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J A C K S O N H O L E A R T A U C T I O N PA R T N E R S

Roxanne Hofmann Trailside Galleries trailsidegalleries.com (480) 945-7751

Maryvonne Leshe Trailside Galleries trailsidegalleries.com (307) 733-3186

Gerald Peters Gerald Peters Gallery gpgallery.com (505) 954-5700


266 ERNEST BLUMENSCHEIN (1874-1960) Rock of Fire - Morning, Ghost Ranch, ca. 1925, oil on canvas, 24 x 27 inches, $300,000 – $450,000


A N A U C T I O N O F PA S T A N D P R E S E N T MASTERWORKS OF THE AMERICAN WEST

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

SESSION I

Preview will be held at Trailside Galleries 130 E Broadway, Jackson, Wyoming Auction will be held at the Center for the Arts 265 South Cache, Jackson, Wyoming SESSION I AUCTION PREVIEW

Thursday, September 15th | 10:00am – 7:00pm LIGHT LUNCH

Friday, September 16th | 11:00am SESSION I LIVE AUCTION

Friday, September 16th | 12:00pm MDT

SESSION II

All events will be held at the Center for the Arts 265 South Cache, Jackson, Wyoming SESSION II AUCTION PREVIEWS

Friday, September 16th | 10:00am – 7:00pm Saturday, September 17th | 9:00am – 12:00pm BBQ LUNCHEON

Saturday, September 17th | 11:00am SESSION II LIVE AUCTION

Saturday, September 17th | 12:00pm MDT

P R E S E N T E D BY T R A I L S I D E GA L L E R I E S & G E R A L D P E T E R S GA L L E RY ©


TOP TIER JURIED COMPETITION Top Tier artists, chosen by invitation, are a select group of contemporary artists with exemplary auction records: WILLIAM ACHEFF • KEN CARLSON • MICHAEL COLEMAN • JENNESS CORTEZ LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE • Z.S. LIANG • BONNIE MARRIS • MIAN SITU • TUCKER SMITH

A $10,000 cash prize will be awarded to the artist whose work is of significant merit, as determined by a three person jury: M INDY B ESAW , PhD, Curator, Crystal Bridges of American Art L AUR A FRY , Curator of Art, Gilcrease Museum JAM ES H. NOT TAGE , Vice President and Chief Curatorial Officer, Gund Curator of Western Art,

History and Culture, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art The award will be announced September 17, 2016 prior to the start of the Session II auction, during which all Top Tier paintings will be sold.

WILLIAM ACHEFF (1947– ) William Acheff’s art passion was kindled while living in the San Francisco Bay Area when, at age 22, artist Roberto Lupetti invited him to his drawing class. After six months, Acheff moved into his own studio while continuing visits to Lupetti’s studio for criticism and words of wisdom.

Restless, Acheff ventured to Taos in 1973. Armed with classical training, he developed a very distinct style that is widely recognized and admired. He is renowned for his highly realistic still lifes of rich Native American artifacts of the past. The Pueblo Indians of Taos have provided him with inspiring subjects to paint. “Artifacts and traditions of the past,” he explains, “seem to hold more mystical and aesthetic value than those of contemporary times.” Acheff has shown in major Western art shows, including: Western Heritage Sale, Artists of America, National Academy of Western Art, The Hubbard Show, Prix de West, Autry Masters of the American West. He is a two time Prix de West Award winner (1989, 2004) and received the Masters of America West Purchase Award in 1998.

KEN CARLSON (1937– ) Ken Carlson was born and raised in Minnesota and now resides in the hill country of central Texas. Following art

school training, he began his career as a commercial illustrator in Minneapolis. In 1968, he put aside commercial work to devote full time to painting wildlife subjects. A critical element of Carlson’s work has always been first-hand observation of his wildlife subjects. Each fall, he travels to Alaska, the western prairies, the Canadian Rockies, or to Africa to study animal subjects in their varied habitat. As a participant of the Prix de West Exhibition at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Carlson has been the recipient of the Frederick Remington Award for Artistic Merit and twice the recipient of the Pittman Wildlife Award. He was the recipient of the first Bob Kuhn Wildlife Award from the American West Exhibition at the Autry National Center and the Briscoe Western Art Museum Legacy Award for a lifetime of artistic accomplishments.

MICHAEL COLEMAN (1946– ) Michael Coleman was born and raised in Provo, Utah and spent his boyhood hunting, fishing and trapping

throughout the Rocky Mountains, often taking a sketchbook with him. Early on, he decided on a career in art, and traveled broadly for subject matter. Coleman quickly became a prominent Southwestern artist when in 1978, at the age of thirty-two, he was given his first retrospective at the Buffalo Bill Historical Center. He exhibited at the National Academy of Western Art and at Kennedy Galleries in New York. Then, in 1999, he won the Prix de West Award at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame for his bronze of a moose titled “September,” which work has joined the permanent collection of the Hall of Fame.


JENNESS CORTEZ (1944– ) Jenness Cortez is a distinguished figure in the contemporary revival of classical realist painting. She was born in Indiana,

received private lessons from noted Dutch-born painter Antonius Raemaekers, graduated from the Herron School of Art where she received a rigorous five year training in all technical aspects of art making, and studied at the Art Students League under another gifted teacher, Arnold Blanch. From 1977 to 1996 Jenness became world renown for her skillful portrayal of sporting and wildlife subjects. In 2001 she began concentrating on a form of still life painting inspired by the age-old tradition of “art in art.” By means of her intricate creations Cortez challenges the viewers’ intellectual curiosity as she celebrates the sheer pleasure of beautiful painting. In the process of creating each work Cortez plays author, architect, visual journalist, art historian, curator and pundit to help open our eyes to what we might otherwise have overlooked or taken for granted. Each painting presents a specific theme, mixing straightforward cues and obscure allusions, complemented by references to other artists’ lives and times. By depicting iconic artworks in her own paintings, Cortez underscores a classic paradox of realism: the painting as a “window” into an imagined space and as a physical object––both a metaphysical presence and a material entity. Jenness Cortez has been exhibiting her work since 1975, and has had more than 40 solo shows throughout the United States. Her work is in numerous public and private collections including those of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, HRH Queen Elizabeth II, the New York State Museum.

LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE (1980– ) Logan Maxwell Hagege is a talented artist who excels in depicting the figure and landscapes. Serious study in art started for Hagege when early interest in animation sent him to a local art school, Associates in Art. His interest quickly moved from animation to fine art while attending life drawing classes, and later the Academy`s Advanced Master’s Program, which was modeled after the old time French Art Schools where students spent more than six hours per day studying from live models. Hagege also studied privately under Steve Huston and Joseph Mendez.

Hagege finds encouragement and guidance in masters of the past such as Gustav Klimt, N.C. Wyeth, T.W. Dewing and Maynard Dixon. One idea that drives Hagege’s work is that evolution in art is never ending. He is constantly challenging himself with new ideas and new ways of looking at the same subject.

Z.S. LIANG (1953– ) Z. S. Liang was born in China in 1953. He studied at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing and Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts in

Guangzhou. Liang furthered his art study in the United States, he earned his MFA in Painting at Boston University in 1989. Liang received his great inspiration in this country while studying and painting the Wampanoag Indian culture at Massachusetts. This new found interest fired his imagination, and he began to focus his painting primarily on Native American Indian cultures and their traditional ways of life. During the ensuing years of field research, he has made many connections and friends among native tribes from the east coast to the west coast. Liang’s obvious passion for the Indians as a people, coupled with his emphasis on historical accuracy, adds strength and truth to his portrayals. Among the many awards Liang has received are: Masters of the American West Purchase Award 2011; the David P. Usher Patrons’ Choice Award, Master of the American West, 2009; the President’s Award for Excellence, Oil Painters of America, 2005.

BONNIE MARRIS (1951– ) While a student at Michigan State University, Bonnie Marris illustrated several books, including a mammalogy text by a leading expert in the field. The book attracted the attention of noted zoologist George Schaller, who invited Marris to prepare the art for posters to support his worldwide rare animal relief programs.

Beyond academic training and emotional involvement, there lies that element for which there is no substitute: experience. Marris makes several field trips each year to study the animals that are the subjects of her paintings. This close proximity with the animals gives her the confidence to paint them with total realism in their natural surroundings. Marris’ work is highly sought after and can be found in many major collections throughout the country. Marris and her husband, Woody, live on a farm in Ada, Michigan with two dogs and three horses.

MIAN SITU (1953– ) Born in southern China, Mian Situ earned BA and MFA degrees from the Guangzhou Institute of Fine Art and then worked as an art

instructor for six years. He lived in Canada for ten years before immigrating to the United States in 1998.

Situ received the Masters of the American West Purchase Award for Convergence of Cultures, given in recognition of the work acquired for the Autry National Center’s permanent collection, at the 2009 Masters of the American West Fine Art Exhibition and Sale. He won the Gene Autry Memorial Award, sponsored by Jay H. Grodin, at the 2012, 2008, 2009, and 2010 Masters. He was given the David P. Usher Patrons’ Choice Award and the Artists’ Choice Award at the 2006 Masters, the Artists’ Choice Award at the 2005 Masters, and the Thomas Moran Memorial Award for Painting and the Patrons’ Choice Award at the 2004 Masters. In 2003, he received three Masters awards: the Thomas Moran Memorial Award for Painting, the Artists’ Choice Award, and the Patrons’ Choice Award. At the 2002 Masters, his painting Powder Monkeys won the Masters of the American West Purchase Award; he also received the Thomas Moran Memorial Award for Painting and the Patrons’ Choice Award. In 2000 his work won the first-place prize at the Carmel Art Festival and the Artists’ Choice Award for best painting at the 90th Gold Medal Exhibition of the California Art Club. He has also received numerous awards from the National Juried Exhibition of Oil Painters of America.

TUCKER SMITH (1940- ) Well known as a nature and wildlife artist, Tucker Smith was born in 1940 in St. Paul, Minnesota. In 1952 he and his family

moved to Pinedale, Wyoming. Smith graduated from Pinedale High School in 1958 and received a B.S. degree from the University of Wyoming in 1963, with a major in mathematics and a minor in art.

After working eight years as a computer programmer and systems analyst for the State of Montana, he began painting full time in 1971. Tucker and his wife, Jean, returned to live on the Hoback Rim, thirty miles north of Pinedale, Wyoming in 1993. Their home is at the foot of the Wind River Mountains from which he draws inspiration.


JACKSON HOLE ART AUC TION

Absentee and phone bidding arrangements must be made no later than 5pm MDT on September 15, 2016 Telephone bidders are encouraged to leave absentee bids in case of technical difficulties Please direct all inquiries to (866) 549-9278 Register online and view auction results at: www.jacksonholeartauction.com Online Bidding available through BIDSQUARE 229 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Brüllende Löwen, oil on canvas, 44 ¾ x 83 ½ inches, $200,000 – $300,000


A N AU C T I O N O F PA S T A N D P R E S E N T MASTERWORKS OF THE AMERICAN WEST

P R E S E N T E D BY T R A I L S I D E GA L L E R I E S & G E R A L D P E T E R S GA L L E RY ©


138 CARL RUNGIUS (1869-1959) Among the Crags, 1935

139 CARL RUNGIUS (1869-1959) Face to Face, 1931

etching and drypoint 8 x 11 inches signed lower right: C. Rungius lower left: To Carolyn and Donald R. Murdock from C.R.

etching and drypoint 8 x 10 ¾ inches signed lower right: C. Rungius lower left: For Mr. Dl. E. Hevens. C.R.

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Shreveport, LA

PROVENANCE: Arthur H. Harlow & Co., New York, NY (label verso) From The Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Center, Rockford, IL

LITERATURE: Donald E. Crouch, Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints, Mountain Press Publishing: Missoula, MT, 1989, illus. plate 33 $3,000 – $5,000

LITERATURE: Donald E. Crouch, Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints, Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT, 1989, illus. plate 28 Proceeds from the sale of this lot will benefit The Salvation Army. $4,000 – $6,000

140 CARL RUNGIUS (1869-1959) An Old Fighter, 1925

141 CARL RUNGIUS (1869-1959) Three Old Gentlemen, 1928

etching and drypoint 6 ⅛ x 8 ¼ inches signed lower right: C. Rungius

etching and drypoint 7 ¾ x 10 ⅞ inches signed lower right: C. Rungius

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Shreveport, LA

PROVENANCE: Rendezvous Gallery, Crested Butte, CO (label verso) From a Texas Collection

LITERATURE: Donald E. Crouch, Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints, Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT, 1989, illus. plate 3 $4,000 – $6,000

LITERATURE: Donald E. Crouch, Carl Rungius: The Complete Prints, Mountain Press Publishing: Missoula, MT, 1989, illus. plate 24 $4,000 – $6,000 – 8 –


142 NICHOLAS EGGENHOFER (1897-1985) Horse Herder watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper 8 ½ x 9 ⅛ inches (sight) signed lower right: N. EGGENHOFER numbered lower right: XIX PROVENANCE: The Artist, Cody, WY Mr. and Mrs J.H. Shephard, Cody, WY By Descent in Family, Cody, WY EXHIBITED: Nick Eggenhofer: Works from Cody Collection, Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, WY, June 1, 1981-September 25, 1981 (label verso)

143 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Palomino & Horseman watercolor on paper 7 x 9 ½ inches (sight) unsigned verso: letter of authentication from Harold Davidson, 1972 PROVENANCE: Kennedy Galleries, New York, NY (label verso) From a Private Collection $5,000 – $10,000

$2,000 – $4,000

144 EDWARD BOREIN (1872-1945) Cowboys Riding watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper 9 ½ x 12 ½ inches (sight) signed lower right: EDWARD BOREiN PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $12,000 – $18,000

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145 OLAF CARL SELTZER (1877–1957) Indian Chief - Blue Robe watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper 7 x 5 inches (sight) signed lower right: O.C. SELTZER PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Salt Lake City, UT EXHIBITED: CM Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT, 1977 (label verso) $5,000 – $7,000

146 OLAF CARL SELTZER (1877-1957) Indian Brave in Blue Shawl watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper 7 x 5 inches (sight) signed lower left: O.C. SELTZER 147 JOE BEELER (1931-2006) Calling the Mountain Spirit

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Salt Lake City, UT

bronze 3/17 24 ⅝ x 11 x 10 ½ inches inscribed right side: JOE BEElER CA 3 of 17 left side: BBW (buffalo cipher)

EXHIBITED: CM Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT, 1977 (label verso) $4,000 – $6,000

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $3,000 – $5,000

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148 OLAF CARL SELTZER (1877-1957) Scouting Party watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper 9 ½ x 14 ¾ inches (sight) signed lower left: O.C. SELTZER. PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $15,000 – $25,000

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149 FRANK MCCARTHY (1924-2002) Leaving the Stronghold, 1980 oil on board 17 ¾ x 24 inches signed lower left: McCarthy CA © 1980 verso: titled, signed, dated, numbered PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $18,000 – $24,000

150 MELVIN WARREN (1920-1995) Searching for Lodging, 1964 oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: Melvin C. Warren PROVENANCE: Plaza Gallery, Taos, NM Private Collection, Georgetown, TX $12,000 – $18,000

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151 GARY NIBLETT (1943- ) The Scout Report oil on canvas 48 x 60 inches signed lower left: Gary Niblett CA © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Los Angeles, CA $20,000 – $30,000

152 JOE BEELER (1931-2006) Arizona Whirlwind (Geronimo & His Lieutenants), 1961 oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: JOE BEElER PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $7,000 – $10,000

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153 MARTIN GRELLE (1954- ) Crossing Over acrylic and oil on board 12 x 12 inches signed lower left: (cross) MARTiN GRELLE 2014 © CA verso: titled PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection EXHIBITED: Cowboy Crossings, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, OK, 2014 (label verso) $20,000 – $30,000

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154 JIM NORTON (1953- ) The Owl Bonnet (Owl Society) oil on board 24 x 32 inches signed lower left: Jim C Norton CA verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: The Artist From a Wyoming Collection $15,000 – $20,000

155 KENNETH RILEY (1919-2015) The Ritual acrylic and pen on paper 5 ½ x 4 inches (sight) signed lower right: Kenneth Riley CA PROVENANCE: The Artist, by Descent $4,000 – $6,000

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156 BONNIE MARRIS (1951- ) Family Ties, 2016 oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower right: BL Marris © “Family Ties is my celebration of the wonderful, complex social structure of a wolf pack.  Each wolf has his or her place in the pack and all know and respect their leaders.  Several times a day the group will demonstrate their place and ‘honor’ the alphas.  How sad we as people can’t learn and live by such a beautiful, simple pact.” – Bonnie Marris PROVENANCE: The Artist $20,000 – $30,000

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157 CARL BRENDERS (1937- ) Mighty Intruder mixed media on illustration board 21 x 27 ¼ inches (sight) signed lower left: © CBrenD 86 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Plymouth, MN $18,000 – $24,000

158 MICHAEL COLEMAN (1946- ) Upper Geyser Basin - Steam and Clouds, 2016 oil on linen 21 ⅛ x 36 inches signed lower right: MICHAEL COLEMAN - © “In 1871 the Hayden expedition set out to survey the sources of the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, the area that was soon to become the nation’s first national park. Thomas Moran joined as artist of the team and depicted many of Yellowstone’s geologic features and landscapes. These depictions later proved essential in convincing the United States Congress to establish Yellowstone as a national park. In the same spirit Michael Coleman for almost four decades has sought to capture the heart and feeling of Yellowstone. His love of the outdoors endures in his passionate depictions of this historic place. In the words of Theodore Roosevelt, ‘There is a delight in the hardy life of the open. There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the wilderness that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy and its charm. The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased and not impaired in value. Conservation means development as much as it does protection.’ Coleman looks to nature to find beauty in this life, his enthusiasm and love of his subject is a standard in American Art. Soft spoken in public his work speaks for him in almost all that he does. This piece is his tribute to the National Parks’ centennial.” – Nicholas Coleman (artist’s son) PROVENANCE: The Artist $18,000 – $24,000 – 17 –


159 MICHAEL COLEMAN (1946- ) In the Cliffs oil on board 72 x 40 inches signed lower middle: MICHAEL COLEMAN— © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $40,000 – $60,000

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160 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Miles to Go oil on board 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: CARLSON PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hillsborough, CA LITERATURE: Tom Davis, From the Tundra to Texas: The Art of Ken Carlson, Collectors Covey, Dallas, TX, 1994, illus. p. 163 $20,000 – $30,000

161 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Morning Moose oil on board 15 x 30 inches signed lower right: KEN CARLSON PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hillsborough, CA $18,000 – $24,000

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162 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Power of the Plains oil on canvas 20 x 40 inches signed lower left: KEN CARLSON © 78 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Casper, WY $15,000 – $25,000

163 CARL RUNGIUS (1869-1959) Untitled (Valley Study)

164 CARL RUNGIUS (1869-1959) Untitled (Mountain Study)

oil on board 7 x 10 ½ inches signed lower right: C Rungius

oil on board 7 x 10 ½ inches signed lower right: C Rungius

PROVENANCE: Drummond Gallery, Coeur D’Alene, ID (label verso) Private Collection, Bridgewater, CT

PROVENANCE: Drummond Gallery, Coeur D’Alene, ID (label verso) Private Collection, Bridgewater, CT

$6,000 – $9,000

$6,000 – $9,000

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165 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Bull Elk Portrait oil on board 32 x 44 inches signed lower right: KEN CARLSON PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hillsborough, CA LITERATURE: Tom Davis, From the Tundra to Texas: The Art of Ken Carlson, Collectors Covey, Dallas, TX, 1994, illus. p. 94 $30,000 – $40,000

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166 FRANK MCCARTHY (1924-2002) They Passed in the Moonlight oil on board 18 x 24 inches signed lower right: McCarthy © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Los Angeles, CA $25,000 – $35,000

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167 KENNETH RILEY (1919-2015) Sweet Tooth, 1974 oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: Kenneth Riley 74 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Houston, TX $20,000 – $30,000

168 HERB MIGNERY (1937- ) Seventy Winters bronze 10/12 25 ½ x 25 x 22 inches inscribed back left: Mignery 10/12 2008 CA ENSS PROVENANCE: From a Wyoming Collection $6,000 – $8,000

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169 MARTIN GRELLE (1954- ) Mountain Meadow oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches signed lower right: * MARTiN GRELLE 1991 © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Burley, ID $30,000 – $40,000

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170 BILL ANTON (1957- ) Making Tracks oil on board 30 x 45 inches signed lower left: Bill Anton verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $20,000 – $30,000

171 BRUCE GREENE (1953- ) A Cowboy’s Carnegie Hall

172 BILL ANTON (1957- ) A Quiet Pool

bronze 16/50 19 x 13 ¾ x 13 ¾ inches inscribed back left: Bruce R. Greene 16/50 CA ©

oil on board 16 x 20 inches signed lower right: Bill Anton

PROVENANCE: The Artist From a Wyoming Collection

PROVENANCE: The Artist From a Wyoming Collection

$4,000 – $6,000

$6,000 – $9,000

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173 RICHARD D. THOMAS (1939- ) Moving Through the Herd oil on canvas 36 x 54 inches signed lower right: RICHARD D. THOMAS verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY Private Collection, Rancho Mirage, CA $18,000 – $24,000

174 BRUCE GREENE (1953- ) Somewhere West of Wall Street

175 HARRY JACKSON (1924-2011) The Foreman, 1974

bronze 9AC/15 15 ¾ x 12 x 11 ¾ inches inscribed left side: Bruce R. Greene 9AC/15 CA

bronze 4/40 18 x 13 x 12 inches inscribed verso: © Harry Jackson 1974 4.

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Kirkland, AZ

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ

$4,000 – $6,000

LITERATURE: Don Goddard, Ed., Harry Jackson: Forty Years of His Work 1941-81, WFS, Cody, WY, 1981, illus. p. 91 $4,000 – $6,000

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176 JAMES BAMA (1926- ) Butch Kelly Saddle Bronc Rider watercolor and pencil on paper 18 ¾ x 23 inches (sight) signed lower right: © Bama '75 verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Helena, MT $20,000 – $30,000

177 KYLE POLZIN (1974- ) Cowboy Coffee, 2015 oil on canvas 12 x 13 inches signed lower right: POLZIN © PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection EXHIBITED: Masters of the American West: Fine Arts Exhibition and Sale, Autry Museum of the American West, Los Angeles, CA, January 31- March 8, 2015 (label verso) $15,000 – $25,000

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178 ROBERT LOUGHEED (1910-1982) The Mustang Runners, 1973 oil on board 20 x 30 inches signed lower left: ROBERT LOUGHEED (artist cipher) CA verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: The Artist Commission for Armco Steel Private Collection, Charlotte, NC $22,000 – $28,000

179 CHARLIE DYE (1906-1972) Mules, Mustangs, and Men oil on panel 8 x 12 inches signed lower right: CD verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: La Galleria, Sedona, AZ Private Collection, Tucson, AZ $7,000 – $10,000

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180 ROBERT LOUGHEED (1910-1982) Open Range Encounter, 1976 oil on canvas 30 x 60 inches signed lower right: ROBERT LOUGHEED © 76 (artist cipher) NAWA verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Paradise Valley, AZ, by descent LITERATURE: B. Byron Price, Lougheed: A Painter’s Painter, Nygard & Elliott Publishing Company, Bozeman, MT, 1991, illus. p. XV $40,000 – $60,000

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181 E.S. PAXSON (1852-1919) Louison “The Judge” Flathead Chief, 1914 oil on canvas 27 ¼ x 20 inches signed lower right: E’S’ Paxson- -1914verso: titled PROVENANCE: Los Angeles Athletic Club, Los Angeles, CA (label verso) From a Private Collection LITERATURE: William Edgar Paxson, Jr., E.S. Paxson: Frontier Artist, Pruett Publishing Company, Boulder, CO, 1984, illus. p.83 $40,000 – $60,000

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182 E.S. PAXSON (1852-1919) Ever Westward, 1910 oil on canvas 36 x 28 ¼ inches signed lower right: E.S. Paxson- -1901verso: titled PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Paradise Valley, AZ, by descent LITERATURE: William Edgar Paxson, Jr., E.S. Paxson: Frontier Artist, Pruett Publishing Company, Boulder, CO, 1984, illus. p.102 $75,000 – $100,000

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183

MAYNARD DIXON (1875-1946)

Indian and Soldier (The Indian Yesterday), 1938 charcoal on paper 16 ⅛ x 33 ⅞ inches (each) signed lower left: MAYNARD DIXON 1938 Indian and Teacher (The Indian Today), 1938 charcoal on paper 16 ⅛ x 33 ⅞ inches (each) signed lower left: MAYNARD DIXON 1938 In the late 1930’s Maynard Dixon received a prestigious commission from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to create two murals (illustrated below) for their offices in the Department of the Interior building in Washington, D.C. Working with the theme The Indian Yesterday and The Indian Today, Dixon created these sketches—also known as Indian and Soldier and Indian and Teacher. The negative tilt of these original plans was rejected by the Bureau and Dixon was forced to temper his frustrations, particularly in The Indian Today, and create a more positive and harmonious scene, as depicted in the extant murals. Following the completion of the murals, Dixon provided his commentary on the piece, saying: “Ever since the founding of Jamestown and Santa Fe our dealings with the Indian tribes had been a long series of wars and broken treaties down to the 1870s and 80s, ending in a sort of carpet bag era during the final settlement of the great Plains and Rocky Mountain regions, 1890-1910, and the breaking up of the great Indian Reservations. Only recently our Government has undertaken a new policy based on a real understanding of Indian character and recognition of Indian rights long denied. In the former period the Indians dealt mostly with the soldier sent to punish his resistance to the encroachment of settlers. In the present he deals with the teacher (Government Agent) sent to help him make the most of his native resources. There is a vast amount of material in this subject, but in these two murals I have attempted to summarize it in simple designs. The present tendency in mural painting is to “fill the space” – often ending in complexity and confusion – which does not apply here. There is a starkness of outline in this subject and in the land of its last drama that I have tried to reflect in the paintings. The west is vast, and the forms of men and animals stand clear-cut against great empty spaces. Simplicity of design is also necessary for these walls because they are not large nor architecturally important.”1 PROVENANCE: Collection of John Dixon Private Collection, Santa Barbara, CA LITERATURE: Donald J. Hagerty, Desert Dreams: The Art and Life of Maynard Dixon, Gibbs Smith, Layton, UT, 1998, illus. p. 229 Donald J. Hagerty, The Life of Maynard Dixon, Gibbs Smith Publisher, Layton, UT, 2010, illus. p. 212 $20,000 – $40,000 (for the pair)

1

Donald J. Hagerty, The Life of Maynard Dixon, Gibbs Smith, Layton, UT, 2010, p.211-213.

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184 E.S. PAXSON (1852-1919) Watchful Waiting, 1917 oil on canvas 36 x 28 inches signed lower right: E’S’ Paxson- -1917PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection LITERATURE: William Edgar Paxson, Jr., E.S. Paxson: Frontier Artist, Pruett Publishing Company, Boulder, CO, 1984, illus. p.99 $40,000 – $60,000

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185 CYRUS EDWIN DALLIN (1861-1944) The Invocation of the Rising Sun, 1916 oil on canvas 26 x 34 inches signed lower left: C.E. Dallin 1916 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, New Mexico Private Collection, Wyoming $75,000 – $150,000

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186 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1988) Packin’ In oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower left: O - Wieghorst (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ EXHIBITED: Wieghorst Retrospective, Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson, AZ, October, 4 - November 30, 1981 (label verso) Holter Museum of Art, Helena, MT, January - April 1991 (label verso) $50,000 – $75,000

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187 EDGAR ALWIN PAYNE (1883-1947) High Sierra Landscape - Big Pine Canyon oil on canvas 28 x 34 inches signed lower left: EDGAR PAYNE PROVENANCE: Christies, New York, NY, 2013 (label verso) Private Collection, Utah $50,000 – $75,000

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188 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1988) Bear Hunt oil on canvas 28 x 38 inches signed lower left: O-Wieghorst (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $20,000 – $40,000

189 E.S. PAXSON (1852-1919) Antelope, 1900 oil on canvas 16 x 12 inches signed lower left: E’S’ Paxson’ 6-1900PROVENANCE: Biltmore Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) From an Arizona Collection $5,000 – $10,000

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190 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1988) Concord Stage oil on canvas 22 x 30 inches signed lower left: O - Wieghorst (artist cipher) lower right: © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ EXHIBITED: Phippen Museum of Western Art (label verso) $60,000 – $90,000

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191 JOHN CLYMER (1907-1989) Moving Camp, 1972 oil on canvas 20 x 40 inches signed lower left: John Clymer CA verso: titled Commonly recognized for recording western history and wildlife in his art, John Ford Clymer was born in Ellensburg, Washington in 1907. Clymer developed an interest in art from a very early age. Following high school, he moved to Vancouver, British Columbia, where he worked as an illustrator and attended art school. In 1930, Clymer attended the Wilmington Academy in Delaware, where he encountered and found inspiration from the illustrator and western artist, N.C. Wyeth. In 1932, Clymer married his childhood sweetheart Doris and moved to Westport, Connecticut to join the artist gathering there. During World War II, Clymer and illustrator Tom Lovell joined the Marines. Stationed in Washington State, they spent their time painting war illustrations. After the war Clymer decided to create historical paintings. In order to accurately depict the West in his work, Clymer researched and traveled throughout the region. In 1966, Clymer and his wife settled down in the quiet western town of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, to better pursue Clymer’s interest in painting local western people and regional wildlife. Clymer received many honors, including the National Academy of Western Art’s Prix de West Award and the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Rungius Medal. His hometown of Ellensburg, Washington established the Clymer Museum. Clymer’s family generously donated the contents of his studio to the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Scholar Walt Reed describes the scene in Moving Camp, saying, “After horses were introduced by the Spanish into North America, the lives of the Indians who acquired them were transformed. Nomadic tribes had previously relied on dogs as beasts of burden to drag the lodges and other tribal possessions on the small travois. Much also had to be carried on the backs of the women, while the braves ranged as protective guards. All were on foot. Moving camp became much easier after the Indians acquired horses. This painting shows a band of Crow Indians moving out over a windswept ridge in Wyoming. The late fall hunt is over and the robes and food supplies have been replenished. They are now traveling to a sheltered valley to spend the cold winter months. Everyone is riding, and the horses are hauling the travois and carrying the burdens.”1 Clymer exhibited this piece in the 1972 Cowboy Artists of America Exhibition, where it won the Gold Medal in Oil. PROVENANCE: The Artist National Academy of Western Art, 1975 Private Collection, Paradise Valley, AZ, by descent EXHIBITED: Cowboy Artists of America Exhibition, 1972, Gold Medal in Oil LITERATURE: Walt Reed, John Clymer: An Artist’s Rendezvous with the Frontier West, Northland Press, 1976, illus. p. 67 Paul Weaver, The Western Paintings of John Clymer, Peacock Press, New York, NY, 1977, illus. plate 13 $150,000 – $250,000

1

Walt Reed, John Clymer: An Artist's Rendezvous with the Frontier West, Northland Press, 1976, p. 66

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192 KYLE POLZIN (1974- ) Trophies of Valor oil on canvas 33 x 32 ¾ inches signed lower right: POLZIN © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Portland, OR $35,000 – $55,000

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193 G. RUSSELL CASE (1966- ) Below the Mesas oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower right: G. Russell Case verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Wyoming $15,000 – $25,000

194 LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE (1980- ) Steady They Walk, 2016 oil on linen 20 x 30 inches signed lower right: LOGAN MAXWELL HAGEGE verso: titled, signed, dated “The desert’s weather conditions create some of the most interesting light and dark patterns that I have ever seen. Many hours spent observing the landscape, taking mental notes, as well as actual paint and drawing studies have helped me to remember and interpret what I have seen in nature. The end result comes about by using field studies and a lot of imagination.” – Logan Maxwell Hagege PROVENANCE: The Artist $12,000 – $16,000 – 43 –


195 KENNETH RILEY (1919-2015) Ceremonial Lance acrylic on canvas 36 x 36 inches signed lower right: Kenneth Riley CA Descended from Irish immigrants on his father’s side and Dutch farmers on his mother’s, Ken Riley was born in Waverly, Missouri. While music was an important part of his formative years, art proved to be Riley’s true calling, and from an early age both his parents and teachers encouraged this interest. After high school he attended the Kansas City Art Institute where he studied drawing with Thomas Hart Benton. Riley later earned a scholarship to attend the Art Students League and Grand Central Art School in New York, where he studied under Harvey Dunn—one of America’s most influential artists and teachers. During World War II, Riley showcased his talents as a combat artist while stationed on the USS Middleton, an attack transport ship that saw a great deal of action in the Pacific Theater. After the war, he spent the next twenty-five years making a name for himself as a much sought after illustrator for major magazines including The Saturday Evening Post, National Geographic, Reader’s Digest, McCalls, Redbook and Life magazine, among many others. Riley’s excursions to Utah and South Dakota’s Badlands, combined with an interest in western history, fueled his desire to paint western subjects and ultimately to live in the western United States. He moved to Tucson, Arizona, in the early 1970’s and began researching prereservation Native Americans. Utilizing the original journals of western adventurers, artists, and others, Riley developed his narratives from actual events. Using an abstract approach and a stunning, sophisticated palette, he focused his art on the history and culture of the American west; notably the life, culture, and philosophies of the Apache, Mandan, and Plains tribes. Using rich layers of color and dramatic design, his paintings offer not only a literal story, but also an allegorical and spiritual interpretation of Native American life and culture. In 1973 Riley became a charter member of the National Academy of Western Art, and in 1982 was voted into the Cowboy Artists of America, receiving the prestigious Stetson Award in 1987, 1988, 1989, and 1991. He was also awarded Gold Medals in 1984, 1988, 1989, 1993, and Silver Medals in 1983, 1987, and 1995. Riley won the coveted Prix De West Award in 1995. His original works are displayed at major venues and museums across the nation including the White House, the Smithsonian Institute, The Air Force Academy, and the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana. In a preface for the catalog produced for Ken Riley’s 2003 retrospective show at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City, museum director and writer Michael Duty noted, “On the most literal level, Ken’s paintings are grounded in a specific time period, but on a deeper level, they are timeless. They reflect his own deep sense of humanity and, like all great art, they connect the viewer to the world at large. They allow or even prompt each of us to step into another world and in doing so, we are able to contemplate our own nature and environment from a new perspective. Riley’s paintings capture both a strong and dramatic narrative sense, but all have a symbolic presence as well. His unique sense of design, use of color and choice of subject all combine to convey a whole world of meaning at once.” PROVENANCE: The Artist, by Descent $75,000 – $125,000

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196 R. TOM GILLEON (1942- ) Teton Fall oil on canvas 16 x 16 inches signed lower left: R Tom Gilleon verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: From a Wyoming Collection $5,000 – $7,000

197 R. TOM GILLEON (1942- ) Crow Lodge III oil on canvas 48 x 48 inches signed lower right: R tom Gilleon verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $20,000 – $30,000

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198 WILLIAM ACHEFF (1947- ) The Doll with the Red Dress, 2016 oil on canvas 30 x 22 inches signed lower right: Acheff 2016 “There is something about red. ‘The Red Violin’, ‘The Lady in Red’ and now ‘The Red Doll’.  I am sure the young girl that carried this doll was the envy of many of her friends. I wonder if the doll was passed on to her children and grandchildren. In the Native cultures, females were directed toward motherhood and domestic duties at a young age, and were given dolls, toy cradle boards and such to learn about adult female duties and chores.” – William Acheff PROVENANCE: The Artist $35,000 – $45,000

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199 JENNESS CORTEZ (1944- ) Home on the Range, 2016 acrylic on mahogany panel 34 x 41 inches signed lower right: CORTEZ © 2016 “Frank Tenney Johnson’s last painting, Somewhere on the Range, remained unfinished on his easel at the time of his sudden death in 1939.  The painting showed promise of being one of the greatest of his cowboy nocturnes, but when the artist passed from this life, the lone painted rider was left with few details, no cattle, and worse yet, virtually no face.  I’ve collaborated with Frank Tenney Johnson, in spirit, intending only to solidly complete this handsome painting as its creator would have done – had he been granted that luxury.   And where should such a painting hang?  I’ve chosen for it a Home on the Range, filled with objects emblematic of American family life – in the broadest sense of those words.  The elements are vintage and contemporary, rustic and refined, American Indian and pioneer.  My hope is that the viewer finds pleasure in exploring the details of this Western life, as much pleasure as I’ve found in painting them.” – Jenness Cortez Painting Elements: Frank Tenney Johnson (1874-1939) “Somewhere on the Range,” Amended by Jenness Cortez (1944- ) Henry Farny (1847-1916) “Days of Long Ago,” private collection Charles Marion Russell (1864-1926) “In the Wake of the Buffalo Runners,” private collection Alexander Phimister Proctor (1860-1950), Bronze sculptures “The Spirit of the Pioneer Mother,” Santa Barbara Museum of Art Charles Schreyvogel (1861-1912) bronze sculpture, “The Last Drop,” Gerald and Kathleen Peters collection Kachina (left) Hopi c.1900, private collection Kachina (right) Early Hopi “Salaka Mana,” private collection Charles M. Russell bronze sculpture, “Mountain Mother,” The Petrie Collection Chinese vase, Northern Song Dynasty (960-1279), private collection Navajo Chief ’s blanket c.1900, private collection PROVENANCE: The Artist $100,000 – $150,000 – 48 –


200 JOHN CLYMER (1907-1989) September, 1972 oil on board 15 x 30 inches signed lower right: John Clymer CA verso: titled “In the early 1800s game was plentiful, and travelers, whether by boat or overland, relied on hunting parties for fresh meat to augment their few staples of flour or corn meal, coffee, sugar and salt. Here, a party of old-time hunters and their pack train loaded with game comes along the western slope of Union Pass. Autumn comes early and is a short season in the high country.” – Walt Reed, Clymer scholar PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Dallas, TX, by descent LITERATURE: Walt Reed, John Clymer: An Artist’s Rendezvous with the Frontier West, Northland Press, 1976, illus. p. 105 Paul Weaver, The Western Paintings of John Clymer, Peacock Press, New York, NY, 1977, illus. plate 30 $100,000 – $150,000

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201 R. BROWNELL MCGREW (1916-1994) The Bull Pen, 1988 oil on board 44 x 66 inches signed lower right: R Brownell McGrew verso: titled, signed, dated A photographer and a painter, R. Brownell McGrew traveled the back roads of the Hopi and Navajo reservations of the Southwest for nearly thirty years, recording a unique legacy of tribal life. McGrew was born in Columbus, Ohio in 1916, but moved to California with his family as a child. From 1936 to 1940 he attended the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles. While he had many fine art teachers at the Institute, Ralph Holmes had a profound and decisive influence on him. McGrew once noted, “He taught entirely by principle; by creating a sort of ambient aesthetic. Never once in my years with him did he demonstrate or teach technique. It’s a slow way to learn, but if one’s patience and money hold out probably the best.” Although he preferred portrait painting, McGrew won recognition for his landscapes and was so proficient technically that he spent the last year at Otis teaching. Upon completing his formal training, McGrew painted portraits and scenic backgrounds for various motion picture companies in Southern California, including Metro Goldwyn Mayer and Columbia Studios. In the mid-1950’s, he had the opportunity to travel to Arizona with Jimmy Swinnerton, who was known as the Dean of Desert Painters. It was then that McGrew met the Navajo and Hopi people whose way of life would become the heart of his life’s work. Thus inspired, McGrew began driving the narrow roads of the Southwest seeking his own models. From 1959 to 1989 he photographed and painted tribal members, ceremonies, and other events of tribal life at a time when elders, but few outsiders, were trying to preserve American Indian cultures. McGrew also kept detailed notes and corresponded over the years with his models. These accounts of meetings, coming-of-age ceremonies, and every day life drew a detailed portrait of tribal life in a period for which few such archives exist. He came to be known among the tribes as “The Man Who Paints The Old.” Striving to create a wet-looking finish on the canvas, he mixed his colors to get luminosity by combining oil paint, linseed oil and turpentine, never utilizing traditional methods of glaze or lacquer. These vibrant colors are readily evident in The Bull Pen. McGrew was elected to the Cowboy Artists of America in 1969 and became a charter member of the National Academy of Western Art at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame in 1973. McGrew and his wife Ann lived in Sonoita, Arizona from 1984 until his death in 1994. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Lyndhurst, OH EXHIBITED: R. Brownell McGrew: A Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings, Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, OK, September, 16 - November, 16 1988 (label verso) $75,000 – $125,000

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202 OLAF CARL SELTZER (1877-1957) Indian Brave - Standing watercolor and pencil on paper 9 ¼ x 4 inches (sight) signed lower left: O.C. SELTZER. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Salt Lake City, UT EXHIBITED: CM Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT, 1977 (label verso) $8,000 – $12,000

203 OLAF CARL SELTZER (1877-1957) Indian Squaw watercolor and pencil on paper 9 ¼ x 4 inches (sight) signed lower center: O.C. SELTZER. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Salt Lake City, UT EXHIBITED: CM Russell Museum, Great Falls, MT, 1977 (label verso) $8,000 – $12,000

204 HARRY JACKSON (1924-2011) Washakie II, 1981 polychrome bronze 25/50 18 ½ x 14 ¾ x 5 ⅞ inches inscribed and signed verso: © Harry Jackson 1981 stamped: WFS Italia inscribed: WA II II 25P PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Aspen, CO LITERATURE: Don Goddard, Ed., Harry Jackson: Forty Years of His Work 1941-81, WFS, Cody, WY, 1981, illus. p. 106 $3,000 – $5,000 – 52 –


205 OLAF CARL SELTZER (1877-1957) Medicine Man oil on board 12 ⅞ x 9 ⅞ inches (sight) signed lower left: O.C. SELTZER. PROVENANCE: Christie’s, New York, NY, 1996 (label verso) From a Private Collection $20,000 – $30,000

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206 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) The Hunt oil on board 17 ¾ x 23 ⅝ inches signed lower right: Hoffman (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: Eden Hurst Gallery, West Hollywood, CA Private Collection, Wyoming $50,000 – $90,000

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207 WILLIAM GOLLINGS (1878-1932) Protecting the Herd oil on canvas 29 ⅞ x 23 ½ inches signed lower left: Gollings (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $60,000 – $90,000

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208 OSCAR E. BERNINGHAUS (1874-1952) Pueblo Indians on Their Reservation, 1941 oil on masonite 12 x 16 inches signed lower right: O.E. Berninghaus verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Christie’s, New York, NY, 1996 (label verso) From a Private Collection $25,000 – $35,000

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209 E.S. PAXSON (1852-1919) AK-ENE, 1905 oil on canvas 24 x 20 inches signed upper left: E’S’ Paxson- —1905 PROVENANCE: Richard Hale (artist’s son-in-law) Richard Hale, Jr. From a Texas Collection A letter of authentication by Edgar Paxson Jr., great grandson of the artist and author of the book E.S. Paxson Frontier Artist, will accompany this lot. $30,000 – $50,000

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210 FREMONT ELLIS (1897-1985) Aspens, Santa Fe Canyon oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower left: FREMONT ELLiS PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $25,000 – $35,000

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211 EANGER IRVING COUSE (1866-1936) Turkey Hunter in the Aspens oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches signed lower right: E- I-COUSEPROVENANCE: Biltmore Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) From a Private Collection $100,000 – $160,000

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212 WALTER UFER (1876-1936) October oil on canvas 31 ½ x 47 ¼ inches signed lower right: wufer Born to German immigrants in Lexington, Kentucky in 1876, Ufer showed an early talent for drawing. Apprenticed to a local commercial lithographer, Ufer quickly polished his nascent artistic abilities. Leaving Lexington in 1893, Ufer traveled to Germany where he studied in Hamburg and at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Dresden. Although he was to make several more excursions to Germany over the next twenty years, Ufer settled in Chicago in 1900, the cosmopolitan outlet of the Midwest. There he earned a living by working in advertising and teaching art at the J. Francis Smith School. In 1911 Ufer returned to Germany for two years of further study at the Royal Academy in Munich, where he worked alongside Victor Higgins and Martin Hennings, both fellow artists from Chicago. Ufer returned to Chicago in 1913, where he initially struggled to make his way as a professional artist. Fortunately, his work soon attracted the attention of Carter H. Harrison, who was then serving his fifth term as Mayor. Harrison bought two works at Ufer’s first one man sale, and encouraged Ufer to visit New Mexico. Towards the end of the summer of 1914, Ufer left for Taos, where he became acquainted with Buck Dunton, Bert Geer Phillips, and Joseph Henry Sharp. When he returned to Chicago later that year, he was full of enthusiasm for Taos, and initiated a correspondence with his future associates in New Mexico. During this visit Ufer also gained the patronage of Oscar Mayer and Charles Herrmann, both of whom would become important collectors of his work. The following summer he brought his wife, Mary, with him, and as his summers in New Mexico lengthened, so did his associations with the Taos Society members. In August of 1916 Ufer was invited to show with the Taos Society in a Santa Fe exhibition, and at the annual meeting on July 15, 1917, he was elected to membership along with Victor Higgins. An active member until the Society’s demise in 1927, Ufer was strongly associated with the group and painted southwestern subjects almost exclusively after 1919. The effect New Mexico had upon Ufer is discernable in his light-filled palette, and strong use of shadow. His Taos scenes reflect a genuine interest in the predicament facing Pueblo culture as it headed towards a crossroads. October represents a theme that Ufer returned to throughout his career; another well-known example is Where the Desert Meets the Mountain. In both works, a small covered wagon winds through the foreground, the driver obscured from view, dwarfed by the majesty of the New Mexico landscape. Dark clouds loom over the mountains, pierced by a dramatic sunburst—emphasizing the unpredictability of the desert weather, and the power of nature over the less significant presence of man. Undoubtedly the star of this composition, nature reigns supreme, highlighted through the stunning fall landscape, the towering mountainside, and the simultaneously ominous and luminous skyline. Ufer spoke to his passion for this tierra encantanda in 1916, saying, “Here, some day, will be written the great American epic, the great American opera…The very cliffs cry out to be painted. The world in all of its history has never seen such models as these survivors of the cliff dwellers. These mountains are the American Parnassus.” PROVENANCE: Painters and Sculptors Gallery Association, New York, NY (label verso) John E. D. Trask, INC, New York, NY (label verso) Zaplin Lampert Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) From a Private Collection EXHIBITED: Department of Fine Arts, Centennial International Exhibition, Philadelphia, 1926 (label verso) LITERATURE: John Ellingwood Donnell Trask, Paintings, Sculpture and Prints in the Department of Fine Arts, Sesqui-Centennial International Exposition, The Exposition, 1926, p. 73 $300,000 – $450,000

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213 CLYDE ASPEVIG (1951- ) White Carnations oil on board 20 x 22 inches signed lower left: .C. ASPEVIG PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY (label verso) Private Collection, Gainesville, GA $6,000 – $9,000

214 ROBERT BATEMAN (1930- ) European Robin and Hydrangeas acrylic on board 8 x 12 inches signed lower right: Robert Bateman - 1985 © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Plymouth, MN $4,000 – $6,000

215 ROBERT BATEMAN (1930- ) Fresh Snowfall - Ruffed Grouse acrylic on board 12 x 17 inches signed lower right: Robert Bateman 1985 © . PROVENANCE: The Tryon Gallery, Ltd, London, UK (label verso) Private Collection, Plymouth, MN $10,000 – $15,000

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216 CLYDE ASPEVIG (1951- ) Turning of the Larch (Canada - Moraine Lake) oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches signed lower left: C. ASPEVIG verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Gainesville, GA $25,000 – $35,000

217 ANDREW PETERS (1954- ) Odessa Lake and Ptarmigan Pass oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches signed lower right: ANDREW PETERS PROVENANCE: Claggett/Rey Gallery, Vail, CO (label verso) Private Collection, Highland Park, IL $10,000 – $15,000

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218 RICHARD SCHMID (1934- ) Dogwood Blossoms oil on canvas 12 x 18 ¼ inches signed lower right: Schmid verso: titled, signed, dated, numbered PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Elk Grove Village, IL, by descent $20,000 – $30,000

219 PINO D’ANGELICO (1939-2010) The Onion Basket oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches signed lower left: pino PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $15,000 – $25,000

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220 RICHARD SCHMID (1934- ) Kath oil on board 12 x 16 inches signed lower right: Schmid verso: titled, signed, dated, numbered PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Harwich, MA $8,000 – $12,000

221 LEON GASPARD (1882-1964) Winter Visitors, 1907 oil on board 15 ¼ x 10 inches (sight) signed lower right: Leon Gaspard Vitebsk 1907 PROVENANCE: Estate of Leon Gaspard (stamp verso) Handsworth Fenn Galleries, Santa Fe, NM (stamp verso) From a Private Collection $20,000 – $40,000

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222 DAVID SHEPHERD (1931- ) Elephant Country Tsavo oil on canvas 11 x 17 ½ inches signed lower right: David Shepherd PROVENANCE: From a Colorado Collection $8,000 – $12,000

223 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) A Very Big Elephant, 1981 conte crayon on paper 25 ½ x 32 inches signed lower right: Kuhn 81 titled lower left: A Very Big Elephant PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $8,000 – $12,000

224 PIP MCGARRY (1955- ) Protective Instincts oil on canvas 40 x 46 inches signed lower right: PIP McGARRY PROVENANCE: The Artist $20,000 – $30,000

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225 JOHN BANOVICH (1964- ) Simba oil on canvas 30 ¼ x 42 ¾ inches signed lower left: © Banovich 2004 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Olympia, WA $25,000 – $45,000

226 GUY COMBES (1971- ) Spirit of Soysambu, 2016 oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: Guy Combes © verso: titled, signed, dated “Soysambu is rich with reminders of my late father, and now that I live in California and only get to go back once a year, those memory triggers are strong and poignant.  Leopards have a reputation for revealing themselves at their own whim, and in this respect I seem to have better luck than most finding them.  A close friend and neighbour at Soysambu always tells me that when I do, it’s my father checking in, and my encounters would certainly encourage the belief that this is true.  I am most frequently on my own, the leopard is relaxed, and it’s most often at a time when I need spiritual reassurance.  I always come away from such encounters with an incredible sense of euphoria, the like of which is impossible to describe or recreate in any way.  My safari clients often make the mistake of assuming that my ‘leopard luck’ will rub off on them, but unfortunately this rarely happens.  The giant candelabra euphorbia forest at Soysambu is one of the very unique ecosystems proudly protected within the conservancy, and it’s at its thickest around the Simon Combes campsite, where I found the inspiration for this painting.  It is an homage to the memory of my father and his passion for the beautiful sanctuary he wanted to see preserved forever.” – Guy Combes PROVENANCE: The Artist $14,000 – $18,000

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227 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Contemplating the Odds, 2016 oil on board 28 x 42 inches signed lower left: CARLSON “Seeing leopard tracks in the soft dusty soil in the morning lets you know you missed a great sighting during the dark hours. Hearing the sawing roar of the leopard in predawn hours lets you know they are near. Observing the leopard’s highly skilled ability to hunt from trees allows you to appreciate their mastery of the environment and superior intelligence in calculating the odds for success.” – Ken Carlson PROVENANCE: The Artist $40,000 – $50,000

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228 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Cape Buffalo, 2000 acrylic on board 15 x 20 inches signed lower right: Kuhn verso: signed and dated “For many years now, I’ve been preaching to aspiring animal artists about the need to convey those gestures, poses and attitudes that spell out the character unique to an animal. And maybe that explains why I find Cape Buffalo so appealing; when it comes to character, they reek of it. The bulls are impressive beasts with their sweeping horns and dark, massive bodies. But it’s the way they look at you that says so much more about their truculent, intimidating nature. No matter where you encounter buffalo it seems that every last member of the herd will suddenly stop what its doing, swing its head in your direction, and stare right through you with pig-like eyes. It’s a look I love to paint, because it invariably says ‘Buffalo!’”– Bob Kuhn PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Clio, CA $25,000 – $45,000

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229 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Brüllende Löwen oil on canvas 44 ¾ x 83 ½ inches signed lower left: Wilh. Kuhnert verso: titled and signed Friedrich Wilhelm “Lion” Kuhnert, as his contemporaries knew him, was born in Oppeln, Germany in 1865. After beginning an apprenticeship at seventeen, Kuhnert moved to Berlin in 1883 where he studied with renowned animal painter Paul Meyerheim at the Berlin Academy of Arts. Kuhnert first traveled to Africa in 1891 where he went on safaris in the German and English colonial territories, sketching and making field notes which he later turned into impressive oil paintings in his Berlin studio. In 1893 Kuhnert had the opportunity to share his vision of Africa with the world at the Berliner Art Exhibition; he proceeded to win the Medal of Honor. Not only a painter, but also a hunter, Kuhnert traveled to Africa as often as he could to capture its wild animals in the flesh and on the canvas. In between Kuhnert’s extended visits to Africa, he returned to Germany where he continued his wildlife studies, traveling throughout Europe in pursuit of indigenous species including the red stag, elk, bison, wild boar, and moose. Kuhnert died while traveling in Switzerland in 1926, leaving a legacy of extraordinary wildlife paintings behind. It is estimated that Kuhnert’s body of work totaled 5,500 paintings. Today, there are less than a thousand known works in existence. The remainder of his artwork was destroyed or lost in World War II. Terry Wieland poignantly spoke to the scarcity of Kuhnert’s work, saying “Kuhnert loved Africa. He foresaw its end. He tried to preserve its memory in canvas, at least, and now even those memories are largely gone. From Africa to Berlin to points east to oblivion, washed away like tears in the rain.”1 The rarity of extant works by this German master speaks in and of itself to the importance of this collection. The eight Kuhnert paintings in this special section reflect the artist’s love of Africa and the magnificent tigers of the east. Ranging in medium from oil to watercolor and in scale from miniature to monumental, this body of work serves as a rare window into Kuhnert’s artistic process, style, and development. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $200,000 – $300,000

1

Charles Wechsler, The Animal Art of Wilhelm Kuhnert, Live Oak Press, INC & Wildlife Art News, Columbia, SC, 1995, p. xxiv

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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


230 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Eland watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper 17 ½ x 24 ½ inches (sight) signed lower right: -Wilh. Kuhnert PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah LITERATURE: Charles Wechsler, The Animal Art of Wilhelm Kuhnert, Live Oak Press, INC & Wildlife Art News, Columbia, SC, 1995, illus. p. 12 $25,000 – $35,000

231 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Yawning Tiger watercolor and gouache on paper 5 x 7 inches (sight) signed lower right: Wilh. Kuhnert PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $8,000 – $12,000

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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


232 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Waterbuck oil on board 16 ¾ x 29 ¼ inches signed lower left: -Wilh. Kuhnert “Kuhnert did not attain the pinnacle of his ability and his unprecedented position in the art world until his travels to wild Africa. He, himself, realized that early on, and so he continued to have a burning desire to return again and again. As the finest artist in his field, he was able to portray African big game in its natural habitat, but from his own perspective. His images provide indescribable pleasure to those of us who come in contact with these animals in our profession or who pursue them in the field.” – Dr. H.L. Heck, Director of Zoological Gardens, Berlin, 1925 PROVENANCE: The Fine Art Society, London, United Kingdom (label verso) Tryon Gallery, Ltd, London, United Kingdom (label verso) Private Collection, Utah $30,000 – $50,000

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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


233 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Roan Antelope Resting in the Shade, 1913 oil on canvas 14 ½ x 28 ¼ inches signed lower right: -Wilh. Kuhnert 1913 “When viewing a Kuhnert painting one can understand his awe of the animal—you will see the tension in each muscle, the soft lighting reflected by the clouds, and the interweaving of animals with the landscape.” – Fritz Meyer-Schoenbrunn PROVENANCE: The Art Society, Ltd, London, United Kingdom (label verso) Christies, London, United Kingdom, 2013 (label verso) Private Collection, Utah $30,000 – $50,000

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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


234 WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Reclining Tiger watercolor on paper 7 x 13 inches (sight) signed lower left: Wilh. Kuhnert PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $20,000 – $30,000

235 RICHARD FRIESE (1854-1918) Tigers, 1892 pencil on paper 34 ½ x 62 ½ inches (sight) signed lower left: 92 R Friese “When it comes to sketching animals, Kuhnert has only one older counterpart and that is [Richard] Friese…” – Dr. H.L. Heck, Director of Zoological Gardens, Berlin, 1925 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $20,000 – $30,000

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236 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Sable, 1913 oil on canvas 14 ½ x 28 inches signed lower left: Wilhelm Kuhnert 1913 “Wilhelm Kuhnert’s achievements can be measured by more than just aesthetics. His greatest merit is that he was the first [European] artist to paint wild animals in their natural habitat. He clearly recognized that painting timid caged animals in zoos could never lead to meaningful artistic expression.” – Fritz Meyer-Schoenbrunn PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $30,000 – $50,000

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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


237 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Kafferbüffel am Tümpel oil on canvas 39 ½ x 72 ¼ inches signed lower right: Wilh. Kuhnert verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Christies, London, United Kingdom, 2013 (label verso) Private Collection, Utah $200,000 – $300,000

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FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT


238 TUCKER SMITH (1940- ) Vigilance, 2016 oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed lower right: Tucker Smith 16 “I saw this cub and its mother early this summer. Grizzlies are making a comeback in our area and have expanded their range. Sharing the backcountry with grizzlies adds a touch of spice to the experience. I have tried to convey some of that tension in the painting.” – Tucker Smith PROVENANCE: The Artist $45,000 – $55,000

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239 CLYDE ASPEVIG (1951- ) The White Cloud oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: ©. ASPEVIG PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Gainesville, GA $12,000 – $18,000

240 TUCKER SMITH (1940- ) Bitterbrush (study) oil on canvas 10 x 9 inches signed lower right: Tucker Smith 86 verso: titled

241 G. HARVEY (1933- ) Half Dome

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Helena, MT

oil on board 11 x 7 inches signed lower left: G. Harvey —

$6,000 – $8,000

PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson WY Private Collection, Boulder, CO $8,000 – $12,000

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242 PHILIP R. GOODWIN (1881-1935) Moose Hunters oil on canvas 25 x 36 inches signed lower right: Philip R. Goodwin PROVENANCE: Harry Eichleay Art CO, Pittsburgh, PA (label verso) Private Collection, Pittsburgh, PA $80,000 – $120,000

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243 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) Bull Elk oil on board 9 x 12 inches signed lower left: Hoffman PROVENANCE: Robert L. Parsons Fine Art, Taos, NM Private Collection, Wyoming $7,000 – $10,000

244 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) Bustin’ Camp oil on artist board 10 x 14 inches signed lower left: Hoffman PROVENANCE: John R. Howard Fine Art, Missoula, MT Private Collection, Wyoming $10,000 – $15,000

245 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) Surprise oil on board 12 x 15 ¾ inches signed lower left: Hoffman PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Wyoming $10,000 – $16,000

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246 MAYNARD DIXON (1875-1946) Cattle Drive, 1939 mixed media on panel 49 x 36 ⅓ inches signed lower left: MAYNARD DIXON 1939 The 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition served as a celebration of the newly completed Bay Bridge and Golden Gate Bridge, centered fittingly on the theme “Pageant of the Pacific.” Held on the artificial island dubbed Treasure Island, the World’s Fair provided fodder for artists across the country. Maynard Dixon answered the call and created his two largest murals to date, Grassland and Ploughed Land. At the heart of Treasure Island towered an eighty foot statue of Pacifica, the goddess of the Pacific, and Dixon’s murals held a place of prominence on the adjacent buildings. Cattle Drive served as a preliminary design for a portion of the Grassland mural, a key component in Dixon’s artistic process. Art critic Eugen Neuhaus described the murals, saying “Both designs have a charm that results from a clear and simple use of form and color. Dixon here refrains from any new adventures, and these decorations in their straightforwardness reflect qualities long recognized in his easel paintings. The color scale is conscientiously restricted to the warm earth hues characteristic of the palette of the fresco painter.” In 1941 circumstances lead to the creation of a naval base on Treasure Island, resulting in the destruction of both murals. While Grassland exists only in memory, Cattle Drive remains, speaking to the stalwart western spirit that encompassed the larger scale works and standing alone as a powerful piece in its own right. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Santa Fe, NM Private Collection, Wyoming EXHIBITED: Maynard Dixon: Masterpieces from Brigham Young University and Private Collections, Pasadena Museum of California Art, Pasadena, CA, May – August 2007 LITERATURE: Donald J. Hagerty, The Life of Maynard Dixon, Gibbs Smith, Layton, UT, 2010, illus. p. 214 $500,000 – $800,000

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247 THOMAS HILL (1865-1929) Encampment Surrounded, 1890 oil on canvas 26 ½ x 37 ¼ inches signed lower right: T. Hill 1890 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hunt, TX $40,000 – $60,000

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248 CHARLES M. RUSSELL (1864-1926) The Rescue, ca. 1913 pen and ink on paper 17 ½ x 12 ½ inches signed lower left: CMR (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Bluffton, SC LITERATURE: B. Byron Price, editor and Anne Morand, Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonné, Volume 1, Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007, (Raisonné no. CR.DR.302) Walter Cooper, A Most Desperate Situation, Falcon Publishing, Helena, MT, 2000, illus. p. 44 A copy of A Most Desperate Situation will accompany this lot. $40,000 – $60,000

249 FREDERIC REMINGTON (1861-1909) The Sergeant, 1914 bronze 41 10 ½ x 5 x 4 ¼ inches inscribed verso: Copyright by Frederic Remington stamped verso: ROMAN BRONZE WORKS .INC. inscribed underside: 41 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, New York, NY Private Collection, Cody, WY LITERATURE: Michael Greenbaum, Icons of the American West: Frederic Remington’s Sculpture, Frederic Remington Art Museum, 2nd edition, 1996, illus. p. 114 Michael Edward Shapiro, Cast and Recast: The Sculpture of Frederic Remington, The Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C., 1981, p. 114 $30,000 – $40,000

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250 CHARLES M. RUSSELL (1864-1926) Buffalo Hunting, 1894 oil on canvas 20 ⅛ x 24 inches signed lower left: CMRussell (artist cipher) 94 Born into an affluent St. Louis family in 1864, Charles M. Russell railed against convention from a young age. Shirking the comforts of home, as a teenager he left his family in Missouri to pursue a western life in Montana. Russell found work on a ranch as a sheepherder before eventually graduating to a wrangler and a cowboy. From the back of a horse he quickly fell in love with the West and sought to capture it on paper or mold in wax. In 1888 one of Russell’s sketches appeared in Harper’s Weekly, the first national exposure for this self-taught cowboy artist. That winter, Russell lived with the Blood Indians in Canada, gaining first-hand knowledge of their way of life. In the following years, his career as an artist took off and his work steadily grew in popularity. Lacking the business where-with-all to make any real money, Russell frequently gave his pieces away to friends and to pay his debts, doing the occasional saloon commission along the way. All of that changed when he married Nancy Cooper in 1896. Nancy possessed the business savvy to match Russell’s artistic talent, and together they made a formidable pair. Russell had a home and studio in Great Falls, Montana, where he worked until his death in 1926, spending his winters in Pasadena, California. There are a number of consistent themes that Russell returned to throughout his career, both on canvas and in bronze. Among the most common subjects in Russell’s work is the buffalo hunt. A major source of food and clothing, the buffalo was prized as the Native American’s greatest resource, the most hunted and also the most venerated prey. In these works, Russell pays homage to a cultural approach far different than the indiscriminate and casual recreational slaughter of the buffalo practiced by settlers. Throughout his career, Russell’s depiction of the buffalo took many forms, from rapid pencil sketches to carefully thoughtout oil paintings. For Russell, as for many other western artists, the extinction of the buffalo in the late nineteenth century came to symbolize the poignant passing of the Old West and a treasured way of life. In much the same way that many of his compositions show compassion for the difficulties of the American Indian, Buffalo Hunting is indicative of the artist’s sympathy for these animals that once dominated the Great Plains. PROVENANCE: Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, TX (label verso) Owings Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Private Collection, Colorado LITERATURE: B. Byron Price, editor and Anne Morand, Charles M. Russell: A Catalogue Raisonné, Volume 1, Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 2007, (Raisonné no. CR.ACM.29) $500,000 – $750,000

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251 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) All He Surveys, 2002 acrylic on board 24 x 36 inches signed lower left: Kuhn 2002 verso: titled, signed, dated Born in Buffalo, New York, Bob Kuhn received his artistic training at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, where he studied design, anatomy, and life-drawing. For the next thirty years, Kuhn made his living as one of the most popular wildlife illustrators in America, before turning to easel painting full time in 1970. Kuhn traveled around the world to obtain inspiration, with many of his wildlife expeditions lasting up to eight weeks. He made countless trips to Africa, six trips to Alaska, and numerous journeys into Canada and the American West. Originally inspired by African wildlife, Kuhn turned to the mammals of North America in later years. Kuhn worked primarily in acrylic and strove to capture the particular movements and personalities of the wild animals he painted. A member of the Society of Animal Artists in New York, Kuhn had paintings in many prestigious permanent collections including, The John L. Wehle Gallery of Sporting Art at the Genesee Country Museum in Mumford, NY, The National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson Hole, WY, and The National Cowboy Hall of Fame in Oklahoma City, OK. In discussing his affinity for certain subjects, Kuhn expressed particular fondness for the grizzly, saying, “The grizzly is a true glamour animal, not only for his air of bouncy self-sufficiency, but because of the folklore that has evolved about him. The Indians, who have shared his home for thousands of years, regard his with a mixture awe and fear.” Kuhn undoubtedly conveyed that sense of glamour in All He Surveys. Poised at the edge of his wilderness kingdom, the grizzly gazes out—at once relaxed yet still lethal. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Rancho Mirage, CA EXHIBITED: Western Visions, National Museum of Wildlife Art, Jackson, WY, 2002 $100,000 – $200,000

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252 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Moose in Freshly Fallen Snow, 1984 acrylic on board 12 x 15 inches signed lower right: Kuhn 84 verso: signed “Some people think moose are ugly. They haven’t seen a prime bull on his own turf, where he looks and acts like a king.” – Bob Kuhn PROVENANCE: From the Collection of Curtice and Bob McCloy LITERATURE: Tom Davis, Patrons Without Peer, Collector’s Covey, Dallas, TX, 2009, illus. p. 114 $25,000 – $45,000

253 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Grizzly Study

254 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Ambling Moose

conte crayon on paper 6 ¾ x 8 inches (sight) signed lower left: Kuhn

conte crayon on paper 10 x 14 inches signed lower right: Kuhn

PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Centreville, MD

PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Centreville, MD

$1,500 – $2,500

$2,000 – $4,000

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255 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) Midnight Serenade acrylic on board 9 ¾ x 12 inches signed lower left: Kuhn “Years ago I discovered a book about coyotes, entitled God’s Dog. This name was probably lifted from the lore of western Native American tribes. In any case, it’s a wonderful, affectionate name for a very resourceful animal. Coyotes, like white-tailed deer, can live within the fringes of human enclaves and manage very well, thank you. They’re omnivores, which means they’ll eat almost anything they can find, from fruits, berries and melons, to rabbits, mice and prairie dogs. They are not, as you can guess, universally loved, but the ecosystem of which they are a part would be poorer without them.” – Bob Kuhn PROVENANCE: From the Collection of Curtice and Bob McCloy LITERATURE: Tom Davis, Patrons Without Peer, Collector’s Covey, Dallas, TX, 2009, illus. p. 97 $25,000 – $35,000

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256 ROBERT BATEMAN (1930- ) Above the Rapids - Gulls and Grizzly acrylic on canvas 30 x 48 inches signed lower right: Robert Bateman 2005 © verso: titled, signed, dated “Pacific salmon form an important part of the many bounties of North America’s wild west coast. We all know the epic story of birth in a clear and beautiful mountain stream, the growth of the fingerlings, the journey to the sea, the mysterious years in the deep, distant ocean, then the mass migration back to the place of their birth as handsome, gleaming adults. Then there is the heroic struggle against the current, leaping waterfalls and avoiding capture to the final destiny of courtship, mating and death. The story is almost biblical in its scope. The salmon is really responsible for the possibility of the great west coast aboriginal nations with their highly evolved cultures. It was an important item in the European settlers’ diet, then later in trade and commerce. And now we know of the health benefits of the Omega 3 fats and oils in salmon. Recently there have been sinister discoveries of too high mercury levels. Now many knowledgeable people tell us of the threat that salmon farming is having on this precious wild heritage. Salmon, of course, are an essential element for nourishment for wildlife from grizzly bears, to birds, to other aquatic life and insects. Moreover, scientists have just discovered that the nutrient makes it way through bears, birds and insects to fertilize the giant west coast lowland forest. Salmon rivers have much bigger trees than non-salmon rivers. This fish is so important and integral to society and nature that many people think it should be the poster creature for the Endangered Species Act instead of the spotted owl. Although I have not shown a salmon in this painting, you know that they are there. Some are in the quiet water above the falls and others are still fighting their way upstream. This is why the grizzly bear and gulls are there. This is the banquet time so important to these species and many others. It is a far-ranging crime against nature and against ourselves to jeopardize the spectacular wild salmon.” – Robert Bateman PROVENANCE: Spanierman Gallery, New York, NY (label) Private Collection, Waynesburg, PA LITERATURE: Robert Bateman and Nancy Kovac, Bateman New Works, Greystone Books, Vancouver, Canada, illus. p. 111 $50,000 – $75,000

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257 CARL BRENDERS (1937- ) Golden Season mixed media on illustration board 19 ¼ x 12 ¾ inches (sight) signed lower right: © C BrenD PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Plymouth, MN LITERATURE: Carl Brenders, Pride of Place, the Art of Carl Brenders, Langford Press, Langtoft, Peterborough, United Kingdom, 2007, illustrated p. 132 $9,000 – $12,000

258 CARL BRENDERS (1937- ) Colorful Playground mixed media on illustration board 22 x 14 ¾ inches (sight) signed lower left: © C BrenD 86 “On one of my first trips to North America, I was pleasantly surprised to discover that dandelions grew there. In Europe, dandelions are consumed in salads for their nutritional benefits. I am very interested in edible plants, and I am always on the lookout during my travels for the types of plants found in Europe. Since the Dandelion is both American and European, I was enthused to do a painting using them, but I needed a scene with a mammal found on both continents. The eastern cottontail and the European rabbit are quite similar, especially the young. Even though the painting of plants requires a strong discipline, the inspiration for this piece came quite easily.” – Carl Brenders PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Plymouth, MN LITERATURE: Carl Brenders, Pride of Place, the Art of Carl Brenders, Langford Press, Langtoft, Peterborough, United Kingdom, 2007, illustrated p. 49 $10,000 – $15,000

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259 CARL BRENDERS (1937- ) Mother of Pearls mixed media on illustration board 26 ¾ x 38 inches (sight) signed lower right: © CBrenders 93 “If a polar bear is a very dangerous animal, it becomes really dangerous when it has cubs; but if there is no danger to the young, one cannot imagine a more peaceful mother. Polar bear cubs are beautiful, cute little creatures. Their fur is incredibly soft, and, with the northern sunlight on it, lots of nice reflections appear on the fine hairs—an easy comparison to the reflections on pearls. I was surprised that these white animals can be so colourful in the snow. Most polar bears are not white at all. I got so excited about their creamy colour combined with the blue reflections on the snow that I could not wait any longer to do this painting, although so many other subjects are waiting. In this painting, I wanted to have the feeling of being part of that family, close to that big, soft, wild mother.” – Carl Brenders PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Polson, MT LITERATURE: Jack Hana and Rick Prebeg, Wild About Babies: What the Animals Teach Us About Parenting, Harvest House Publishers, Eugene, OR, 2004, cover illustration Carl Brenders, Pride of Place, the Art of Carl Brenders, Langford Press, Langtoft, Peterborough, United Kingdom, 2007, illus. p. 66-67 $45,000 – $55,000

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260 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) In Ellesmere Land - Arctic Wolf, 1996 acrylic on board 11 x 10 ½ inches signed lower left: Kuhn 96 PROVENANCE: Spanierman Gallery, New York, NY (label verso) Private Collection, Bridgewater, CT LITERATURE: Western Art Collector, September 2016, cover illustration $25,000 – $35,000

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261 BOB KUHN (1920-2007) South Texas Whitetails, 1998 acrylic on board 12 x 20 inches signed lower right: Kuhn 98 verso: signed and dated “One of the prettiest pieces of country within the vast reaches of Texas is the Hill Country south of Austin and north of San Antonio. One of its major attributes is a healthy population of whitetails.” – Bob Kuhn PROVENANCE: From the Collection of Curtice and Bob McCloy LITERATURE: Tom Davis, Patrons Without Peer, Collector’s Covey, Dallas, TX, 2009, illus. p. 106 $40,000 – $60,000

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262 N.C. WYETH (1882-1945) He Rode Away Following a Dim Trail Among the Sage, 1909 oil on canvas 38 x 25 inches signed lower right: NC WYETH Newell Convers Wyeth, better known as N.C. Wyeth, grew up on a farm in Massachusetts at the end of the nineteenth century. Wyeth showed his artistic talent early, and studied at the Massachusetts Normal Art School in Boston. In 1902, Wyeth received the opportunity that would shape the rest of his career and firmly cement his place in the canon of American art—to study with the father of American illustration, Howard Pyle. Arguably the most successful of Pyle’s protégés, Wyeth encapsulated all of his teachings and within two years was well on his way to establishing his own career. Wyeth ventured west in 1904 and 1906, spending vital time observing, studying, and absorbing all the rich subject matter of the west. In is own words, Wyeth described this early attraction, saying “The West appealed to me as it would to a boy; a sort of external effervescence of spirit seemed to be all that substantiated my work.”1 With trips to both Arizona and Colorado, Wyeth not only worked as a cowboy but also lived with the Navajo for a short time. He received numerous commissions for western subjects from Scribner’s, The Saturday Evening Post, and many more. It was during this period that Wyeth created most of his Native American pieces, including He Rode Away Following a Dim Trail Among the Sage. One of three illustrations that Wyeth created for the October 1909 issue of Red Book Magazine, this piece served to depict the moment of catharsis within the story. Detailing the struggles of Svenson, a young Navajo man, the narrative begins with his return to the Navajo after six years at an American school. Lacking the training and language skills to fit in among his own people, Svenson struggles to find acceptance. Heartsick and without a place in the world, Svenson strikes out to find work among the white men. The exact moment depicted here comes right after Svenson bids farewell to his father. “He dropped the blanket over the doorway, shutting himself out. Placing a rude saddle constructed from a fork of quaking-aspen, leather-covered and ornamented with brass tacks, upon the shaggy paint-pony which was his father’s gift, he mounted and rode away to the east in the direction of the Mission, following a dim trail in and out among the sage.”2 While the point in the story that Wyeth chose brings a certain anguish and sadness, the painting holds out hope for the future. Svenson sits poised on his pony, hat in hand, looking out across the horizon. He allows his horse to graze, caught for a moment in reflection, thoughts of what he leaves behind as well as what the future holds comingling in his mind. Wyeth sets the tone by illuminating the scene with a warm, captivating sky; the sun is setting on the character’s past, but with its beauty holds out the promise of a better future. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, New York EXHIBITED: Western World of NC Wyeth, Buffalo Bill Historical Center, Cody, WY, June 1, 1980-September 30, 1980 (label verso) LITERATURE: Michael Williams and Kenneth MacNichol, The Red Book Magazine, vol. XII, No. 6, October 1909, illus. p. 917 Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, Crown Publishers, INC., New York, NY, 1972, illus. p. 48 $500,000 – $700,000

1

Douglas Allen and Douglas Allen, Jr., N.C. Wyeth: The Collected Paintings, Illustrations and Murals, Crown Publishers, INC., New York, NY, 1972, p. 53

2

Michael Williams and Kenneth MacNichol, The Red Book Magazine, vol. XII, No. 6, October 1909, p. 920

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263 E.S. PAXSON (1852-1919) Northern Sioux Brave, 1910 oil on canvas 17 ¼ x 14 inches signed lower right: E.S. Paxson’ -1910verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $20,000 – $30,000

264 WILLIAM R. LEIGH (1866-1955) Moonlight in the Badlands oil on canvasboard 7 x 8 inches signed lower left: W Leigh PROVENANCE: Arizona West Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) Private Collection, Hunt, TX $10,000 – $15,000

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265 GERALD IRA DIAMOND CASSIDY (1879-1934) The Scout oil on canvas 18 x 24 inches signed lower left: Ira D Cassidy PROVENANCE: Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) From a Private Collection $30,000 – $50,000

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266 ERNEST BLUMENSCHEIN (1874-1960) Rock of Fire - Morning, Ghost Ranch, ca. 1925 oil on canvas 24 x 27 inches signed lower right: E.L.BLUMENSCHEIN Outspoken Taos Society founder Ernest Blumenschein was a colorful and sometimes controversial figure whose personality was marked by unlimited energy and fierce tenacity. A staunch supporter of Post Impressionism, Blumesnchein’s own style is marked by the use of deep, rich colors and a strict sense of spatial geometry and rhythm. Possibly the most complex and least understood member of the Taos Society, Blumenschein’s Southwestern pictures were often born of the artist’s interest in formal integrity and harmony rather than a desire to accurately portray Pueblo culture. Similar to several of his later Taos colleagues, Blumenschein was of modest, midwestern beginnings. Born on May 26, 1874 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Blumenschein moved with his father, to Dayton, Ohio in 1878, following the death of his mother. Encouraged by his father who was the Director of the Dayton Philharmonic, Blumenschein earned a scholarship to study at the Cincinnati College of Music upon graduating from high school. After taking an illustration course from Fernand Lungren at the Cincinnati Art Academy, however, Blumenschein decided to pursue a career in the visual arts, and in 1892 he moved to New York to study at the Art Student’s League. Within two years he became convinced that a European sojourn was necessary to establish himself as a professional artist, and in 1894 he enrolled at the Académie Julian, in Paris. It was at the Académie Julian that Blumenschein became acquainted with Bert Geer Phillips and Joseph Henry Sharp, who regaled the younger two artists with fantastic tales of Taos and the Pueblo Indians who lived nearby. Upon his return from Paris two years later, Blumenschein worked as an illustrator in New York. After an assignment that took him to Arizona and New Mexico in the winter of 1898, he persuaded his friend Bert Geer Phillips to make another journey West with him that following summer. When a broken wagon wheel landed the artists in the nearby town of Taos, Phillips decided he had reached the end of his journey. Blumenschein stayed for three months, returning to his lucrative illustration career in New York, and eventually to Paris for further study at the Académie Julian, in 1899 and again from 1902 to 1909. During the later and longer stay there he met and married Mary Shepherd Greene, herself an established artist. After their return to New York in 1909, the couple worked as an illustration team and Blumenschein found work teaching at his alma mater, the Art Student’s League. In 1910 he began spending his summers in Taos, settling there permanently in 1919. As a founding member of the Taos Society, Blumenschein was deeply involved with the group from its inception in 1915. Art Historian Peter Hassrick discusses the style and significance of Rock of Fire—Morning, Ghost Ranch, saying “As in the previous several years, Blumenschein painted many of his landscape in series. Such is the case with Rock of Fire—Morning, part of a set of three works that traveled with his one-man show. The artist and Denver Art Museum’s director, Arnold Rönnebeck, referred to the three works (the other two are Rock of Fire—Afternoon and Apache Country) as painted in the manner of the French Impressionists, at various times of day and under various weather conditions. They illustrate, Rönnebeck concluded, ‘what a penetrating and passionate way this artist seeks to find out about the light of New Mexico and the atmospheric peculiar to this very country.’ The vitality of Blumenschein as a man translated into the freshness and potency of his art.”1 PROVENANCE: Owing Dewey Fine Art, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Biltmore Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) From a Private Collection LITERATURE: Peter H. Hassrick and Elizabeth J. Cunningham, In Contemporary Rhythm: The Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK, 2008, p. 185 $300,000 – $450,000

1

Peter H. Hassrick and Elizabeth J. Cunningham, In Contemporary Rhythm: The Art of Ernest L. Blumenschein, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, OK, 2008, p. 185-186

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267 BERT GEER PHILLIPS (1868-1956) Fall Splendor oil on board 22 ¼ x 52 ¼ inches signed lower right: PHillips. Bert Phillips was born in the industrial town of Hudson, New York in 1868. He later recalled of his childhood that he could always be found with a brush in hand, and when George McKinstry opened an art studio in Hudson around 1884, Phillips was among the first to enroll. At the age of sixteen, Phillips left home for New York City, where he studied at the Art Student’s League and the National Academy of Design before leaving for England in 1894. From London he soon went to Paris to study at the Académie Julian, where he befriended Ernest Blumenschein and Joseph Henry Sharp. After his return to New York in 1896 Phillips rented a studio with Blumenschein, who convinced him to journey West in the summer of 1898. The artists made their way to Denver, where they outfitted themselves with horses, a wagon, camping and art supplies, and a large Navy revolver, and then headed for Mexico. When they broke a wagon wheel on the rough terrain of northern New Mexico, Phillips waited with their equipment while Blumenschein set out on horseback to have the wheel repaired in nearby Taos. Blumenschein returned three days later, and the two continued on to Taos, where they sold their wagon, harness, and remaining horse, and “pitched into work with unknown enthusiasm.”1 Although Blumenschein returned to New York three months later, Phillips decided to stay permanently. In addition to real adventure, Phillips found an unlimited source of subject matter in the mountain landscape and colorful Indian culture which surrounded him in Taos. In 1899, he married Rose Martin, the sister of the local doctor, and began corresponding with Blumenschein in New York about forming an art colony. Always willing to make arrangements for visiting artists, Phillips played an instrumental role in the growth of Taos as an artistic center, and was a founding member of the Taos Society of Artists in 1915. His taste for drama may have also been the source of the romantic, poetic nature of much of his art. To Phillips, who spent more years in the town than any other member of the Taos Society, Taos was a place where “a distinctive American art idea should develop on a soil so imbued with romance, history, and scenic beauty.” Part of a triptych, Fall Beauty was exhibited at the Museum of New Mexico in 1925, and was described in the local paper as follows, “in the exhibit is a decorative triptych by Bert Phillips of the Taos Art colony. It is entitled ‘Tuil-Al-Pella and His Friend, Santa, Went to the Mountains to Hunt the Deer,’ and is a poetic concept of Indian life and southwestern mountain landscape, the keynote of the background being the yellow cottonwoods and aspens, which is carried forward in yellows and delicate greens in the fields in the foreground touch by the autumn frosts. The two Indian figures, one of them draped in the typical white costume of the Taos braves, is carrying a box, while the other, a younger man, has just dismounted from the horse and is looking across a charming mountain lake through the trees following a deer that is leaping in fright.”2 PROVENANCE: Jim Fowler’s Period West Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ (stamp verso) Biltmore Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) From a Private Collection EXHIBITED: Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe, NM, c. October 1, 1925 LITERATURE: Julie Schimmel, Bert Geer Phillips and the Taos Art Colony, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, NM, 1994, p. 221 $300,000 – $500,000

1

Ernest L. Blumenschein, “Origin of the Taos Art Colony,” El Palacio 20, No. 10: 190-193, May 1929.

2

El Palacio 19, October 1, 1925, p. 147.

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268 JOSEPH HENRY SHARP (1859-1953) Landscape oil on board 16 x 20 inches signed lower right: JHSHARP. PROVENANCE: Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) From a Private Collection $15,000 – $25,000

269 GERARD CURTIS DELANO (1890-1972) Hopi Farmer oil on board 17 x 10 ⅜ inches signed lower right: DELANO PROVENANCE: Owings Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Biltmore Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) From an Arizona Collection LITERATURE: Richard G. Bowman, Walking with Beauty: The Art and Life of Gerard Curtis Delano, University Press of Colorado, Niwot, CO, 1990, illus. p. 83 $6,000 – $8,000

– 106 –


270 BERT GEER PHILLIPS (1868-1956) Taos Indian oil on canvas 16 ½ x 12 inches signed lower right: PHillips PROVENANCE: Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Santa Fe Art Auction, Santa Fe, NM, (label verso) From a Private Collection LITERATURE: Julie Schimmel, Bert Geer Phillips and the Taos Art Colony, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, NM, 1994, p. 263 $15,000 – $25,000

271 BERT GEER PHILLIPS (1868-1956) Untitled (Taos Lane in Spring) oil on canvas 14 x 18 inches signed lower left: BERT PHiLLiPS. PROVENANCE: Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Santa Fe Art Auction, Santa Fe, NM, 1998 (label verso) From a Private Collection $10,000 – $20,000

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272 ROBERT HENRI (1865-1929) Roshanara oil on canvas 32 x 26 inches verso: titled and signed Born to British parents in Calcutta, India, Olive Craddock grew up immersed in the sounds, sights, and movements of the East. After studying dance in India, Craddock adopted the stage name Roshanara, evoking the famous Mughal princess Roshanara Begum. Performing with a mixture of authentic and improvised dance moves, Roshanara became a sensation in the London dance world. She danced with the Ballets Russes at Covent Garden, and then went on to tour with the legendary ballerina Anna Pavlova. In 1916 Roshanara brought her dance to America, appearing in vaudeville theaters around the country, and bringing her in contact with Robert Henri. Keith’s Magazine describes a performance at Madison Square Garden, for which Henri was in attendance, saying “The dancing of Madame Roshanara was a delightful feature. This picturesque person is an English girl, married, it seems, to a native prince. She has studied the subject first hand and is the personification of grace.”1 Widely praised for her skill and captivating qualities, Rosharana certainly inspired Henri—as evidenced by this stunning portrait. Founding member of “The Eight” and a pillar of the Ashcan School, Henri sought to personify the ethos of his generation, rebelling against the gentrified academy. In his pursuit of real subjects, Henri found dancers. Likely a study for the larger canvas by the same name, Roshanara appears at first blush to be a standard portrait. Unlike traditional monumental portraits, however, this work and the similar depictions of dancers like Ruth St. Denis and Betalo Rubino also by Henri, lack one key component—they were not commissions. Created purely from Henri’s own desire to depict these talented women, Henri’s series of dancer portraits represent the artist’s own interest in dance and his desire to capture this new exotic version of the modern woman. PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hunt, TX $125,000 – $175,000

1

Virginia Robie, An East India Setting, Keith’s Magazine,

vol. XXXVII, no. 1, July 1917, p. 104

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273 DEAN CORNWELL (1892-1960) Portrait, 1929 oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches signed lower right: D.C 29’ PROVENANCE: Altermann Galleries, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Private Collection, Hunt, TX $40,000 – $60,000

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274 ALBERT BIERSTADT (1830-1902) Western Landscape oil on paper mounted on board 6 x 8 ½ inches signed lower left: AB PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Sacramento, CA $30,000 – $50,000

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275 JOSEPH HENRY SHARP (1859-1953) Chief Duck Man, 1909 oil on board 12 x 8 inches signed lower left: J.H. Sharp PROVENANCE: Fenn Galleries, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Private Collection, Hunt, TX $20,000 – $30,000

276 SYDNEY LAURENCE (1865-1940) Lakeside Fishing Camp oil on canvasboard 16 x 20 inches signed lower left: Sydney Laurence PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Fairbanks, AK $20,000 – $30,000

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277 WILLIAM BRADFORD (1823-1892) Straits of Belle Isle, 1856 oil on board 12 x 20 inches signed lower right: W. Bradford PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hunt, TX $25,000 – $35,000

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278 JOSEPH HENRY SHARP (1859-1953) October Morning - Crow Tepees, Montana oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches signed lower right: JHSHARP. verso: titled and signed Widely considered to have been the “Spiritual Father” of the Taos Society of Artists, Joseph Henry Sharp was the first painter of this iconic group to visit New Mexico, leaving behind a vast cultural record of Native American life. His work was steeped in the nostalgia that he felt for the vanishing culture of the American Indian. Born in Bridgeport, Ohio, in 1859, Sharp moved to Cincinnati at the age of thirteen. From his earliest days, he was interested in drawing and was utterly fascinated by anything and everything he could learn about the American Indians. A swimming accident left the young Sharp with severe hearing damage, a condition that would continue to deteriorate rapidly, eventually leaving him completely deaf. Never letting this hold him back, Sharp learned to read lips and began to carry pencil and pad everywhere he went. His natural drawing ability began to evolve, and he often sketched outdoors. In 1881 Sharp left Cincinnati for Europe to build upon his decade of training in the United States. Spending two years at the Antwerp Academy, Sharp studied in the realist tradition. After his return to the United States, he made the first of many journeys West, visiting New Mexico, Arizona, California, and Wyoming where he sketched several of the local Native American tribes. In 1886 Sharp returned to Europe, where he studied at the Royal Academy in Munich, with Frank Duveneck in Italy, and at the Académie Julian in Paris. Sharp returned to Cincinnati in 1892 and worked as an instructor at the Cincinnati Art Academy. He made his second trip West in 1893, visiting Taos, New Mexico for the first time. Thrilled with the mountain landscape and fascinated by the Indian culture, Sharp shared his fondness for Taos with his younger colleagues Ernest Blumenschein and Bert Greer Phillips, whom he met upon his later return to the Académie Julian in 1893. Having secured considerable academic credentials, Sharp returned again to Cincinnati in 1896, where he taught for several years before establishing residency in Crow Agency, Montana in 1902. Living on the Crow Agency, Sharp developed a deep respect for the Crow’s inherent connection to their surroundings, ancestral history, and customs. Inspired by his genuine affection and regard for the Native Americans; Sharp spent the next several years recording the traditions of several of the Plains tribes, including the Crow, Sioux, Dakota and Nez-Percé. His heartfelt depictions of Native American subjects as the proud, rightful inhabitants of their diminishing lands were popular with Eastern collectors and museums, including the Smithsonian Institution. In 1910 Sharp moved permanently to Taos, where in 1915 he helped to found the Taos Society of Artists. He continued to travel the west throughout the remainder of his career, and built a studio in Pasadena, California, where he died in 1953. PROVENANCE: Biltmore Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) From a Private Collection $175,000 – $250,000

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– 115 –


279 FRANK TENNEY JOHNSON (1874-1939) Evening Ride, 1927 oil on canvas 18 x 14 inches signed lower left: F Tenney Johnson 1927 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hunt, TX $35,000 – $55,000

– 116 –


280 EDWARD POTTHAST (1857-1927) Camp by Lake Louise oil on board 12 x 16 inches signed lower right: E. Potthast PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hunt, TX $15,000 – $25,000

281 OSCAR BERNINGHAUS (1874-1952) Saddled Horses in Moonlight oil on canvasboard 9 ½ x 13 ¼ inches signed lower left: O. E. Berninghaus PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hunt, TX $10,000 – $20,000

– 117 –


282 ALBERT BIERSTADT (1830-1902) Wind River Mountains oil on board 6 ¾ x 9 ¼ inches signed lower left: ABierstadt Albert Bierstadt was an expert landscape painter who created brilliant vistas in a realistic yet idealized style. Some of his most successful paintings are his small landscapes and Wind River Mountains is a perfect example of this genre. Inspired by the artist’s first trip west in 1859, it depicts Wyoming’s Wind River Mountains probably as viewed from South Pass. South Pass was an important landmark for emigrants en route to Oregon because it marked the half-way point. The most challenging part of the trip, however, traversing several mountain ranges, including the Rocky Mountain range depicted in Wind River Mountains, still lay ahead. The precise and delicate brushwork found in Wind River Mountains is characteristic of Bierstadt’s work from the 1860s and the painting most likely dates from this period. Bierstadt was a master at creating the illusion of depth in his landscapes. He does so simply and effectively in Wind River Mountains by using the artistic technique of aerial perspective: rendering objects that are meant to be viewed in the distance lighter in tone, less detailed and often with a bluish cast. The foreground, dotted with brightly painted wild flowers, merges quickly with the midground, as defined by the trees on the left, which gives way immediately to the distant Wind River Mountains, rendered in muted tones as though viewed through an intervening atmospheric haze. Bierstadt was impressed with the Rocky Mountains when he encountered them in the summer of 1859, traveling as an artist for Colonel Frederick William Lander’s government expedition to survey and build a wagon road through Wyoming and into Idaho. He wrote, “They are of granite formation, the same as the Swiss Mountains and their jagged summits, covered with snow and mingling with the clouds, present a scene which every lover of landscape would gaze upon with unqualified delight.”1 - Melissa Webster Speidel, director, Albert Bierstadt Catalogue Raisonné Project PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Wyoming $125,000 – $175,000

1

Albert Bierstadt, “Sketches,” The Crayon vol. 6, no. 9 (July 1859), p. 287.

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– 119 –


283 CHARLES (CARL) F. WIMAR (1828-1862) Monarch of the Plains, ca. 1859 oil on paper mounted on board 9 ¾ x 13 ¾ inches unsigned PROVENANCE: Kennedy Galleries, New York, NY Collection of Edward Eberstadt & Sons, New York, NY Private Collection, Wyoming LITERATURE: Stewart, Rick, Joseph D. Ketner II, and Angela L. Miller, Carl Wimar: Chronicler of the Missouri River Frontier, Fort Worth, TX: Amon Carter Museum, distributed by Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, 1991, pg. 234 $100,000 – $150,000

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284 ALBERT BIERSTADT (1830-1902) Jim Bridger, The Mountain Man, 1859 oil on panel 9 x 6 ⅞ inches signed lower right: ABierstadt Albert Bierstadt, known primarily for his landscapes, painted about a dozen portraits during his career. Jim Bridger is one of these rare paintings. It is an early work that most likely dates to 1859 during the artist’s first trip west. In the summer of 1859, Bierstadt accompanied Colonel Frederick William Lander’s expedition that was charged with surveying and building a wagon road across Wyoming and into Idaho. Bierstadt was one of three artists that traveled with the group to visually chronicle the country, people and wildlife encountered on the journey. During the trip, Bierstadt painted the portrait of a scout who is thought to be Jim Bridger. Jim Bridger was a guide, scout, and trapper who explored the American West in the first half of the nineteenth century. He discovered an alternate route to South Pass in Wyoming that came to be known as Bridger’s Pass. In 1842, he established a fur-trading post on the Black Fork of the Green River in present-day Wyoming. It became an important place for wagon trains heading west to restock their supplies, and in 1858, the army established a military post there. It was at or near Fort Bridger that Bierstadt may have met the famous scout. Although Jim Bridger is a sketch and the background and clothes are rendered with loose brushwork, care is taken with the face. He is an older man, his beard gray and his face weathered.1 It is the calm countenance of someone who has been challenged and succeeded. The artist was evidently intrigued by him because not only did he paint a front view, he also painted a side view of the man—currently in a private collection. This venture into portraiture did not last, but the painting’s quality is evidence of Bierstadt’s great artistic skill and versatility. - Melissa Webster Speidel, director, Albert Bierstadt Catalogue Raisonné Project PROVENANCE: The National Cowboy Hall of Fame and Western Heritage Center, Oklahoma City, OK Private Collection, Wyoming EXHIBITED: ABierstadt, The Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, Fort Worth, Texas, January 27 - March 19, 1972 LITERATURE: Gordon Hendricks, ABierstadt (1972), p. 45, no. 19 (exh. checklist) Gordon Hendricks, Albert Bierstadt: Painter of the American West, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., in association with the Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, 1988, illus. p. 81 $125,000 – $200,000

1

Jim Bridger was born on March 17, 1804 so would have been fifty-five in July, 1859, when Bierstadt would have encountered him.

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285 RICHARD FRIESE (1854-1918) Moose in a Winter Landscape, 1895 oil on canvas 36 x 29 ¼ inches signed lower right: Rich. Friese Brln. 6.95. PROVENANCE: Christies, London, United Kingdom, 2001 (label verso) Private Collection, Utah $30,000 – $50,000

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286 FRIEDRICH WILHELM KUHNERT (1865-1926) Wisen im Urwald oil on canvas 25 ¼ x 33 ¼ inches signed lower right: Wilh. Kuhnert verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $10,000 – $20,000

287 ROBERT FARRINGTON ELWELL (1874-1962) Indian Lovers oil on canvas 32 ½ x 25 inches signed lower left: © R. Farrington Elwell PROVENANCE: Harry Eichleay Art CO, Pittsburgh, PA (label verso) Private Collection, Pittsburgh, PA $5,000 – $7,000

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288 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) Surprise Visitor oil on board 10 x 14 inches signed lower left: Hoffman PROVENANCE: Robert L. Parsons Fine Art, Taos, NM Private Collection, Wyoming $10,000 – $15,000

289 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) The Water Hole oil on board 12 x 16 inches signed upper left: Hoffman PROVENANCE: Robert L. Parsons Fine Art, Taos, NM Private Collection, Wyoming $7,000 – $10,000

290 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) The Moose Call oil on board 9 ¾ x 14 inches signed lower left: Hoffman PROVENANCE: Robert L. Parsons Fine Art, Taos, NM Private Collection, Wyoming $7,000 – $12,000

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291 FRANK B. HOFFMAN (1888-1958) Watching the Herd oil on board 22 x 28 inches signed lower right: Hoffman (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Wyoming $30,000 – $50,000

– 125 –


292 BRENT COTTON (1972- ) Cutthroat Heaven, 2016 oil on linen 22 x 28 inches signed lower right: Cotton “This painting depicts a creek near my home that has it’s headwaters in the Bitterroot/ Selway wilderness along the Idaho and Montana border. A crystal clear stream full of cutthroat trout that I love to paint and fish as often as I can.” – Brent Cotton PROVENANCE: The Artist $7,000 – $8,000

293 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Texas Courtship oil on board 13 x 18 inches signed lower left: KEN CARLSON PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Hillsborough, CA $10,000 – $15,000 – 126 –


294 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) The Spoils of the Victor oil on board 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: CARLSON PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada $30,000 – $40,000

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295 KYLE SIMS (1980- ) Dappled Light oil on canvas 30 x 48 inches signed lower left: K Sims verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $15,000 – $25,000

296 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Red Fox oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches signed lower right: KEN CARLSON ‘82 PROVENANCE: From the Collection of Curtice and Bob McCloy $20,000 – $30,000

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297 CLYDE ASPEVIG (1951- ) Bales of Hay oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches signed lower left: C. Aspevig PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY Private Collection, Rancho Mirage, CA $35,000 – $55,000

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298 MARTIN GRELLE (1954- ) Of One Heart oil on canvas 40 x 30 inches signed lower right: (cross) MARTIN GRELLE CA © * 97 verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Overland Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $75,000 – $125,000

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299 MARTIN GRELLE (1954- ) The Victor, 2016 acrylic on linen 12 x 9 inches signed lower right: (cross) MARTiN GRELLE © 16 CA verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Waco, TX $15,000 – $25,000

300 ROY ANDERSEN (1930- ) Tall Bull oil on board 14 x 11 inches signed lower left: Roy Andersen (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $5,000 – $10,000

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301 MIAN SITU (1953- ) Ready for Rendezvous - Wyoming 1835, 2016 oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches signed lower left: Mian Situ “A trapper’s life in the early nineteenth century was wild and perilous. After a hard working spring season, these men eagerly await the summer rendezvous held in July, when fur trading companies, an array of fur traders, mountain men and Native Americans gather to exchange pelts and supplies and to engage in a good amount of revelry.” – Mian Situ PROVENANCE: The Artist $30,000 – $40,000

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302 Z.S. LIANG (1953- ) Protectors of the Tribe, 2016 oil on canvas 40 x 56 inches signed lower right: Z.S. LIANG verso: titled, signed, dated, numbered “The focal point of this painting is a group of Blackfeet warriors riding the flank position for the protection of the tribal camp movement.  Each man has a role to play like soldiers in a military maneuver.  The first warrior wears a ‘split horn’ bonnet, grizzly bear claw necklace and arm bands identifying him as a war chief and a ‘grizzly bear’ within his warrior society. The middle rider also has led numerous war parties and has earned many honors as a seasoned warrior, one of which is symbolized by the red hand print upon the rump of his war horse.  The man on the right carries a short ‘stabber’ lance and shield, weapons that require strength and agility.  This entire group is wholly dedicated to the protection of their people, the Blackfeet, raiders of the Northern Plains!” – Z.S. Liang PROVENANCE: The Artist $45,000 – $65,000

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303 RICHARD SCHMID (1934- ) Pears oil on canvas 16 x 20 inches signed lower right: Schmid 1995 verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From the Collection of Curtice and Bob McCloy $30,000 – $50,000

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304 RICHARD SCHMID (1934- ) Willows oil on canvas 18 ¼ x 24 inches signed lower left: Schmid verso: titled, signed, dated, numbered PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Elk Grove Village, IL, by Descent $8,000 – $12,000

305 BIRGER SANDZEN (1871-1954) Landscape, 1926 watercolor on paper 9 ½ x 12 ⅞ inches (sight) signed lower right: Birger Sandzén 1926 PROVENANCE: Orie J. Abel, McPherson, KS (label verso) From an Arizona Collection $6,000 – $8,000

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306 GEORGE HALLMARK (1949- ) The Ruins oil on linen 60 x 48 inches signed lower left: © Hallmark - 07 verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ Private Collection, Rancho Mirage, CA $30,000 – $50,000

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307 GEORGE HALLMARK (1949- ) Mi Favorita oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower left: © Hallmark verso: signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Denton, TX $25,000 – $35,000

308 MAYNARD REECE (1920- ) Sonoran Desert - Gambel’s Quail oil on canvas 36 x 60 inches signed lower left: © Maynard Reece 1988 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, West Union, IA $10,000 – $20,000

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309 JIE WEI ZHOU (1962- ) Pottery Maker, 2016 oil on canvas 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: Zie wei zhou “Porcelain vases play an integral role in China’s history and culture. This piece reveals the making of the signature blue and white porcelain, also known as Qinghua, which has been produced since the late 14th century. I wanted to capture the effort and meticulousness that go into creating such beautiful vases and this is especially emphasized through the potter’s unwavering and immersed focus.” – Jie Wei Zhou PROVENANCE: The Artist $8,000 – $12,000

310 JIE WEI ZHOU (1962- ) Miao Woman

311 JIE WEI ZHOU (1962- ) New Shoes

oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches signed lower right: Jie wei zhou

oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches signed lower left: Jie wei zhou

PROVENANCE: The Artist

PROVENANCE: The Artist

$8,000 – $12,000

$8,000 – $12,000 – 138 –


312 HUIHAN LIU (1952- ) Time for Milk-Tea oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower right: Huihan Liu 2000 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Alberta, Canada $15,000 – $20,000

313 JIE WEI ZHOU (1962- ) Still Life With Roses oil on board 20 x 16 inches signed lower right: Jie wei zhou PROVENANCE: Manitou Galleries, Santa Fe, NM (label verso) Private Collection, Dallas, TX $3,000 – $5,000

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314 STANLEY MELTZOFF (1917-2006) Jacks & Squid (Jacks 1), 1997 oil on canvas on board 8 ½ x 11 ¾ inches signed lower left and lower right: SM verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Spanierman Gallery, New York, NY (label verso) Private Collection, Chadds Ford, PA $4,000 – $6,000

315 JOSEPH HENRY SHARP (1859-1953) La Jolla oil on canvas 20 x 24 inches signed lower right: JHSHARP PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Phoenix, AZ $10,000 – $15,000

316 STANLEY MELTZOFF (1917-2006) Blue Marlin #29 (Blue Marlin & Cyanea), 2001 oil on Belgian linen on board 6 x 11 ⅞ inches signed lower right: SM verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: From the Estate of Stanley Meltzoff EXHIBITED: The Lure of the Ocean: The Art of Stanley Meltzoff, Bruce Museum, Greenwich, CT, February 9-June 2, 2013 (label verso) Lure of the Ocean: The Art of Stanley Meltzoff, Neville Public Museum, Green Bay, WI, February 20-May 8, 2016 $5,000 – $7,000

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317 STANLEY MELTZOFF (1917-2006) The Lord of Barcajon Channel, 2004 oil on Belgian linen on board 31 ¾ x 41 inches signed lower right: SM verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From the Estate of Stanley Meltzoff EXHIBITED: The Lure of the Ocean: The Art of Stanley Meltzoff, Bruce Museum, Greenwich, CT, February 9-June 2, 2013 (label verso) Lure of the Ocean: The Art of Stanley Meltzoff, Neville Public Museum, Green Bay, WI, February 20-May 8, 2016 $30,000 – $50,000

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318 KEN CARLSON (1937- ) Polar Ice Pack oil on board 20 x 40 inches signed lower left: CARLSON PROVENANCE: The Artist From a Wyoming Collection $30,000 – $40,000

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319 EWOUD DE GROOT (1969- ) Gyrfalcon oil on linen 55 ¼ x 47 ¼ inches signed lower left: Ewoud ‘12 PROVENANCE: The Artist $8,000 – $12,000

320 STEVE BURGESS (1960- ) Spike, 2016 oil on board 48 x 24 inches signed lower left: Steve Burgess “These birds are a real treat for an artist to paint, this particular one I saw in East Africa and loved the way the bright midday sun played on the feathers. I have placed it against a dark background to emphasize the lighting on the bird and feel it really helps to bring the subject forward in the painting.” – Steve Burgess PROVENANCE: The Artist $10,000 – $20,000

321 GUY COHELEACH (1933- ) Victoria Falls - African Fish Eagle oil on linen 30 x 40 inches signed lower right: Guy Coheleach © PROVENANCE: The Artist EXHIBITED: Society of Animal Artists Annual Exhibition, The Roger Tory Peterson Institute, Jamestown, NY, August 28 - October 25, 2015 Hiram Blauvelt Art Museum, Oradell, NJ, November 14, 2015 - January 3, 2016 The Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson, AZ, January 20 - April 3, 2016 The Canton Museum of Art, Canton, OH, April 23 - July 17, 2016 $20,000 – $30,000

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322 RALPH OBERG (1950- ) Beauty’s Beast oil on linen 26 x 36 inches signed lower left: oberg. verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada $8,000 – $12,000

323 LANFORD MONROE (1950-2000) Caution oil on board 16 x 20 inches signed lower right: Lanford Monroe verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY Private Collection, Jackson, WY $6,000 – $8,000

324 LANFORD MONROE (1950-2000) Teton Autumn, 1994 oil on board 18 x 24 inches signed upper left: Lanford Monroe verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY Private Collection, Lloyds Neck, NY $8,000 – $12,000

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325 RALPH OBERG (1950- ) High Summer Hideout, 2016 oil on linen 48 x 36 inches signed lower right: oberg. verso: titled, signed, numbered “High Summer Hideout was the result of a little solo hike I took last summer in the mountains near my home.  For years, from a distance, I could see this small group of attractive peaks behind those generally in front of them, and resolved to get a closer look.  A major and busy trail passes an obscure entrance to the side valley that leads to these hidden peaks, and I left the trail to explore this valley that it seemed few ever visit.  Almost immediately I was seeing groups of elk cows and calves in this pristine summer green valley.  Also, I noticed a fresh black bear print in the mud as I left my chosen tent site to continue higher.   A few  hours of climbing got me to this viewpoint just as the sun was setting.  Still enjoying the regular elk sightings along the way, I returned down to my tent as it got dark.  The next morning, not 50’ from my tent I discovered the black bears’ bed, and nearby his large toilet replete with the hair of calf elk.  It was his fat season.  I imagined the bulls in velvet from their safe and high vantage point” – Ralph Oberg PROVENANCE: The Artist $15,000 – $20,000

326 MICHAEL COLEMAN (1946- ) September bronze AP 39 ½ x 44 x 24 inches inscribed left side: MICHAEL COLEMAN © 1998 1999 Prix de West Purchase Award Winner PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Utah $8,000 – $12,000

– 145 –


327 BILL ANTON (1957- ) At Canyon Springs, 2015 oil on board 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: Bill Anton verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $10,000 – $15,000

328 CYRUS AFSARY (1940- ) Roaming Free, 2016 oil on linen 16 x 20 inches signed lower right: CYRUS AFSARY “Open fields and farm houses are scattered across so many wonderful vistas in many states.  And driving around the Northwestern parts of the country, one sees more of the buffalo and other animals that scatter the landscape of this region.  The buffalo grazing and roaming around is not often seen close to a home, at lease not by me, however perhaps they were just ones that had been part of the family compound or quite used to the environment and the interested visitors that pass.” – Cyrus Afsary PROVENANCE: The Artist $9,000 – $12,000

– 146 –


329 DAN MIEDUCH (1947- ) What Waits Out There, 2016 oil on board 20 x 30 inches signed lower right: © DAN MIEDUCH 2016 verso: titled “It is said that the reality of a soldier’s life is endless boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror. There is also fear of the unknown. The dismounted trooper holding the reins of the officer’s horse is the bugler who, in the cavalry, always rode a grey pony. This was so the commander could quickly locate him in the heat of the battle. In order to keep up with the C.O. the bugler carried no rifle. Only a revolver, his bugle, and his anxieties about the coming fight.” – Dan Mieduch PROVENANCE: The Artist $10,000 – $15,000

330 BILL ANTON (1957- ) Back-Country Companions, 2015 oil on board 18 x 24 inches signed lower right: Bill Anton verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $8,000 – $12,000

331 OLEG STAVROWSKY (1927- ) Confrontation oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower right: oleg Stavrowsky verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Helena, MT $7,000 – $10,000

– 147 –


332 MELVIN WARREN (1920-1995) Winter Storm, 1993 oil on canvas 28 x 40 inches signed lower left: © Melvin C Warren CA 1993 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Waco, TX EXHIBITED: Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Indianapolis, IN, August 26 - October 29, 1995 (label verso) $35,000 – $55,000

– 148 –


333 G. HARVEY (1933- ) Breaking Daylight, 1975 oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower left: Harvey 1975 © verso: titled and numbered PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Port Arkansas, TX $25,000 – $45,000

334 JOE BEELER (1931-2006) Thanks for the Rain bronze 16/17 11 x 13 ½ x 9 ½ inches inscribed front: CA JOE BEElER 16 of 17 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Muskogee, OK $20,000 – $30,000

– 149 –


335 JIM NORTON (1953- ) A Crow Warrior oil on canvas 24 x 32 inches signed lower left: Jim C. Norton CA verso: titled, signed, numbered PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Pismo Beach, CA $10,000 – $15,000

336 MELVIN WARREN (1920-1995) Angry West, 1972 bronze 1/10 14 ½ x 21 ½ x 7 inches inscribed right front: Melvin C. Warren CA 1972 1/0 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Waco, TX $4,000 – $6,000

337 OLAF WIEGHORST (1899-1988) Indian with Rifle on Horseback watercolor, ink, and gouache on paper 12 ¼ x 10 inches (sight) signed lower left: O - Wieghorst (artist cipher) PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $4,000 – $6,000 – 150 –


338 R. BROWNELL MCGREW (1916-1994) Autumn Gold: Canyon de Chelley, 1990 oil on board 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: R Brownell McGrew verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Palm Desert, CA $15,000 – $25,000

339 TOM DARRO (1946- ) On the San Carlos Apache, 1885 oil on canvas 54 x 36 inches signed lower left: © TOM DARRO PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $10,000 – $20,000

– 151 –


340 BRUCE CHEEVER (1958- ) Missouri River Camp oil on board 23 x 38 inches signed lower left: —Bruce . Cheever © PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY (label verso) Private Collection, Steamboat, CO $8,000 – $12,000

341 NICHOLAS COLEMAN (1978- ) Color of Night, 2016 oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches signed lower left: — NICHOLAS COLEMAN — © “Spending many an evening under the stars, away from the city lights. The light of the moon as your eyes adjust to your surroundings can be very visually stimulating and as a painter you want to share that with others. Frank Tenney Johnson really had the colors down and from an early age he has been an influence in my own work, especially when it comes to my palette and the colors I use to achieve the color of night. Cerulean Blue, Alizarin Crimson, Raw Sienna, Naples Yellow in certain combinations can be mixed to come up with some interesting effects. I love the night, the sounds, the crisp air, how could I not paint the night!” – Nicholas Coleman PROVENANCE: The Artist $10,000 – $15,000

– 152 –


342 ROBERT DUNCAN (1952- ) Learning Winter’s Lessons oil on board 15 x 30 inches signed lower right: RDuncan © ‘77 PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) Private Collection, Paradise Valley, AZ, by descent $6,000 – $9,000

343 DAVE MCGARY (1958-2013) Chief Washakie

344 NICHOLAS COLEMAN (1978- ) Buffalo Runner

bronze 22/50 29 ¾ x 15 x 12 inches inscribed verso: Dave McGary 1999 numbered left: 22/50

oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches signed lower right: Nicholas Coleman ©

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $4,000 – $6,000

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Cody, WY EXHIBITED: Buffalo Bill Art Show & Sale, Buffalo Bill Center of the West, Cody, WY, 2012 $15,000 – $20,000

– 153 –


345 WILLIAM ACHEFF (1947- ) Serranos and Habaneros oil on linen 12 x 28 inches signed lower right: © Wm. Acheff 1998 verso: signed and dated PROVENANCE: From a Private Collection $15,000 – $25,000

346 PAUL CALLE (1928-2010) Pause for a Drink, 1976 monochrome pencil on paper 29 ½ x 39 ½ inches (sight) signed lower right: Paul Calle © 1976 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Paradise Valley, AZ, by descent $10,000 – $20,000

347 CHARLES PABST (1950- ) Kachina - Corn Ceremony oil on canvas 30 x 24 inches signed lower right: Charles H. PabsT verso: titled PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Paradise Valley, AZ, by descent $3,000 – $5,000

– 154 –


348 ERIC MICHAELS (1949- ) Villa Takes Zacatecas - June 23, 1914 oil on board 30 x 40 inches signed lower right: Eric Michaels verso: titled “This was unquestionably the most significant battle of the Mexican Revolution. Villa dislodged and routed 12,000 Federal Troops, capturing Zacatecas, an important railroad terminal, giving Villa a clear shot at Mexico City. It ultimately forced Huerta to resign his usurped presidency, and expedited the end of the Mexican conflict.” – Eric Michaels PROVENANCE: The Artist $12,000 – $16,000

349 HOWARD ROGERS (1932- ) Afternoon Shadows oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches signed lower right: HRogers © PROVENANCE: The Artist $5,000 – $7,000

– 155 –


350 ALFREDO RODRIGUEZ (!954- ) Rendezvous with Yesteryear, 2016 oil on linen 24 x 36 inches signed lower left: A Rodriguez © 2016 verso: titled, signed, dated “The short-lived Fur Trade/Mountain Man era was over by 1840... but here, two contemporary characters decide to don their post- fur trade capotes and imagined the life of the mountain men of yesteryear, as they journeyed through the mountains, valleys and rivers in search of beaver. Scenes of encounters with Native Americans who were proud of their land and unwilling to share it with the white man appear, as well as encounters with grizzly bears and other animals, which made their travels complicated and dangerous. Survival was their most priority.” – Alfredo Rodriguez PROVENANCE: The Artist $15,000 – $20,000

351 CLYDE ASPEVIG (1951- ) The Melt oil on canvas 22 x 24 inches signed lower right: ©. ASPEVIG 84 PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY (label verso) Private Collection, Gainesville, GA $7,000 – $10,000 – 156 –


352 BRUCE LAWES (1962- ) On the Hunt, 2016 oil on linen 20 x 30 inches signed lower right: © B.K. Lawes “The beautiful coat of the red fox is striking against the crisp white snow. Although mostly nocturnal hunters the male fox or ‘dog’ in my painting is ‘On the Hunt’ during daylight, which will occur if they feel safe in their surroundings. My fox follows the snow covered creek bed hoping to discover a small mammal. With his acute hearing he can locate his prey under the snow and he will leap in the air to pounce with surprising accuracy.” – Bruce Lawes PROVENANCE: The Artist $9,000 – $12,000

353 KYLE SIMS (1980- ) Days of Summer, 2016 oil on canvas 32 x 48 inches signed lower left: k sims “The runoff from Old Faithful Geyser creates some very interesting patterns and is quickly recognizable to the artist as something tempting to reproduce.  When there is a small breeze, it adds to the drama of the scene and provides some more lines that help your eye move through the piece.  I have taken some small liberties with some shapes and some of the design from the actual place, but in essence, this is what you could see on any given summer day there.” – Kyle Sims PROVENANCE: The Artist $15,000 – $20,000

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354 MICHAEL COLEMAN (1946- ) Green River oil on board 30 x 50 inches signed lower right: MICHAEL COLEMAN -- © PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Salt Lake City, UT $30,000 – $50,000

– 158 –


355 MARTIN GRELLE (1954- ) Late Autumn Gather oil on canvas 30 x 40 inches signed lower left: * MARTiN GRELLE © 1991 verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Burley, ID $20,000 – $30,000

356 BRUCE CHEEVER (1958- ) May Landscape, Salem oil on board 24 x 48 inches signed lower left: - Bruce . Cheever © PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Alaska $7,000 – $10,000

– 159 –


357 BILL ANTON (1957- ) Day’s End at Mint Springs oil on board 24 x 30 inches signed lower right: Bill Anton verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Cost, TX $10,000 – $15,000

358 BRUCE GREENE (1953- ) An Old Dog and a New Trick bronze 31/75 16 ½ x 13 x 12 inches inscribed lower right: Bruce R. Greene CA 31/75 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Kirkland, AZ $4,000 – $6,000

– 160 –


359 CONRAD SCHWIERING (1916-1986) Gatherin’ Strays oil on board 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: Schwiering (artist cipher) © verso: titled and numbered PROVENANCE: The Artist Commission for Private Collection, Red Bud, IL, by descent $12,000 – $18,000

360 ROBERT LOUGHEED (1910-1982) Pilot Mountain oil on canvas 32 x 24 inches signed lower right: R.E.LOUGHEED PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Calgary, Alberta, Canada $8,000 – $12,000

– 161 –


361 CLARK KELLEY PRICE (1945- ) Psychotherapy, Wyoming Style, 2015 oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches signed lower left: clarK Kelley Price 15 (artist cipher) CA “The gurgle of the cool water, the fresh air and the smells of nature, the enjoyment of a good friend, and the anticipation of the big one – good medicine for the mind and soul.” – Clark Kelley Price PROVENANCE: The Artist $8,000 – $12,000

362 CLARK KELLEY PRICE (1945- ) MMM...My Favorite - Beans & Bacon oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower left: cLark Kelley Price 08 (artist cipher) CA © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Tucson, AZ $10,000 – $15,000

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363 HOWARD ROGERS (1932- ) Homeward Bound oil on canvas 30 x 48 inches signed lower right: HRogers © PROVENANCE: The Artist $12,000 – $18,000

364 BONNIE MARRIS (1951- ) Night and Day oil on canvas 20 x 30 inches signed lower left: MARRIS © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Alberta, Canada $7,000 – $10,000

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365 STEVE BURGESS (1960- ) High Summer, 2016 oil on board 32 x 24 inches signed lower right: Steve Burgess 2016 “Big horn sheep to me embody the Rockies, I have wanted to paint these animals for a while now but waited until I came up with a composition that would convey both the majesty of the sheep and the environment in which they live. In this painting the background and waterfall are as important as the sheep themselves and I feel they add to the sense of grandeur and feeling of clear clean mountain air.” – Steve Burgess PROVENANCE: The Artist $9,000 – $12,000

366 BRUCE CHEEVER (1958- ) The King, 2016 oil on board 38 x 30 inches signed lower left: - Bruce . Cheever © “No symbol better represents the Great American West, than that of the bison. Large, powerful, and uniquely shaped, they are what we imagine when we think of a truly wild place. Over two hundred million once roamed Western North America.  In this painting, ‘The King’ is strolling a Yellowstone ridgeline, silhouetted against a brooding sky, feeding on the tall grass of summer.” – Bruce Cheever PROVENANCE: The Artist $12,000 – $16,000

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367 NANCY GLAZIER (1947- ) Misty Morning oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches signed lower right: N. GlAZIER © 2000 PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY Private Collection, Jackson, WY $15,000 – $25,000

368 SHERRY SANDER (1941- ) Boys in a Tussle bronze 17/35 15 x 17 x 13 inches inscribed right: SSander © 17/35 PROVENANCE: The Artist $2,000 – $4,000

369 LUKE FRAZIER (1970- ) An Old Bruin oil on board 22 x 28 inches signed upper right: L. frazier verso: titled, signed, dated PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $7,000 – $10,000

– 165 –


370 CONRAD SCHWIERING (1916-1986) Gone With the Wind oil on board 30 x 36 inches signed lower right: Schwiering (artist cipher) © NAWA PROVENANCE: Private Collection, La Quinta, CA $10,000 – $15,000

371 CONRAD SCHWIERING (1916-1986) Autumn Reflections oil on canvas 30 x 25 inches signed lower right: Schwiering (artist cipher) © PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Omaha, NE, by descent $8,000 – $12,000

372 JOHN WADE HAMPTON (1918-2000) I Ride Old Paint, 1993 oil on canvas 28 x 42 inches signed lower left: JW HAMPTON (artist cipher) CA © 1993 PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Tucson, AZ $10,000 – $20,000 – 166 –


373 LUKE FRAZIER (1970- ) The Gig is Up oil on board 24 x 24 inches signed lower right: L. frazier verso: titled and signed PROVENANCE: From a Texas Collection $6,000 – $9,000

374 KENT ULLBERG (1945- ) Pronghorn Pyramid bronze 2/20 15 ¾ x 13 ¼ x 6 ½ inches inscribed front: © Ullberg 2/20 PROVENANCE: From a Wyoming Collection $4,000 – $6,000

375 PACO YOUNG (1958-2005) River Grizzlies oil on canvas 16 x 24 inches signed lower left: Paco Young © PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Jackson, WY (label verso) Private Collection, Cedarburg, WI $4,000 – $6,000

– 167 –


376 CURT WALTERS (1950- ) Anasazi Castle oil on canvas 36 x 36 inches signed lower right: CURt WAltERS verso: titled PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $8,000 – $12,000

377 CURT WALTERS (1950- ) Towers of Elegance oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches signed lower right: CURt WAltERS PROVENANCE: Sedona Arts Center INC, Sedona, AZ (label verso) Private Collection, Scottsdale, AZ $5,000 – $7,000

378 CURT WALTERS (1950- ) Guardians of the Creek oil on canvas 28 ¼ x 22 inches signed lower left: CURt WAltERS verso: titled PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Del Mar, CA $4,000 – $6,000 – 168 –


379 CRYRUS AFSARY (1940-) In the Old Shrine oil on canvas 40 x 48 inches signed lower left: CYRUS AFSARY PROVENANCE: Trailside Galleries, Scottsdale, AZ (label verso) Private Collection, Birmingham, MI $15,000 – $25,000

380 CURT WALTERS (1950- ) Great Waters (Point Lobos) oil on canvas 30 x 60 inches signed lower left: CURt WAltERS verso: titled PROVENANCE: The Artist Private Collection, Del Mar, CA $8,000 – $12,000

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A N AU C T I O N O F PA S T A N D P R E S E N T MASTERWORKS OF THE AMERICAN WEST

WE ARE SEEKING QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS FOR THE SEPTEMBER 2017 AUCTION F O R A N O - O B L I G AT I O N A U C T I O N E S T I M AT E C O N TA C T M A D I S O N W E B B , A U C T I O N C O O R D I N AT O R 8 6 6 - 5 4 9 - 9 2 7 8 , C O O R D I N AT O R @ J A C K S O N H O L E A R TA U C T I O N . C O M V I S I T U S AT W W W. J A C K S O N H O L E A R TA U C T I O N . C O M

P R E S E N T E D BY T R A I L S I D E GA L L E R I E S & G E R A L D P E T E R S GA L L E RY ©


INDEX ACHEFF, WILLIAM The Doll with the Red Dress, 198 Serranos and Habaneros, 345

BRENDERS, CARL Colorful Playground, 258 Golden Season, 257 Mighty Intruder, 157 Mother of Pearls, 259

AFSARY, CYRUS In the Old Shrine, 379 Roaming Free, 328

BURGESS, STEVE High Summer, 365 Spike, 320

ANDERSEN, ROY Tall Bull, 300

CALLE, PAUL Pause for a Drink, 346

ANTON, BILL A Quiet Pool, 172 At Canyon Springs, 327 Back-Country Companions, 330 Day's End at Mint Springs, 357 Making Tracks, 170

CARLSON, KEN Bull Elk Portrait, 165 Contemplating the Odds, 227 Miles to Go, 160 Morning Moose, 161 Polar Ice Pack, 318 Power of the Plains, 162 Red Fox, 296 Texas Courtship, 293 The Spoils of the Victor, 294

ASPEVIG, CLYDE Bales of Hay, 297 The Melt, 351 The White Cloud, 239 Turning of the Larch (Canada - Moraine Lake), 216 White Carnations, 213

CASE, G. RUSSELL Below the Mesas, 193

BAMA, JAMES Butch Kelly Saddle Bronc Rider, 176

CASSIDY, GERALD IRA DIAMOND The Scout, 265

BANOVICH, JOHN Simba, 225

CHEEVER, BRUCE May Landscape, Salem, 356 Missouri River Camp, 340 The King, 366

BATEMAN, ROBERT Above the Rapids - Gulls and Grizzly, 256 European Robin and Hydrangeas, 214 Fresh Snowfall - Ruffed Grouse, 215

CLYMER, JOHN Moving Camp, 191 September, 200

BEELER, JOE Arizona Whirlwind (Geronimo & His Lieutenants), 152 Calling the Mountain Spirit, 147 Thanks for the Rain, 334

COHELEACH, GUY Victoria Falls - African Fish Eagle, 321

BERNINGHAUS, OSCAR Saddled Horses in Moonlight, 281 Pueblo Indians on Their Reservation, 208

COLEMAN, MICHAEL Green River, 354 In the Cliffs, 159 September, 326 Upper Geyser Basin - Steam and Clouds, 158

BIERSTADT, ALBERT Jim Bridger, The Mountain Man, 284 Western Landscape, 274 Wind River Mountains, 282

COLEMAN, NICHOLAS Buffalo Runner, 344 Color of Night, 341

BLUMENSCHEIN, ERNEST Rock of Fire - Morning, Ghost Ranch, 266

COMBES, GUY Spirit of Soysambu, 226

BOREIN, EDWARD Cowboys Riding, 144 Palomino & Horseman, 143

CORNWELL, DEAN Portrait, 273

BRADFORD, WILLIAM Straits of Belle Isle, 277

CORTEZ, JENNESS Home on the Range, 199

– 172 –


COTTON, BRENT Cutthroat Heaven, 292

GOODWIN, PHILIP R. Moose Hunters, 242

COUSE, EANGER IRVING Turkey Hunter in the Aspens, 211

GREENE, BRUCE A Cowboy's Carnegie Hall, 171 An Old Dog and a New Trick, 358 Somewhere West of Wall Street, 174

DALLIN, CYRUS EDWIN The Invocation of the Rising Sun, 185

DARRO, TOM On the San Carlos Apache, 1885, 339

GRELLE, MARTIN Crossing Over, 153 Late Autumn Gather, 355 Mountain Meadow, 169 Of One Heart, 298 The Victor, 299

DE GROOT, EWOUD Gyrfalcon, 319

HAGEGE, LOGAN MAXWELL Steady They Walk, 194

DELANO, GERARD CURTIS Hopi Farmer, 269

HALLMARK, GEORGE Mi Favorita, 307 The Ruins, 306

D'ANGELICO, PINO The Onion Basket, 219

DIXON, MAYNARD Cattle Drive, 246 Indian and Soldier; Indian and Teacher, 183

HAMPTON, JOHN WADE I Ride Old Paint, 372

DUNCAN, ROBERT Learning Winters' Lessons, 342

HARVEY, G. Breaking Daylight, 333 Half Dome, 241

DYE, CHARLIE Mules, Mustangs, and Men, 179

HENRI, ROBERT Roshanara, 272

EGGENHOFER, NICK Horse Herder, 142

HILL, THOMAS Encampment Surrounded, 247

ELLIS, FREMONT Aspens, Santa Fe Canyon, 210

HOFFMAN, FRANK B. Bull Elk, 243 Bustin' Camp, 244 Surprise, 245 Surprise Visitor, 288 The Hunt, 206 The Moose Call, 290 The Water Hole, 289 Watching the Herd, 291

ELWELL, ROBERT FARRINGTON Indian Lovers, 287 FRAZIER, LUKE An Old Bruin, 369 The Gig is Up, 373 FRIESE, RICHARD Moose in a Winter Landscape, 285 Tigers, 235

JACKSON, HARRY The Foreman, 175 Washakie II, 204

GASPARD, LEON Winter Visitors, 221

JOHNSON, FRANK TENNEY Evening Ride, 279

GILLEON, R. TOM Crow Lodge III, 197 Teton Fall, 196

KUHN, BOB A Very Big Elephant, 223 All He Surveys, 251 Ambling Moose, 254 Cape Buffalo, 228 Grizzly Study, 253 In Ellesmere Land - Arctic Wolf, 260 Midnight Serenade, 255

GLAZIER, NANCY Misty Morning, 367 GOLLINGS, WILLIAM Protecting the Herd, 207

– 173 –


INDEX KUHN, BOB – continued Moose in Freshly Fallen Snow, 252 South Texas Whitetails, 261

MIEDUCH, DAN What Waits Out There, 329 MIGNERY, HERB Seventy Winters, 168

KUHNERT, FRIEDRICH WILHELM Brüllende Löwen, 229 Eland, 230 Kafferbüffel am Tümpel, 237 Reclining Tiger, 234 Roan Antelope Resting in the Shade, 233 Sable, 236 Waterbuck, 232 Wisen im Urwald, 286 Yawning Tiger, 231

MONROE, LANFORD Caution, 323 Teton Autumn, 324 NIBLETT, GARY The Scout Report, 151 NORTON, JIM A Crow Warrior, 335 The Owl Bonnet (Owl Society), 154

LAURENCE, SYDNEY Lakeside Fishing Camp, 276 LAWES, BRUCE On the Hunt, 352

OBERG, RALPH Beauty's Beast, 322 High Summer Hideout, 325

LEIGH, WILLIAM R. Moonlight in the Badlands, 264

PABST, CHARLES Kachina - Corn Ceremony, 347

LIANG, Z.S. Protectors of the Tribe, 302

PAXSON, E.S. AK-ENE, 209 Antelope, 189 Ever Westward, 182 Louison "The Judge" Flathead Chief, 181 Northern Sioux Brave, 263 Watchful Waiting, 184

LIU, HUIHAN Time for Milk-Tea, 312 LOUGHEED, ROBERT Open Range Encounter, 180 Pilot Mountain, 360 The Mustang Runners, 178

PAYNE, EDGAR ALWIN High Sierra Landscape - Big Pine Canyon, 187

MARRIS, BONNIE Family Ties, 156 Night and Day, 364

PETERS, ANDREW Odessa Lake and Ptarmigan Pass, 217 PHILLIPS, BERT GEER Fall Splendor, 267 Taos Indian, 270 Untitled (Taos Lane in Spring), 271

MCCARTHY, FRANK Leaving the Stronghold, 149 They Passed in the Moonlight, 166 MCGARRY, PIP Protective Instincts, 224

POLZIN, KYLE Cowboy Coffee, 177 Trophies of Valor, 192

MCGARY, DAVE Chief Washakie, 343

POTTHAST, EDWARD Camp by Lake Louise, 280

MCGREW, R. BROWNELL Autumn Gold: Canyon de Chelley, 338 The Bull Pen, 201

PRICE, CLARK KELLEY MMM...My Favorite - Beans & Bacon, 362 Psychotherapy, Wyoming Style, 361

MELTZOFF, STANLEY Blue Marlin #29 (Blue Marlin & Cyanea), 316 Jacks & Squid (Jacks 1), 314 The Lord of Barcajon Channel, 317

REECE, MAYNARD Sonoran Desert - Gambel's Quail, 308 REMINGTON, FREDERIC The Sergeant, 249

MICHAELS, ERIC Villa Takes Zacatecas - June 23, 1914, 348

– 174 –


RILEY, KENNETH Ceremonial Lance, 195 Sweet Tooth, 167 The Ritual, 155

SIMS, KYLE Dappled Light, 295 Days of Summer, 353 SITU, MIAN Ready for Rendezvous - Wyoming 1835, 301

RODRIGUEZ, ALFREDO Rendezvous with Yesteryear, 350

SMITH, TUCKER Bitterbrush (study), 240 Vigilance, 238

ROGERS, HOWARD Afternoon Shadows, 349 Homeward Bound, 363

STAVROWSKY, OLEG Confrontation, 331

RUNGIUS, CARL Among the Crags, 138 An Old Fighter, 140 Face to Face, 139 Three Old Gentlemen, 141 Untitled (Mountain Study), 164 Untitled (Valley Study), 163

THOMAS, RICHARD D. Moving Through the Herd, 173 UFER, WALTER October, 212

RUSSELL, CHARLES M. Buffalo Hunting, 250 The Rescue, 248

ULLBERG, KENT Pronghorn Pyramid, 374 WALTERS, CURT Anasazi Castle, 376 Great Waters (Point Lobos), 380 Guardians of the Creek, 378 Towers of Elegance, 377

SANDER, SHERRY Boys in a Tussle, 368 SANDZEN, BIRGER Landscape, 305

WARREN, MELVIN Angry West, 336 Searching for Lodging, 150 Winter Storm, 332

SCHMID, RICHARD Dogwood Blossoms, 218 Kath, 220 Pears, 303 Willows, 304

WIEGHORST, OLAF Bear Hunt, 188 Concord Stage, 190 Indian with Rifle on Horseback, 337 Packin' In, 186

SCHWIERING, CONRAD Autumn Reflections, 371 Gatherin' Strays, 359 Gone With the Wind, 370

WIMAR, CHARLES (CARL) F. Monarch of the Plains, 283

SELTZER, OLAF CARL Indian Brave - Standing, 202 Indian Brave in Blue Shawl, 146 Indian Chief - Blue Robe, 145 Indian Squaw, 203 Medicine Man, 205 Scouting Party, 148

WYETH, N.C. He Rode Away Following a Dim Trail Among the Sage, 262 YOUNG, PACO River Grizzlies, 375

SHARP, JOSEPH HENRY Chief Duck Man, 275 La Jolla, 315 Landscape, 268 October Morning - Crow Tepees, Montana, 278

ZHOU, JIE WEI Miao Woman, 310 New Shoes, 311 Pottery Maker, 309 Still Life With Roses, 313

SHEPHERD, DAVID Elephant Country Tsavo, 222

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SAVE THE DATE T H E 2 017 A U C T I O N W I L L B E H E L D S E P T E M B E R 15 - 16 , 2 017

A N A U C T I O N O F PA S T A N D P R E S E N T MASTERWORKS OF THE AMERICAN WEST


A N AU C T I O N O F PA S T A N D P R E S E N T MASTERWORKS OF THE AMERICAN WEST

SESSION I PREVIEW TRAILSIDE GALLERIES JACKSON HOLE ART AUCTION (Gallery and Office)

CENTER FOR THE ARTS LIVE AUCTIONS SESSION I & SESSION II

MAP OF DOWNTOWN JACKSON HOLE

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NOTES

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NOTES

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TERMS AND CONDITIONS The following Terms and Conditions of Sale constitute Jackson Hole Art Auction, LLC’s (“Jackson Hole Art Auction”) and its agents’ and consignors’ entire agreement with prospective bidders, bidders and purchasers relative to the property listed in this catalogue. These Terms and Conditions of Sale and all other contents of this catalog are subject to amendment during or before the sale. The property will be offered by the Jackson Hole Art Auction as agent for the consignors, unless the catalogue indicates otherwise. 1.

Jackson Hole Art Auction operates as an agent of the seller only. It is not responsible in the event any buyer or seller at the auction fails to live up to their respective agreements, including failure of the seller to deliver any property to buyers. The Jackson Hole Art Auction assumes no risk, liability, or responsibility beyond the limited warranty contained herein. a.

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b.

The authenticity of the authorship attributed to the property as described in this catalogue is guaranteed to the limited extent as stated in this paragraph 1(b). i.

The authorship attributed to an item of property includes name of the artist and any reservations therewith stated, as, for example, “attributed to”, “in the school of ”, or “appears to have been signed by.” The Jackson Hole Art Auction makes no warranties whatsoever, express or implied, with respect to any material in the catalogue other than the authorship attributed to the property.

ii.

This guarantee is further limited as follows: The benefits of this guarantee are not assignable and shall be available only to the purchaser of record; this guarantee shall remain in force and be effective only if notice of rescission is given to the Jackson Hole Art Auction within three (3) years following the date of sale, provided the property is tendered to the Jackson Hole Art Auction in Jackson, Wyoming, in the same condition as the property was found at the time of sale; and that the rescission of a sale and the refund of the original purchase price paid (the successful bid price, plus the buyer’s premium and applicable tax) is exclusive and in lieu of any other remedy which might be otherwise available, and that the Jackson Hole Art Auction and its agents and consignors shall not be liable for any incidental or consequential damages incurred or claimed.

iii.

In no event will the liability of the Jackson Hole Art Auction, or its agents or consignors, exceed the original purchase price actually paid.

2.

Prospective bidders should inspect the property before bidding to determine its condition, size, and whether or not it has been repaired or restored.

3.

A buyer’s premium will be added to the successful bid price and is payable by the purchaser as part of the total purchase price. If paying by cash or check, the purchase price will be the sum of the final bid price plus a buyer’s premium of 17% of the final bid price of each lot up to and including $500,000, 15% of the excess of the final bid price above $500,000, and 12% of the excess of the final bid price above $1,000,000, plus any applicable sales tax, shipping and handling charges. The buyer’s premium is calculated separately for each lot. If paying by credit card, the purchase price will be the sum of the final bid price plus a buyer’s premium of 20% of the final bid price for each lot up to and including $500,000, 18% of the excess of the final bid price above $500,000, and 15% of the excess of the final bid price above $1,000,000, plus any applicable sales tax, shipping and handling charges.

4.

The Jackson Hole Art Auction reserves the right to withdraw any property before or during the sale and shall have no liability whatsoever for such withdrawal.

5.

Except as may be announced by the auctioneer, all bids are per lot, as numbered in the catalogue.

6.

The Jackson Hole Art Auction reserves the right to reject any bid. The highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer will be the purchaser, subject to reserves. In the event of any dispute between bidders, or in the event of doubt as to the validity of any bid, the auctioneer will have the final discretion to determine the successful bidder, cancel the sale, or to reoffer and resell the article in dispute. If any dispute arises after the sale, the Jackson Hole Art Auction’s sale record shall be final and conclusive. The Jackson Hole Art Auction, in its discretion, may execute orders or absentee bids as a convenience to clients who are not present at the auction; however, the Jackson Hole Art Auction is not responsible for any errors or omissions in connection therewith.

7.

If the auctioneer, in his or her discretion, determines that any bid is below the reserve of the article offered, he or she may reject the same and withdraw the article from sale, and, if having acknowledged an opening or other bid, the auctioneer decides that any advance thereafter is insufficient, he or she may reject the advance.

8.

On the fall of the auctioneer’s gavel, the highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer assumes full risk and responsibility for the offered lot, subject to all of the terms and conditions set forth herein, and is immediately obligated to pay the full purchase price or such parts thereof as the Jackson Hole Art Auction may then require. All sales are final, and there shall be no exchanges or returns. Payment shall be made by cash, check, wire transfer, Visa, MasterCard, or American Express. (See, paragraph 3 above: “If paying by credit card . . .”) In addition to other remedies available to us by law, the Jackson Hole Art Auction reserves the right to impose, from the date of sale, a late charge of 1.5% per month (18% per annum) of the total purchase price, if payment is not made in accordance with the conditions set forth herein. – 184 –


9.

a.

All property must be removed by the purchaser at his or her expense not later than (10) business days following the sale, and if it is not so removed, (i) a handling charge of 1% of the total purchase price per month from the tenth day after the sale (until its removal) will be payable to us by the purchaser, with a minimum of 5% of the total purchase price due for any property not so removed within 60 days after the sale, and (ii) we may send the purchased property to a public warehouse for the account, at the risk and expense of the purchaser.

b.

If any applicable conditions herein are not complied with by the purchaser, the purchaser will be in default, and in addition to any and all other remedies available to the Jackson Hole Art Auction and its agents and consignors by law, including, without limitation, the right to hold the purchaser liable for the total purchase price, including all fees, charges, and expenses set forth herein, the Jackson Hole Art Auction, at its sole option, may (i) cancel the sale of that, or any other lot or lots sold to the defaulting purchaser, or (ii) resell the purchased property, whether at auction or by private sale, or (iii) effect any combination thereof. The purchaser will be liable for any deficiency, any and all costs, handling charges, late charges, expenses, and commissions of both sales, legal fees, and expenses, collection fees, and incidental damages. In addition, a defaulting purchaser will be deemed to have granted and assigned the property or money to the Jackson Hole Art Auction or its agents and consignors or any of their affiliated companies, and the Jackson Hole Art Auction may retain and apply such property or money as collateral security for the obligations due. The Jackson Hole Art Auction and its agents and consignors shall have all of the rights accorded to a secured party under the Wyoming Uniform Commercial Code. The purchaser of each lot agrees that each lot is unique and that the Jackson Hole Art Auction, in its sole discretion, shall not be required to sell or otherwise seek to mitigate damages should such purchaser fail to pay the total purchase price. Payment will not be deemed to have been made in full until the Jackson Hole Art Auction shall have collected good funds. The Jackson Hole Art Auction reserves the right to hold all purchases pending collection of the total purchase price.

All lots are subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum price acceptable of the consignor. In such instances, the Jackson Hole Art Auction may implement the reserve by bidding on behalf of the consignor. In instances where the Jackson Hole Art Auction has an interest in the lot, it may bid up to the reserve to protect such interest. The Jackson Hole Art Auction, or its agents or consignors, may also bid upon other property listed in this catalogue.

10. Jackson Hole Art Auction is the owner of images of each lot offered for sale and may use such images for its own archival purposes, as well as for advertising and publicity in connection with this or future sales by the Jackson Hole Art Auction. 11. Unless exempted by law, the purchaser will be required to pay all applicable state and local sales, gross receipts, and compensation tax. Proof of exemption in the form of a current Non-Taxable Transaction Certificate must be provided at registration. It is the purchaser’s responsibility to pay any applicable compensating use tax of another state on the total purchase price. 12. These Terms and Conditions of Sale, together with the parties’ respective rights and obligations hereunder, shall be governed by and construed and enforced in accordance with the laws of the State of Wyoming, without regard to Wyoming rules concerning conflicts of law. 13. Prospective bidders and purchasers agree that, in the event of any controversy or claim arising out of or relating to a sale of property, the party asserting such controversy or claim shall provide written notice thereof to the other party, and that any such controversy or claim not settled within fourteen (14) days of delivery of notice by the other party, including any controversy or claim arising from or relating to the sale, or to these Terms and Conditions of Sale, including the terms of this paragraph, shall be resolved and settled by binding arbitration in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, or such other place upon which the parties may agree, in writing; such arbitration shall be pursuant to the commercial arbitration rules of the American Arbitration Association then in effect; the award, which shall include costs of arbitration and an award of reasonable attorneys’ fees to the prevailing party, shall be final, and the judgment on the award may be entered in any court having jurisdiction. 14. The Jackson Hole Art Auction may, in its discretion and at a purchaser’s request, package and ship items as directed by the purchaser. In such event, purchaser agrees to the following conditions: a.

All such packaging, handling and shipping is at the sole risk of the purchaser, and the Jackson Hole Art Auction shall have no liability for any loss or damage to such items.

b.

A $100 packaging, handling, and shipping deposit will be included on purchase invoice. The balance of the packaging, handling and shipping charges will be billed after services are completed. Please allow 4-6 weeks for shipping.

15. Results are sent to buyers, catalogue subscribers, absentee and phone bidders, and other registered bidders four weeks after the sale. 16. Bidding increments will be as follow but may vary at the auctioneer’s discretion Under $2,000 $2,000 - $5,000 $5,000 - $10,000 $10,000 - $20,000 $20,000 - $50,000 $50,000 - $100,000 over $100,000

$100 $250 $500 $1000 $2,500 $5,000 $10,000

– 185 –


Auction Coordinator: Madison Webb Photography: Price Chambers, John Peelle, Madison Webb Catalog Design: Maryvonne Leshe Catalog Essays: Madison Webb, Melissa Webster, Joan Griffith Graphic Design: Shane Mieske Printing and Binding: O’Neil Printing, AZ Auctioneer: Jason Brooks Jackson Hole Art Auction, LLC 130 East Broadway, Jackson WY 83001 | Post Office Box 1568 Tel 866 JH WY ART (866-549-9278) | Fax 307-732-1600 www.jacksonholeartauction.com © 2016 Jackson Hole Art Auction Limited Co.



2016 Jackson Hole Art Auction: Session II Catalog