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Kate Walker

An interview with An interview by Dario Rutigliano, curator and Katherine C. Wilson, curator arthabens@mail.com

Kate Walker accomplishes the difficult task of establishing an effective synergy between an insightful socio-political criticism, and a refined aesthetics to create an area in which perceptual parameters are subverted. The multidisciplinary nature of her approach urges us to investigate the relationship between reality and the way we perceive it: one of the most convincing aspects of Walker's work is the way she establishes an area of intellectual interplay between memory and perception, inviting the viewers to explore social issues from unconventional sides. We are very pleased to introduce our readers to her refined artistic production. Hello Kate and welcome to ART Habens. To start this interview, would you like to tell us something about your background? You have a solid formal training: you hold a MFA from the University of Arizona in 2005 and you are currently Assistant Professor, Interdisciplinary Studio at Boise State University. How do these experience influence your evolution as an artist and how do they impact on the way you currently conceive and produce your works?

Kate Walker

I look for ways that everyday life can influence my work. Interesting ideas and material for art are everywhere. I like to blur boundaries between teaching, art and life, allowing these to merge into each other. After I first came to Boise, in 2011, I was teaching in a large lecture class. I had students shift between lecture format seating into informal seating for group work. In that transition there was this powerful moment for me seeing the whole dynamic of the large group change as people’s individual personas emerged. This became the impetus for a project about civic agency and ‘group’ identity by tracing a shift between a ‘staged’ informal gathering of people, which recalls day-to-

Thanks for your interest in my work. Coming from New Zealand to Arizona USA for graduate school was an eye opening experience. The landscape, culture and politics all had a huge impact on my work. Being at a large graduate program was great for building a network of peers, to support and critique each other’s work. Graduate school was great practice in having some objective distance from your work, and seeing work from many perspectives. My work and ideas change a lot depending on where I am living, what I am doing.

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Summer 2015

Profile for ART Habens

ART Habens Contemporary Art Review // Special Issue  

ART Habens Contemporary Art Review // Special Issue  

Profile for arthabens
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