Corpo-real Report Case-study 8.0 2019 city.e.scape

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Report Case Study 8.0

2019

city.e.scape Case Study 8.0/ city.e.scape

A Research Project about The City as a School

Corporeal/ ArtEZ Master Interior Architecture

Corpo-real

December 2019

Corpo-real/ ArtEZ Master Interior Architecture ArtEZ University of the Arts


Corpo-real provides a LAB-based community in Zwolle where we investigate the corpo-real. In the word corpo-real ‘corpo’ stands for bodies in general, and ‘real’ for the reality that they relate to. A fundamental principle of Corpo-real is the intertwining of theory and artistic research. Three main strands are developed for this: Expert Unit, Case, Theory. and Reflect. All four semesters of the two-year full-time education programme start with a three-week introduction, consisting of the following components: Travel, Intervention and Public. During the ‘Travel’ week, we explore the world, looking for new thoughts, developments, insights. During the ‘Intervention’ week, we will be working from the ‘Public’ week is when students share their research, visions of the future and designs with the world at large. Vision Humanity has never changed as much as it has in the last 20 years, in social interactions, the economic systems, our living environment in cities and neighbourhoods and in the on-going globalisation. Today’s reality of new unfolding social and political structures, immigration, gender issues, scientific and technological developments challenge us in profound ways. Corpo-real students are encouraged to reflect, discuss and act upon these issues in a respectful and open environment. For the near future Corpo-real identifies four urgent matters: 1. Social spaces: bodies of local and sharing communities, about tribal communities, global digital networks and sharing freespace; 2. Spaces of inclusion: migration as a source of growth and connection, about being radically inclusive, taking care of others, being aware of vulnerabilities within certain groups; 3. Economical spaces: the common good economy, about modern banking, new communities, and about sharing; 4. New bodies of technologies spaces: the interface between human and technology, transhumanism, privacy matters and unpredictable digital futures. Case In the Case-study, students work on an urgent research question which plays an important role in work commissions by institutional clients. These are challenges which do not require immediate and concrete solutions; rather, the clients are looking for unexpected new strategies and scenarios. The main teaching methods used are field work, studio days and workshops. Research methods are adopted from other disciplines such as anthropology, writing, scenography or curating. Irene Müller (tutor case-study) Ingrid van Zanten (head Corpo-real)

ArtEZ, Zwolle location

ArtEZ, Zwolle location

inside out, in a reflective and contemplative manner. Finally, the


I profoundly believe that learning should happen in a broad sense. By offering opportunities. In other words, we need a city to raise a child. Report Case Study 8.0

Jacques Giesbertz

city.e.scape

2019


Contents 5

Preface

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About us

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Introduction

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Jacques Giesbertz – BuzzyChain, Stadouders

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Irene Müller - ArtEZ

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1. LITERATURE REVIEWS

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2. OBSERVATIONS

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3. ART INSTALLATIONS

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4. NETWORKS

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5. WORKSHOPS

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6. SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITIES

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7. PHYSICAL SKILLS ACTIVITIES

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8. DESIGNS

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9. SYMPOSIUM

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Conclusion

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Colophon

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Corpo-real


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Preface School building As individuals we experience different childhood upbringings, every individual is taught different values and life lessons from a very young age, which is carried through with them during their life whether they choose to continue these practices or continue to learn about new things. The things that children learn in primary school differ from country to country. Children are not only learning at school by are learning through the environment that surrounds them like: the home, the garden, holiday trips or even a trip down to the local shop.

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Children are constantly being surrounded by new things that they can learn from, now in this new era, one can see the emergence of technology - something new and something different that can act as a learning aid for children. Many schools still interact with basic technological tools to help children learn‌ but what technological tools are available outside of the traditional school system? Why is there now a great need to learn outside of the traditional school environment? This publication gives insight into one year worth of research including making, method development, and discovering new ways in which children are using spaces within the city as a learning environment. Through building up a network with local businesses in the city, this new community can help to empower the minds of children and encourage them to see the city and daily life in a new way.


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About us Eight international Master students started the research project ‘City.e.scape’ to explore innovative possibilities for children to learn outside the traditional school building. Coming from different educational and cultural backgrounds, we started the mission to discover possibilities and how the minds of children work in order from them, as they are the experts of learning and adapting faster than us. City.e.scape is:

Sila/ Turkey

Anyue is a 23-year-old Chinese. She enjoys playing badminton, guitar and travelling. Her bachelor majored in Landscape Architecture and in the future she would like to work as a designer that is good at communication.

Zehra/ Netherlands

Lisabell/ Germany Elif is Dutch-Turkish and 28 years old. She loves baking cakes, sketching, painting and reading. Before this master, she studied Spatial Design. She is fascinated by art in architecture. After graduation, she would like to design public spaces as an entrepreneur and interior architect.

Paloma/ Colombia

Ying-Ting/ Taiwan

Anyue/ China

Kaylyn is 24 years and is from South Africa. She enjoys cooking, travelling and Dachshunds. Kaylyn studied Interior Design before and in the future, hopes to own a small interior, product design and styling business.

Kaylyn/South Africa

Elif/ Netherlands

Lisabell is 27 years and from South Germany: She did her bachelor's degree in Interior Architecture and spend 3 years working and travelling at different places to explore herself afterward. Besides Design and Art, she is practicing Yoga to keep the physical and mental life balance. Paloma is 29 years old born in Bogotá, Colombia. She has a passion for animals, plants and watching movies. Before starting her master’s, she did her bachelor's in Architecture and worked for 4 years in retail architecture. In the future, she wants to use her design knowledge to improve the quality of life of those who experience the spaces. Síla (30 years old) is a Netherlands based designer and architect of Turkish origin. Síla plays with the roles and perceptions of the norm, distorts and twists them for human pleasure. Síla’s rebellious nature dedicates herself as a designer to social gender equality.

Ying-Ting is 29 years old and from Taiwan. She loves making ceramics, collecting ceramic, drawing, and traveling. Before the master, she studied interior design in Taiwan. In the future, she wants to have interior architectural experience in multi-country. Zehra (26 years old) from Zwolle has a very diverse background: she sold coffee, baked fries and edited vlogs for a living. She truly is at her happiest when she paints. In the future, she would like to develop herself as a conceptual interior architect to eventually teach and motivate others.


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Introduction In the 21st century,

there is an urge to encourage

educational programmes to adopt digital learning methods in order to cope with the digital revolution. Children nowadays spend less time outside and instead are found indoors ‘whizzing’ around on their smartphones, tablets and laptops - accessing the internet, online games and social media platforms. The national government invites people from different fields to help create solutions to this problem. (www.rijksoverheid.nl) Research Question How can children between four and eight years old learn outside of the traditional school building? The main research question formed as the focal point for the investigation and experimentation into combining the city and children. As ongoing research, this project remains open for future research, investigation, design solutions and methods on how to include children into the city environment and act as an educational tool that is not found within the traditional classroom. Throughout the process, we used the city environment extensively in order to create methods and possibilities for the city as a tool for learning. This research shows the importance of merging the traditional educational learning system with more practical learning, which can be found within the city. The city is an important layer in our research and with that, found it appropriate to name our studio ‘City.e.scape’, giving meaning to escaping from what is already there in the traditional school building, to how children can discover and rediscover the city. Aim The aim is to create an educational method through design for children, parents and schools as an addition to the existing educational system taught in schools.


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‘Our challenge is to explore this enormous networking, learning power and to not stick to the formal education systems.’

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Jacques Giesbertz–BuzzyChain, Stadouders Jacques Giesbertz is an entrepreneur and the initiator of the Case Study for 18/19. Social issues are his main focus like education, learning and unemployment.

enthusiasm as well as places to children to discover, to experiment, in other words, to learn. Our challenge is to explore this enormous networking learning power and do not stick to the formal education systems. Either, make a far more and better linkage between the learning world of schools and the learning which takes place outside the walls and playgrounds of schools. Parents are worthly and logic linking pin between the school and the outside. Their role could be diverse, namely:

Jacques Giesbertz: Learning is human. Learning means joy, chances, kind of a process. Learning is a simple word to explain a complex process. A human being starts learning, right from the beginning of their existence. Mostly embedded around family space and values. Parents (and family/ close relatives as a whole) are the first teachers that we as humans know. After a while enlarged by the ‘learners’, the mix of pupils and teachers outside, mostly the play- Thinker (new ideas, design, making ideas public) ground at number one. Then, from 4 years old, something - Networker (makes linkages between schools and the strange happens in a child’s life: outside worlds) - Organiser (the planner, the organiser, making things - Learning seems to be claimed by schools. done) - Learning becomes a duty (leerplicht), for children - Teacher (a lot of parents, even if they are not between 4 years and 18 years. officially graduated as a teacher, can teach) - Learning is embedded in systems and methods. - Learning should be measured. The learning capacity of all space outside the schools is - Cognitive learning is the main way at school. also enormous. Parks, beaches, squares, theatres. - And children are quickly divided into learning levels. This list is endless, all of them with unique characteristics. So, we can define two learning environments, the schools In case children would like to learn about nature, nature versus everything outside the schools. The latter, the itself is the best place to learn. Of course, also the i outside is broad, far more related to society (because it nternet offers an extra dimension, a boundless mixture is society itself) and less organised with less formal of platforms, games and meeting places. methods. Our challenge is to explore this enormous networking, What is happening is that: learning power and to not stick to the formal education systems. Parents are not only participants of the new - There are rarely any connections between these linked networking approach but, in my opinion, also the learning environments. leaders. Innovations in our education systems will not - The government (so the society) spends most effort, occur from the systems themselves. time, public money and plans. - At the same time, the formal learning environments (schools) have to handle problems (to keep the system work). Work stress. Working pressure. Lack of teachers. Segregation between pupils, depending on their socio-economic backgrounds. More money is conceived as unique and ultimate solutions. I profoundly believe that learning should happen in a broad sense. By offering opportunities. In other words, we need a city to raise a child. Parents, family, teachers, neighbours, and many more people in the complex modern networking communities do offer knowledge, expertise,


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Irene Müller - ArtEZ

Irene Müller has been our Case Study tutor by giving us constructive feedback throughout the whole year of research within the given topic. She helped us develop our studio and motivated us to be confident about our process, no matter how the outcomes might have been. As a mother herself, she shared some insights about her own son and how he learns outside school which inspired us to have a look into computer games as an example. Irene Müller: Time and activities spent outside school and curriculum form a very substantial part of the forming and learning of elementary school pupils. The omnipresence of social media and computer games compete with schools and didactical methods to attract and hold the attention and pleasure of children even more than the outside space. Eight students of Corpo-real have studied how the spots, networks and professionals (digital or analog) in the city could be more methodically integrated into the development of children, in order to design richer learning environments and intense learning processes. They have used many different sources and developed a variety of searching directions, ideas, concepts and scenario’s, and have tried out a series of methods for outer-schoollearning. They also have faced some problems such as safety, the increasing physical absence of children in the city and the time it takes to grow and bind networks of professionals to the purpose of child-learning. The diversity of the student’s backgrounds and experiences has provided a wide spectrum of perspectives on the topic, of sources, concepts and methods.


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1/ LITERATURE REVIEWS Collecting data through revising of existing literature

Urbanism, Safety and Playgrounds Question: What is urbanism and which aspects play an important role in the theme of urbanism in the context of learning environments for children? Safety is a crucial aspect to take into account while children are using the city and other outdoor environments. Conclusion: It is that through the aspect of safety in the context of the city, outdoor environments and playgrounds that protocols regarding safety between educators, parents and children become a sensitive issue and needs to be addressed with lots of caution. This could be the reason for a lack of children being present in the city environment unsupervised.


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Timelines Playground

1800-1880

1880-1890

1900-1920

1940-1950

1950-1970

1970-1980

1980-Present

Beginning

Beginning

Model Playground

Adventure or Junk Playground

Novelty Playground

Sanderlized Playground

Modern Playground

The Hague Urban Development

Safety Rules

Safety while going to school in the 1900’s

Safety while going to school in the 2000’s

Common Sense Safety Signage


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1/ LITERATURE REVIEWS

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Nature Question: How can schools use outdoor spaces in nature as a new place to teach? Conclusion: In our investigation, we concluded that outdoor spaces are able to contribute extensively to a child’s development and wellbeing.

Treasure hunting Question: How can children learn in a playful way? Conclusion: Through ‘Treasure Hunting’ children become researchers themselves by hunting for all sorts of information and hints in a playful manner. This becomes a non-traditional learning method where children learn through play.

Art as a school Question: What methods can be employed in order to support and promote children’s emotional intelligence? Conclusion: De-learning Conclusion for further research: Found theoretical research could be used for this method. However, to collect data, it was important to get in touch with schools and children in order to observe and analyse these learning environments. In order to investigate, how could designers create educational environments outside the school buildings?


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2/ OBSERVATIONS Collecting and analysing

data by observing as

a participatory study. We as researchers immersed ourselves in different settings in the Netherlands where children could be found while taking notes and/or photos. Aim: The aim is to see how children behave naturally in diverse environmental situations and by this, getting insight into how they interact with their surroundings as well as learn from what is given already outside school without any of our physical influences.

Urban Environment (playground, city beach, week market)

In order to create the desired network centered around educational spaces for children. A group of three students looked at opportunities within The Hague, in an attempt to create connections we arranged a meeting with The Urban Farmers organisation. This organisation practice different biological farming methods in an effort to move farming and its produce towards a more sustainable system. The results from this meeting provided us with more insight into ways in which we could better move forward with the marketing aspect of the project. Some farmers lacked interest in our project proposal as they thought that it was not yet developed enough as well as some farmers wanted to know how they themselves were going to benefit from this approach instead of just allow for a free learning environment for young children.


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Conclusion: Therefore, it can be said that this outcome deemed fruitful in a sense that it allowed us to develop our projects aims faster in order to market it better, however unfruitful as it proved that making connections was going to very difficult as many people did not want to generate their efforts if they were unable to benefit from it.

Nature (forest)

Through the investigation

into the nature

section of the city, we started walking the route from the Malieveld park towards the Haagse Bos in the city of The Hague. We analysed and observed the routes and looked at what this environment had to offer. During our visit, we often came across hikers, cyclists and mothers with very young children. We assumed that it was more a morning walk, a route to home or work for these people that crossed our paths. Unfortunately, there were no children playing actively. This is probably due to the fact that it was during their school day. However, what we noticed was that there were traces of children who had previously played a game in this environment, as there were drawing marks in the sand. Looking at their tracks, they probably did this with a branch which involves using nature as their source of method of play. We did an observation by taking photos and taking notes of our route through the forest. Conclusion: We assume that being outdoors can contribute a lot to a child’s development and wellbeing, and of course their consciousness of the environment can be

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2/ OBSERVATIONS

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triggered from a young age. It concerns us that today’s city-children lack these activities because they lack using the outdoors such as parks. We asked ourselves a series of questions: ’Why are parents not involved in this ‘problem’, do they prefer their children to be indoors?’ ‘Do children even like to be outdoors?’ ‘Are there enough natural spaces in big cities, or are these places not accessible to the children?’ The city can be regarded not only as a learning space but also as a learning material. It is full of things where learning can begin: a park with flora and fauna, the beach and the sea and dunes, a church, a mosque, a shop, a theatre, a street, the sewer, a view, etc.

Informative Environment

For this investigation,

two different museums

were visited, the kind of museums selected was based on potential museums that children would be interested in. The first museum was the Castellum Hoge Woerd and the second ‘het Spoorwegmuseum’ in Utrecht. We analysed the exhibitions in which spatial, product and graphic designers used their skills to create educational environments in different, playful and modern ways. We observed the way in which children interacted with the design (learning) methods. Jacques, our client was convinced that these types of learning environments were very effective, he stated that ‘Most of the time, children learn without being aware that they are learning’. As a form of data collection this group made films, recorded sounds and made sketches about what was gained by visiting these locations. Conclusion: The Castellum is a very modern approach to educate children in Dutch history. In this, they used a lot of digital devices to make learning more enjoyable, as children are used to the iPad nowadays, they wanted to create something familiar for


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the children of today. We noticed that technology is an important tool in the future of education. Whereas in the Railwaymuseum (het Spoorwegmuseum) children had a lot of fun seeing and even using authentic historical items. This museum is more nostalgic and creates real life representations. Children love to experience things that are not possible to experience at school or at home. We concluded that a nostalgic act, together with a tangibility referencing real life programmes, is more enjoyable and valuable than digital means.

2/ OBSERVATIONS

Digital media

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3/ ART INSTALLATIONS Collecting data

through interactive installations as a

conceptual method to inspire children and encourage them to interact with the installations. Aim: The aim is to build nostalgic installations in order to discover how children interact and react to them. Conclusion: When building an installation, it must be clear with what we want to achieve with it. Children are used to processing a lot of information. It is a challenge to trigger their curiosity and get their attention. This is why we should look for methods to make an installation where they can work on it by themselves, or where they can interact with it, using their phone, or work together, in a team. So they can use it they want it or need it.


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5/ WORKSHOPS Collecting data

through existing professional fields.

Aim: The aim is to connect with different professionals in all kinds of fields in order to build up a network which contains expert knowledge about learning outside of school but also to create a network for a new learning method. Locations: Cultuurhuis in Stadshagen, Zwolle Conclusion for further research: We started become in contact with people in different working fields in The Hague. We then realised that every contribution, every relationship that we were able to form, could become useful for building up this network. We continued with broaden up our network research in Zwolle as that is where we are based.


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6/ SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITIES Collecting and analysing

data by giving tasks

within a chosen theme. The tasksolving happens in a planned and safe setting and children would be given some instructions in order for a controlled outcome. Aim: The aim is to encourage children to solve specific assignments with just a few rules to show how they work and how they respond to certain topics. Conclusion for further research: Due to busy schedules teachers rejected our proposal to organise workshops at school.


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6/ SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITIES Website

We started with a name, logo, concept: city.e.scape.

We continued with a website: www.cityescape.info. This is the platform which holds our research overview, like an ‘information tank’. It allows us to share our progress, but also share announcements, like for the activities. It is the place where everyone, who is interested in our topic can take part in our experiments, research, but also can get to know us better personally. It makes it also very easy for people to get into contact with us. Furthermore, in our end project, the website forms an important layer. The installations we intended to make would work with data and information, where there are QR-codes attached to each installation. When the QR code is scanned via smartphone, that were then the transferred to a web link containing information about what is physically presented in front of them.

Vlog challenge

Another method we used to get into contact

with children. Since the schools did not reply to spent e-mails, and the children are hard to approach in the city, we created a tool that would help us to interact in a way where children are familiar with. Namely on social media. In our ‘vlog' we challenged children to create a ‘vlog' in which they could express how, what and where they would like to learn outside of the school building. Our aim was to get more input from the children's point of view. To get data, information or inspiration by their way of approaching this topic. For creating the ‘vlog', we watched other ‘vlogs' for how they are built, the language in which they speak and the tools that were used. Our aim was to make it easy to understand (language), entertaining to watch (use of go-pro camera, music, using of emoticons), accessible (youtube), challenging to take action (arranging a give-away/price/award). We sent this ‘vlog' to famous dutch ‘vloggers’/influencers, parents, teachers and shared it all on social media.


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Conclusion for further research: To make this ‘vlog’ go viral, and received by the target group, the help of parents and teachers were important to raise awareness and get attention. Children have access to youtube, but it is hard for them to directly get a notification of the ‘vlog' since they don't use other social media platforms where we shared the video, like: Facebook, Instagram, linked and E-mail. So we found out that if we are going to design something, it should be a total package which the parents and teachers can use a class of children. This requires a solid plan, to which we could: 1. let the children be involved 2. Let the network/local community be involved 3. Make our design actually blend in with the cityscape 4. Create a learning environment in which children are learning in an informal way.


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7/ PHYSICAL SKILLS ACTIVITIES Collecting data

through children’s making.

Aim: The aim is to create/make things with what is already available (everyday found material) we would like to create a teaching and learning environment as an interactive setting outside the school. With that, we can see what kind of skills children are already familiar with and which skills still have the potential to be taught more/have potential, generate curiosity, interaction, attention. As a result of contacting teachers to help organise workshops at schools, we decided to bring a free, independent activity to the city streets in order to get into contact with children. This is an outcome of our urge to talk and observe children. Due to busy schedules teachers rejected our proposal to organise workshops at school. This project is about involving the city scape and using the city as an educational environment, so we were curious about what experimenting on the streets would bring.

Gardening

We invited children to plant flowers in the city centre and in

the garden of the old age home. We made a big sign in the shape of our studios our to raise attention of the children and hung up balloons. We handed out flyers in neighbourhoods to invite parents and children to attend our activity. Most of the children rejected, because they did not want to get bothered or feel pressured to be present in an unfamiliar environment. But there was a child of five years old who did participate


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and she was very enthusiastic about planting flowers. Doing things that she normally sees her parents doing. During this activity we had incredible conversations, we noticed that children already have so much knowledge and are so well-spoken. They have the capacity to speak out their mind in a very clear way. Although the concentration span changed during the day very quickly. We also concluded that the weather is a crucial aspect of organising activities on the streets.

Dancing

We invited children to our workshop to do activities together

with us while dancing in the park. To attract their attention, we made our logo as large as possible and placed it in the middle of the park. We previously handed out invitations so that they knew when and where the activity would take place. We conducted this workshop at two different locations and on two Wednesdays. Unfortunately, no children were present and those who were did not want to participate in the workshop. That is understandable probably because they did not want to get bothered or feel pressured to be present in a familiar environment with total strangers. The second Wednesday presented poor weather conditions, it was not really attractive to participate in these activities outside.

Drawing

In the first activity located in Stadsstrand, Zwolle children were

asked to make use of toilet rolls to depict what their favourite thing was to do in the city. Allowing for them to draw on a curved surface as apposed to flat encouraged them to use none conventional surfaces to communicate their ideas. On this day two young boys around the age of 10 communicated two ideas each of their interests on

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these toilet rolls. The second activity was placed in a schoolyard in Wipstik, Zwolle where children were encouraged to make collages on timber boards which encouraged them to create their dreamschool. Due to the day providing unpleasant weather we took the decision to leave the activity with the description in the school yard where we would monitor the progress over a couple of days. Unfortunately the sign was removed over the first day.

Spreading the word

The studio set out on the streets of

Zwolle handing leaflets out to the community informing them about the activities that were to be held in various locations by three different groups. The activities located in Stadsstand and Wipstik encouraged children to use the city as a tool as an inspiration to what they could learn outside of thee school. The two activities ran over two separate Wednesdays. Conclusion: The activities unfortunately resulted in a failure with no many children responding to our public activities due to a lack of children out in the city on a Wednesday as well as weather played a part in the activities. We also learnt that by leaving objects in public spaces as a form of data collection however will also result in failure as it would most likely be removed. Conclusion for further research: To make this kind of activity succeed, it is important that we have back support from teachers or a group of parents. Children are hard and vulnerable to approach and so we decided to use different methods to approach children or to create activities that are universal and accessible for teachers and parents as an event.


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8/ DESIGNS First ideas

This part of the research describes the design steps

that we took throughout the process. Some methods during the research and experimentation process were successful and some were not. During the beginning stage, the group brainstormed ideas of different methods that could potentially result in a designed solution. We developed various deign pillars which would help to navigate us through the process:

Symbolic installation

A symbolic installation is an

installation with a conceptual meaning relating to its context and this topic of moving the traditional classroom outside.

Accessibility

(made just for children)

We understood that in todays era we often live in places with many different people who speak different languages. In order to communicate our method to a wider range of children it was important to come up with a communicate system understood by many, and this can be achieved through the used of signs and symbols to replace words. This would all for the project to be accessible to a wider variety of children.

Communication

We found that it may be interesting if

children were abel to learn everyday things through interact of professionals in certain sectors of the city. We came up with a kind of game that children would could play throughout the city and communicate and interact with professionals in order to unlock or collect clue. We believe that by creating a new type of education contains creativity and experimentation. With these pillars in mind, each one of us could propose a design solution. In the end we decided to combine two winning ideas and develop them further as a group.


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3/ Park Using the QR code to connect the website; showing the wild animals/plants in the area.

1/ Map Receive the map from teacher or event staff; the first location will be point out on the map.

4, 5/ Destination (Installation) Puzzle

In this final concept, we created a method in which there could be

four outcomes: 1. The creation of a unique participating network which is based around leaning in the city.

2/ Bakery Using the QR code to connect the website; showing the the backstage of bakery.

2. Using QR codes and social media, in the form of our website creates to share easily accessible information, this all forms the technology part of our research. 3. Let Children become the builders, by allowing them to build their own installation. 4. This ultimately results in a playful, engaging and challenging way of thinking and making. This puzzle game formed the concept in which the city becomes the learning environment and will operate in the following manner:


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1. Tokens of the puzzle in the form of a seat covering made from canvas / fabric could be collected from stores willing to participate in the game. 2. When collecting each token the children first need to find the location in the city. 3. The locations provide / teach the children about what the location does (ie. the optometrist). This comes in the form of a ‘token’ the seat cover made from canvas / fabric, with a QR code containing information of the location of the collected ‘token’ 4. Once each child has collected their tokens, they are then able to complete the game as a group of children in another allocated location. 5. The seat covers connect to a premed frame to form a seat. All the combined seats make for a make shift classroom setting where children can continue to learn.

Tubes

The idea of the tube is to encourage and trigger the curiosity of the

children, allowing them to see things they normally can’t see in a more playful way, being also an element that somehow merges into the aesthetics and image of the city. The tube itself has the potential to be shaped in many ways, therefore we decided to focus and explore some of the many possibilities and experiment on them. We came up with 5 different options that allow the children to adapt the tube to what they want or need to see. The straw: This tube is inspired by the way the straw is able to bend into position and will be explored in terms of ways in which the tube can be connected in joining sections. Lego: The lego tube is inspired by lego building blocks, where the tube is able to adjust to different lengths depending on the surface in which it is mounted on. Telescopic: This tube is inspired by the telescope which will have two parts to it which will be able to slide in and out one another to extend and close the tube. Foldable tube: This tube is inspired by a flat pack system where tubes will be flat and able to unfold by children for easy mobility. It will be folded closed when not in use and will be able to be folded down when peeping. Attach mirror: The bottom mirror will come as a separate piece which when wanting to view can be attached to the bottom section of the tube and easily removed with a ‘gap’ to allow for it to lifted with ease. The style of the mirror will remain simple with the addition of a mirror that can be carried around as a ‘method’ to attach to different tubes.


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Scenario 1

The Tube Method 1 Ready to use

2 Incomplete

- trigger curiosity - trigger awareness - change perspective - inform and teach

See how nature looks like from closer and learn from it.

- connect places - are a learning method

mirror

Scenario 2 Located network places and observation tubes. (online and physical map) See how your favorite meal is cooked and learn from it.

Interesting information about each network location.


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8/ DESIGNS

Foldable tube

Lego Tube

Unfolded tube

This tube is inspire by a flat pack system where Tubes will be flat and able to unfold by children for easy mobility.

Cubed pieces stacking on one another.

Folded tube

Flat pack tube The Lego Tube is inspired by Lego building blocks, where the tube is able to adjust to different lenghts depending on the surface in which it is mounted on.

This tube will be folded closed when not in use and will be able to be folded down when peeping. Folded tube

Long tube

Medium tube

Short tube

Retractable Tube

Attachable Mirror

This tube is inspired by the telescope which will have two parts to it which will be able to slide in and out one another to extend and close the tube.

Closed tube

Front view of attachable mirror

Open tube

Style of the mirror will remain simple with the addition of a mirror that can be cared around as a ‘method’ to attach to different tubes.

Detail of how the tubes will connect, the twos will have an interlocking connection so that they will always stay attached as well as have a slight thickness difference so that it can hold firmly in one another. Close up of mirror attached

The bottom mirror will come as a seperate piece which when wanting to view can be attached to the bottom section of the tube and easily removed with a ‘gap’ to allow for it to lifted with ease.

3D of tube

Two colours can distingush the two parts as well as for aesthetics.

Cross section of the tube

Detail of connection

Cross Section of the tube

3D of attachable mirror


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9/ SYMPOSIUM The event

of the final symposium forms an important aspect in

rounding off our entire research process. Our studio decided to look for an inspiring location that encourages and supports people to think about new ways of educating children. Therefore, we chose to realise the event at the De Cultuurhuis which is located in the heart of the neighbourhood Stadshagen, Zwolle. It is a place with a library including a large section for children to explore Augmented Reality or small versions of the escape room as new learning methods to attract the children to this location in their spare time. Furthermore, the place organises different kind of events in their spaces to create opportunities for the community to connect and learn from each other. Reflecting on the event itself, which took place at the 15th of October, it can be seen as an additional (ninth) method that evolved throughout our research process. By exchanging thoughts and projects with the expert, Dick Heijdra (from the design studio PRONK) gave us more insight into the world of museums created especially for children and how the learning can be approached by design, in a very playful way. Presenting the outcomes of the 8 methods, we have been developed and used to get information that we could use for designing for children revealed the broad spectrum of what we were working on and achieved. Learning can be approached in many different ways which is visualised by the previous outcomes of the used methods described earlier. All in all, the symposium represented a summary of our diverse process steps, which came together to a union and illustrated a whole package full of opportunities how to implement and/or make use of existing learning opportunities consisting in the given urban environments of the dutch city site.


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Conclusions The event During our research process we developed 6. Social Media Activities eight methods. A summary of each methods conclusion is By research into ways in which we could approach as follows: children in a no confronting method, we took to social media as a platform as this is were many children spend 1. Literature Reviews majority of their time exploring virtual worlds. By wanting Adapted from literature that we found, we could conclude to know more about childrens fascinations and curiosithat the aspect of safety in the context of a city and the ties we had to let the children (1), We needed to create a vulnerability of children requires measurements out of kind of network to be used in future (2), we needed the our research as designers. Of course as designers we are informations from (1) and (2) to make an attempt able to make aware of the safety precautions one needs towards solving the problem through design (3) and to take when dealing with the city and children, however it finally by doing steps (1) through (3) we are able to cannot be measured whether these precautions can be create a unique learning environment through design. taken and it is therefore up to the user, parent, and organisers that this aspects of safety can be measured. 7. Physical Skill Activities Conclusion for further research: To make this kind of acti2. Observations vities succeed, it is important that we have back support By conducting field research and the vulnerability factor from teachers or a group of parents. Children are hard and of children, we needed to rely on observations as a vulnerable to approach and so we decided to use different method of research, through observing how children methods to approach children or to create activities that interacted with nature and museum devices we could are universal and accessible for teachers and parents as identify where the interests of children lie the most an event. within. We could conclude that through these observations targeting the well being of a child through encoura- 8. Design ging them to spend more time outdoors was a key factor Design can also be a method, to arrive at a solution. to involve children and the city as well as creating some- By making us of ones professional field (us as interiors thing of a tangible element which is an important element architects), we were able to use our skills and knowledge allowing for curiosity. in design to deliver a final solution for our client, that could be implemented in schools and the city. 3. Art Installations Allowing for children to have the ability to explore, create Final rounding off interest and long term stimulations are factors that we Through our research into the city as a school and a place considered when using installations as a methods by for additional learning for children. We have learnt that asking ourselves: how can grab the attention of children dealing with a vulnerable target group can host an array of and keep their mind simulated for longer periods of times obstacles of which by developing a series of methods, we - which encourages children to want to learn more. were able to answer some important questions involving children and the city. By trying to engage and grab the 4. Networks attention of children through what they are interested in Creating networks was possibly the hardest method in today was seemingly difficult and due to our lack of this case study process asn children, schools and extensive knowledge in the world of social media and parents were virtually impossible to contact or were not digital devices we could conclude that by using our prowilling to make any contribution to our process. Though fessional knowledge in design that we could arrive at a our project was fundamentally based for The Hague, we designed solution, to be used by the city, children and found it more fruitful to attempt networking somewhere schools was the best way in which we could provide usemore familiar - Zwolle. ful and fun instruments and additional to the educational system. 5. Workshops Due to busy schedules teachers rejected our proposal to organise workshops at school.


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Colophon 2019 Report Case-study 8.0 / city.e.scape Corpo-real / Master Interior Architecture Tutor Irene MĂźller Students Anyue Deng Paloma Franco Hempenius Ying-Ting Shen Kaylyn Jedlinski Zehra Kahvecioglu Elif Liman Sila Oztekin Lisabell Zint Client BuzzyChain, Stadouders Jacques Giesbertz Illustrations Ying-Ting Shen Lisabell Zint Zehra Kahvecioglu Graphic design Office for Design, Loek Kemming Production Drukkerij Loor, Varsseveld

ArtEZ University of the Arts Rhijnvis Feithlaan 50 8021 AM Zwolle corporeal@artez.nl www.corpo-real.artez.nl www.artez.nl

ArtEZ University of the Arts


Corpo-real provides a LAB-based community in Zwolle where we investigate the corpo-real. In the word corpo-real ‘corpo’ stands for bodies in general, and ‘real’ for the reality that they relate to. A fundamental principle of Corpo-real is the intertwining of theory and artistic research. Three main strands are developed for this: Expert Unit, Case, Theory. and Reflect. All four semesters of the two-year full-time education programme start with a three-week introduction, consisting of the following components: Travel, Intervention and Public. During the ‘Travel’ week, we explore the world, looking for new thoughts, developments, insights. During the ‘Intervention’ week, we will be working from the ‘Public’ week is when students share their research, visions of the future and designs with the world at large. Vision Humanity has never changed as much as it has in the last 20 years, in social interactions, the economic systems, our living environment in cities and neighbourhoods and in the on-going globalisation. Today’s reality of new unfolding social and political structures, immigration, gender issues, scientific and technological developments challenge us in profound ways. Corpo-real students are encouraged to reflect, discuss and act upon these issues in a respectful and open environment. For the near future Corpo-real identifies four urgent matters: 1. Social spaces: bodies of local and sharing communities, about tribal communities, global digital networks and sharing freespace; 2. Spaces of inclusion: migration as a source of growth and connection, about being radically inclusive, taking care of others, being aware of vulnerabilities within certain groups; 3. Economical spaces: the common good economy, about modern banking, new communities, and about sharing; 4. New bodies of technologies spaces: the interface between human and technology, transhumanism, privacy matters and unpredictable digital futures. Case In the Case-study, students work on an urgent research question which plays an important role in work commissions by institutional clients. These are challenges which do not require immediate and concrete solutions; rather, the clients are looking for unexpected new strategies and scenarios. The main teaching methods used are field work, studio days and workshops. Research methods are adopted from other disciplines such as anthropology, writing, scenography or curating. Irene Müller (tutor case-study) Ingrid van Zanten (head Corpo-real)

ArtEZ, Zwolle location

ArtEZ, Zwolle location

inside out, in a reflective and contemplative manner. Finally, the


Report Case Study 8.0

2019

city.e.scape Case Study 8.0/ city.e.scape

A Research Project about The City as a School

Corporeal/ ArtEZ Master Interior Architecture

Corpo-real

December 2019

Corpo-real/ ArtEZ Master Interior Architecture ArtEZ University of the Arts