowed me to focus on what needed to be more, I wanted to be proud of myself. done. For me, school was, and still is, the My goal of doing well in school through most important. Another goal is to do hard work gave me focus. When I was de- more extracurricular activities, since the ciding what to do on a weekend I sched- more I keep busy, the more my brain is uled my free time around course readings able to power down and do well (I have I needed to read and take notes on. I made no idea why or how that works…). I dethe time for school, for the hard work I cided to take more risks, to not be afraid needed to put in so that it would show in to fail, to try new things that I wouldn’t my marks. I turned down invitations that have done previously. Once I have spewould distract me from work that needed cific goals in my head, I do things that are to be done. When I had to write 3 pa- in preparation for them. Only then am pers in 4 days, I shut off the world. Yes, I able to focus and de-emphasize other it made me go a little bit crazy. But it did things that I’m not prioritizing. My time work out in the end. Well except for the management is much better now that I last paper that I didn’t have enough time have an end-goal. The smaller goals are to edit (Note to self: if you have more probably going to change, it’s not 100% than 1 paper due within the same week, that I will accomplish all my goals, and

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there’s a huge possibility that my objectives will change entirely. But what’s important is that I have my own goals. Aims around school, friendships, relationships, hobbies, interests and other things will set a standard that you can use to work around how you live each day, what you focus on and what you do. It will also help you in terms of doing what you want to do, what you want your future to be like, as opposed to what parents, friends, or teachers want you to do. You’re the only person who can live your life. What I want to do isn’t what others told me they wanted me to do, it’s all my own decisions which I work harder at since it’s what I want. I’ve taken into account, planned around, family commitments in what I’m able to do, what I have time for. There’s only 24 hours in a day! …that many are used for sleeping, so I will not finish everything I set out to do. But I’m going to try. “Success is reaching our goals”. I don’t know who said that but it sounds good to me.


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HEALTH

by: Shannon Marek

I GUARANTEE you’ve all heard the term “freshman fifteen”, which unfortunately for most students seems unavoidable. But what if you could identify the causes, come up with solutions and ultimately avoid the problem all together? I will help you do exactly that by outlining the major causes and offering some simple solutions that you can implement into your daily routine. What we put in our mouths to stop the grumble in our tummies is something that for the most part isn’t given much thought. When you’re in line in the caf-

eteria, at Tim’s, or at the grocery store, remember to choose whole grains instead of refined ones. The higher fiber content will stay with you longer and therefore keep hunger at bay. Many of the restaurants at York participate in the Eat Smart program - just look for the Eat Smart symbol at your favourite eating place. You can check out the online resource in the health education section on the YorkU site; they offer some good tips as well as an ‘eat this not that’ list for some of the popular haunts. To keep from overeating at meal time remember to carry some

healthy, portable snacks in your bag. Trail mix is a great option (the ones without the M&M’s). But remember nuts are high in fat, so don’t eat too much of them. Apples are a great snack to have in between meals. The combination of naturally occurring sugar and fiber can help keep energy levels up. And like your grandmother used to say (well mine did anyway), “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”. Now I don’t care if you’re a freshmen or a senior, stress is something that we all have to deal with. Did you know that unhealthy levels of stress raise the


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adrenaline and cortisol levels in our bodies? These stress hormones (1) are directly related to unhealthy immune function and weight gain. And being under stress often leads to unhealthy snacking as well. You know what I’m talking about… Late night cram sessions, while munching on M&Ms, maybe going on a late night Timmies run. If this is you, it’s ok, we’ve all been there. While stress will most likely be present no matter what, there are things that can be done to help. Try to implement a consistent routine. Consistency is the key to managing stress, as is being prepared. Keep appointments and important dates written down in a planner, on your computer or in your phone. Review your week at a glance so that you don’t get an unwelcome surprise in the form of a test or project that accidentally slipped your mind. Remember to stay ahead of the game, and don’t procrastinate. Procrastination is the breeding ground for stress.

And now unless you are a mature student in your freshmen year, this SHOULDN’T apply to you. But alcohol plays a huge role in weight gain for students. It’s a double whammy of empty calories and sugar. ‘Studies have shown that in the short term, alcohol stimulates food intake and can also increase feelings of hunger. Having your judgment impaired and stimulating your appetite is a recipe for failure if you are trying to follow a weight-loss plan’. (2) Remember people, you don’t need alcohol to have fun, but if you are going to drink do so in moderation. Last, but certainly not least, daily physical activity is something that is usually the first thing to be cut out of the schedule when things get busy. Instead of

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looking at it as a huge task to tackle, break it down. York has a massive campus so take advantage of that fact and get your heart pumping and your body moving. And instead of walking through a building as a short cut, go around, and if you are faced with stairs take them two at a time. For those of you that require something a little more physical there are a number of sports to get involved in, both varsity and intramural. You can check those out online under student life by clicking on sport & recreation. That’s all for now folks. I look forward to bringing you a plethora of health and wellness information in the coming months. If there is a specific topic of interest, or a question that you would like answered, feel free to shoot me an email at marek84@yorku.ca. I will leave you now with these words; “Don’t worry about failures, worry about the chances you miss when you don’t even try.” -Jack Canfield


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HEALTH

Epiphanies for the Stage-Five CLINGER BY ALEXANDRIA YOUNG

Emotional protection for the unguarded, vulnerable and hopeless romantics

When we were young time went by slowly. A year semmed like an eternity and relationships were met with shy giggles, irrepressible blusing and somewhat ‘dirty’ jokes. As innocence flew away, personal sexuality became a raw reality. Pre-teenage fantasies of what sex might be like intersected with the truth, and the stage-f ive clingers were exposed and left to fend for themselves.

On e - n i g ht s t an d s l ea v e m any o f t ho s e w ho ho pe t o f i n d l o ve i n s o m e o n e , w h o o n l y e m phas i s e s o n sex, he ar t b r o ken.


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Adolescent lessons in school rammed developing minds with the importance of contraception and STI prevention. Sadly, the crutial emotional preparation for sex was left ignored and forgotten by educators and even parents. Despite the obvious importance of physical protection, I am tired of reliving the rancid sexual education taught to me in a steamy portable classroom. Sexual health should not just be about biological factoids and birthing videos. Taking care of yourself personally, not only bodily but mentally is important when entering adulthood. The research projects examining the symptoms and effects of chylamydia, syphilis and herpes typically left my surrounding peers feeling impassive, disinterested and slightly nauseas. The stage-f ive clingers around me were busy dreaming about romance, deep connections and chemistr y. Clouded with invented white picket fences, they were thrust into the unfo rgiving world of one-night-stands, friends with benef its and ‘booty calls’. As I watched clingy friends, heartbroken and crushed by the lack of commitment and assurance from partners, I decided to examine their sensitive and passionate toil.

Coming to terms with the new realm of sex may be diff icult for many stage-f ive clingers to grasp. Unfortunately, meeting people at bars or clubs MIGHT NOT lead to a promising serious relationship. One-night stands can lead to crushing hopes that he/she MIGHT want to see you again. You should never use sex as a way to get someone to like you. Although this is accurate guideline for ever yone, this is especially true if you are a clinger. If your partner has a different motive or intention, and things do not work out in your favour, you will see it as a personal blow to either your sexuality or characte. There are just too many openended scenarios for clingers that may lead to shame and emotional humiliation. Although there is absolutely nothing wrong with fantasizing about the perfect relationship, being embedded in the domain of social sex can be devastating for a stage-f ive clinger .

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ISSUES

by: Laura Speare

Why you should feel good about yourself no matter what Hello there, fellow students! You may be aware that we will all soon be starting off a school year at York University. This is big news for freshmen such as myself, and probably big news for everyone else as well. This issue of the Artichoke is the first of the year and will serve, or so I gather, as part of a sort of welcome package for all the Frosh. I think that’s lovely and I look forward to receiving mine! For introduction’s sake: I am Laura. Each instalment of this particular column will be loosely based around the central theme of people and their practices, qualities, and general goings-on. Body art! It’s everywhere. Tattoos, piercings, and other body modifications, permanent or otherwise, seem to be everywhere nowadays. And for those of us who have only just reached that age after which parental consent is no longer an issue, it can be an exciting, scary world that’s suddenly within reach! I think body modification is fascinating. Not only for the courage and determinedness one has to have to go through with the larger-scale modifications, but just for the range of ideas that people can come up with. I mean, who ever thought of a transdermal implant for non-medical purposes? Hip piercings, shoulder piercings: just shiny baubles to be stabbed through the skin – a simple idea, but such a striking end result. I think that’s brilliant. And then we get to the heavier things: People slit their tongues, build up hornlike ridges on the tops of their heads, and hang chains that wrap from one part of their body to the next. With technology being what it is, soon we’ll all be sporting pre-

hensile tails and retractable claws in addition to our intricately coloured bodies. But of course, there are the non-permanent forms of body art: body painting to make people look like nymphs or dragons or animals, face-painting to mask their features, and of course, everyday makeup. Any part of the face or body can be accentuated, hidden, or otherwise altered by the simple addition of a touch of colour here or there, and we have people whose entire lives are dedicated to the application and wearing of this sort of art. I could now begin harping on all the things that are wrong with this culture, this idea of doing everything in our power to change who we are. And perhaps it is, on some level, disturbing that we’re in such a hurry to make ourselves anything but what we would naturally be. But that was never my intention: as I say, body modification is fascinating. Who cares if your tattoo hasn’t got any deeper meaning that that you like the look of it? To some people, aesthetics are

everything! If you think a flaming skull on your bicep or an adorable butterfly tramp-stamp is cool, all power to you! If you’d rather have something that commemorates a time in your life, that’s fine too. I suppose my point is that we should all live while we’re alive, change our look if we don’t like it, and basically do everything in our power to be as awesome as we can possibly be within the constraints of being human. At the end of the day, what’s important is not that we’ve done everything that’s expected of us or stayed in exactly the same shape as ever – what’s important is that we’ve had a smashing good time, or perhaps more accurately that we’ve done something for ourselves instead of the rest of the world.

by: Laura Speare


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12 shameless money saving tips for students by: Yousra Zaki

NOW THAT YOU’RE living on your own and your parents can’t (and probably wont) bail you out financially, its good to know how to make the most of this year for less. Sure, you might think that saving is a drag, but I’m not asking you to set money aside every month, I am telling you how to avoid spending unnecessarily on food, entertainment, transport and school, so you can (once in a while) enjoy the finer things in life with your hard “saved” cash.


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ISSUES

DO buy the used books. Although some people don’t appreciate the tattered pages and the underlined sentences, you should seriously consider it… Previous owners might have actually highlighted all the important stuff for you. Also do try looking for York’s very own buying/selling books Facebook page created by students for students. Sometimes buying privately might land you a cheaper price. Some students even sell their notes with the book, you never know.

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DO Wine and Dine for less…

…if you’re on the flex plan. Spending just $5 a day on food will rack up a whopping $150 a month. Cheap eating does not mean you’ll sacrifice good eating. Not everyone knows how to cook, but if you do know then eat at home. For those who can’t cook, learn how to dress up sandwiches or flatbreads and turn them into drool-worthy entrees for less than 2$ per serving (google it!). For that once- aweek eating out in the city, consider St. Lawrence Market or Kensington Market downtown where you can eat good fresh food for a very low price. DO use your student ID outside of school. It can seriously do wonders! Many movie theaters, restaurants and some clothing stores WANT to give you discounts because they know how hard your life is. So why not shamelessly ask if they would like to keep your wallet fat, by selling stuff to you for less.

DO drink more cocktails for less $$ Dates just got cheaper with this move! Hello 2 for 1 drinks and meals! Find out, what kind of deals are going on in your city right now from Dealfind.com. Plus download the Happy Hour Finder appit locates nearby specials being offered THIS second. DON’T spend what your spending on transport. Students who live on campus and who don’t need to take buses daily, should buy TTC Tokens in Bulk once and you will never have to think about looking for change to pay your way again. Buying in Bulk is cheaper in the long run, so do it more often and not just when it comes to transport. For GO bus users, DO get the presto card. You get 15% off the first 30 rides. For more than 30 the discount goes up to 94% off. For TTC, if you are an avid user I don’t have to tell you to buy the monthly pass, because you already have. DO take stores up on their offer to sign up for point’s cards. I honestly always declined signing up, but when I realized how many points I could gain just so I can make FREE purchases, I signed up and the points began piling on. You may always be in a rush when you’re checking out and find it unnecessary, but it will be really beneficial in the long run. Sign up at Shoppers Drugmart or Sephora to rack up points!


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DO take advantage of the fact that York has free wifi. With free Internet all over campus, you can always have your phone connected to wifi. This means you wont be losing any of your limited 3G. When buying my I phone, I insisted on just 500MB when everyone in the store tried convincing me to go for the 1GB instead. P.s: I saved $10 a month ($120 a year) and still have so much data available because I’m constantly connected to York’s wifi. DO shop on a rainy day. DO choose cheap basics when shopping.

DON’T always party at a bar or a club

There are people who believe that sports gear such as yoga pants or basketball shorts are worth the large amount we spend on them. (Has anyone seen the price tags at Lulu Lemon?). Think again. Most sports clothes, basic tees, leggings and tank tops are made in the same place, so whether you buy them from Club Monaco or H&M, the quality and durability will probably be the same. Note: what you should spend on are jeans, because the cut and quality are obviously better when you spend more.

Going to parties is an inevitable college experience and can seriously put a strain on your student-sized wallet. During the school year try to experience as many on-campus house parties as you can. Also try finding a big group of people with who you can score group rates with when you actually do go downtown or anywhere nearby campus to party. Using guest lists in clubs can give girls free entrances and guys a reduced price. It doesn’t even have to be a special occasion. This way you save money and you guarantee (because you planned ahead) that everything will go smoothly with the doormen.

DO join student clubs.

Some clubs need a membership fee of just $5 or $10 at the beginning of the year, with which they take you on many free trips. By joining certain clubs at York you can enjoy free excursions, free sports events, free club dinners at some really good restaurants, cheap trips to Montreal (a very popular destination among Yorksters) and just a lot of fun people to hang out with

A study found that exposure to sunlight makes people prone to spending more money when shopping. So keep your wallet fat by shopping on a cloudy day instead! You will notice greater self control. DON’T buy these at a grocery store! It’s tempting to get everything you need from one place but you could just save by going elsewhere: Shampoo: Drug marts have a bigger selection AND offer discounts and points. Kitchen Utensils: Grocers mark up spatulas and mixing bowls because people would be willing to pay for convenience. Go to the Dollar store instead.


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ISSUES

by: Nirusika Balamohan In today’s economy, innovative products are constantly being invented to fit and fulfill the human desire and need. It can be electronics, clothing, footwear, jewellery, equipment and many other various kinds of possessions. When they are at higher rates, there are only few that can afford to buy these products. However to increase the demands of consumers over these inventions, businesses and companies often rate these products with lower prices. Life instantly becomes smoother with these reduced prices, where many will have the ability to purchase these products, not having to worry about the large expense that was avoided with a cheap

price. As these products continue having lower prices on them, there is rarely no inquiry as for why. Where these products are originally coming from, how they are really manufactured, and who truly toils hard to make them is swept under the rug. According to the International Labour Organization, child labour is when a child is employed in a workplace that deprives them of his or her childhood. These workplaces can be hazardous to these children, where they endure mental, physical and verbal abuse. In most, if not all situations, these workplaces lack safety and regulation. The children are also not given right to their basic human needs, such

as food and clean water. They are not given education, often being forcefully pulled out of school and ordered to work. Child Labour has existed throughout history, especially during the Industrial Revolution period in Europe, where numerous children were employed in factories. In 1995, one-hundred twenty children globally were working in dangerous places for more than ten hours per day, in order to earn just a little less than minimum wage (Basu, 1999). Globally today, twohundred and eighteen children are employed and they mostly toil to grow crops and make products such as cotton, sugar cane, coffee, footwear, carpets, gold, and


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etc (CBC, 2009). Countries that are infamous for their vast number of child labourers are India and China. Other countries include the Philippines, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Madagascar and several others. Referring again to the International Labour Organization, a sweatshop is defined to be a workplace, usually a factory that employs people, giving them very minimal wages and forcing them to work under poor conditions. Those employed in sweatshops are from families that are very poor, with no source of income. Much like child labourers, those who work in sweatshops are also deprived of their basic human rights and needs. They receive no time to eat or drink water, and they stand for hours and hours per day toiling to make different products for various companies. In almost all sweatshops around the world, if an employee refuses to work or tries to escape the sweatshop, they are brutally beaten or killed. Similar to child labor, sweatshops also have existed time and time again throughout history. In recent years however, major corporations such as Wal-Mart and Nike have been accused of and proved to be possessing these sweatshops. In 2008, Business Week reported that Wal-Mart’s Bangladesh factory paid their workers as little as twenty

dollars a month, demanding them to work up to nineteen hours a day. The workers at this Bangladesh factory of Wal-Mart also reported being abused, both verbally and physically. In 2005, The Guardian reported Nike, a major footwear company, owned its share of sweatshops. Nike owned seven hundred factories and was accused for abusing their workers, and forcing them to work under poor conditions. These poor conditions included not allowing the workers to have water to drink, restricting them from using the washrooms, and demanding the workers to toil for more than sixty hours a week. Although many acknowledge that child labour does exist, “Child Labour” are just two words that are often overlooked. When taking in the information, child labour has a much greater extent to it, where the matter is not just about a child working. The intention of this article is to shine a light on a sensitive, global issue of child labour, which everyone should be aware of.

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Issue 06  

Artichoke First Issue of 2012-2013

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