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SCHEDULE OF EVENTS LIVE AUCTION Saturday, November 14 from 1:30pm – 5:30pm MST 1011 PASE O DE PE RALTA, SAN TA F E

AUCTION PREVIEWS Friday, November 13 from 10:00am – 8:00pm MST Saturday, November 14 from 9:00am – 1:00pm MST 1011 PASE O DE PE RALTA, SAN TA F E

ONLINE AUCTION Online bidding available through liveauctioneers.com


SANTA FE ART AUCTION Absentee and phone bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5:00pm MST on November 13, 2015 Telephone bidders are encouraged to leave absentee bids in the case of technical difficulties Please direct all inquiries to 505 954-5858 Register online at www.santafeartauction.com

SANTA FE ART AUCTION Saturday, November 14, 2015 | 1:30pm MST Peters Projects | 1011 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, NM 87501 Tel 505 954-5858 | Fax 505 954-5785 www.santafeartauction.com © 2015 Santa Fe Art Auction Limited Co. Executive Director: Adam H. Veil Photographers: Molly Wagoner, Kristin Schillaci Assistant Photographer: Uma Ostheim Graphic Designer: Shane Mieske Printing: O’Neil Printing, AZ Binding: Roswell Book Binding, AZ Front Cover: Lot 111, LaVerne Nelson Black (1887-1938), Taos Winter Morning, oil on paper laid on board, 14 1/2 x 18 inches, $150,000 – $200,000 v Frontispiece: Lot 175, Robert Henri (1865-1929), Portrait of Po Tse (Water Eagle), oil on canvas, 41 1/2 x 32 3/4 inches, $2,300,000 – $3,000,000 v Back Cover: Lot 162, George Bellows (1882-1925), Santa Fe Canyon, 1917, oil on canvas, 18 x 22 inches, $225,000 – $275,000 v

O’Neil Printing joins the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) in being an international organization whose mission is to promote responsible management of the world’s forests. The intent of the FSC system is to eliminate the destruction to forest ecosystems that often accompanies logging, as well as unlawful logging in undesignated forests. Through this system, the forests from which the trees are harvested, the logging companies, the paper mills, the paper vendors and the printers all become a “link” in the “chain of custody” insuring that the rules set forth by the FSC are strictly adhered to. Each “link” must go through the process of being certified, and will be subject to audit at any given time to insure that the “chain of custody” is not broken.


R O L L I N W. K I N G (1931 – 2014)

The Santa Fe Art Auction is pleased to offer a selection of works from the Estate of Rollin W. King in our 2015 Sale. Rollin W. King was an amazing entrepreneur who famously came up with the idea and founded Southwest Airlines, the world’s most successful airline. His idea for better service and low cost air travel was revolutionary, and changed air travel worldwide forever. He was the Founder, first Chairman, and President of Southwest Airlines Co. He remained a Director and an Executive Committee member from the formation of the company until he retired from the Board after 40 years, at the age of 75. After leaving the management of the airline Mr. King engaged in other business ventures as well as led executive education seminars. He did consulting as a principal of Rollin King Associates until his retirement in 1995. Subsequently he was principally engaged in private investing and art collecting. Rollin King had a home in Santa Fe for more than 40 years and loved his time there. He was involved in the arts and the community through his support and time spent with a variety of school and art organizations. He built a remarkable art collection over the years represented by many Santa Fe and Taos artists. When not looking for new art he spent time with friends and family fishing, golfing and dining. Mr. King had a passion for hunting and fishing, which he shared with his children and grandchildren. He loved Africa and went on more than 20 safaris during which he enjoyed sitting around the fire listening to or telling stories with family and friends. He was a member of Brook Hollow Golf Club in Dallas, The Old Baldy Club in Saratoga, Wyoming; and Eldorado Country Club in Indian Wells, California, and served on the Board of Visitors for UT Southwestern University Hospitals and Clinics. He is a former member of Little Sandy Hunting and Fishing Club and the Chevaliers du Tastevin. At various times, he was a trustee of the Dallas Symphony, St. John’s College of Annapolis, Maryland and Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the Dallas Museum of Art for which he served on the Executive Committee. He also was President of the Board of the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico and Chairman of the Executive Committee of the College of Santa Fe. He was an Honorary Life Member of the Board of Directors of the School of American Research in Santa Fe and the Southwest Outward Bound School. Rollin King graduated from Shaker Heights High School in Ohio and received his BA from Case Western Reserve and an MBA from Harvard Business School.


1 CARMELITA DUNLAP AND CARLOS SUNRISE Brown Pot, 1981 ceramic 18 x 15 inches Provenance: Collection of the Genesee Country Village & Museum, Mumford, New York $1,000 – $1,500 nr

2 CARMELITA DUNLAP (1925-1999) Black on Black Vase, 1978 ceramic 17 x 15 inches dated and signed: 1978 / Carmelita / Dunlap / San Ildefonso / Pueblo Provenance: Collection of the Genesee Country Village & Museum, Mumford, New York $2,000 – $3,000

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3 JONI FALK (b. 1933) Still Life with Pottery and Navajo Rug, 1977 oil on board 5 1/8 x 7 1/8 inches signed and dated lower right: Joni Falk / © ‘77 Provenance: Private Collection, New York $800 – $1,000 nr

4 FORD RUTHLING (b. 1933) Untitled (Zia Pot Under Three Ears of Corn), 1981 oil on canvas 36 x 30 inches signed and dated lower right: Ford Ruthling / ‘81 Provenance: The Artist Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $2,000 – $3,000 v

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5 JONI FALK (b. 1933) Still Life with Kachina and Poppies oil on panel 10 x 8 inches signed lower left: Joni Falk W/AWA Provenance: Private Collection, Wisconsin $900 – $1,200 nr

6 HOLLIS WILLIFORD (b. 1940) Tewa Water Girl bronze 7/100 12 3/4 x 6 x 6 inches (with base) inscribed and editioned: Hollis Williford 7/100 Provenance: Private Collection, Wisconsin $1,000 – $1,500 nr

7 ROSETA SANTIAGO (b. 1946) Clay Basket oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches signed verso: R. Santiago Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $1,500 – $2,500 nr 8


8 CLITSO DEDMAN (1897-1953) 16 Navajo Carved Wood Yeibichai Figures cottonwood various sizes ranging from 9 1/4 to 11 inches signed on soles of feet: Clitso Literature: Rebecca M. and Jean-Paul Valette, “The Life and Work of Clitso Dedman, Navajo Woodcarver (1897-1953),” American Indian Art Magazine 25, no. 2 (Spring 2000), 54-67. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico Including Talking God, with white mask topped with twelve eagle feathers, and deerskin sash; God of Precipitated Waters (“Water Sprinkler”), wearing blueand-white mask adorned with two eagle feathers, juniper bracelets/garlands around wrists and torso, and holding a fox pelt in right hand; six male Yei dancers, all in thigh-length kilts and blue masks adorned with eagle feathers; six female Yei dancers, wearing blue masks and holding branches of spruce and/or eagle feathers; medicine man, with white cotton pants, concha belt and turquoise necklace, and holding a medicine pouch containing sacred pollen; and, finally, a male patient, dressed in traditional Navajo attire and carrying a ceremonial basket of pollen; each signed “Clitso” on soles of feet. $15,000 – $20,000

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9 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) Pueblo Dancer, 1982 drypoint on paper AP 8 x 5 1/2 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss editioned and titled lower right: Artist’s Proof Pueblo Dancer Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $800 – $1,000 nr

10 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) Corn Dancers Coming, 1975 etching and drypoint on paper AP 11 x 14 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss editioned and titled lower left: Artist’s Proof Corn Dancers Coming Literature: Phillips Kloss, Gene Kloss Etchings, Santa Fe, NM: Sunstone Press, 1981, no. 569. Provenance: Private Collection, New Jersey $1,500 – $2,500 nr

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11 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) Courtyard in Chimayó, 1973 etching on paper AP 7 1/2 x 9 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss editioned and titled lower left: Artist’s Proof Courtyard in Chimayó Literature: Phillips Kloss, Gene Kloss Etchings, Santa Fe, NM: Sunstone Press, 1981, no. 547. Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $800 – $1,200 nr

12 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) Navajo Canyon Cliffs, 1974 etching and drypoint on paper 41/50 12 x 15 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss editioned and titled lower left: 41/50 Navajo Canyon Cliffs Literature: Phillips Kloss, Gene Kloss Etchings, Santa Fe, NM: Sunstone Press, 1981, no. 563. Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $2,000 – $3,000 nr

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13 GERARD CURTIS DELANO (1890-1972) In the Shadow of the Canyon oil on canvas 24 x 28 inches signed lower left: © Delano inscribed, titled and signed verso: 24 x 28 / In the Shadow of the Canyon / Painted & Copyright / by / Gerard Curtis Delano Gerard Curtis Delano was born in Massachusetts, to a family that traced its ancestry in America back to the early 17th century. As a young boy, Delano showed talent at drawing cowboys, Indians, horses, and storybook adventures, but his family was not enthusiastic about his ambitions for a career in the arts. They suggested that he consider becoming an architect, which he initially pursued by working as a carpenter’s apprentice. Regardless, he began his art studies in New Bedford, Massachusetts, and by 1910 was studying at the Art Students League in New York under George Bridgman. Delano also studied with Dean Cornwell, Harvey Dunn, and N. C. Wyeth at the Grand Central School of Art. In 1919, shortly after his release from service in the U.S. Navy, Delano had a chance to “go west,” and took a job at a ranch in Colorado. It was after his return to New York City in 1923 for further study at the Art Students League that he sold his first western cover to Ace-High Magazine. This led to work with other publications, and soon he was firmly launched as a cover artist and illustrator for Ace-High, Western Story, Adventure, Cowboy Stories, Ranch Romances, Colliers, and others. Despite his initial success, with the advent of the Great Depression his career as a commercial artist began to falter. Delano ended up “flat broke,” but ultimately considered this to be “the finest thing that ever happened to me.” Leaving the big city and the sorry states of his finances behind, he returned west to his homesteader’s cabin in Colorado in 1933, and began to consider his talent in a different light. Delano continued to work as a commercial artist, but by 1940 he had decided to stake his future on producing paintings rather than illustrations. Delano visited Arizona and the Navajo Reservation in the fall of 1943, and was enraptured by the majestic beauty of the landscape and its native people. In the Navajo, as evidenced by paintings like In the Shadow of the Canyon, the artist found a proud and noble people that he wanted to convey on canvas; the Navajo and their unique environment became the dominant theme in Delano’s art and the inspiration for many of his most celebrated images. Provenance: Private Collection, Kansas $85,000 – $125,000

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a. 14a-b

b. LAURA ADAMS ARMER (1874-1963)

a. Waterless Mountain gouache and graphite on paper 13 3/4 x 9 3/4 inches signed lower right: Laura Adams Armer Literature: Laura Adams Armer, Waterless Mountain, London: Longman, 1931, cover illustration. b. Mother Took Out the Sheep gouache and graphite on paper 13 3/4 x 9 inches initialed lower left: A. Literature: Laura Adams Armer, Waterless Mountain, London: Longman, 1931, pg. 56. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico A copy of Armer’s Waterless Mountain will accompany this lot. $4,000 – $6,000 (for the pair) nr

15 WARREN E. ROLLINS (1861-1962) Pueblo Girl with Shawl oil on canvas mounted on board 15 x 10 inches signed lower left: - W E Rollins Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $7,000 – $9,000 14


16 GERALD CASSIDY (1879-1934) Navajo Woman and Child mixed media on board 17 1/2 x 23 3/8 inches signed lower right: Gerald Cassidy Provenance: Private Collection, Arizona Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 2013 $30,000 – $50,000 v

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17 DONALD BARTON (1903-1990) Oraibi Pueblo, Navajo County, Arizona oil on canvas laid on panel 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches signed lower left: Barton Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $1,500 – $2,500 nr

18 DONALD BARTON (1903-1990) Hopi Dance, Oraibi Pueblo oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches signed lower left: Barton Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $4,000 – $6,000

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19 VICTOR HIGGINS (1884-1949) Fiesta Day, ca. 1930 color lithograph on paper 32 x 34 inches signed in plate lower left: Victor Higgins. Literature: Photocopy of letter of gratitude from Rudolph Lesch (President, Rudolph Lesch Fine Arts, Inc., New York, New York) to Margaret Evans (Director, Butler Art Institute, Youngstown, Ohio) for permission to reproduce Higgins’ Fiesta Day affixed to verso, dated June 25, 1930. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $5,000 – $7,000 nr

20 UNKNOWN Untitled (Indian Ceremony) oil on canvas 48 1/2 x 48 1/2 inches Provenance: Private Collection, New York $3,000 – $5,000 nr

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21 JOSEPH HENRY SHARP (1859-1953) Spotted Rabbit oil on canvas 8 x 6 inches signed lower right: JHSHARP Joseph Henry Sharp was born in Bridgeport, Ohio, in 1859 and by thirteen was in Cincinnati working in a nail factory to earn money to take art classes. After ten years of study in Cincinnati, Sharp took his first trip to Europe in 1881, to study in Antwerp and Belgium for a year. In 1886, Sharp returned to Europe to study at the Royal Academy in Munich, with Frank Duveneck in Italy and at the Académie Julian in Paris. Sharp’s first trip to Taos came in 1893 and he enthusiastically recommended it to his friends Blumenschein and Phillips who would arrive there in 1898. In 1902 Sharp established a residence in Crow Agency, Montana, where he would remain for the next eight years painting the Plains Indian tribes of the region. In 1910, Sharp moved permanently to Taos as the traditional Plains Indian culture of Montana was beginning to wane, and in Taos he found many available and enthusiastic models whom he befriended. He was one of the founding members of the Taos Society of Artists in 1915. Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $15,000 – $20,000 v

22 EANGER IRVING COUSE (1866-1936) White Tipi Nocturne and Chamisa oil on canvas 12 x 9 inches signed lower left: COUSEProvenance: Estate of the Artist Private Collection, Washington $3,000 – $5,000

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23 BERT GEER PHILLIPS (1868-1956) Indian Family in Wild Plums oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches signed lower left: PHilliPS Bert Phillips was born in Hudson, New York, in 1868, and was interested in art from an early age, moving to New York City at age sixteen where he studied at the Art Students League and the National Academy of Design before heading to Europe in 1894, where he studied at the AcadÊmie Julian. While in Paris he befriended Joseph Sharp and Ernest Blumenschein who would be instrumental in getting Phillips to the west. It was with Blumenschein in 1898 that Phillips first went to the southwest and the iconic broken wagon wheel story laid the foundation for the formation of the Taos Society of Artists in 1915. Following his first encounter with Taos in 1898, Phillips remained there for the rest of his life where he found endless inspiration for the idyllic and agrarian images he painted of the Taos Indians, who in his art remain untouched and unchanged by time and the influence of the white man and instead are engaged in romantic and relaxing traditional pursuits. Provenance: Private Collection, Litchfield, Connecticut Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1978 $35,000 – $45,000 v

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24 HARVEY YOUNG (1840-1901) San Jacinto Hills, Southern California oil on board 13 x 18 3/4 inches signed and titled lower left: Harvey Young / San Jacinto Hills / Southern California Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,000 – $2,000 nr

25 JOSEPH HENRY SHARP (1859-1953) Santa Rosa Desert, ca. 1925 oil on board 17 1/4 x 21 1/4 inches signed and titled lower left: J.H. SHARP / SANTA ROSA DESERT Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $10,000 – $20,000 20


26 MANNER OF THOMAS HILL (1829-1908) Yosemite Valley oil on canvas 43 x 54 inches signed lower right: T. Hill Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $15,000 – $20,000 nr

27 HAMILTON HAMILTON (1847-1928) Western Scene, 1875 oil on canvas 28 x 50 inches signed and dated lower right: Hamilton Hamilton / 1875 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $8,000 – $12,000 nr 21


28a-d THOMAS MORAN (1837-1926) a. Pink Terraces, Mammoth Hot Springs Gardiner’s River chromolithograph on paper 4 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches inscribed and titled in plate: U S Geological Survey / Plate A / Pink Terraces. Mammoth Hot Springs Gardiner’s River. b. Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River chromolithograph on paper 4 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches inscribed and titled in plate: U S Geological Survey / Plate B / Grand Canon of the Yellowstone River. c. Castle Geyser and Beautiful Spring, Upper Geyser Basin chromolithograph on paper 4 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches inscribed and titled in plate: U S Geological Survey / Plate C / Castle Geyser and Beautiful Spring. Upper Geyser Basin. d. Great Blue Spring, Lower Geyser Basin chromolithograph on paper 4 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches inscribed and titled in plate: U S Geological Survey / Plate D / Great Blue Spring. Lower Geyser Basin. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $4,000 – $6,000 (for the set) nr

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a.

b.

c.

d.

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29 THOMAS MORAN (1837-1926) Head of Yellowstone River, 1874 watercolor and graphite on paper 9 x 13 1/4 inches signed and dated lower left: TMoran / 1874 (with initials conjoined) The Yellowstone River flows northward through Yellowstone National Park in northwestern Wyoming and eastward across southern Montana into North Dakota where it empties into the Missouri River. Inside Yellowstone National Park, it flows into and out of Yellowstone Lake. It is a view of the river as it leaves the lake that Thomas Moran captures in his watercolor, Head of Yellowstone River. Moran was the artist for Dr. F. V. Hayden’s Geological Survey that set out to find the source of the Yellowstone River in the summer of 1871. Earlier expeditions had tried to find the head of the river but had failed. Moran worked closely with the expedition’s photographer, William Henry Jackson, helping him set up his photographic equipment and suggesting shots. Moran made at least two pencil sketches of Yellowstone Lake, and his subsequent watercolors of the area were based upon his sketches as well as Jackson’s photographs. Moran’s paintings of Yellowstone captured the beauty and wonder of the region, and along with Jackson’s photographs, helped to convince Congress to establish Yellowstone as the country’s and the world’s first National Park in 1872. In 1874, Louis Prang, a noted Boston publisher, commissioned Moran to paint a group of watercolors depicting Yellowstone and other Western locals the artist had visited to be reproduced as chromolithographs for a deluxe, limited-edition portfolio. Moran created Head of Yellowstone River for this portfolio. F. V. Hayden’s description of the scene accompanied the Prang reproduction: The river passes through a great variety of scenery, but at no point can it boast of more enchanting beauty than at its very head, near the magnificent lake of which it forms the outlet. Starting from the northwest extremity of the lake, it wanders in an aimless sort of way to the northward, with sluggish current more like a lake than a great stream, its waters teeming with flocks of geese and ducks. Beautiful islands spot its broad surface, and beyond its pine-fringed Shore the hazy outlines of distant mountains stand out boldly against the horizon.1 To complete the commission, as was his practice, Moran used sketches, photographs and memory to create the finished watercolor. There are similarities between Moran’s watercolor and Jackson’s photograph of the same title.2 Both are taken from the vantage point of the left bank looking out at a wide, slow river. Trees and bushes line the shore and mountain ranges appear in the distance. Moran’s format is horizontal, however, where Jackson’s is vertical. Moran eliminates some of the foreground found in Jackson’s photograph and cuts off the sky just above the trees on the left. Moran was a master of color and equally adept with both oil and watercolor. In his composition, he includes the sun low in the horizon and suffuses the upper sky with salmons and pinks. William Henry Jackson noted in later years that while in Yellowstone, what excited Moran “. . . was the landscape effects that included the lake as seen from its outlet, with its dots of wooded islands and background of the Absarokas.”3 And this is precisely the scene that Moran captures in Head of Yellowstone River. The splendor of the river and its outlet evidently left an impression on the artist: he had painted the scene earlier, in 1872,4 and he created an etching of the same spot in 1878-79.5 His excitement for the area is felt in all his depictions. That it had been a goal of the 1871 Hayden expedition to locate this outlet and that goal had been achieved would have only added to Moran’s excitement. His watercolor was at once a faithful and beautiful depiction of the head of the Yellowstone River. Literature: American Art Association, Collection of L. Prang and Company of Boston, New York sale, February 16-18, 1892, lot 356. James Benjamin Wilson, The Significance of Thomas Moran as an American Landscape Painter, PhD dissertation, Ann Arbor, Michigan: University Microfilms, 1955, pg. 161, no. 36. Carol Clark, Thomas Moran: Watercolors of the American West, Fort Worth, Texas: Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, 1980, pg. 129, no. 43. Nancy Anderson, Thomas Moran, Washington, D.C.: National Gallery of Art, 1997, pg. 340, chromolithograph illustrated. Sotheby’s New York sale, 3 December 1998, lot 180, not sold. Provenance: The Artist Louis Prang & Co., Boston, Massachusetts American Art Association sale, New York, 1892 J. N. Bartfield Galleries, New York Private Collection, California Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Private Collection, Wyoming, 2006 Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico $800,000 – $1,300,000 v

1 2

3

4 5

24

Sheet 7 of the unbound portfolio, The Yellowstone National Park, and the Mountain Regions of Portions of Idaho, Nevada, Colorado and Utah, Boston: L. Prang & Co., 1876. Several copies of this photograph exist. The one reproduced here is in Moran’s personal collection (William Henry Jackson, Scenes Taken on Exploring Trips, 1871-1892, bound album, Moran Collection, East Hampton Library, pg. 24). Fritiof Fryxell, ed. Thomas Moran: Explorer in Search of Beauty, East Hampton, New York: East Hampton Free Library, 1958, pg. 60. This essay by Jackson appeared in Appalachia, September, 1938. The 1872 watercolor, Yellowstone River, is in the collection of the Gilcrease Museum. The etching, The Head of the Yellowstone River, is no. 19 in Anne Morand and Nancy Friese, The Prints of Thomas Moran in the Thomas Gilcrease Institute of History and Art, Tulsa, Oklahoma: Gilcrease Museum Association, 1986, pg. 82.


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30 THOMAS MORAN (1837-1926) The Great Falls of Snake River, Idaho Territory, 1876 chromolithograph on paper 8 3/8 x 12 1/2 inches Provenance: Zaplin-Lampert Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Private Collection, Colorado $7,500 – $9,500

31 THOMAS MORAN (1837-1926) Grand Canyon of Arizona from Hermit Rim Road, 1912 chromolithograph on paper 25 3/4 x 34 3/8 inches signed and dated lower left: Moran, 1912. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,500 – $2,500

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32 WILLIAM R. LEIGH (1866-1955) Keams Cañon, Arizona, 1915 oil on board 10 x 13 1/4 inches signed lower right: W. R. Leigh. titled, dated and signed verso: Keams Cañon, Arizona / Aug. 1915. / W. R. Leigh William R. Leigh was born in New Jersey in 1866. At a young age he began drawing and by the age of twelve had sold his first drawing for $100. After studying for three years at the Maryland Institute of Art, Leigh went to Europe and spent twelve years studying primarily at the Royal Academy in Munich. Upon his return to New York, Leigh began a successful career in illustration. Leigh’s first trip to the American west was on assignment for Scribner’s and he would be drawn back to the area for the rest of his life, both on assignment and on his own. In the late 1920s Leigh went to Africa for two years and completed numerous sketches and studies that would be the basis for his completion of historical dioramas for the Museum of Natural History in New York City. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $10,000 – $15,000 nr

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33 DONALD BARTON (1903-1990) Grand Canyon, Arizona oil on canvas 25 1/4 x 30 1/4 inches signed lower left: Don. Barton Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $5,000 – $7,000

34 WILLIAM R. LEIGH (1866-1955) Grand Canyon oil on canvas laid on board 11 5/8 x 8 3/4 inches signed lower right: W. R. Leigh Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $15,000 – $25,000

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35 WILSON HURLEY (1924-2008) The Praying Monk, Camelback Mountain, Arizona, 1970 oil on canvas 31 x 31 inches signed and dated lower left: Wilson Hurley / 1970 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $8,000 – $12,000

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36 ARTURO CHÁVEZ (b. 1949) Mojave Wall, 1995-2015 oil on linen mounted on panel 9 x 12 inches signed lower right: Arturo Chávez signed, dated and inscribed verso: Arturo Chávez © 1995-2015 / Grand Canyon / November 1995 / West of Hopi Point South Rim / Sunset Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $3,000 – $5,000

37 ARTURO CHÁVEZ (b. 1949) La Cueva Winter, 2015 oil on linen mounted on panel 8 x 12 7/8 inches signed lower left: Arturo Chávez signed and dated verso: Arturo Chávez 2015 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $3,000 – $4,000

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38 PETER INGLIS (b. 1963) Desert Road, 1991 oil on board 6 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches signed and dated lower right: Peter Inglis 5/10/91 Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $300 – $500 nr

39 HELEN HILL (1899-2004) Red Rock Crossing, Sedona oil on board 18 x 24 inches signed lower right: H.C. Hill titled and inscribed on label affixed to verso: “Red Rock Crossing, Sedona” / Original Oil By / Helen C. Hill Provenance: Private Collection, California $1,000 – $2,000 nr

40 FREMONT ELLIS (1897-1985) Untitled (Red Canyon Formation) watercolor on paper 12 5/8 x 17 3/4 inches signed lower right: Fremont Ellis Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $3,000 – $5,000

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41 VICTOR HIGGINS (1884-1949) Red Mountains oil on canvas 19 x 27 inches signed lower right: VICTOR HIGGINS Victor Higgins was born in Shelbyville, Indiana, and moved to Chicago at the age of fifteen after learning about the newly opened Art Institute of Chicago from a travelling sign painter. Following ten years of study in Chicago, Higgins went to New York in 1911, where he studied with Robert Henri’s Ashcan School and then later that year went to Europe to study in London, Paris and Munich. In 1913, Higgins returned to Chicago and was able to view the reduced format Armory Show, which introduced the young artist to modernist painting. In 1914, at the urging of his patron Mayor Carter Harrison, Higgins made his first trip to Taos and immediately established his residency there painting the unchanged lifestyle of the Pueblo Indians of the region. In 1917, Higgins was invited to join the Taos Society of Artists, and remained with the group until they disbanded in 1927; however, he was not one of the most active participants and in fact by 1920 was spending more and more time with the more progressive artists Andrew Dasburg and Kenneth Adams. Following the dissolving of the Taos Society of Artists Higgins turned his focus almost completely to the depiction of cubist forms and concentrated primarily on portraying the pattern evident in his surroundings. In Red Mountains, Higgins explores this interest in cubism and pattern through the representation of the distinct geological strata present in so many mountains of the northern New Mexico region. Provenance: Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1979 $200,000 – $300,000 v

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42 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Harden Hollow, 1911-1913 woodblock print 58/125 9 1/8 x 11 1/8 inches titled lower left: HARDEN HOLLOW signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: 58 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $6,000 – $8,000

43 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Coast Range woodblock print 7/120 9 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches titled lower left: COAST RANGE signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: NO 7 OF 120 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $7,000 – $9,000

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44 GEORGE CARLSON (b. 1940) The Hunter (Tarahumara Series), 1974 bronze 12/21 12 x 11 x 8 1/2 inches inscribed, dated and editioned: CARLSON / 1974 © 12-21 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $5,000 – $7,000

45 GEORGE CARLSON (b. 1940) Drinking Tesguino (Tarahumara Series), 1974 bronze 12/21 13 1/2 x 5 3/4 x 9 1/4 inches inscribed, dated and editioned: CARLSON / 1974 © 12-21 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $5,000 – $7,000

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46 GEORGE CARLSON (b. 1940) Canyon Winds (Tarahumara Series), 1974 bronze 12/21 18 1/4 x 7 x 14 1/2 inches inscribed, dated and editioned: CARLSON / 1974 © 12-21 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $7,000 – $10,000

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a.

b.

d.

c.

e.

47a-e

NED JACOB (b. 1938)

a. Indian on Horseback with Flag, ca. 1979 charcoal on paper 6 x 6 1/4 inches (sight) initialed lower right: nj.

d. Indian (Chief) on Horse, ca. 1979 crayon on paper 9 x 10 inches (sight) signed lower right: Ned Jacob

b. Pair of Indians on Horseback, ca. 1979 charcoal on paper 5 3/4 x 8 1/4 inches (sight) initialed lower right: nJ.

e. Apache Horseman, ca. 1975 charcoal on paper 5 3/4 x 8 1/2 inches signed lower left: Ned Jacob

c. Two Indians with Rifles, ca. 1979 pencil on paper 9 x 9 3/8 inches (sight) initialed lower center: nJ.

Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,500 – $3,500 (for the set) nr

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a.

b. 48a-c

NED JACOB (b. 1938)

a. Studies of a Crow Indian, ca. 1979 ink on paper 11 7/8 x 8 inches signed lower left: Ned Jacob b. Cheyenne with Society Staff, ca. 1979 ink on paper 10 x 11 7/8 inches signed lower right: Ned Jacob c. Crow Warrior, ca. 1979 ink on paper 10 3/4 x 10 inches signed center left: Ned Jacob Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,000 – $3,000 (for the set) nr c.

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49 KEVIN RED STAR (b. 1943) Crow Medicine Man, 1975

50 BOB BOOMER (b. 1944) Medicine Basket

mixed media on paper 24 x 18 inches signed and dated upper right: Kevin Red Star 1975

wood 19 1/2 x 5 x 6 1/2 inches (with base) inscribed and dated: Bob Boomer © [date undecipherable]

Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado

Provenance: Private Collection, Missouri

$1,500 – $2,500 nr

$1,500 – $2,000

51 AGNES SIMS (1910-1990) Medicine Man Gives Away His Horse oil on canvas 57 x 70 inches signed lower right: Agnes Sims Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $2,000 – $3,000 v

39


52 DAN NAMINGHA (b. 1950) Sacred Shield oil on canvas 60 x 50 inches signed lower left: Namingha titled on label affixed to verso: Sacred Shield Provenance: Private Collection, California $6,000 – $8,000

40


53 JON ZAHOUREK (b. 1940) Painted

54 JON ZAHOUREK (b. 1940) Blackfoot

mixed media on paper 18 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches

mixed media on paper 17 x 10 1/2 inches signed lower right: Zahourek

Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $600 – $800 v

Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $600 – $800 v

41


55 BUCK MCCAIN (b. 1943) Portrait of an Era oil on masonite 72 x 36 inches signed lower right: McCain Provenance: Private Collection, Illinois $15,000 – $25,000 42


56 PAUL PLETKA (b. 1946) Zuni Man oil on masonite 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: Paul Pletka Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $8,000 – $12,000

57 PAUL PLETKA (b. 1946) Bois Brule oil on canvas 48 x 36 inches signed lower center: Pletka Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $15,000 – $25,000

43


58 DAN GARRETT (b. 1948) Mystic Winds, 1989 bronze 17/50 20 1/4 x 8 x 10 3/4 inches (with base) dated, inscribed and editioned: 89 © / Dan Garrett 17/50 Provenance: The Artist Private Collection, Missouri, 1995 $1,000 – $2,000

59 BRUCE BRADY (1934-2000) Osage, 1989 bronze 10/30 22 1/4 x 9 1/2 x 10 inches (with base) inscribed, dated and editioned: Bruce Brady / 1989 © 10/30 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $3,000 – $5,000

44


60 MARK ROHRIG (b. 1955) Untitled, 1987 oil on canvas 12 x 17 inches signed and dated lower left: Mark Rohrig 87 © Provenance: Aspen Mountain Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Private Collection, Missouri, 1989 $3,000 – $5,000

61 LARRY RILEY (b. 1947) Untitled (Indian Girl)

62 RAMON KELLEY (b. 1939) Crow Bonnet, Crow Agency, Montana, 2015

oil on canvas 14 x 11 inches signed lower right: Larry Riley / ©

oil on board 8 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches signed and dated upper left: Ramon 15 / © titled, inscribed and signed verso: Crow Bonnet / Crow Agency / Montana / oil / Ramon Kelley / ©

Provenance: Private Collection, Minnesota $1,000 – $2,000

Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $1,000 – $2,000 45


63 PAUL PLETKA (b. 1946) Breaking of a Chief oil on canvas 46 x 72 inches signed lower right: Pletka Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $40,000 – $60,000

46


64 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Nine Riders ink on paper 8 1/2 x 14 inches Provenance: Estate of the Artist, 1950 Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, New York Private Collection, Colorado Accompanied by statement of authenticity from Harold Davidson, Santa Barbara, California

$2,000 – $3,000

65 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Three Cowboys on Horses, 1924 pencil on paper 8 1/2 x 10 1/2 inches signed and dated lower right: Borein / 1924 Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $2,500 – $3,500 v

47


66 WILLIAM R. LEIGH (1866-1955) Bronco Buster etching on paper 9 3/4 x 7 3/4 inches signed lower right: W. R. Leigh Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,200 – $1,800 nr

67 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Headin’ a Steer etching and drypoint on paper 8 3/8 x 12 1/8 inches signed lower right: Edward Borein lower left: remarque of rider on horseback Literature: John R. Galvin, The Etchings of Edward Borein, San Francisco: J. Howell Books, 1971. $2,500 – $3,500 48


68 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Ramada at Taos etching on paper 7 x 10 7/8 inches signed lower right: Edward Borein Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $1,500 – $2,500 nr

69 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Church at Acoma etching and drypoint on paper 8 x 11 3/4 inches signed lower right: Edward Borein Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $1,000 – $1,500 nr

49


70 FRANK TENNEY JOHNSON (1874-1939) California’s First Theatre oil on canvas 18 1/2 x 28 1/4 inches signed lower left: F. Tenney Johnson. Frank Tenney Johnson was born near the Oregon Trail in Pottawatamie County, Iowa, and as a boy he was able to see stagecoaches and covered wagons heading west. When Johnson was ten years old, his family moved to Milwaukee, where he studied art with F.W. Heine whose specialty was painting horses. Johnson learned this skill from him and never gave up his study of the horse, striving to portray the animal with complete accuracy. Johnson then studied with Richard Lorenz, a member of the Society of Western Painters. Not only a talented teacher, Lorenz also passed on a great enthusiasm and love for the West to his pupil. A small inheritance enabled Johnson to study at the Art Students League in New York City for five months in 1895. While there he worked with John Henry Twachtman. Back in Milwaukee he worked as a free lance illustrator to save enough money to return to New York with his wife in 1902. This second time to the city Johnson studied with William Merritt Chase and Robert Henri. In 1904 Field and Stream sent Johnson to the Rockies and the Southwest. Dr. Harold McCracken, in his excellent book on Johnson, says that this trip was the single most important event in his artistic career. It was on this journey that Johnson established his distinctive style and discovered the subject matter on which he would draw throughout his life. One of the most important things he learned on this first trip west was to appreciate the quality of the western sky by day and by night. He made notes of the subtle differences not only in the sky but in the landscape and rocks in the moonlight. He later developed the skill of painting night scenes to such a degree that he became quite famous for these pictures. 50

Field and Stream was well satisfied with Johnson’s work and his skills as an illustrator became more in demand. He took more trips west and finally settled in California. Around 1919, his easel paintings began to outsell his illustrations, and there were increasing numbers of sales and commissions, including murals in a famous Los Angeles movie palace, the Cathay Circle Theatre. California’s First Theatre was likely executed during this fertile time in Johnson’s career. Johnson was a fluent painter who worked swiftly using brush, palette knife or finger to achieve the desired texture. In order to better render the luminosity of a night sky, he studied the work of Maxfield Parrish extensively, whose depictions of the phenomenon were famous. Johnson developed a special style of underpainting to give his night skies the quality of light which he so admired in nature. Johnson’s process demanded that he work quickly but carefully so as not to lose the composition. His draftsmanship is sure but never hard. His backgrounds are usually dark, with the central figures painted in lighter tones so that they stand out clearly, techniques that are employed in California’s First Theatre. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $100,000 – $150,000


71 WILL SHUSTER (1892-1969) San Miguel Church oil on panel 24 x 16 inches Will Shuster first came to Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the advice of his doctors to help treat his tuberculosis. Upon his arrival he was not yet an artist, but a formally trained engineer, however he was immediately drawn into the rich culture and heritage of Santa Fe and worked in a variety of media throughout his career.  A member of the Cinco Pintores and also one of the leading figures in the Santa Fe Art Colony, Shuster also inaugurated and created Zozobra, Old Man Gloom, who remains an icon of Santa Fe today and is burned every year during Fiestas.  Although he experimented with abstraction, Shuster remained primarily devoted to realist art and his Indian-themed murals at the Fine Arts Museum in Santa Fe remain in situ today. Provenance: Estate of the Artist Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1989 $15,000 – $20,000 v

51


72 LAURENCE SISSON (b. 1928) Sanctuario oil on canvas 36 x 27 inches signed lower left: L. SISSON Provenance: The Artist Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1980 $4,000 – $6,000 v

73 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) El Santo, 1919 woodblock print III 48 125 9 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches titled lower left: EL SANTO signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: III 48 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $4,000 – $6,000

52


74 FRANCISCO ZÚÑIGA (1912-1998) Mujer de Pie, 1962 bronze 16 x 4 3/4 x 6 3/4 inches inscribed: Zúñiga Provenance: The Artist Brewster Gallery, New York, New York Private Collection, Missouri, 1995 $10,000 – $15,000

75 FRANCISCO ZÚÑIGA (1912-1998) Mujer Reclinada, 1977 pastel on paper 21 1/2 x 29 3/4 inches signed and dated lower left: Zúñiga 1977 Provenance: Brewster Gallery, New York, New York Private Collection, Missouri, 1997 $7,000 – $9,000

53


76 DAVID ALFARO SIQUEIROS (1896-1974) Zapata, 1930 lithograph on paper E/E 20 1/2 x 15 inches signed and dated lower right: D.A. Siqueiros / 1930 editioned lower left: E/E Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $3,000 nr

77a-b NED JACOB (b. 1938) a. Standing Vaquero, ca. 1967 pencil on paper 9 x 6 inches initialed lower right: nJ. b. Vaquero (Hands on Hips), ca. 1967 pencil on paper 8 x 5 3/4 inches (sight) initialed lower left: N / J. Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $1,000 – $2,000 (for the pair) nr

a.

54

b.


78 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1998) Mexican Rancho, 1960 oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower left: O-Wieghorst (with artist’s cipher) inscribed on stretcher: “Mexican Rancho” by O-Wieghorst Exhibited: Tucson, Arizona, Tucson Museum of Art, Wieghorst Retrospective, October 9-November 30, 1981 (label verso). Provenance: Robert Q. Sutherland, Kansas City, Missouri Private Collection, Missouri, 1992 Accompanied by a letter from the artist’s son, Roy Wieghorst, which refers to this painting as an “exceptionally fine” [example of Wieghorst’s work] executed in 1960. $30,000 – $40,000

55


79 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Malapai, ca. 1930 woodblock print 40/125 9 3/8 x 11 1/8 inches titled lower left: MALAPAI numbered lower left: 84 signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: II 40 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $6,000 – $8,000

80 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Morning in Mexico, 1917 woodblock print 9/125 12 3/8 x 13 3/8 inches titled lower left: MORNING IN MEXICO signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: I 9 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $6,000 – $9,000

56


81 DONNA CLAIR (b. 1939) Three Women oil on board 30 x 40 inches signed lower left: Donna Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $3,000

82 MARTHA PETTIGREW (b. 1950) Water Carrier, 1992 bronze 1/20 18 x 6 1/2 x 7 1/2 inches (with base) inscribed, editioned and dated: Martha Pettigrew 1/20 / © 1992 Provenance: The Artist Private Collection, Missouri, 1992 $1,500 – $2,500

83 DONNA CLAIR (b. 1939) Peasant Girl (The Yellow Shawl), 1975 oil on board 32 x 25 3/4 inches signed and dated lower left: © Donna Badynski - ‘75 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,500 – $2,500 57


84 HERBERT (ANDY) ANDERSON (1893-1963) Jose, ca. 1940s mixed media 54 inches high Provenance: Private Collection, California $4,000 – $6,000

85 GLENNA GOODACRE (b. 1939) Rose Gonzales, 1974 oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches signed lower right: G.Goodacre Provenance: Collection of the Genesee Country Village & Museum, Mumford, New York $1,000 – $1,500 nr

58


86 BILL NEBEKER (b. 1942) The Ranger, 1989 bronze 9/25 22 1/4 x 11 x 8 inches (with base) inscribed, dated and editioned: Bill Nebeker © 1989 9/25 / c/a Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $4,000 – $6,000 v

87 VARIOUS ARTISTS Cowboy Artists of America Portfolio, 1988 color lithographs on paper 359/500 20 x 16 and 16 x 20 inches editioned lower right: 359/500 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $600 – $800 nr 59


88 BILLY SCHENCK (b. 1947) Waco, 1985 color serigraph 43/58 21 x 21 1/4 inches signed and dated lower right: Schenk Feb. ‘85 titled and editioned lower left: Waco 43/58 Provenance: Joanne Lyon Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Private Collection, New Mexico $500 – $700 nr

89 HARRY JACKSON (1924-2011) Range Burial, 1968 lithograph on paper 19/20 12 1/4 x 19 7/8 inches signed and dated lower right: Harry Jackson 1968 editioned lower left: 19/20 Provenance: John Meigs, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1972 Nedra Matteucci Galleries, Santa Fe, New Mexico Private Collection, New Mexico $800 – $1,200

90 TOM RYAN (1922-2011) Leading the Remuda lithograph on paper 17/100 12 x 17 1/4 inches signed lower right: Tom Ryan c/a titled and editioned lower left: Leading the Remuda 17/100 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $800 – $1,000

60


91 G. HARVEY (b. 1933) Fording at Dusk, 1976 oil on canvas 30 x 48 1/2 inches signed and dated lower right: G. Harvey­­— / 1976 © Gerald Harvey Jones, better known as G. Harvey, was born in south-central Texas in 1933 into a family steeped in the culture of the American cowboy. After graduating from North Texas State University and following a brief tenure at the University of Texas at Austin, Harvey abandoned a promising teaching career in order to paint full-time. Inspired by his grandfather’s tales of ranch and frontier life, and informed by his own firsthand experiences, Harvey adopted the history, traditions and scenic beauty of the West as the dominant theme in his art. His atmospheric renderings of Texas cow camps and romanticized Hill Country cattle drives subsequently earned him a reputation as one of the foremost chroniclers of an authentic American past. He is the recipient of countless honors, including the esteemed New Masters Award of the American Artists Professional League (1965), numerous public and private commissions, and is the subject of several books and solo exhibitions. Betraying a “soft focus” delineation of forms and virtuoso handling of light, Fording at Dusk (1976) features the hallmarks of Harvey’s best-known images, while demonstrating the artist’s profound sensitivity to the role of the cowboy in the forging of an American national identity. Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $80,000 – $120,000

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92 RON STEWART (b. 1941) Time for Talk oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower left: Ron Stewart (with artist’s cipher) Provenance: Private Collection, Missouri $2,500 – $3,500

93 RON STEWART (b. 1941) Run for Cover bronze 11/35 15 x 7 1/2 x 12 inches (with base) editioned and inscribed: 11/35 / Ron Stewart Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $2,000 – $3,000

62


94 FRED FELLOWS (b. 1934) No Bed of Roses bronze 3/50 22 1/2 x 18 x 9 1/4 inches (with base) editioned and inscribed: 3/50 Fellows Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $2,500 – $3,500

95 RUSTY PHELPS (b. 1936) Sand Creek, 1980 bronze 3/16 26 x 20 1/2 x 16 1/2 inches (with unattached base) inscribed, dated and editioned: Rusty Phelps / 80 © 3/16 Provenance: Robert Q. Sutherland, Kansas City, Missouri Private Collection, Missouri, 1992 $2,500 – $3,500

63


96 ROSS STEFAN (1934-1999) Old Waiting Place, 1966 oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed lower left: Ross Stefan signed, dated and titled on stretcher: by Ross Stefan 1966 “Old Waiting Place” Provenance: Private Collection, Virginia $2,500 – $3,500

97 ROSS STEFAN (1934-1999) Halfway to Kaibito, 1964 oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed lower left: Ross Stefan signed, dated and titled on stretcher: by Ross Stefan 1964 “Halfway to Kaibito” Provenance: Private Collection, Virginia $2,000 – $3,000

64


98 GORDON SNIDOW (b. 1936) Cowboy Santa oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed lower right: gSnidow inscribed on verso: All Rights Expressed or Unexpressed are Reserved by the Artist / gSnidow note: cover illustration for holiday greeting card, Leanin’ Tree Publishing Company (Leanin’ Tree Museum of Western Art), Boulder, Colorado Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $8,000 – $12,000

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99 BYRON B. WOLFE (1904-1973) One More Ridge to Taos, 1972 watercolor on paper 16 x 20 inches signed and dated lower left: Byron B. Wolfe CA / © 1972 titled on matte lower left: “One More Ridge to Taos” inscribed on matte lower right: From the sketchbook of Byron B. Wolfe Provenance: Private Collection, New Jersey $800 – $1,200 nr

100 BYRON B. WOLFE (1904-1973) Kit Carson’s Luck or Marksmanship?, 1971 watercolor on paper 16 x 20 inches signed and dated lower left: Byron B. Wolfe / © 1971 titled on matte lower left: “Kit Carson’s Luck or Marksmanship?” inscribed on matte lower right: From the sketchbook of Byron B. Wolfe Provenance: Private Collection, New Jersey $800 – $1,200 nr

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101 WARREN E. ROLLINS (1861-1962) Taos Mountain, New Mexico oil on board 8 1/4 x 14 inches signed lower right: - W E Rollins titled and signed verso: Taos Mountain / New Mexico / Warren E. Rollins Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $3,000 – $5,000

102 GERALD CASSIDY (1879-1934) Sangre de Cristo Splendor watercolor on paper 8 1/4 x 9 1/2 inches signed lower right: Gerald (artist’s cipher) Cassidy Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $2,500 – $3,500 v

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103 CHARLES M. RUSSELL (1864-1926) Buffalo Hunt, 1901 watercolor on paper 8 3/4 x 17 inches initialed and dated lower left: CMR (with artist’s cipher) / 1901 Born into an affluent St. Louis family, Russell went to Montana at the age of fifteen, first working on a sheep ranch and then working as a cowboy for several outfits. It was an outdoor life, including hunting, fishing and embracing the wilderness – a life that gave him enormous knowledge of and love for the landscape, dress, people and customs of the West. In 1892 he moved to Great Falls, Montana and from then on he was determined to work as a professional, full-time artist. With an unparalleled ability to vividly depict a place and way of life which was already then quickly disappearing, his work has been likened to “a great window opening on the past.” By the time Russell had settled in Montana, the Indian settlements there (Blackfoot, Arapaho, Kootenai and Crow tribes) were receding due to the growing ranches and cattle business. Russell spent time with one tribe – the Bloods – hunting with them and learning their language, legends and customs – both for friendship and with an artistic intent. His reverence for the Indians whom he described as “the only real American” translated into his art. Russell had a number of favorite subjects, variations of which he would depict many times over, both on canvas and in bronze. The one he apparently enjoyed more than any other was single or small groups of Indians hunting buffalo. When the horse was introduced to the Indians in the eighteenth century, the buffalo became a major source of food and clothing, much of what they required in the way of necessities. As a result, the buffalo was prized as the Indian’s greatest resource, the most hunted and also the most venerated prey. In these works, Russell pays homage to a cultural approach far different than the indiscriminate and casual recreational slaughter of the buffalo practiced by white hunters. Throughout his career, Russell’s depiction of the buffalo took many forms, from rapid pencil sketches to carefully thought-out oil paintings. For Russell, as for many other western artists, the extinction of the buffalo in the late nineteenth century came to symbolize the poignant passing of the Old West and a treasured way of life. In much the same way that many of his compositions show compassion for the difficulties of the American Indian, Buffalo Hunt is indicative of the artist’s sympathy for these animals who once dominated the Plains. Perhaps Peter Hassrick best described Russell’s commiseration with the plight of this animal: In any event, once the herds vanished, they, like the pre-reservation Indian, claimed a warm place in Russell’s heart. In his day he garnered the reputation as the best painter of the buffalo. His quiet, reserved portrayals . . . proved his skill as an animal painter while revealing the reverence he felt for these monarchs of the prairie. With such sympathy for and pride in these beasts, it is little wonder that the artist chose the buffalo skull as part of his monogram. (Hassrick, pg. 58) Another important and highly successful aspect of this action filled painting is Russell’s masterful handling of the unique and illusive Northern Plains light. The dusty ground is rendered in muted tans, yellows and greens. The low mountains in the background are a concentration of the same colors from his palette punctuated throughout with blues and purples, which he has painted with an extraordinary economy of means. In all, the light in this painting is an austere, brightened full-blown presence, as much a part of the Northern Plains landscape, a landscape he knew so well, as the ever-present rocks, dust and grasses. According to oral history, the first owner of Buffalo Hunt, William Tannhauser, was a friend of the artist “and knew him well when they both lived in Montana.” Literature: B. Byron Price, editor and Anne Morand, Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonné, Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007, CR.PC.500. Related Literature: Frederic G. Renner, Charles M. Russell: Paintings, Drawings, and Sculpture in the Amon G. Carter Collection, Fort Worth, Texas: The Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, 1966 Peter H. Hassrick, Charles M. Russell, New York, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1989 John Taliaferro, Charles M. Russell: The Life and Legends of America’s Cowboy Artist, Canada: Little, Brown & Co. (Canada) Ltd., 1996 Larry Len Peterson, Charles M. Russell, Legacy: Printed and Published Works of Montana’s Cowboy Artist, Helena, Montana: Falcon Publishers, Inc. in cooperation with the Charles M. Russell Museum, Great Falls, Montana, 1999. Provenance: William F. Tannhauser (1874-1946), Montana and Milwaukee, Wisconsin John and Gertrude Tannhauser Schreibart, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (by bequest), 1946 James D. and Helen Horn Sammarco, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (purchase), 1954 Ailene Horn Beady, Brookfield, Wisconsin (by bequest), 1983 Fenn Galleries, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1983 Private Collection, Florida $500,000 – $700,000

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104 CLAYTON S. PRICE (1874-1950) Prospecting, 1906 oil on canvas 18 x 22 inches signed and dated lower right: C.S. Price / 1906. Provenance: Private Collection, Pennsylvania $12,000 – $15,000

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105 FRANK REED WHITESIDE (1866-1929) Doubling Up, 1928 oil on canvas 14 x 20 inches signed and dated lower left: Frank Reed Whiteside / 1928 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $3,000 – $5,000

106 FRANK REED WHITESIDE (1866-1929) Hopi Snake Dance - Walpi watercolor on paper 15 x 21 inches signed lower right: Frank Reed Whiteside Exhibited: Phoenix, Arizona, Phoenix Art Museum, Whiteside: Painter of the Zuni, January 20, 1971 - March 14, 1971. Phoenix, Arizona, Phoenix Art Museum, Visitors to Arizona: 1846 to 1980, September 6 - October 12, 1980, no. 36., traveled to: Tucson, Arizona, Tucson Museum of Art, October 19 - November 30, 1980. Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,000 – $3,000

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107 HENRY BALINK (1882-1963) Zuni Pueblo oil on canvas 15 1/2 x 20 1/4 inches signed lower right: HENRY BALINK Provenance: Private Collection, Utah $12,000 – $15,000

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108 NICK EGGENHOFER (1897-1985) Indian on Horseback watercolor on paper 17 x 12 inches signed lower right: N. Eggenhofer Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,000 – $3,000 nr

109 ALFRED HOLDSTOCK (1820-1901) Wahasee Rapids, Riviere aux Lievres pastel on paper 12 3/4 x 19 inches signed and inscribed lower right: A. Holdstock / Montreal titled lower left: Wahasee Rapids / Riviere aux Lievres Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $3,000 nr

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110 WINOLD REISS (1886-1953) Chief Medicine Boss Ribs, Blackfeet Medicine Man pastel, gouache and charcoal on paper mounted on board 52 x 30 inches signed lower right: WINOLD / REISS Fritz Winold Reiss, better known as Winold Reiss, was born in Karlsruhe, Germany. He was raised in the Black Forest, where he studied under his father, who painted landscapes. Reiss also studied with Franz von Stuck at the Royal Academy in Munich and with Julius Diez at the Art School in Munich. Inspired by the novels of James Fenimore Cooper, Reiss came to the United States in 1913 expressly to paint the American Indian. Delayed slightly by World War I, Reiss began in 1919 to paint his collection of Indian portraits, including 81 for the Great Northern Railroad that were exhibited nationally and in Europe. The Blackfeet, in particular, were the subjects of many book illustrations for which Reiss was commissioned. He spent so much time with them that he became a member of the tribe under the name “Beaver Child,” a reference to the intensity of his painting. Although known for his portraits, Reiss also painted landscapes, including the Grand Canyon. In 1941, he was assistant professor of mural painting at New York University, and had constructed tens of murals depicting the Indian in theaters, restaurants such as Longchamps in New York City, hotels, clubs and the Cincinnati Union Terminal. Some of these murals were done in glass mosaic. Reiss spent his life portraying the West. When he died, the Blackfeet scattered his ashes at the foot of the Rockies. Literature: Stewart, Jeffery C., To Color America; Portraits by Winold Reiss, Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1989. Stewart, Jeffery C., Winold Reiss; An Illustrated Checklist of his Portraits, Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990. Native Faces; Winold Reiss, exhibition catalogue, Thomas Nygard Gallery, Bozeman, Montana, June 28 – July 26, 1997. Provenance: Private Collection, Montana Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico $225,000 – $375,000

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111 LAVERNE NELSON BLACK (1887-1938) Taos Winter Morning oil on paper laid on board 14 1/2 x 18 inches signed lower left: LaVerne Nelson Black / Taos LaVerne Nelson Black was born in 1887 in Viola, Wisconsin, a small trading post in the Kickapoo Valley. As a child he taught himself to draw and would paint pictures of the Indians and their horses that would come through the trading post. Around 1900, Black moved with his family to Chicago and in 1906 enrolled in art classes at the Art Institute of Chicago where he studied until 1908, while also working as a newspaper illustrator. Due to declining health, Black moved with his family to the dry and arid climate of Taos, New Mexico in the 1920s. While in Taos, Black produced numerous paintings of the Indians of the region either on horseback or engaged in everyday activities. Painted in an impressionistic style with bold swaths of color, creating a spontaneous yet controlled feel, these works are some of the most celebrated and well-known works of his career. Provenance: Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1985 Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1985 $150,000 – $200,000 v

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112 FREMONT ELLIS (1897-1985) Village of Truchas oil on canvas 9 x 12 inches signed lower right: Fremont Ellis Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $2,500 – $3,500 v

113 BETTINA STEINKE (1913-1999) Taos Scene (A Memory Sketch) oil on canvas 10 x 8 inches signed lower right: BETTINA / STEINKE Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $1,000 – $2,000 v

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114 OSCAR E. BERNINGHAUS (1874-1952) Taos Field of Workers, 1950 oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches signed and dated lower right: O.E. BERNINGHAUS / -50 Exhibited: Colorado Springs, Colorado, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, October 6 – November 6, 1972. Literature: Dorothy Harmsen, Harmsen’s Western Americana: A collection of one hundred western paintings with biographical profiles of the artists, Flagstaff, Arizona: Northland Press, 1971, pg. 20, illustrated in color pg. 21. Sugar and Spice (quarterly publication of Jolly Rancher Candies), Fall 1978, illustrated in color on cover. Provenance: Mission Gallery, Taos, New Mexico Collection of Dorothy & William Harmsen, Colorado, 1967 The Harmsen Art Museum Foundation Denver Art Museum, 2001 Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 2011 $500,000 – $800,000 v

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115 VICTOR HIGGINS (1884-1949) November Evening, ca. 1940s oil on board 8 x 16 inches signed lower right: VICTOR HIGGINS (indistinctly) The present work is an example from Higgins’ series of oil paintings called “Little Gems,” created during the final years of his career. Having developed an intimate knowledge of the landscape of New Mexico, Higgins returned to some his favorite locations to execute these oils on board or Masonite, almost always horizontal in format and measuring 8 x 13 to 18 x 24 inches. Much admired for their deft handling of light and color and thick, impastoed surfaces, these works depict the Taos Valley and Rio Grande Canyon and were painted on the spot from the back of his vehicle. As described by his fellow Taos painter, Ernest Blumenschein, “In them was the best Higgins quality, a lyrical charm added to his lovely color… He always had, as most good artists, an instinct that guided his form structure… And he put all he had into this dozen of small canvases… All works of love: love of his simple subjects and of his craftsmanship.”1 Provenance: Private Collection, Los Angeles, California Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1983 $90,000 – $120,000 v

1

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Dean A. Porter, Ph.D., Victor Higgins: An American Master, Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith, 1991, pgs. 222-223.


116 THOMAS HART BENTON (1889-1975) The High Plains oil on panel 4 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches signed lower left: Benton Thomas Hart Benton was the leading exponent of Regionalism, a movement characterized by its celebration of rural American subject matter. Together with Grant Wood and John Steuart Curry, Benton was catapulted to fame in 1934 following the group’s first exhibition together titled American Painting Since Whistler at the Kansas City Art Institute in 1933. Born in Neosho, Missouri in 1889, Benton studied at the Corcoran Gallery in Washington and in 1907 at the Art Institute of Chicago, intending to become a newspaper illustrator. The following year he went to Paris where he enrolled in the Académie Julian and briefly experimented with Impressionist techniques. In 1911 Benton returned to this country and eventually went to New York.   He held a variety of jobs working as a commercial artist, a decorator of ceramics, and in 1914 as a set designer for a motionpicture studio then located in Fort Lee, New Jersey. From 1914 to 1918, Benton experimented with Synchromist style paintings, a style that depended to a great extent on color contrasts. In 1918, while in Norfolk, Virginia, where he was stationed with the Navy, Benton began to question the modernist ideas he had been exposed to in France. Shifting away from abstraction, Benton started to portray romanticized small town scenes, subject matter that reflected his belief that art should be accessible to the average person. Throughout the rest of his life, Benton continued to paint in the distinct regionalist manner he developed, which is identified by his bold use of color and undulating forms. The High Plains is a focused study for a larger 1954 work titled The Plains, a tempera on board measuring 19 x 26 1/2 inches, which was sold at Christie’s in November of 2014 for $725,000. Provenance: Private Collection, St. Louis, Missouri $200,000 – $300,000

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117 SANDOR BERNATH (1892-1984) Northern Adobes - New Mexico, 1933 watercolor on paper 13 1/4 x 16 1/4 inches signed and dated lower left: Sandor Bernath / 33. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $800 – $1,200 nr

118 WILLARD NASH (1898-1942) New Mexico Landscape watercolor on paper 10 x 14 inches Provenance: Private Collection, California $4,000 – $6,000

119 JOZEF BAKOS (1891-1977) Ojo Caliente, 1930 watercolor on paper 14 x 18 3/4 inches signed lower right: Bakos titled, inscribed and dated verso: Ojo Caliente / Made in March - 1930 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $4,000

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120 WILLARD NASH (1898-1942) Adobe Church, New Mexico watercolor on paper 10 x 14 inches Provenance: Private Collection, California $5,000 – $7,000

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121 ALBERT HANDELL (b. 1937) On the High Road to Taos pastel on paper 13 3/4 x 21 1/2 inches signed lower left: HANDELL Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $700 – $900 nr

122 RAY VINELLA (b. 1933) Taos Chamisa oil on canvas 24 x 24 inches signed lower right: R. Vinella Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $1,500 – $2,500 nr

123 WILLIAM JENNINGS (b. 1952) Abandoned Adobe, 1985 oil on board 16 x 20 inches signed lower left: Jennings Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $1,000 – $2,000 nr

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124 E. MARTIN HENNINGS (1886-1956) Chili Peppers oil on panel 8 x 10 inches signed lower right: E.M.Hennings E. Martin Hennings was born to German immigrant parents in 1886 in New Jersey, and moved with his family to Chicago at two years old. An early visit to the Art Institute of Chicago solidified Hennings intention to become an artist, and he enrolled there after high school graduating with honors in 1904. Like so many of his contemporaries, Hennings then travelled to Europe and studied at the Munich Academy until he was forced to return to the states at the outbreak of World War I. In 1917, at the suggestion of his powerful Chicago patrons, Mayor Carter Harrison and meat magnate Oscar Mayer, Hennings made his first trip to Taos with the understanding they would acquire all works he completed while there. Hennings was immediately and profoundly affected by Taos, but did not return to permanently settle there until 1923. Upon his arrival he was immediately invited to join the Taos Society of Artists and remained an active member until the group disbanded in 1927. Known for his brilliant, sun-drenched landscapes rendered with thick and meticulous brushstrokes, Hennings works have a very tactile quality that seem to capture truly timeless environments. Exhibited: New York, New York, Salmagundi Club, Thumb-box Exhibition, dates unknown (label on verso). Provenance: McCulley Fine Arts, Dallas, Texas Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1986 $25,000 – $45,000 v

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125 DAN BODELSON (b. 1949) Near Ghost Ranch, 1978 oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches signed and dated lower left: Dan Bodelson / © 78 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,000 – $2,000

126 AMANDA JACOBSON (1884-1948) Old Church, Ranchos de Taos oil on board 6 1/4 x 8 1/4 inches signed lower right: Amanda Jacobson titled and inscribed verso: Old Church / Rancho de Taos / 200 years old, adobe Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $500 – $700 nr

127 JOE REED (1916-1963) Cottonwoods oil on board 24 x 18 inches signed lower right: J. Reed Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $4,000

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128a-b

ARTHUR V. DIEHL (1870-1929)

a. Rabbits, 1893 oil on canvas 28 x 14 inches signed and dated lower left: Arthur Diehl 1893 b. Partridge, 1893 oil on canvas 22 x 14 inches signed and dated lower right: Arthur Diehl 1893 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,000 – $2,000 (for the pair)

a.

b.

129 ROBERT LOUGHEED (1910-1982) Antelope Crossing

130 KENNETH R. BUNN (b. 1938) Sable Antelope

charcoal on paper 15 x 23 1/4 inches signed lower right: Robert / Lougheed (with artist’s cipher)

bronze AP 7 3/4 x 10 x 4 inches (with base) inscribed and editioned: Bunn / © / AP / 20

Provenance: Private Collection, Nevada

Provenance: Private Collection, Nevada

$3,000 – $4,000

$3,000 – $4,000 87


131 E. MARTIN HENNINGS (1886-1956) Untitled (Deer and Aspens) oil on board 23 x 48 inches signed lower right: E.Martin Hennings One of the compositional motifs that E. Martin Hennings utilized time and time again in his paintings and graphic work was that of a sinuous array of aspen trees, often on a green hillside, and often set against a distant backdrop of mountains. The thin, white aspen trunks provided an organizing structure for compositions in which Hennings placed figures of Taos Indians on horseback or on foot, or, as in this case, a herd of grazing deer. The strongly horizontal orientation of Untitled (Deer and Aspens) and its bands of green grass, purple mountains, white clouds, and blue sky are balanced by the vertical thrust of the aspen trunks, into which Hennings has interwoven no less than a dozen does, stags, and fawns. The deer appear alert but peaceful: the foremost stag to the right of center looks directly at the viewer, but does not seem alarmed. Provenance: Estate of the Artist Private Collection, Illinois Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico $200,000 – $300,000

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132 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Snow Leopard conte crayon on paper 7 1/2 x 10 inches signed middle left: Kuhn titled lower right: SNOW LEOPARD Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,000 – $3,000

133 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Lynx conte crayon on paper 6 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches signed lower right: Kuhn Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,000 – $3,000

90


134 MARTHA PETTIGREW (b. 1950) Two Ravens, 1994 bronze 4/25 16 x 14 1/2 x 12 inches (with base) titled, editioned and inscribed: Two Ravens / 4/25 Martha / Pettigrew Provenance: The Artist Private Collection, Missouri, 1994 $1,500 – $2,000

135 THOMAS AQUINAS DALY (b. 1937) Elk on a River oil on board 18 x 27 inches signed lower right: TA Daly titled and inscribed verso: Elk on a River / 18 x 27 / Oil on board / Thomas Aquinas Daly Literature: David Petersen, Racks: A Natural History of Antlers and the Animals That Wear Them, Durango, Colorado: Raven’s Eye Press, 2010, cover illustration. Provenance: Private Collection, Nevada $9,000 – $12,000

136 DEL PETTIGREW (b. 1937) Snake River Surprise, 1997 bronze 4/20 11 1/2 x 15 x 8 inches (with base) inscribed, editioned and dated: Del Pettigrew / 4/20 / 97 © Provenance: The Artist Private Collection, Missouri, 1997 $1,000 – $1,500

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137 TERRY OWEN MATHEWS (b. 1931) Birdsong, 1991 bronze 2/25 11 x 7 1/2 x 8 inches inscribed and dated: T.O. Mathews / © 1991 Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $700 – $1,000 v

138 TERRY OWEN MATHEWS (b. 1931) Little Salute, 1990 bronze 44/100 6 1/2 x 9 x 4 1/4 inches (with base) inscribed, dated and editioned: T.O. Mathews / 1990 © 44/100 Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $500 – $1,000 v

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139 TERRY OWEN MATHEWS (b. 1931) Buffalo Walk, 1991 bronze 31/100 5 3/4 x 10 x 3 3/4 inches (with base) inscribed, dated and editioned: T.O. Mathews / 1991 © 31 100 Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $500 – $1,000 v

140 TERRY OWEN MATHEWS (b. 1931) Bovine Belligerence, 1991 bronze 4/10 9 3/4 x 17 x 15 3/4 inches (with base) inscribed, dated and editioned: T.O. Mathews / 1991 © 4/10 Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $2,000 – $3,000 v

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141 GEORGE CARLSON (b. 1940) Draft Team II, 1997 bronze 13/18 7 x 9 1/2 x 5 3/4 inches inscribed, dated and editioned: Carlson / 1997 13/18 Provenance: Private Collection, Wisconsin $2,000 – $3,000

142 ROBERT LOUGHEED (1910-1982) Bell Quarter Horse charcoal on paper 9 1/2 x 13 inches signed lower right: ROBERT / LOUGHEED / (with horse cipher) Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $1,000 – $2,000 v

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143 JERRY R. WEST (b. 1933) Chaquaco Cows, Horns, and Light, 1972 oil on canvas 18 x 15 inches signed and dated lower right: Jerry R. West ‘72 titled, inscribed and signed verso: “Chaquaco cows, horns, and light” / oil / Jerry R. West Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,500 – $2,500 nr

144 EARL BISS (1947-1998) Long Horns on the Run, 1989 oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed upper right: Biss titled, signed, dated and inscribed verso: “Long Horns / on the Run” / Biss 89 © / oil on canvas Provenance: Wyckoff Barney Gallery, Aspen, Colorado Private Collection, Missouri, 1989 $3,000 – $5,000

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145 ACE POWELL (1912-1978) Napi & His Friends, 1964 bronze 9/20 11 x 8 x 9 inches dated, inscribed and editioned: © 1964 DICK FLOOD (Arnet Shaw Foundry mark) 9/20 Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $800 – $1,200 v

146 RAY SWANSON (1937-2004) What’s UP!, 1992 oil on board 24 x 30 inches signed and inscribed lower right: Ray Swanson © CA titled, signed, dated and inscribed verso: 1129 “What’s UP” / Ray Swanson / 92 / All Rights Reserved by the Artist Provenance: Private Collection, Arizona $12,000 – $15,000 96


147 RAY SWANSON (1937-2004) Market Scene oil on canvas 40 1/4 x 50 inches signed and inscribed lower right: Ray Swanson / CA © Provenance: Private Collection, Arizona $25,000 – $35,000

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148 LEON GASPARD (1882-1964) Girl with Melons, 1925 oil on canvas 20 x 12 1/2 inches signed, dated and inscribed lower left: Leon Gaspard / 1925 Taos N.M. Leon Gaspard was born in Vitebsk, Russia, in 1882, to a very culturally well-rounded family that supported his interest in the arts. At a young age he was enrolled in an art class where he studied alongside Marc Chagall. Gaspard ultimately went to Paris to further his studies at the Académie Julian. While there he met and married a young woman from America, Evelyn Adell. In 1914, when World War I broke out, Gaspard fought with the French Aviation Corp and was wounded gravely. After two years of recovery he finally joined his wife in New York in 1916. This year also saw his first encounter with the Southwest on a trip to Santa Fe to visit Sheldon Parsons, however, he was ultimately drawn to the Taos pueblo, where he would permanently move in 1918. Gaspard’s work is recognized for the impressionist quality of his brushwork as well as his incredible use of color and his focus and attention to regional details, costumes and rituals, which is evident in works of both his native Russia as well as Taos. Provenance: Matthew Chase, Ltd., Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1978 $75,000 – $125,000 v

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149 LEON GASPARD (1882-1964) Going to Market oil on canvas 10 x 10 inches signed lower left: L Gaspard Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $15,000 – $25,000 v

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150 ERIC SLOANE (1905-1985) Fresh Powder oil on masonite 26 1/2 x 33 1/2 inches signed lower left: Sloane Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $3,000 – $5,000

151 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1998) Glacier National Park, Montana, ca. 1946 oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches signed lower right: O-Wieghorst (with artist’s cipher) Provenance: Christie’s, New York, New York, 1985 Robert Q. Sutherland, Kansas City, Missouri Private Collection, Missouri, 1992 Accompanied by a letter from the artist’s son, Roy Wieghorst, which discusses the likelihood of this painting resulting from a family trip to Glacier National Park, 1946. $8,000 – $12,000

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152 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1988) Castle Rock oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower left: O-Wieghorst (with artist’s cipher) inscribed lower right: © Provenance: Private Collection, Illinois $40,000 – $60,000

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153 ADOLPH F. KLEIMINGER (1865-1945) Trail in the Rockies oil on canvas 15 x 29 inches signed lower left: A.F. KLEIMINGER Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,000 – $2,000 nr

154 RAPHAEL LILLYWHITE (1891-1958) Mount Moran, Teton Range oil on canvas 34 3/4 x 40 3/4 inches signed lower left: Raphael / Lillywhite Provenance: Private Collection, Oregon $15,000 – $25,000 10 2


155 SAMUEL HYDE HARRIS (1889-1977) Araby Hideaway oil on board 16 x 20 inches signed lower left: Sam Hyde Harris (estate signature) titled and stamped verso: Araby Hideaway / certified as original painting by Sam Hyde Harris, Maurine St. Gaudens, Estate Appraiser Provenance: Private Collection, California $3,000 – $5,000

156 SAMUEL HYDE HARRIS (1889-1977) Utah Country oil on board 18 x 24 inches signed lower left: Sam Hyde Harris (estate signature) titled and stamped verso: Utah Country / certified as original painting by Sam Hyde Harris, Maurine St. Gaudens, Estate Appraiser Provenance: Private Collection, California $4,000 – $6,000 10 3


157 ALBERT BIERSTADT (1830-1902) Mountain Scene, ca. 1870s oil on canvas 22 x 30 5/8 inches signed lower left: ABierstadt Albert Bierstadt was a master landscape painter who throughout a 40-year career, successfully created magnificent vistas in a realistic yet idealized style. In his lifetime, he traveled extensively through mountain ranges in North America and Europe, sketching and painting and producing a voluminous oeuvre of both real and imaginary scenes. The location depicted in Mountain Scene has not been identified and the artwork most likely falls into the latter category. The fact that it shares stylistic and compositional characteristics with paintings Bierstadt did of California’s Sierra Nevada range, however, suggests that the inspiration for the scene was the American West. Bierstadt spent from July 1871 until October 1873 in California, spending much of that time exploring the Sierra Mountains, from Mount Whitney in the south to Lake Tahoe in the North. In August 1872, he joined Clarence King’s survey of the southern Sierra for more than three months, sketching, painting and making oil studies that would provide inspiration for the rest of his career. Mountain Scene depicts a lake nestled among mountains in the midst of a passing storm. Bierstadt was a keen observer of light and he leads the viewer’s eye through his juxtaposition of light and shadow: both sides of the canvas are in shadow and the eye is naturally drawn to the brightly lit mountains in the center of the canvas. A circular break in the storm clouds reveals the peaks, and the eye follows this circular pattern of clouds around the canvas. Exhibited: Morristown, New Jersey, Morris Museum of Arts and Sciences, American Art Treasures Discovered, 1977, no. 55 as Landscape-Snow Capped Peak Overlooking Rocky Mountain Scene. New York, New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, Downtown Branch, Nineteenth Century American Landscape and the American Site, 1980, no. 3 as View in Yosemite Valley. Kobe, Japan, Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Modern Art, Two Hundred Years of American Paintings from the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, traveled to Tokyo, Japan, The Bunkamura Museum of Art, Hiroshima City Museum of Contemporary Art, Hiroshima, January 5-August 25, 1991, no. 12. Literature: Barbara Novak, The Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection: Nineteenth-Century American Painting, London: 1986, pg. 212, no. 67, illustrated, pg. 213. Provenance: Mrs. Frank Cotton, East Orange, New Jersey B. Douglas Orton, Montclair, New Jersey Mrs. Linton Koller, Montclair, New Jersey, 1978 Private Collection, Rhinebeck, New York Andrew Crispo Gallery, New York, 1980 Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Lugano, Switzerland, 1980-2002 Private Collection, Dallas, Texas, 2004 $700,000 – $1,200,000 v

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158 COLIN CAMPBELL COOPER (1856-1937) Untitled (Redwood Grove) oil on board 14 x 10 inches signed lower right: Colin Campbell Cooper Provenance: Private Collection, California $1,500 – $2,500

159 CARL REDIN (1892-1944) Fall Colors, New Mexico oil on canvas 28 x 24 inches signed lower left: Carl Redin Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $8,000 – $12,000

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160 ALBERT SCHMIDT (1885-1957) Valley and Mountains pastel on paperboard 10 x 15 inches Provenance: Estate of the Artist $8,000 – $12,000

161 ALBERT SCHMIDT (1885-1957) Embudo Station oil on canvasboard 18 x 24 inches signed lower left: A. H. Schmidt Provenance: Estate of the Artist $10,000 – $15,000

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162 GEORGE BELLOWS (1882-1925) Santa Fe Canyon, 1917 oil on canvas 18 x 22 inches signed lower left: Geo. Bellows / [undecipherable] George Bellows was one of the most highly acclaimed American realist painters of the twentieth century. Known primarily for his depictions of New York, prize fighters and tenement children, Bellows was instrumental in the shift of American art into the modern era. Bellows arrived in New York in 1904, and immediately began studying with Robert Henri, who would remain influential to Bellows throughout his career, at the New York School of Art. In 1909, Bellows was the youngest artist to ever receive the honor of being elected as an Associate member of the National Academy of Design, following his receipt of a prize in their annual exhibition in 1908. Additionally, Bellows was one of the twenty-five members of the Association of American Painters & Sculptors involved in organizing the ground-breaking Armory Show of 1913, which truly changed American art.   From 1912-1919, at the suggestion of his mentor Henri, Bellows would spend his summers in Maine and paint landscapes up and down the coast, with the exception of 1917, when he went to Carmel, California for four months to work on a portrait commission. On his way back east he travelled through Santa Fe to visit friends Leon Kroll and Henri. Santa Fe Canyon was completed during Bellows’ brief stay in Santa Fe in 1917. A beautiful, richly colored landscape of the river flowing at the bottom of the Santa Fe canyon, the present work is a fine example of Bellows’ skill with color and composition.   Known for his use of very expressive color, Bellows was often viewed as a spontaneous painter, but in reality was very thoughtful and planned not only his compositions but also the palette of his paintings quite meticulously.1 Bellows died suddenly in 1925, at the age of 42 from appendicitis, while still at the height of his talent. Exhibited: Santa Fe, New Mexico, Museum of New Mexico, 1917 Provenance: Estate of the Artist Emma S. Bellows, the artist’s wife Estate of Emma S. Bellows, 1959 H.V. Allison & Co., New York, New York Collection of John Hill, Nashville, Tennessee Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1987 Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1987 $225,000 – $275,000 v

1

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Michael Quick, “Technique and Theory: The Evolution of George Bellow’s Painting Style,” in The Paintings of George Bellows, Amon Carter, LACMA, Harry Abrams, 1992, pgs. 9, 63.


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163 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) Taos Valley Winter, 1973 etching on paper 73/75 9 x 15 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss editioned and titled lower left: 73/75 Taos Valley Winter Literature: Phillips Kloss, Gene Kloss Etchings, Santa Fe, NM: Sunstone Press, 1981, no. 548. Provenance: Private Collection, New Jersey $2,000 – $3,000 nr

164 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) The Rio Grande at Embudo, 1984 etching and drypoint on paper AP 7 1/2 x 9 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss editioned and titled lower left: Artist’s Proof The Rio Grande at Embudo Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $1,000 – $1,500 nr

165 GENE KLOSS (1903-1996) Winter Roundup, 1957 drypoint and aquatint on paper AP 9 x 15 inches signed lower right: Gene Kloss, N.A. editioned and titled lower left: Artist’s Proof Winter Roundup Literature: Phillips Kloss, Gene Kloss Etchings, Santa Fe, NM: Sunstone Press, 1981, no. 464. Provenance: Private Collection, Washington $1,500 – $2,500 nr

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166 RON STEWART (b. 1941) Company Coming watercolor on paper 14 1/2 x 21 1/2 inches signed lower left: Ron Stewart (with artist’s cipher) titled and signed verso: “Company Coming” / Ron Stewart (with artist’s cipher) Provenance: Private Collection, Missouri $1,000 – $1,500

167 TOM PHILLIPS (1927-2005) Opening the Santa Fe Trail watercolor on paper 14 1/2 x 21 1/2 inches signed lower right: © Tom Phillips Provenance: Private Collection, Missouri $800 – $1,200

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168 LARRY ZABEL (1930-2012) Pack Trail, Late Spring

169 THOMAS DEDECKER (b. 1951) Evening Conversation - Encampment, 2015

oil on canvas 24 x 16 inches signed lower left: Zabel

oil on canvas 36 x 36 inches signed lower right: Thomas deDecker titled and signed verso: “Evening Conversation - Encampment” / Thomas deDecker

Provenance: Private Collection, California $4,000 – $6,000

Provenance: The Artist $5,000 – $7,000

170 JOE BEELER (1931-2006) Cherokee, 1968 ink on paper 7 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches signed and dated upper right: Joe Beeler / 1968 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $900 – $1,200 nr

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171 E. MARTIN HENNINGS (1886-1956) Indian on Horseback watercolor and gouache on paper 13 x 15 1/2 inches signed lower right: E.Martin Hennings Provenance: Private Collection Bonhams & Butterfields, San Francisco, California, 1987 Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1987 $20,000 – $25,000 v

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172 RICHARD GREEVES (b. 1935) The Storyteller, 1976 bronze 31 x 29 x 21 inches titled: The Storyteller inscribed and dated: RV GREEVES 1976 2 Provenance: Collection of the Genesee Country Village & Museum, Mumford, New York $7,000 – $9,000

173 ROD GOEBEL (1946-1993) Kiva Watch oil on canvas 12 x 11 inches signed lower right: Rod Goebel Provenance: Matthew Chase, Ltd., Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1983 $1,000 – $2,000 v

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174 WILLIAM SHARER (b. 1934) Buffalo Dance oil on canvas 50 x 26 inches signed upper right: Sharer inscribed verso: Buffalo Dance / Nambé Pueblo / William E. Sharer Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $15,000 – $20,000

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175 ROBERT HENRI (1865-1929) Portrait of Po Tse (Water Eagle) oil on canvas 41 1/2 x 32 3/4 inches signed lower left: Robert Henri Often regarded as one of the most influential artists of twentieth-century America, Robert Henri championed individual freedom and progress in the arts throughout his career. His own style drew upon a number of avant-garde theories, including the realism of Winslow Homer and Thomas Eakins in addition to the French PostImpressionist and Symbolist practices. In his ongoing battle to liberalize art institutions in America, Henri communicated the new spirit of rebellion and innovation that was at the heart of these movements to numerous students and colleagues. In this manner he was the chief means by which major breakthroughs in European painting were assimilated into American practice. As Henri crusaded actively against academic conservatism, he enlisted younger artists such as John Sloan, and his students included George Bellows, Edward Hopper, Morgan Russell, and Stuart Davis. Henri’s cause of artistic freedom and unflinching realism led his detractors to dub Henri’s group the “Ashcan School.” In 1908 Henri and other members of the “Eight” achieved notoriety with their exhibit at Macbeth Gallery in New York. In 1914, Henri took his first trip west to paint in Southern California. It was during this first trip that Henri’s interest in Southwestern subject matter began. According to Henri’s Record Book, in September 1914 in San Diego, the present work of Po Tse was painted among the second group of Indian portraits he executed while in California. This painting is of a Tewa Indian, and according to current research by Margi Conrads his name is Julian Martinez, husband of the well-known potter Maria Martinez. Julian posed for Henri in at least five other paintings. Considered to be one of Henri’s most important early Indian portraits, Portrait of Po Tse uses brilliant colors and “concentrates on the novelty of visible characteristics seen in facial features and in the detailed execution of the Native dress and accoutrements.”1 While in California, Henri achieved great strides in the development of his use of color, which from here forward would become a defining characteristic of his work. The beautiful, rich tones used in Portrait of Po Tse, including the striking blue background, very clearly demonstrate this newfound focus on color. Exhibited: New York, New York, The Macbeth Gallery, Recent Paintings by Robert Henri, November 17-December 7, 1914, cat. no. 1. San Diego, California, Panama-California Exposition, 1915, traveled to: Los Angeles, California, January 18-February 1, 1916, Seattle and Spokane, Washington, Portland Art Association, Portland, Oregon, April 4-24, and possibly Rochester, New York. New York, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Catalogue of a Memorial Exhibition of the Work of Robert Henri, March 9-April 19, 1931, illustrated, cat. no. 59. Great Falls, Montana, C. M. Russell Museum, Masters of the Taos Tradition, May-September, 1993, traveled to: Colorado Springs Fine Art Center, Colorado Springs, Colorado, May-September, 1996, Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, California, January-April, 1995, National Museum of Wildlife Art, Jackson, Wyoming, May-November, 1995. Albuquerque, New Mexico, The Albuquerque Museum, Taos Artists and Their Patrons, April 16-August 6, 2000. New York, New York, Gerald Peters Gallery, Robert Henri: The Painted Spirit, October 27-December 10, 2005. Kansas City, Missouri, Nelson Atkins Museum of Art, on loan, May-November, 2010. San Jose, California, San Jose Museum of Art, Robert Henri’s California: Realism, Race & Region 1914-1925, September 13, 2014-January 18, 2015, traveled to Laguna Art Museum, Laguna Beach, California, February 22-May 31, 2015. Literature: “Art at Home and Abroad: News and Comment: Recent Paintings by Robert Henri,” The New York Times (November 22, 1914), sec. 5, pg. 11, illustrated A Catalogue of Paintings, exh. cat., San Diego: Gallery of Fine Arts, Panama-California Exposition, 1915, n.p., cat. no. 39. Valerie Ann Leeds, Robert Henri in Santa Fe: His Work and Influence, Santa Fe: Gerald Peters Gallery, 1998, pgs. 9-10, illustrated. Valerie Ann Leeds, “Robert Henri and the American Southwest,” PhD diss., City University of New York, 2000, pgs. 107-8, 456, illustrated. Margaret A. Stenz, “Primitivism and Nationalism in the Portraiture of Robert Henri,” PhD diss., City University of New York, 2002, pgs. 292-94, 320, illustrated. Valerie Ann Leeds, “The Painted Spirit: Robert Henri’s Figurative Works,” in Robert Henri: The Painted Spirit, New York: Gerald Peters Gallery, 2005, pg. 23, pl. no. 11. Derrick Cartwright and Valerie Ann Leeds, Robert Henri’s California: Realism Race & Region 1914-1925, Laguna Art Museum, 2014, pg. 20, pg. 36 note no. 31, pg. 38, note no. 52. Provenance: Private Collection, San Antonio, Texas Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1978 $2,300,000 – $3,000,000 v

1

116

Valerie Ann Leeds, introduction, Robert Henri in Santa Fe: His Work and Influence, Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, 1998, pg. 10.


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176 CHARLES H. HUMPHRISS (1867-1934) The Warrior, 1904 bronze (posthumous casting) 16 x 14 1/2 x 5 1/2 inches (with base) inscribed and dated: Ch. H. Humphriss 1904 Provenance: Private Collection, Missouri $2,000 – $4,000

177 RAPHAEL LILLYWHITE (1891-1958) Untitled (Journey Home) oil on masonite 25 1/4 x 31 1/4 inches signed lower left: Raphael / Lillywhite Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $20,000 – $30,000 118


178 BERT GEER PHILLIPS (1868-1956) A Daughter of the Water Clan oil on canvas 25 x 30 1/4 inches signed lower right: Bert Phillips Provenance: Private Collection, Florida $30,000 – $50,000

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179 CHARLIE DYE (1906-1972) Wet Days Branding oil on paper laid on board 7 3/8 x 10 7/8 inches initialed lower right: C / D Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $8,000 – $12,000

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180 NELSON BOREN (b. 1952) Cowboy, 1988

181 JOE BEELER (1931-2006) Untitled (Portrait of a Cowboy)

watercolor on paper 30 x 22 1/4 inches signed and dated lower right: N. Boren / 88

watercolor and pastel on paper 15 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches signed lower right: Joe Beeler c/a

Provenance: Private Collection, Minnesota

Provenance: Private Collection, Texas

$2,500 – $4,500

$3,000 – $5,000

182 ROSETA SANTIAGO (b. 1946) White Woolies oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches titled verso: White Woolies Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,500 – $2,500

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183 THEODORE VAN SOELEN (1890-1964) New Slippers lithograph on paper 29/100 14 x 17 inches signed lower right: Van Soelen, N.A. editioned and titled lower left: 29/100 New Slippers Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $700 – $900 nr

184 THEODORE VAN SOELEN (1890-1964) Working with the Wagon lithograph on paper 53/100 16 x 21 1/2 inches signed lower right: Van Soelen editioned and titled lower left: 53/100 Working with the Wagon Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $700 – $900 nr

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185 GARY ERNEST SMITH (b. 1942) Roughneck oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: Gary E. Smith Provenance: Private Collection, Utah $12,000 – $18,000

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186 PATRICIA ROSE (1934-2008) Alcalde oil on masonite 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: PATRICIA ROSE Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $3,000 – $4,000

187 FRANCIS DONALD (b. 1947) San Geronimo Woman, 1979 oil on canvas 37 x 33 inches signed and dated lower right: F. Donald / ‘79 Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $1,500 – $2,500

188 JUDY ORTIZ (b. 1948) Santa Fe Plaza oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed lower right: Ortiz Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $500 – $700 124


189 THEODORE VAN SOELEN (1890-1964) Untitled (House Beneath Willow) oil on canvas 36 1/8 x 40 inches signed lower left: Van Soelen NA Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $50,000 – $60,000

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190 CHRISTOPHER GERLACH (b. 1952) Mist Under Snow: Canyon Road, 1981 oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower right: Gerlach Provenance: Private Collection, Arizona $1,500 – $2,500

191 CHRISTOPHER GERLACH (b. 1952) Mountain Lake: San Diego, ca. 1985-87 oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches signed lower right: Gerlach Provenance: Private Collection, Arizona $1,000 – $2,000 nr

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192 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Big Timber - Upper Pecos, 1920 woodblock print 27/120 9 1/8 x 11 1/8 inches titled lower left: BIG TIMBER - UPPER PECOS signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: NO 27 OF 120 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $8,000 – $12,000

193 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Three Pines, 1956 woodblock print 10 7/8 x 9 1/2 inches titled lower left: THREE PINES signed lower right: Gustave Baumann Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $8,000 – $12,000

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194 ALBERT SCHMIDT (1885-1957) Adobe House & Well in Spring oil on board 20 x 24 inches Provenance: Estate of the Artist (with notarized statement of authenticity from the artist’s granddaughter affixed to verso) $15,000 – $20,000

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195 FRANCIS DONALD (b. 1947) The Lineberry Studio, Taos oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches signed lower right: F. Donald / © signed, titled and inscribed verso: F. Donald / © / “The Lineberry Studio” / #169 Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $2,500 – $3,500

196 DIRK VAN DRIEST (1889-1989) Dr. Dominguez’s Kitchen, Taos oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches signed lower left: Driest Provenance: Private Collection, Texas $2,000 – $4,000

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197 ANDREW DASBURG (1887-1979) Talpa Houses, 1967 pencil on paper 18 x 23 1/2 inches signed and dated lower right: Dasburg ‘67 Provenance: Sid Deutsch Gallery, New York, New York Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, Inc., New York, New York Owings-Dewey Fine Art, Santa Fe, New Mexico Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $4,000

198 FRANK APPLEGATE (1882-1934) New Mexican Landscape watercolor on paper 8 1/8 x 5 3/4 inches signed lower right: Frank Applegate Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $800 – $1,200

199 ALFRED MORANG (1901-1958) Clouds over Sangre de Cristo, 1941 watercolor on paper 10 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches signed and dated lower right: Alfred Morang / 1941 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $3,000

200 NICOLAI FECHIN (1881-1955) Eya, 1930/1978 bronze FC/13 15 1/4 x 10 x 11 1/2 inches (with base) inscribed, dated, titled and editioned: N. Fechin / 1930 / Eya Fechin Branham / 1978 / FC/13 Literature: Nicolai Fechin: Across Two Continents, exh. cat., Santa Fe, New Mexico: Gerald Peters Gallery, 1997, no. 48. Provenance: Private Collection, Wisconsin $3,000 – $5,000 13 0


201 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Cedar - Grand Cañon woodblock print 12 7/8 x 12 7/8 inches titled lower left: CEDAR - GRAND CAÑON Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $5,000 – $7,000

202 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Hillside Woods woodblock print 40/120 II 10 5/8 x 9 5/8 inches titled lower left: HILLSIDE WOODS signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: 40 120 II Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $7,000 – $9,000

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203 JOHN MARIN (1870-1953) Road to Santa Fe, 1929 watercolor on paper 15 x 20 inches signed and dated lower left: Marin 29 John Marin was born and raised in Rutherford, New Jersey. After a brief stint studying to become a mechanical engineer, Marin spent several years working as a draftsman for several architectural firms. At the age of twenty-eight he chose to pursue his art education and enrolled at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, followed by studying at the Art Students League in New York. In 1905, Marin left for Paris to study abroad for five years. While in Paris Marin was introduced to Alfred Stieglitz who became a lifelong friend and also began showing his work at his New York gallery 291. The yearly one-man exhibitions that Stieglitz held of his work launched his career and made him one of the most successful artists in America. In 1929, Marin took his first of two trips to New Mexico and was fortunate to be there at the same time as Georgia O’Keeffe, Andrew Dasburg, and Marsden Hartley. Marin visited New Mexico again in 1930 and during his two trips created over 100 watercolors of the region. Road to Santa Fe is an incredible example of the output produced by Marin while in New Mexico for his first visit. With simple, deft brushwork his modernist aesthetic captures the beauty of the region’s unique natural forms. Provenance: Marlborough Gallery, New York, New York Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1981 $125,000 – $175,000 v

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204 ERNEST L. BLUMENSCHEIN (1874-1960) Portrait of Sheldon Parsons oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches titled and signed lower left: Sheldon PARSONS / BY / EL BLUMENSCHEIN Ernest Blumenschein arrived in Taos under un-planned, and somewhat inconvenient circumstances in 1898. He and his companion, the painter Bert Geer Phillips, had been traveling on a journey from Colorado to Mexico when the wheel on their wagon broke 20 miles north of Taos. Blumenschein then carried the broken wheel on horseback to Taos to have it repaired. Despite the difficult journey, he became immediately enamored of the landscape, and he and Phillips resolved to remain in Taos rather than continuing on to Mexico as planned.1 Of his first impressions of the New Mexico landscape during his horseback ride to Taos, Blumenschein wrote: Never shall I forget the first powerful impressions; my own impressions direct from a new land through my own eyes. Not another man’s picture this, not another’s adventure. The great naked anatomy of a majestic landscape once tortured now calm; the fitness of adobe houses to their tawny surroundings; the vastness and overwhelming beauty of the skies; terrible drama of storms; peace of night – all in beauty of color, vigorous form, everchanging [sic] light.2 The two artists remained in Taos, painting for three months. While Phillips enjoyed some relative financial stability that allowed him to stay in Taos permanently, Blumenschein felt anxious to get back to New York and secure some illustration commissions, which would not only provide valuable income, but also help to further develop his career and standing as a commercial artist. He was also eager to return to the Académie Julien in Paris, where he had trained for two years prior to his arrival in Taos, to complete his education. Blumenschein returned to France in 1899, and in 1905 married Mary Shepherd Greene, a classmate at the Académie and accomplished painter herself.3 The Blumenscheins returned to New York in 1906, where they both worked as illustrators and teachers. Although Blumenschein enjoyed a fair amount of success as an illustrator, working with prominent writers of the day such as Jack London and Willa Cather, he continued to think about Taos, and hoped to one day return and work there as a fine artist, free from the constraints of the commercial world. By 1910, he was splitting his time between Taos and New York, spending the summer months in Taos, and, in 1919, he moved to Taos permanently.4 During his time away from Taos, Blumenschein had also encouraged fellow painters to visit: E.I. Couse, Joseph Henry Sharp (who had visited Taos once in 1893 and again in 1897), who had been classmates at the Académie and Herbert “Buck” Dunton who had been a student of Blumenschein at the Art Students League, all made trips to Taos between 1899 and 1910. These artists, like Blumenschein and Phillips were so taken with the beauty of the landscape, as well as the opportunity to be near American Indians and their culture, that they also quickly became residents of the pueblo. With Sharp, Couse, Dunton, and Oscar Berninghaus, whom Phillips had met in Taos in 1899, Phillips and Blumenschein founded the Taos Society of Artists in 1915,5 appointing Eanger Irving Couse the first President of the group. Blumenschein now had the freedom to paint what he liked, and took full advantage, using his eye for design and color to create paintings that exuded the majesty of the New Mexican vistas, and his admiration for the pueblo people and their culture. As a teacher, he had always encouraged his students to be sure that they were giving their paintings “something that is your own.” 6 In Taos, and surrounded by the Taoseños, he became even more convinced of the value of authenticity and of creating art that not only depicts nature, but also conveys personal expression. He observed of the pueblo Indians’ art: The Art of the Indian is not only beautiful, but it is unique. Originality is the priceless donation of all human endeavor and the aboriginal American has actually contributed more to the arts than two-hundred years of ‘civilized’ occupation of North America has produced.7 Accordingly, he infused his own Taos paintings with his exuberance for the Northern New Mexican landscape, using a more vibrant palette than he had in the past and creating rhythmic compositions of land, trees and sky. His portrait of fellow artist Sheldon Parsons, though adhering to academic principles of proportion, employs a light palette, and shows the other man in a somewhat more relaxed manner, with a few hairs askew on his forehead, even as he looks seriously toward the viewer. Thus, even as Blumenschein proved an excellent academic draftsman and commercial illustrator, it was ultimately his years spent in Taos that provided the freedom and inspiration to develop his true artistic identity, and best works. Provenance: Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico Peters Family Art Foundation, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1986 $100,000 – $200,000

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

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Patricia Janis Broder, Taos: A Painter’s Dream (New York: Little Brown and Company, 1980), 68, 69. Broder, 70 Broder, 70, 71 Broder, 71-73 Dean A. Porter, Teresa Hayes Ebie and Suzan Campbell, Taos Artists and Their Patrons: 1898-1950 (South Bend, Indiana: Snite Museum of Art, University of Notre Dame, 1999), 21, 37. Broder, 72 Broder 75


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205 ALBERT SCHMIDT (1885-1957) Barn and Mountainscape, Spring oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches signed lower right: A. H. SCHMIDT Provenance: Estate of the Artist $15,000 – $20,000

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206 PETER HURD (1904-1984) Sunday Afternoon in New Mexico lithograph on paper 27/50 9 1/2 x 13 3/4 inches signed lower right: Peter Hurd titled and editioned lower left: Sunday Afternoon in New Mexico 27/50 Literature: Peter Hurd, Peter Hurd: The Lithographs, Lubbock, Texas: Baker Gallery Press, 1968. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $700 – $900 nr

207 EMIL BISTTRAM (1895-1976) Ranchos de Taos Church, 1934 lithograph on paper 12 x 15 1/2 inches signed and dated lower right: Bisttram 34 editioned and titled lower left: no. 3 Ranchos + de Taos Church inscribed verso: To Lindsey and Dixie with Love and all good wishes on their ninth anniversary. May they bring greater happiness each year. / Emil and Mayrion. / 1935. Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $1,000 – $1,500 nr

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208 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Harvest Time - Taos woodblock print I 12/125 9 3/8 x 11 inches titled lower left: HARVEST TIME - TAOS signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: I 12 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $7,000 – $10,000

209 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Taos Placita, 1947 woodblock print 22/125 9 3/8 x 11 1/8 inches titled lower left: TAOS PLACITA signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned and dated lower right: 22 125 47 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $7,000 – $9,000

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210 B.J.O. NORDFELDT (1878-1955) Yellow House oil on canvas 34 x 38 inches signed lower right: Nordfeldt Nordfeldt arrived in Chicago in 1891 from his native Sweden. Following a year of training at the Art Institute of Chicago, he began a decade of further art studies in painting and printmaking. In 1919, Nordfeldt arrived in Santa Fe where he would remain for the next twenty years until settling in Lambertville, New Jersey, where he would spend the rest of his life. Fascinated by the rugged southwestern landscape and the Hispanic population of Santa Fe, Nordfeldt was quite prolific while in the region, although destroyed many of his works before leaving. Nordfeldt is known for his abstract renderings of everyday subject matter including still lifes, landscapes, and portraits. Provenance: The Artist Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1979 $35,000 – $45,000 v

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211 RAYMOND JONSON (1891-1982) Blue Roofs, 1922 oil on panel 18 x 24 inches dated lower left: 19 (artist’s cipher) 22 signed and titled verso: Raymond Jonson / (artist’s cipher) / TITLE BLUE ROOFS Raymond Jonson was born in Iowa in 1891. After saving up enough money he went to Chicago where he studied under B.J.O. Nordfeldt at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts and later at the Art Institute of Chicago. Following the completion of his education, Jonson spent several years working for the Chicago Little Theater as the graphic art director. Seeking a break from the city, Jonson made his first trip to Santa Fe in 1922, to visit his friend the poet, John Curtis Underwood. Immediately enamored of the landscape and vast open spaces, Jonson ultimately settled in Santa Fe in 1924, staying until 1949. Once in Santa Fe Jonson established himself with the modernist painters in the area and founded the Transcendental Painters Group. As he evolved into complete abstraction, Johnson spent his first several years in Santa Fe experimenting with a gradual abstraction of natural forms which maintained some roots in representation, but ultimately allowed him to fully realize his evolution to complete abstraction by around 1927. Blue Roofs was painted in 1922, during Jonson’s first trip to Santa Fe. The vibrant colors of the sun-drenched landscape and the simple planes created by the steady shapes and sizes of the traditional adobe structures are clearly represented, however, Jonson’s strong interest in abstraction is evident, particularly in his treatment of the landscape in the foreground and the cloud and mountain formations of the horizon. Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $55,000 – $75,000 v

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212 LEN CHMIEL (b. 1942) Willows and Wheatstraw - Taos oil on board 10 3/4 x 13 7/8 inches signed lower left: L. Chmiel Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $1,000 – $2,000 nr

213 LEN CHMIEL (b. 1942) Snow on the North Side, Talpa oil on panel 10 1/2 x 25 3/4 inches signed lower right: L. Chmiel Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $1,500 – $2,500 nr

214 ROY MASON (1886-1972) The Haunted House

215 MICHAEL HURD (b. 1946) Tinnie’s

oil on board 12 x 16 inches signed lower right: Roy Mason

watercolor on paper 12 x 16 inches signed lower right: Michael Hurd

Provenance: Blair Galleries, Ltd., Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas

Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas

$800 – $1,200 v

$1,500 – $2,500 v

141


216 BEATRICE MANDELMAN (1912-1998) Skull oil on canvas 18 x 32 inches signed lower right: B. MANDELMAN Provenance: Private Collection, British Columbia, Canada $5,000 – $7,000

217 DEVIN PETERS (b. 1983) Still Life and Death, 2015 oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches titled, inscribed, dated and signed verso: “Still Life and Death” / Oil on Canvas / Laguna Beach 2015 / Devin Peters Provenance: The Artist $2,500 – $3,500

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218 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Tulips, 1930 woodblock print 47/120 12 7/8 x 12 5/8 inches titled lower left: TULIPS signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: 47 120 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $20,000 – $30,000

219 RAYMOND JONSON (1891-1982) Apples, 1926 oil on canvas 20 x 18 inches signed and dated lower left: Jonson / ‘26 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $15,000 – $20,000

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220 VICTOR HIGGINS (1884-1949) Still Life (Coreopsis) oil on canvas 24 x 27 inches signed lower right: VICTOR HIGGINS Victor Higgins applied his modernist ideas to the genre of still life painting in order to explore spatial tensions and circular patterns. Often including a variety of different patterns in the background, through his use of different textiles as backdrops, Higgins created an opportunity to experiment with color and texture, as is done here in Still Life (Coreopsis). Provenance: Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1980 $200,000 – $300,000 v

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221 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Live Oak Landa Park woodblock print 37/125 12 7/8 x 12 3/4 inches titled lower left: LIVE OAK LANDA PARK signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: II 37 - 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $4,000 – $6,000

222 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Windswept Eucalyptus woodblock print II 57/125 9 5/8 x 11 3/8 inches titled lower left: WINDSWEPT EUCALYPTUS signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: II 57 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $5,500 – $7,500

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223 VICTOR HIGGINS (1884-1949) Evergreens watercolor on paper 19 x 15 inches signed lower right: VICTOR HIGGINS Provenance: Private Collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1978 Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1981 $20,000 – $30,000 v

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224 SHELDON PARSONS (1866-1943) Hollyhocks oil on panel 33 1/2 x 23 1/2 inches signed lower left: SheldoN PARSONS signed lower right: SheldoN PARSONS Provenance: McKee Foundation, El Paso, Texas Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1989 $10,000 – $15,000 v

225 GERALD MERFELD (b. 1936) Untitled (Still Life with Flower Arrangements) oil on canvas 30 3/4 x 41 inches signed lower left: Merfeld signed and inscribed verso: Gerald Merfeld / New Lenox Provenance: Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas $4,000 – $6,000 v

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226 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Harden Hollow, 1926 woodblock print 55/125 9 1/8 x 11 1/8 inches titled lower left: HARDEN HOLLOW signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: 55 125 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $6,000 – $8,000

227 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Woodland Meadows, 1918 woodblock print 16/125 9 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches titled lower left: WOODLAND MEADOWS numbered upper right: 23 signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned and dated lower right: 16 125 1918 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $5,000 – $7,000

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228 ERIC SLOANE (1905-1985) East Mill, Cape Cod oil on masonite 20 x 28 inches signed lower left: Eric Sloane Literature: Eric Sloane, Eric Sloane’s I Remember America, New York: Funk & Wagnalls, 1971, pg. 176. Provenance: Grand Central Art Galleries, Inc., New York, New York Christie’s, New York, New York, 2007 Private Collection, Texas $4,000 – $6,000

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229 GUSTAVE BAUMANN (1881-1971) Coast Range woodblock print 30/120 9 1/2 x 11 1/4 inches titled lower left: COAST RANGE signed lower right: Gustave Baumann editioned lower right: N 30 OF 120 Provenance: Corporate Collection of Bryan Cave, LLP, Missouri $7,000 – $9,000

151


230 JUAN HAMILTON (b. 1945) Abstract Form, 1979 black bronze 2/7 15 3/4 x 14 x 11 inches inscribed, editioned and dated: JUAN / 2/7 79 Juan Hamilton was born in Texas, and studied at City University of New York and New York University, received his degree from Hastings College in Nebraska, and earned his MFA in ceramics from Claremont College in California. Following a 1970 trip to Japan, Hamilton’s work and life were influenced by the aesthetic and practice of Zen Buddhism. From 1973 until her death in 1986, Hamilton was the primary assistant to Georgia O’Keeffe. Provenance: The Artist Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1984 $10,000 – $15,000 v

231 MIGUEL MARTINEZ (b. 1951) Broken Heart, 1991 pastel on paper 30 x 40 inches signed and dated lower left: M. Martinez ‘91 Provenance: Michael McCormick Gallery, Taos, New Mexico Private Collection, Missouri, 2001 $5,500 – $7,500

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232 BEVERLY PEPPER (b. 1922) Pithius Wedge, 1978-1988 cast iron 71 1/4 x 12 x 8 1/2 inches (with unattached base) Beverly Pepper was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1922, and studied at both the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and the Art Students League, as well as studying in Paris with Fernand Leger and Andrew Lhote. In 1951, Pepper settled in Italy, although still would spend part of each year in the United States. In 1960, Pepper turned her attention entirely to sculpture, first working in wood and after a 1962 invitation to use a local Italian steel factory as a studio, Pepper apprenticed herself to an ironmonger and soon began making her first steel sculptures. From that point forward, Pepper sculpted only in metal preferring the monumental scale for installation outdoors and particularly in urban spaces. Provenance: The Artist Collection of Rollin W. King, Dallas, Texas, 1989 $15,000 – $20,000 v 15 3


233 RUSH COLE (b. 1951) Viva Santa Fe!, 2010 oil on canvas 48 x 72 inches signed lower left: Rush Cole titled, signed, dated and inscribed verso: Rush Cole’s VIVA SANTA FE! © Rush Cole 2010 All Rights Reserved note: all rights expressed or unexpressed reserved by the artist. Provenance: The Artist $30,000 – $50,000

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234 BARBARA VAN CLEVE (b. 1935) Rain Broom, 1987

235 WILLIAM CLIFT (b. 1944) Black Mesa, New Mexico, ca. 1950

gelatin silver print 19 1/2 x 15 3/8 inches titled lower left: Rain Broom signed and dated lower right: © Barbara Van Cleve 1987

gelatin silver print 13 1/2 x 19 inches signed lower right: William Clift

Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $1,500 – $2,000 nr

Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,000 – $3,000 nr

236 OTTO ROACH (1891-1965) Untitled (Monument Valley), 1950 gelatin silver print 15/50 15 x 19 inches editioned lower left: 15/50 signed and dated lower right: Otto Roach - 1950 Provenance: Private Collection, Colorado $2,500 – $3,500

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237 ZARA KRIEGSTEIN (b. 1952) Dinner Party, 1985 oil on canvas 59 x 49 inches signed and dated lower left: Kriegstein ‘85 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $7,000 – $9,000

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238 ZARA KRIEGSTEIN (b. 1952) Nude with Mandolin, 1990 oil on canvas 48 x 40 inches signed and dated lower left: Kriegstein ‘90 Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $5,000 – $7,000

239 XIANG ZHANG (b. 1954) Ballet Lesson oil on canvas 20 x 16 inches signed lower right: Xiang Zhang © Provenance: Private Collection, New Mexico $2,000 – $3,000

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THE SANTA FE ART AUCTION IS PLEASED TO OFFER A SELECTION OF WORKS (LOTS 240 THROUGH 278) FROM THE ERNEST AND EDITH SCHWARTZ COLLECTION. LIVING IN SANTA FE FOR 17 YEARS, THE SCHWARTZES WERE PASSIONATE ABOUT LOCAL ARTISTS. THEY AMASSED A LARGE COLLECTION OF SOUTHWEST ART, WHICH THEY DONATED TO THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART. MANY OF THESE WORKS ARE NOW IN THE PERMANENT COLLECTION OF THE MUSEUM. PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THE PRESENT GROUP OF WORKS WILL BENEFIT THE MUSEUM’S ACQUISITION FUND.

THE SANTA FE ART AUCTION WILL DONATE 10% OF ITS PORTION OF SALE PROCEEDS FROM THIS COLLECTION TO THE NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART’S ACQUISITION FUND.

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240 V.A. LAMBERT (20th century) Indian in Firelight oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches signed lower right: V.A. LAMBERT $2,000 – $4,000 nr

241 CRAIG GOSEYUN (b. 1960) Hoop & Pole Game Player, 1997 bronze 1/14 33 x 20 x 18 inches inscribed, dated and editioned: Craig Goseyun / ‘97 © 1/14 $3,000 – $5,000 nr

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242 MARK SWAZO-HINDS (20th/21st century) Untitled, 2001

243 TONY LEE (20th century) Yei Mask, 1991

alabaster 36 1/2 x 11 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches inscribed and dated: Mark Swazo-Hinds / © 2001

bronze 23 x 8 x 9 inches inscribed and dated: Tony Lee 91 ©

$1,500 – $2,500 nr

$700 – $900 nr

244 J. ANIBLE (20th century) Untitled, 2002 mixed media 19 1/2 x 26 x 8 inches 26 1/2 x 14 x 8 inches each signed and dated: J. Anible 02 $200 – $300 nr

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245 MAXIMILIANO PRUNEDA (b. 1948) Idols of Passage, ca. 1995 mixed media 72 1/2 x 22 x 5 inches $1,500 – $2,500 nr

246 ADRIAN ARLEO (21st century) Wake, 1990 ceramic 40 x 10 x 6 inches inscribed and dated: Arleo ‘90 $2,000 – $3,000 nr

247 MICHAEL MOTLEY (20th/21st century) Navajo Portrait, 1989 oil on canvas 30 x 23 3/4 inches signed and dated lower right: Motley / 89 $700 – $1,000 nr

161


248 DANIELLE LAWRENCE KENNEDY (20th/21st century) Untitled (Three Figures) mixed media 25 x 26 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches (largest) $1,000 – $1,500 nr

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249 DAVID JOHNS (b. 1948) Untitled

250 ESTHER CAJERO (b. 1944) Friendship Pot, 2005

pastel on paper 22 x 18 inches signed lower right: David Johns ©

painted clay 8 1/4 x 9 1/2 x 8 1/2 inches inscribed, dated and titled: E. CAJERO / “BIRD IMAGE” / JEMEZ / 05 / “Friendship” / Pot

$800 – $1,000 nr

$200 – $300 nr

251 SHARON BRENING (20th/21st century) Untitled commercial production print on canvas 2/50 15 3/4 x 19 1/2 inches signed and editioned lower right: S. Brening © / 2/50 $200 – $250 nr

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252 GREGORY LOMAYESVA (b. 1971) Kachina Mirror mixed media 63 1/4 x 48 inches $3,000 – $5,000 nr

253 DAVID JOHNS (b. 1948) Indian with Turquoise Earring, 1998 acrylic on canvas 54 x 60 inches signed lower right: David Johns © $4,000 – $6,000 nr

254 DAVID JOHNS (b. 1948) Hosteen Klah in Color, 1990 acrylic on canvas 72 x 54 inches signed lower right: David Johns © $5,000 – $7,000 nr

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255 FRANK SCHIVELY (20th century) To Hear the Oldest Songs, 1990 acrylic on canvas 60 x 48 inches signed and dated lower right: SCHIVELY. 90 © titled and inscribed verso: ...“TO HEAR THE OLDEST SONGS” / 60” x 48” / ACRYLIC $2,000 – $3,000 nr

256 DAVID JOHNS (b. 1948) Indian with Large Hat, 1997

257 DAVID JOHNS (b. 1948) Navajo Woman

acrylic on canvas 30 x 35 inches signed lower right: David Johns ©

acrylic on canvas 28 x 23 inches signed lower right: David Johns ©

$4,000 – $6,000 nr

$1,500 – $2,500 nr

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258 PAUL VAN GINKEL (b. 1960) Warrior Child, 1999 oil on canvas 72 x 48 inches signed center right: VAN GINKEL titled, signed and dated verso: “WARRIOR CHILD” © PAUL VAN GINKEL ‘99 $5,000 – $7,000 nr

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259 BEN SHORTY (20th/21st century) Untitled, 1997 acrylic on canvas 24 x 18 inches signed and dated lower right: BEN 97 / SHORTY $300 – $500 nr

260 BARRY COFFIN (20th century) Untitled, 1990 ceramic 29 x 8 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches inscribed and dated: B. Coffin © 1990 $200 – $400 nr

167


261 UNKNOWN Day of the Dead Figures painted clay 27 1/4 x 9 x 7 1/2 inches (largest) $200 – $300 nr

262 ELIAS RIVERA (b. 1937) Untitled ink on paper various sizes signed lower right: RIVERA [8 of 10] $2,000 – $3,000 nr

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263 BILL RANE (1927-2005) Spanish Window, 1990

264 MELISSA ZINK (1932-2009) Within the Ruins, 1999

oil on canvas 48 x 36 inches signed and dated lower right: RANE 1990 titled, signed and dated verso: SPANISH WINDOW / Wm Rane © 90

mixed media (painted print) 9 1/2 x 8 inches $1,000 – $2,000 nr

$1,000 – $2,000 nr

265 CHARLES GREELEY (20th century) Burnt Water, 1990 painted wood 44 x 44 inches signed and dated lower left: GREELEY 90 $3,000 – $5,000 nr

16 9


266 EDWARD WONG-LIGDA (20th century) Fine Arts, 1991 oil on canvas 50 x 72 inches titled, dated and signed verso: “Fine Arts” / 1991 © Ed Wong-Ligda / [undecipherable signature] $6,000 – $8,000 nr

170


267 RANDY LEE WHITE (b. 1951) Taos Art Auction, 1981 mixed media 24 x 19 inches titled lower left: “TAOS ART AUCTION” signed and dated lower right: R Lee White (with artist’s cipher) 81 signed and dated on matte lower right: R Lee White (with artist’s cipher) 81 $600 – $900 nr

268 BUNNY TOBIAS (b. 1963) Untitled ceramic 11 1/2 x 19 3/4 inches $1,000 – $2,000 nr

269 RODNEY HATFIELD (b. 1947) Home from the Fair, 2001 oil on board 31 1/2 x 16 inches signed lower right: ART SNAKE titled, signed and dated verso: Home from / the Fair / ART SNAKE / ‘01 $1,000 – $1,500 nr

171


270 GINA BOBROWSKI (b. 1958) Untitled ceramic 29 x 18 1/2 x 28 inches $1,500 – $2,500 nr

271 GENA FOWLER (20th/21st century) Uncle Lou ceramic 25 x 25 x 23 inches $2,000 – $3,000 nr

272 OTTO DUECKER (b. 1948) Standing Man with Cigarette mixed media 24 3/4 x 9 3/4 x 7 1/2 inches $1,500 – $2,000 nr 172


273 ARMOND LARA (b. 1939) The Herd, 1990 pastel on paper 47 x 69 inches signed and dated upper right: A. Lara ‘90 $2,000 – $3,000 nr

173


274 VARIOUS ARTISTS Pueblo Pottery Miniatures painted clay various sizes each signed and inscribed $500 – $1,000 nr

275 ESTELLA LORETTO (b. 1954) Untitled ceramic 9 x 8 x 7 1/2 inches inscribed: Estella Loretto $200 – $300 nr

174


276 JAMES IBUR (b. 1960) Untitled ceramic 18 x 15 x 9 inches $100 – $200 nr

277 VARIOUS ARTISTS Miscellaneous Folk Art various media 12 x 7 x 6 inches (largest) each signed and/or inscribed $200 – $300 nr

278 JAMES IBUR (b. 1960) The Whole World Dances with You mixed media 74 x 19 x 25 inches (with base) $200 – $300 nr

175


176


I ND EX ANIBLE, J. Untitled, 244 APPLEGATE, FRANK New Mexican Landscape, 198 ARLEO, ADRIAN Wake, 246 ARMER, LAURA ADAMS

BOBROWSKI, GINA Untitled, 270 BODELSON, DAN Near Ghost Ranch, 125 BOOMER, BOB Medicine Basket, 50 BOREIN, EDWARD

Waterless Mountain, 14a

Nine Riders, 64

Mother Took Out the Sheep, 14b

Three Cowboys on Horses, 65

BAKOS, JOZEF Ojo Caliente, 119 BALINK, HENRY Zuni Pueblo, 107 BARTON, DONALD Oraibi Pueblo, Navajo County, Arizona, 17 Hopi Dance, Oraibi Pueblo, 18 Grand Canyon, Arizona, 33 BAUMANN, GUSTAVE Harden Hollow, 42 Coast Range, 43 El Santo, 73 Malapai, 79 Morning in Mexico, 80 Big Timber - Upper Pecos, 192 Three Pines, 193 Cedar - Grand Cañon, 201 Hillside Woods, 202 Harvest Time - Taos, 208 Taos Placita, 209 Tulips, 218 Live Oak Landa Park, 221 Windswept Eucalyptus, 222 Harden Hollow, 226 Woodland Meadows, 227 Coast Range, 229 BEELER, JOE Cherokee, 170 Untitled (Portrait of a Cowboy), 181 BELLOWS, GEORGE Santa Fe Canyon, 162 BENTON, THOMAS HART The High Plains, 116 BERNATH, SANDOR Northern Adobes - New Mexico, 117 BERNINGHAUS, OSCAR E. Taos Field of Workers, 114 BIERSTADT, ALBERT Mountain Scene, 157 BISS, EARL Long Horns on the Run, 144 BISTTRAM, EMIL Ranchos de Taos Church, 207 BLACK, LAVERNE NELSON Taos Winter Morning, 111 BLUMENSCHEIN, ERNEST L. Portrait of Sheldon Parsons, 204

Headin’ a Steer, 67 Ramada at Taos, 68 Church at Acoma, 69 BOREN, NELSON Cowboy, 180 BRADY, BRUCE Osage, 59 BRENING, SHARON Untitled, 251 BUNN, KENNETH R. Sable Antelope, 130 CAJERO, ESTHER Friendship Pot, 250 CARLSON, GEORGE The Hunter (Tarahumara Series), 44 Drinking Tesguino (Tarahumara Series), 45 Canyon Winds (Tarahumara Series), 46 Draft Team II, 141 CASSIDY, GERALD Navajo Woman and Child, 16 Sangre de Cristo Splendor, 102 CHÁVEZ, ARTURO Mojave Wall, 36 La Cueva Winter, 37 CHMIEL, LEN Willows and Wheatstraw - Taos, 212 Snow on the North Side, Talpa, 213 CLAIR, DONNA Three Women, 81 Peasant Girl (The Yellow Shawl), 83 CLIFT, WILLIAM Black Mesa, New Mexico, 235 COFFIN, BARRY Untitled, 260 COLE, RUSH Viva Santa Fe!, 233 COOPER, COLIN CAMPBELL Untitled (Redwood Grove), 158 COUSE, EANGER IRVING White Tipi Nocturne and Chamisa, 22 DALY, THOMAS AQUINAS Elk on a River, 135 DASBURG, ANDREW Talpa Houses, 197 DEDECKER, THOMAS Evening Conversation - Encampment, 169 DEDMAN, CLITSO 16 Navajo Carved Wood Yeibichai Figures, 8

DELANO, GERARD CURTIS In the Shadow of the Canyon, 13 DIEHL, ARTHUR V. Rabbits, 128a Partridge, 128b DONALD, FRANCIS San Geronimo Woman, 187 The Lineberry Studio, Taos, 195 DUECKER, OTTO Standing Man with Cigarette, 272 DUNLAP AND CARLOS SUNRISE, CARMELITA Brown Pot, 1 DUNLAP, CARMELITA Black on Black Vase, 2 DYE, CHARLIE Wet Days Branding, 179 EGGENHOFER, NICK Indian on Horseback, 108 ELLIS, FREMONT Untitled (Red Canyon Formation), 40 Village of Truchas, 112 FALK, JONI Still Life with Pottery and Navajo Rug, 3 Still Life with Kachina and Poppies, 5 FECHIN, NICOLAI Eya, 200 FELLOWS, FRED No Bed of Roses, 94 FOWLER, GENA Uncle Lou, 271 GARRETT, DAN Mystic Winds, 58 GASPARD, LEON Girl with Melons, 148 Going to Market, 149 GERLACH, CHRISTOPHER Mist Under Snow: Canyon Road, 190 Mountain Lake: San Diego, 191 GOEBEL, ROD Kiva Watch, 173 GOODACRE, GLENNA Rose Gonzales, 85 GOSEYUN, CRAIG Hoop & Pole Game Player, 241 GREELEY, CHARLES Burnt Water, 265 GREEVES, RICHARD The Storyteller, 172 HAMILTON, HAMILTON Western Scene, 27 HAMILTON, JUAN Abstract Form, 230 HANDELL, ALBERT On the High Road to Taos, 121 HARRIS, SAMUEL HYDE Araby Hideaway, 155 Utah Country, 156


I ND E X HARVEY, G. Fording at Dusk, 91 HATFIELD, RODNEY Home from the Fair, 269 HENNINGS, E. MARTIN Chili Peppers, 124 Untitled (Deer and Aspens), 131 Indian on Horseback, 171 HENRI, ROBERT Portrait of Po Tse (Water Eagle), 175 HIGGINS, VICTOR Fiesta Day, 19

JOHNSON, FRANK TENNEY California’s First Theatre, 70 JONSON, RAYMOND Blue Roofs, 211 Apples, 219 KELLEY, RAMON Crow Bonnet, Crow Agency, Montana, 62 KENNEDY, DANIELLE LAWRENCE Untitled (Three Figures), 248 KLEIMINGER, ADOLPH F. Trail in the Rockies, 153 KLOSS, GENE

Red Mountains, 41

Pueblo Dancer, 9

November Evening, 115

Corn Dancers Coming, 10

Still Life (Coreopsis), 220

Courtyard in Chimayó, 11

Evergreens, 223 HILL, HELEN Red Rock Crossing, Sedona, 39 HILL, MANNER OF THOMAS Yosemite Valley, 26 HOLDSTOCK, ALFRED Wahasee Rapids, Riviere aux Lievres, 109 HUMPHRISS, CHARLES H. The Warrior, 176 HURD, MICHAEL Tinnie’s, 215 HURD, PETER Sunday Afternoon in New Mexico, 206 HURLEY, WILSON The Praying Monk, Camelback Mountain, Arizona, 35 IBUR, JAMES Untitled, 276 The Whole World Dances with You, 278 INGLIS, PETER Desert Road, 38 JACKSON, HARRY Range Burial, 89 JACOB, NED Indian on Horseback with Flag, 47a Pair of Indians on Horseback, 47b Two Indians with Rifles, 47c Indian (Chief ) on Horse, 47d Apache Horseman, 47e

Navajo Canyon Cliffs, 12 Taos Valley Winter, 163 The Rio Grande at Embudo, 164 Winter Roundup, 165 KRIEGSTEIN, ZARA Dinner Party, 237 Nude with Mandolin, 238 KUHN, BOB Snow Leopard, 132 Lynx, 133 LAMBERT, V.A. Indian in Firelight, 240 LARA, ARMOND The Herd, 273 LEE, TONY Yei Mask, 243 LEIGH, WILLIAM R. Keams Cañon, Arizona, 32 Grand Canyon, 34 Bronco Buster, 66 LILLYWHITE, RAPHAEL Mount Moran, Teton Range, 154 Untitled (Journey Home), 177 LOMAYESVA, GREGORY Kachina Mirror, 252 LORETTO, ESTELLA Untitled, 275 LOUGHEED, ROBERT

Studies of a Crow Indian, 48a

Antelope Crossing, 129

Cheyenne with Society Staff, 48b

Bell Quarter Horse, 142

Crow Warrior, 48c Standing Vaquero, 77a Vaquero (Hands on Hips), 77b JACOBSON, AMANDA Old Church, Ranchos de Taos, 126 JENNINGS, WILLIAM Abandoned Adobe, 123

MANDELMAN, BEATRICE Skull, 216 MARIN, JOHN Road to Santa Fe, 203 MARTINEZ, MIGUEL Broken Heart, 231 MASON, ROY

JOHNS, DAVID

The Haunted House, 214

Untitled, 249

MATHEWS, TERRY OWEN

Indian with Turquoise Earring, 253

Birdsong, 137

Hosteen Klah in Color, 254

Little Salute, 138

Indian with Large Hat, 256

Buffalo Walk, 139

Navajo Woman, 257

Bovine Belligerence, 140

MCCAIN, BUCK Portrait of an Era, 55 MERFELD, GERALD Untitled (Still Life with Flower Arrangements), 225 MORAN, THOMAS Pink Terraces, Mammoth Hot Springs Gardiner’s River, 28a Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, 28b Castle Geyser and Beautiful Spring, Upper Geyser Basin, 28c Great Blue Spring, Lower Geyser Basin, 28d Head of Yellowstone River, 29 The Great Falls of Snake River, Idaho Territory, 30 Grand Canyon of Arizona from Hermit Rim Road, 31 MORANG, ALFRED Clouds over Sangre de Cristo, 199 MOTLEY, MICHAEL Navajo Portrait, 247 NAMINGHA, DAN Sacred Shield, 52 NASH, WILLARD New Mexico Landscape, 118 Adobe Church, New Mexico, 120 NEBEKER, BILL The Ranger, 86 NORDFELDT, B.J.O. Yellow House, 210 ORTIZ, JUDY Santa Fe Plaza, 188 PARSONS, SHELDON Hollyhocks, 224 PEPPER, BEVERLY Pithius Wedge, 232 PETERS, DEVIN Still Life and Death, 217 PETTIGREW, DEL Snake River Surprise, 136 PETTIGREW, MARTHA Water Carrier, 82 Two Ravens, 134 PHELPS, RUSTY Sand Creek, 95 PHILLIPS, BERT GEER Indian Family in Wild Plums, 23 A Daughter of the Water Clan, 178 PHILLIPS, TOM Opening the Santa Fe Trail, 167 PLETKA, PAUL Zuni Man, 56 Bois Brule, 57 Breaking of a Chief, 63 POWELL, ACE Napi & His Friends, 145 PRICE, CLAYTON S. Prospecting, 104 PRUNEDA, MAXIMILIANO Idols of Passage, 245 RANE, BILL Spanish Window, 263


I ND EX RED STAR, KEVIN Crow Medicine Man, 49 REDIN, CARL Fall Colors, New Mexico, 159 REED, JOE Cottonwoods, 127 REISS, WINOLD Chief Medicine Boss Ribs, Blackfeet Medicine Man, 110 RILEY, LARRY Untitled (Indian Girl), 61 RIVERA, ELIAS Untitled, 262 ROACH, OTTO Untitled (Monument Valley), 236 ROHRIG, MARK Untitled, 60 ROLLINS, WARREN E. Pueblo Girl with Shawl, 15 Taos Mountain, New Mexico, 101 ROSE, PATRICIA Alcalde, 186 RUSSELL, CHARLES M. Buffalo Hunt, 103 RUTHLING, FORD Untitled (Zia Pot Under Three Ears of Corn), 4 RYAN, TOM Leading the Remuda, 90 SANTIAGO, ROSETA Clay Basket, 7 White Woolies, 182 SCHENCK, BILLY Waco, 88 SCHIVELY, FRANK To Hear the Oldest Songs, 255 SCHMIDT, ALBERT Valley and Mountains, 160 Embudo Station, 161 Adobe House & Well in Spring, 194 Barn and Mountainscape, Spring, 205 SHARER, WILLIAM Buffalo Dance, 174 SHARP, JOSEPH HENRY Spotted Rabbit, 21 Santa Rosa Desert, 25 SHORTY, BEN Untitled, 259 SHUSTER, WILL San Miguel Church, 71 SIMS, AGNES Medicine Man Gives Away His Horse, 51 SIQUEIROS, DAVID ALFARO Zapata, 76 SISSON, LAURENCE Sanctuario, 72 SLOANE, ERIC Fresh Powder, 150 East Mill, Cape Cod, 228

SMITH, GARY ERNEST Roughneck, 185 SNIDOW, GORDON Cowboy Santa, 98 STEFAN, ROSS Old Waiting Place, 96 Halfway to Kaibito, 97 STEINKE, BETTINA Taos Scene (A Memory Sketch), 113 STEWART, RON

YOUNG, HARVEY San Jacinto Hills, Southern California, 24 ZABEL, LARRY Pack Trail, Late Spring, 168 ZAHOUREK, JON Painted, 53 Blackfoot, 54 ZHANG, XIANG Ballet Lesson, 239 ZINK, MELISSA

Time for Talk, 92

Within the Ruins, 264

Run for Cover, 93

ZÚÑIGA, FRANCISCO

Company Coming, 166 SWANSON, RAY What’s UP!, 146 Market Scene, 147 SWAZO-HINDS, MARK Untitled, 242 TOBIAS, BUNNY Untitled, 268 UNKNOWN Untitled (Indian Ceremony), 20 Day of the Dead Figures, 261 VAN CLEVE, BARBARA Rain Broom, 234 VAN DRIEST, DIRK Dr. Dominguez’s Kitchen, Taos, 196 VAN GINKEL, PAUL Warrior Child, 258 VAN SOELEN, THEODORE New Slippers, 183 Working with the Wagon, 184 Untitled (House Beneath Willow), 189 VARIOUS ARTISTS Cowboy Artists of America Portfolio, 87 Pueblo Pottery Miniatures, 274 Miscellaneous Folk Art, 277 VINELLA, RAY Taos Chamisa, 122 WEST, JERRY R. Chaquaco Cows, Horns, and Light, 143 WHITE, RANDY LEE Taos Art Auction, 267 WHITESIDE, FRANK REED Doubling Up, 105 Hopi Snake Dance - Walpi, 106 WIEGHORST, OLAF Mexican Rancho, 78 Glacier National Park, Montana, 151 Castle Rock, 152 WILLIFORD, HOLLIS Tewa Water Girl, 6 WOLFE, BYRON B. One More Ridge to Taos, 99 Kit Carson’s Luck or Marksmanship?, 100 WONG-LIGDA, EDWARD Fine Arts, 266

Mujer de Pie, 74 Mujer Reclinada, 75


T E R M S & CONDITIO N S O F S AL E   The following Terms and Conditions of Sale are the Santa Fe Art Auction Limited Co.’s (“Santa Fe Art Auction”) and its agents’ and consignors’ entire agreement with the prospective bidders, bidders and buyers relative to the lots listed in this catalog. The lots will be offered by the Santa Fe Art Auction as agent for the consignors, unless the catalog indicates otherwise.    1. The Santa Fe Art Auction operates as an agent of the seller only. It is not responsible in the event any buyer or seller at the auction fails to live up to their respective agreements, including failure of the seller to deliver any property to buyers. The Santa Fe Art Auction assumes no risk, liability, or responsibility beyond the limited warranty contained herein.     (a) Except as set forth in paragraph 1(b) below, all lots are sold “AS IS.” There are no representations or warranties that extend beyond these Terms and Conditions of Sale. All lots shall be available for examination prior to the sale. The Santa Fe Art Auction and its agents and consignors make no representations or warranties as to merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, correctness of the catalog or descriptions of lots, including, but not limited to, the physical condition, size, quality, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, dates, exhibitions, literary or historical relevance of any lot and no statement anywhere, whether oral or written, whether made in the catalog, an advertisement, a bill of sale, a salesroom posting or announcement, or elsewhere, shall be deemed such a warranty, representation or assumption of liability. There are no representations and warranties, express or implied, as to whether the Buyer acquires any copyrights, including, but not limited to, any reproduction rights in any lot. Contents of this catalog are subject to change or supplementation before or during the sale, including the sale of any lot.    (b) The authenticity of the authorship attributed to the lots as described in this catalog is guaranteed only to the limited extent as stated in this paragraph 1(b).    (i) The authorship attributed to a lot includes name of the artist and any reservations therewith stated, as, for example, “attributed to,” “in the school of” or “appears to have been signed by.” The Santa Fe Art Auction makes no warranties whatsoever, express or implied, with respect to any material in the catalog other than the authorship attributed to the lots.    (ii) This guarantee is further limited as follows: The benefits of this guarantee are not assignable and shall be available only to the Buyer of record; this guarantee shall remain in force and be effective only if notice of rescission is given to the Santa Fe Art Auction within three (3) years following the date of sale, provided the lot is tendered to the Santa Fe Art Auction in Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the same condition as the lot was found at the time of sale; and that the rescission of a sale and the refund of the total purchase price paid (i.e., the successful bid price, plus the buyer’s premium and applicable tax) is exclusive and in lieu of any other remedy which might otherwise be available, and that the Santa Fe Art Auction and its consignors shall not be liable to the Buyer for any incidental, consequential, special, compensatory or punitive damages.    (iii) In remitting payment hereunder, Buyer agrees and acknowledges that the absolute limit of Santa Fe Art Auction’s, its agents’ or consignors’ liability and responsibility shall not exceed the total purchase price.    2. Prospective bidders should inspect the lots before bidding to determine condition, size and whether or not the lot has been repaired or restored and to investigate all other matters relating to the lot that is of material importance to the prospective bidder.    3. A buyer’s premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the purchaser as part of the total purchase price. If paying by cash or check, the purchase price will be the sum of the final bid price plus a buyer’s premium of 17% of the final bid price of each lot up to and including $500,000, 15% of the excess of the final bid price above $500,000, and 12% of the excess of the final bid price above $1,000,000, plus any applicable sales tax, shipping and handling charges. The buyer’s premium is calculated separately for each lot. If paying by credit card, the purchase price will be the sum of the final bid price plus a buyer’s premium of 20% of the final bid price for each lot up to and including $500,000, 18% of the excess of the final bid price above $500,000, and 15% of the excess of the final bid price above $1,000,000, plus any applicable sales tax, shipping and handling charges.   4. Unless exempted by law, the Buyer will be required to pay all applicable state and local sales, gross receipts, and compensation tax. Proof of exemption in the form of a current Non-Taxable Transaction Certificate must be provided at registration. In the event of deliveries outside the state, it is the Purchaser’s responsibility to pay any applicable compensating use tax of another state on the total purchase price. If a buyer requests that artwork be shipped to an address in New York State, we must collect New York sales tax due to an affiliated business located in New York City under recent legislation (Part P-1 of Chapter 57 of the Laws of 2009).   • Why Santa Fe Art Auction Collects Sales Tax: New Mexico requires a seller of goods to register with the New Mexico Department of Taxation and Revenue and collect and remit sales tax if the seller maintains a presence within the state. More specifically, tax laws require an auction house, like Santa Fe Art Auction, with a presence in New Mexico, to register as a sales tax collector, and remit sales tax collected to the state. Unless exempted, New Mexico sales tax is charged on the hammer price, buyer’s premium and any other applicable charges on any property picked up or delivered in New Mexico, regardless of the state or country in which the purchaser resides or does business.    • Certain Exemptions: New Mexico allows for specified exemptions to its sales tax. For example, a registered re-seller such as a registered art dealer may purchase without incurring a tax liability, and Santa Fe Art Auction is not required to collect sales tax from such re-seller.  As sales tax laws vary from state to state, Santa Fe Art Auction recommends that clients with questions regarding the application of sales or use taxes to property purchased at auction seek tax advice from their local tax advisors.    5. The Santa Fe Art Auction reserves the right to withdraw any lot before or during the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal.    6. Except as may be announced by the auctioneer, all bids are per lot, as numbered in the catalog.    7. The Santa Fe Art Auction reserves the right to reject any bid. The highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer will be the Buyer, subject to reserves. In the event of any dispute between bidders, or in the event of doubt as to the validity of any bid, the auctioneer will have the final discretion to determine the successful bidder, cancel 18 0


the sale, or reoffer and resell the lot in dispute. If any dispute arises after the sale, the Santa Fe Art Auction’s sale record shall be final and conclusive. The Santa Fe Art Auction, in its discretion, may execute orders or absentee bids as a convenience to clients who are not present at the auction; however, the Santa Fe Art Auction is not responsible for any errors or omissions in connection therewith.   8. If the auctioneer, in his or her discretion, determines that any bid is below the reserve of the lot, he or she may reject the same and withdraw the lot from sale, and, if having acknowledged an opening or other bid, the auctioneer decides that any advance thereafter is insufficient, he or she may reject the advance.   9. On the fall of the auctioneer’s gavel, the highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer assumes full risk and responsibility for the offered lot, subject to all of the Terms and Conditions of Sale set forth herein, and is immediately obligated to pay the full purchase price. All sales are final and there shall be no exchanges or returns. Payment shall be made by cash, check or wire transfer. As set forth in paragraph 3, above, for an additional percentage Santa Fe Art Auction will also accept credit cards as a form of payment. (Visa and MasterCard only).    In addition to other remedies available to Santa Fe Art Auction by law, we reserve the right to impose, from the date of sale, a late charge of 1.5% per month (18% per annum) of the total purchase price, if payment is not made in accordance with the conditions set forth herein.    (a) All lots must be removed by the Buyer at his or her expense not later than ten (10) business days following the sale, and, if it is not so removed, (i) a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month, or a portion thereof from the tenth day after the sale (until its removal) will be payable to us by the Buyer, with a minimum of 5% of the total purchase price due for any lot not so removed within 60 days after the sale, and (ii) Santa Fe Art Auction may send the purchased lot to a public warehouse for the account of and at the risk and expense of the Buyer.    (b) If any applicable conditions herein are not complied with by the Buyer, the Buyer will be in default, and in addition to any and all other remedies available to the Santa Fe Art Auction and its agents and consignors by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the Buyer liable for the total purchase price, together with all fees, charges and expenses set forth in these Terms and Conditions of Sale, the Santa Fe Art Auction, at its sole option, may (i) cancel the sale of that, or any other lot or lots sold to the defaulting Buyer, or (ii) resell the purchased lot or lots, whether at auction or by private sale, or (iii) effect any combination thereof. The Buyer will be liable for any deficiency, any and all costs, handling charges, late charges, expenses and commissions of both sales, legal fees and expenses, collection fees and incidental damages. The Santa Fe Art Auction and its agents and consignors shall have all of the rights accorded to a secured party under the New Mexico Uniform Commercial Code. The Buyer of each lot agrees that each lot is unique and that Santa Fe Art Auction, in its sole discretion, shall not be required to sell or otherwise seek to mitigate damages should such Buyer fail to pay the total purchase price. Payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until the Santa Fe Art Auction shall have collected good funds. The Santa Fe Art Auction reserves the right to hold all purchases pending collection of the total purchase price, together with all additional fees, charges and expenses incurred pursuant to these Terms and Conditions of Sale.    10. All lots (unless otherwise indicated by the letters “nr”) are subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum price acceptable to the consignor. The Santa Fe Art Auction, or its agents or consignors, may implement such reserve by opening the bidding or they or either of them may bid up to the amount of the reserve by placing successive or consecutive bids for a lot or may bid in response to other bidders. In instances where the Santa Fe Art Auction has an interest in the lot, it may bid up to the reserve to protect such interest. Those works indicated by a v have been guaranteed at a minimum price by the Santa Fe Art Auction or a third party. The Santa Fe Art Auction, or its agents or consignors, may also bid upon other lots listed in this catalog.    11. Santa Fe Art Auction is the owner of images of each lot offered for sale and may use such images for its own archival purposes, as well as for advertising and publicity in connection with this or future sales by the Santa Fe Art Auction.   12. These Terms and Conditions of Sale, together with the parties’ respective rights and obligations hereunder, shall be governed and construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of New Mexico, without regard to New Mexico’s rules concerning conflicts of laws.   13. Prospective bidders, bidders and Buyers agree that, in the event of any controversy or claim arising out of or relating to a sale of any lot, the party asserting such controversy or claim shall provide written notice thereof to the other party; that any such controversy or claim not settled within fourteen (14) days of delivery of notice by the other party, including, without limitation, any controversy or claim arising from, or relating to, the sale of any lot or any of these Terms and Conditions of Sale, including the terms of this paragraph, the sole and exclusive means for resolving the dispute shall be by binding arbitration in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Said arbitration shall be confidential and shall be pursuant to the New Mexico Uniform Arbitration Act, shall be conducted before a single arbitrator, and shall otherwise be guided by the then extant New Mexico Rules of Arbitration. This Agreement is deemed made in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and is subject to the internal substantive law of the State of New Mexico without regard to conflicts of laws. The award of the arbitrator shall be final, and may be entered into any court having jurisdiction thereof. Each party shall bear that party’s own costs of arbitration and attorney’s fees. 14. The Santa Fe Art Auction may, in its discretion and at a Buyer’s request, pack and ship items as directed by the Buyer. In such event, Buyer agrees to the following conditions:    (a) All such packing, handling and shipping is at the sole risk of the Buyer and the Santa Fe Art Auction shall have no liability for any loss or damage to such items, and  (b) Buyer shall pay all related expenses in advance. Buyer should allow four to six weeks for shipping from the date of the auction.    15. Results are posted on the Santa Fe Art Auction web site and, upon request, may be sent to Buyers, catalog subscribers, absentee and phone bidders, and other registered bidders.    16.  If any part of these Terms and Conditions is held invalid or unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall continue to be valid and enforceable to the fullest extent permitted by law.   17.  These Terms and Conditions are not assignable by any buyer without the prior written consent of the Santa Fe Art Auction. However, these Terms and Conditions are binding on the buyer’s successors, assigns and representatives. 181


18. No act, omission or delay by the Santa Fe Art Auction shall be deemed a waiver of its rights and remedies under these Terms and Conditions. 19.  The Santa Fe Art Auction shall use reasonable efforts to contact prospective buyers who have made prior arrangements to place telephone bids in order for these buyers to participate in the auction. The Santa Fe Art Auction shall not be liable for its failure to contact said bidders or for any errors or omissions made in connection with telephone bids since telephone bids are offered as a free service that is undertaken subject to the other commitments of Santa Fe Art Auction during the sale.    20. Santa Fe Art Auction shall use reasonable efforts to execute online bids in order for online buyers to participate in the auction. Online bidding is provided as an alternative bidding service and should not be considered a replacement for bidding in the room. Santa Fe Art Auction encourages its buyers to weigh the advantages and limitations of live online bidding when deciding whether to bid in the room or online. Santa Fe Art Auction shall not be liable for any errors or omissions made in connection with online bids or the online bidding process. Although Santa Fe Art Auction will do everything in its power to assure all online bids are recognized, Santa Fe Art Auction has no way of guaranteeing that the internet and the online bidding process will be free from technical malfunctions. In the event of a tie between an online bid and a “room” bid, the “room” bid generally will take precedence. “Room” bids include those bids taken from the live auction room(s), telephones, absentee bidders, or bids made by the auctioneer to protect the reserve. Santa Fe Art Auction will not be responsible for errors or failures to execute bids placed on the internet, including, without limitation, errors or failures caused by (i) a loss of connection on Santa Fe Art Auction’s or on the Buyer’s end, (ii) a breakdown or problems with the online bidding software, and/or (iii) a breakdown or problems with a Buyer’s internet connection, computer or system. Santa Fe Art Auction does not accept liability for failing to execute an online internet bid or for errors or omissions in connection with this activity.

G U I D E FOR BI DDIN G ABSENTEE BIDS If you are unable to attend the auction in person, and wish to place bids, you may give the Santa Fe Art Auction Bid Department instructions to bid on your behalf. Our representatives will then try to purchase the lot or lots of your choice for the lowest price possible, and never for more than the top amount you indicate. The Santa Fe Art Auction offers this service as a convenience to clients who are unable to attend the auction. However, the Santa Fe Art Auction will not be responsible for failure to execute bids, or any errors in executing bids. PLACING ABSENTEE BIDS Absentee bids are accepted only if you have returned a signed Absentee Bid Form by mail or fax which authorizes the Santa Fe Art Auction to place bids on your behalf. The Absentee Bid Form appears in the back of this catalog. Please complete and return to the Santa Fe Art Auction by November 13, 2015. To place bids, please use the absentee bid form provided in the back of this catalog. Be sure the lot number and the descriptions are accurate and note the top price you are willing to pay for each lot. No bid will be placed unless you indicate a Top Limit (i.e., the amount that you would bid if you were attending the auction yourself ). Any alternative bids should be indicated by using the word “OR” between lot numbers. Then if your bid on an early lot is successful, we will not continue to bid on other lots for you. Or, if your early bids are unsuccessful, we will continue to execute bids for alternative lots until a bid is successful. Bids must be placed in the same order as the lot numbers appear in this catalog. Please place your bids as early as possible. In the event of identical bids, the earliest bid received will take precedence. TELEPHONE BIDS Telephone bids are accepted only if you have returned a signed Absentee Bid Form by mail or fax which authorizes the Santa Fe Art Auction to place bids on your behalf. The Absentee Bid Form appears in the back of this catalog. Please check the telephone bid box on the form, complete, and return to the Santa Fe Art Auction by November 13, 2015. Telephone bidders are encouraged to leave back up bids in case of techincal failure. BUYER’S PREMIUM The Top Limit you indicate on your bid form is the gavel price exclusively. Please keep in mind that a buyer’s premium, as stated in paragraph 3 of the Terms and Conditions of Sale, will be added to the successful bid price of each lot you buy and is payable by you together with the applicable sales tax which is applied to the total cost of the purchase. SUCCESSFUL BIDS Successful absentee bidders will be notified and invoiced within a few days of the sale. Successful absentee bidders shall arrange to make payment via cash, check, credit card or wire transfer upon receipt of notification of purchase. TO FAX A COMPLETED BID FORM, DIAL (505) 954-5785. BIDDING INCREMENTS Bidding increments are as follows, but may vary at the sole discretion of the auctioneer: Estimate

Increment

Under $2,000 $2,000 – $5,000 $5,000 – $10,000 $10,000 – $20,000 $20,000 – $50,000 $50,000 – $100,000 OVER $100,000

$100 $250 $500 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000 $10,000

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Santa Fe Art Auction 2015  

November 14, 2015