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TED BARRACLOUGH birds


Ted Barraclough birds Essay by Glenn Barkley


Ted Barraclough birds First published in Australia in 2012 by artHIVES 85 Doggett Street Newstead, Queensland 4006 www.arthives.com info@arthives.com Copyright 2012 © artHIVES holdings PTY LTD Text Copyright 2012 © GlennBarkley Images Copyright 2012 © Ted Barraclough www.tedBARRACLOUGH.com ISBN 978-0-9871970-5-4 Printed in Australia All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior consent of the publisher. title page image Peaceful Dove 2009 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 10 x 23 x 11 cm dustjacket front image Golden-Shouldered Parrot, Bar-Breasted Honeyeater, Rainbow Bee-eater, Blue-faced Honeyeater, Zebra Finch dustjacket back image Nakeen Kestrel 2012 Acrylic on Recycled Pine 28 x 20 x 11 cm image following page Bar-Breasted Honeyeater 2011 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 12 x 11 x 7 cm


contents 7

One with the Birds by Glenn Barkley 12

2012 114

2011 260

2010 320

2009 374

2008 422

2007


One with the Birds

I remember when I was a kid finding a sick bird lying on the roadside across from where I used to go to school. A rosella I think now. I tried to pick it up, but a bird can be a handful, even a stunned one, not wanting to be touched especially by an anxious little kid. A bird’s natural reaction is fight or flight. I remember it twisting in my hands to bite me. Tougher measures were needed so I got some wicket keeper gloves from the sports shed and deposited the bird into the bush. Heart beating hard, twisting in my hands - its little eyes and whole body driven anxious by this unnatural partnership and holding, clutching or lifting a bird is an unnatural thing. Wild birds are loved – anthropomorphized, part of our own domestic rituals –we want them to be part of our lives. We feed and look after them. If they bang into our windows and lie stunned we might take them to the local vet or like me hopefully return them to the bush. We sense their symbolic power, their wildness and natural intelligence, the way they have inserted themselves into our non- spiritual, non-mythological lives.


Fan-Tailed Cuckoo 2012 Acrylic on Recycled Pine 22 x 23 x 10 cm


Regent Bowerbird 2012 Acrylic on Recycled Pine 21 x 13 x 5 cm


Gould’s Bronze Cuckoo 2012 Acrylic on Recycled Pine 13 x 11 cm


Bush Hen 2012 Acrylic on Recycled Pine 15 x 25 x 9 cm


Golden Bowerbird 2012 Acrylic on Recycled Pine 24 x 15 x 8 cm


Gouldian Finch 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 14 x 12 x 9 cm


Rufous Fantail 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 17 x 15 x 11 cm


Mangrove Honeyeater 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 14 x 19 x 13 cm


Red-Backed Button Quail 2012 Acrylic on White Beech 12 x 12 x 9 cm


Restless Flycatcher 2012 Acrylic on White Beech 10 x 16 x 9 cm


Olive-Backed Oriole 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 15 x 25 x 13 cm


Little Shrike Thrush 2012 Acrylic on White Beech 12 x 20 x 8 cm


Australian Owlet-Nightjar 2012 Acrylic on White Beech 19 x 14 x 6 cm


Scarlet Robins & Nest 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 14 x 20 x 14 cm


Common Sandpiper 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine


Olive Whistler 2012 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 17 x 18 x 10 cm


White-Fronted Chat 2012 Acrylic on Pine 10 x 11 x 5 cm


Baillon’s Crake 2012 Acrylic on Pine 15 x 17 x 8 cm


Golden Whistler 2011 Acrylic on White Beech 12 x 10 x 13 cm


Rufous Scrub Bird 2011 Acrylic on White Beech 15 x 17 x 13 cm


White-Browed Robin 2011 Acrylic on Australian Beech 12 x 12 x 7 cm


Little Friar Bird 2011 Acrylic on White Beech 20 x 20 x 12 cm


Grey-Crowned Babbler 2011 Acrylic on Australian Beech 16 x 25 x 13 cm


Shining Bronze Cuckoo 2011 Acrylic on White Beech 17 x 15 x 11 cm


Green Catbird 2011 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 24 x 20 x 9 cm


Diamond Firetail 2011 Ac

c on

cycled Wood 13 x 9 x 10 cm


Singing Honeyeater 2011 Acrylic on Australian Beech 16 x 15 x 8 cm


Bar-Breasted Honeyeater 2011 Acrylic on Plantation Pine 12 x 11 x 7 cm


Scarlet Honeyeaters 2011 Acrylic on White Beech 11 x 17 x 9 cm


Golden Shouldered Parrot 2011 Acrylic on White Beech 19 x 18 x 10 cm


Black Honeyeater 2011 Acrylic on Australian Beech 9 x 12 x 9 cm


Little Corella 2011 Acrylic on Australian Beech 15 x 16 x 8 cm


Black-faced Monarch 2010 Acryli on Australian Beech 16 x 18 x 13 cm


Rainbow Bee-Eater 2010 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 22 x 16 x 12 cm


King Quail 2010 Acrylic on Australian Beech 15 x 9 x 8 cm


Superb Blue Fairy Wren 2010 Acrylic on Red Cedar 21 x 13 x 12 cm


White-naped Honeyeater 2010 Acrylic on Australian Beech 15 x 17 x 11 cm


Fuscous Honeyeater 2010 Acrylic on Australian Beech 16 x 14 x 9 cm


Rainbow Lorikeet 2010 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 19 x 25 x 18 cm


Little Wattle Bird 2010 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 23 x 25 x 9 cm


Yellow-Faced Honeyeater 2010 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 16 x 16 x 9 cm


Blue-Faced Honeyeater 2010 Acrylic on Red Cedar 23 x 20 x 10 cm


Peaceful Dove 2009 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 10 x 23 x 11 cm


Yellow Thornbill 2009 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 10 x 10 x 9 cm


Pale Yellow Robin 2009 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 9 x 14 x 8 cm


Golden-Hed Cisticola 2009 Acrylic on Queensland Ash 12 x 8 x 9 cm


Crimson Finch 2009 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 14 x 10 x 9 cm


Brown Honeyeater 2009 Acrylic on Australian Beech 16 x 14 x 9 cm


Little Lorikeet 2009 Acrylic on Red Cedar 20 x 17 x 11 cm


Double-Eyed Fig Parrot 2009 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 14 x 11 x 13 cm


Night Parrot 2009 Acrylic on Red Cedar 12 x 20 x 13 cm


Golden-Shouldered Parrot 2009 Acrylic on Queensland Ash 24 x 15 x 8 cm


Little Tern 2008 Acrylic on Red Cedar 12 x 22 x 10 cm


Eastern Strike Tit 2008 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 15 x 13 x 12 cm


Rose Robin 2008 Acrylic on Queensland Ash 10 x 14 x 7 cm


Logrunner 2008 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 11 x 20 x 11 cm


Forest Kingfisher 2008 Acrylic on Red Cedar 15 x 18 x 12 cm


Little Kingfisher 2008 Acrylic on White Beech 14 x 11 x 9 cm


Lewin’s Honeyeater 2008 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 15 x 19 x 12 cm


Torresian Crow 2007 Acrylic on Red Cedar 21 x 40 x 14 cm


Shining Flycatcher 2007 Acrylic on Recycled Wood 15 x 13 x 14 cm


Eastern Whip Bird 2007 Acrylic on Red Cedar 20 x 20 x 13 cm


Ted Barraclough

resides on the Sunshine Coast, Australia.

Born in 1935, Barraclough grew up in western Queensland as World War II drew to a close, and would carve toys for his brothers out of the timber that grew on his family’s farm near Clermont. By the age of 10, Barraclough knew all the bird species that frequented the creek below his family’s house. In 1953 Barraclough trained as a primary school teacher at the Queensland Teachers’ College, before a career in education specialising in literature. He completed further studies at the University of Queensland and Ohio State University, USA. After being spotted a the Maleny Wood Expo in 2009, Barraclough’s birds were exhibited to great acclaim in 2010, 2011 and 2012 at Doggett Street Studio, Brisbane, with many of his works finding homes in important private collections both nationally and internationally. In June 2012, twenty of Barraclough’s sculptures were included in the exhibition All You Need Is Love, along with Robert Arnold, Jon Campbell, Patrick Hartigan, Anastasia Klose and Tracey Moffatt curated by Bronwyn Johnson for the Melbourne Art Foundation exhibition at Chandon Australia. In September 2012, Barraclough’s solo exhibition A Rare Bird opened at Artspace Mackay.


Glenn Barkley

is Curator at Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA), Sydney and was previously curator of the University of Wollongong Art collection from 1996 - 2007. He was founding co-Director with Lisa Havilah and Nathan Clark of Project Contemporary Artspace, Wollongong. Major curatorial projects have included Almanac: The Gift of Ann Lewis AO, MCA (2009-10), Making it New: Focus on Contemporary Australian Art, MCA (2009) avoiding myth & message: Australian artist and the literary world, MCA (2009), Home Sweet Home- Works from the Peter Fay Collection NGA (co-curated with Dr Deborah Hart) (2003/2004 and touring), Multiplicity: Prints and Multiples from the Collection of the MCA and the University of Wollongong, MCA (2006 and touring), Without Borders: Outsider Art in an Antipodean Context (co-curated with Peter Fay), Monash University Museum of Art and Campbelltown Art Centre, Sydney (2008). In 2011 he curated a survey of Berlin based New Zealand artist Michael Stevenson and a major exchange exhibition tell me tell me: Australian and Korean Contemporary Art 1976-2011, between the MCA and the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Seoul, Korea). In 2011 he curated the initial hang of the MCA Collection, Volume One: MCA Collection for the MCA’s new collection galleries and co-curated with Lesley Harding, Heide Museum of Modern Art, As If a retrospective of Australian artist Ken Whisson. In 2012 he is curating South of No North: Laurence Aberhart, William Eggleston and Noel McKenna. He is also guest curator of the annual Octopus exhibition at Gertrude Contemporary Melbourne.


Thankyou:

Photography Design and Layout: S. Whitaker, artHIVES www.arthives.com Font: Corbel www.tedBARRACLOUGH.com


for purchasing information visit www.tedBARRACLOUGH.com


Ted Barraclough - birds  

Ted Barraclough has carved and whittled for as long as he can remember however it was in retirement that Barraclough began carving and paint...

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