Unit Report 1+2 July 2019, The Notion of Home

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Unit Report

Unit 1+2

July 2019

The notion of HOME

corpo-real Master Interior Architecture

ArtEZ University of the Arts

Image by: Ying-Ting Shen

Corpo-real / ArtEZ


Corpo-real provides a LAB-based community in Zwolle where we investigate the Corpo-real. Here, ‘corpo’ stands for bodies in the broadest sense; not just the physical, but also the psychological, digital, spiritual, virtual. We investigate their relation to the “real”, meaning the reality of the here and now – and beyond. A fundamental principle of Corpo-real is the intertwining of theory and artistic research. Three main strands are developed for this: Unit, Case, Theory. Reflect is the fourth dimension where students are invited to connect all different parts of the programme with their personal goals. Vision Humanity has never changed as much as it has in the last 20 years, in social interactions, the economic systems, our living environment in cities and neighborhoods and in the ongoing globalization. Today’s reality of new unfolding social and political structures, immigration, gender issues, scientific and technological developments challenge us in profound ways. Corpo-real students are encouraged to reflect, discuss and act upon these issues in a respectful and open environment. We understand that many of this is too big to confront with existing methods. Students are encouraged to make good use of other disciplines’ methods and expertise. We exchange experiences with researchers from different disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, theatre, and music. Corpo-real Corpo-real provides students with working spaces for spatial practice-led research, tutorial groups, research seminars and meetings with visiting crits. To ensure diversity in thinking, inspiration, ideas and current issues we invite external critics from across the world and different disciplines. To explore, interrogate, discuss and pioneer new ideas with the students. All four semesters of the two-year full-time education programme start with a three-week introduction, consisting of the following components: Travel, Intervention and Public. During the ‘Travel’ week, we explore the world, looking for new thoughts, developments, insights. During the ‘Intervention’ week, we will be working from the inside out, in a reflective and contemplative manner. Finally, the ‘Public’ week is when students share their research, visions of the future and designs with the world at large. www.corpo-real.artez.nl

corpo-real


Unit 1+2

Studio Report

Nourish by cultural similarities and the student’s own fascination, we started a search around the theme [HOME]. A search that started with investing in thinking together. Thinking together as an umbrella method that takes you further together, gives you more depth and ultimately sharpens you in your own position as a designer, and in relation to the discipline and society. Other research methods that were discussed during the different units in relation to thinking and making were: theoretical research, survey research, empirical research, participatory observations and design thinking strategies.

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In order to anchor the method of joint thinking in the two units, we started reading books. Specific books that enter into a direct relationship with the subject and the phase of studying within the units. In unit I, the focus was more on broadening (making) research and in unit II on in-depth (making) research. Students were expected to read part of the book every week and (critically) relate to that text and reflect on it from their own personal experiences. This resulted in wonderful conversations that were rich in anecdotes. Thinking dialogue In unit I, the broadening unit, we started with the book Species of Spaces and other Pieces, by George Perec. In his book, he examines the question ‘what is space’? I chose this book in particular because I think that George Perec has a unique view of space and that his observations could inspire the students to look- and think differently about space. But also, to become aware of their own capacity in creative thinking and making. To be released from presuppositions and to continue to cherish one’s own fascination. Thinking through making Unit II, the in-depth unit, is much more about precision. Experiencing what it is to be precise, to formulate precisely, to make precisely. In this unit we have read the book The Craftsman by Richard Sennett. This book is mainly about the (undervalued) role and value of the maker. That thinking and making are complementary and that there is a surprising value in making itself. Both the personal development of the students as a spatial designer and also the relationship with the world were central in units I and II. Students were encouraged to reflect constantly on their own developments and on that of their fellow students from different treated methods. Equipped with this intrinsic knowledge, they are asked to perform interventions, interceptions and changes. It is a continuous search for the questioning of space, in which all kinds of (making) disciplines are used to find future answers to various (social) topics. Henri Snel

July 2019

In this report, the aristic reasearch of first year students is explained and showcased. We are proud to present the work of talented first year of the Master of Interior Architecture: Anyue Deng Paloma Franco Hempenius Kaylyn Jedlinski Zehra Kahvecioglu Elif Liman Sila Oztekin Ying-Ting Shen Lisabell Zint



Unit 1+2

Studio report

July 2019

The notion of HOME Research by making 5

Unit 1and 2 with Henri Snel was a series of classes in which students needed to practice research through making situated around the theme of ‘Home’. General research and possibilities for the topic of ‘Home’ were explored where students could then choose their path of interest and continue researching in this direction. During the Unit, the class participated in reading sessions where Georges Perec’s, Species of Spaces and other Pieces were in one-hour class was discussed. Students needed to read chapters during the week and bring along their findings at the end of the week. Henri always allowed for a free opinion and discussion on the given text, where students could bounce ideas off one another and possibly inspire them through their making process. An exhibition at the end of first semester was held in which students displayed their progress within the process of making where feedback was given from Henri and moderators to assist in the making process during second semester. At the beginning of the second semester, Henri hosted a making workshop which encouraged students to make extensively during a two-day workshop which allowed for them to make great leaps in the research of their topics. Interval presentations were given to allow for constructive feedback from Henri and other students, overall the making workshops were found to be helpful and brought the class and Henri closer together. During the second semester a second book by The Craftsman by Richard Sennett was read and discussed much like the book during the first semester. The making process during this semester continued with the

encouragement to make 1:1 scale models with the use of the workshop or other found resources. The individual topics were now beginning to become more refined. Mid semester another presentation was held with an external moderator where feedback on the making process was given in which students were able to implement feedback in order to alter their design process for final exhibition. Towards the end of the semester a Socratic dialogue was held where students were given a chance to contemplate over aboard question and philosophically solve the question as a group. On the final exhibition - students needed to showcase their design processes through the first and second semester were final design experiments were presented to Henri and two moderators, the presentation took the form of an exhibition where students were free to decide in what ways and where they wanted to exhibit their works. The overall Unit 1 and 2 deemed challenging to some and really took students out of their comfort zones in which they needed to take on the role of critical thinkers and embrace a new way of researching through making.


‘Question your tea spoons.’ - Georges Perec


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“Craftsmanship names an enduring, basic human impulse, the desire to do a job well for its own sake.� - Richard Sennett



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Minimal Residence

July 2019

Anyue Deng

11 Foldable wardrobe, first model of minimalism

Home is a very complicate definition, throughout this year of exploration, the meaning of Home became a very rich topic for me. But still, I want to review my very beginning point, reflect to my word cloud, my personal definition of home.

society, and at the same time releases the stress that human beings get from those unconscious objects? I think designing the system of storage could be a good starting point. What kind of community can provide a better way for both subject and object?

“elderly, quiet, entertaining, chopstick, lazy, midnight, sweet, stressful, curtain, mess, positive, evident, independent, washing, individual, children, clothe, parent, sleep, cook…”

Next stage of my assignment was to try to create systems that can help people manage their belongings no matter big or small, within the scale of community. And also try to encourage people to understand the benefit of a minimalistic life style.

The key word that I picked from my word cloud is STORAGE. The reason I chose this is that it is the main problem that modern human beings are facing. The rapid development of producing after Industrial Revolution and the life style that is promoted by capitalism tempt us to own much more object than we thought. Personally, as an international student, I moved from Guangzhou, China to Taichung, Taiwan and now to Zwolle, the Netherlands. While migrating; how to sort out the stuff that I own is very difficult. I spent a lot of time to accumulate objects that I think I need, but very soon, I threw some of them away because I cannot take everything with me and not all of them are necessary. How to form a life style that can set us free from the control of object somehow? How to create a system that is not against the development of

Is the storage space an excuse? After exploring a lot of storage spaces, I gradually realized that the storage space actually is a big enemy for people to develop a simple life style. We cheat ourselves by hiding the stuff we don’t want to face. An extremely simple domestic space should minimize the storage space as shown in one of the models I made, the storage space should be a frame. It should be limited to some activities that are much more dynamic. Waking up the sleeping life attitude by waking up your dark closet. Clean the dust, remove the load, from your domestic environment to your mental attitude. Thus, my ambition for my project is to at least experience a minimal life style, and try to inspire other people by what I did.


‘Waking up the sleeping life attitute by waking up your dark closet. Clean the dust, remove the load...’


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Minimal residence 1: working mode.

Minimal residence 2: get together mode.


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Minimal residence 3: resting mode.

‘Peoples gathering will contribute knowledge to spread.’ Last semester I worked mostly in a systematic and logical way, and I found it quite difficult to transfer into a spatial work or any other touchable form. So, for the second semester I hope I can deliver an actual space or installation that could express my ideas. The first step I would like to take is to experiment in daily life. First, I wanted to try and collect information and analyse which part can be changed or adjusted for my experiment. Then I tried to do the experiment on myself or even with the eople around me. Now the possibility of the experiment is like trying to wear one style only for one week or only use one pen for a whole week. I hope this kind of experiment can help me explore the possibility of developing the actual design or installation for the storage and explain more about the relationship between object and human beings. I would love to introduce Marie Kondo, who wrote The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up. In the TV show under the same name in Netflix, she inspired people to rebuild the relation between objects, that also somehow related to the concept that Jean Baudrillard mentioned in “Le Système des objets”. All of this work showed me how contemporary society lead us to this unhealthy relationship between humans and objects. Over-consuming, resource waste, even the human resources are abuse. Sociologist and economist already are working very hard to save us from this endless

sickness. As a spatial designer, how can I spread this idea to the public? I build up this limited frame and tried to live in there. Putting myself in this very limited space, actually giving me a deeper insight of what is the meaning of minimalism, from small details to a bigger overview. For example, I found that society didn’t give a lot of chance for a girl to develop a minimal concept, when I tried to find some of the most important stuff for minimal life style. There is shampoo+shower gel for female everywhere. We want girls to be beautiful, so girls get lost in the endless options for shampoo, shower gel and etc. On the other hand, there is a limited amount of 2 in1 products for male customers to choose from. To the bigger overview, this minimal life helped me to build a stronger bond with my environment. The classic form of a home is a place for people to rest and hide, a place where people can enjoy their privacy. But that cocoon might trap us in a very small perspective. My experience of living in a school studio helped me to blend in my community better. The interaction within the small space let me notice what a friendly group I am in. v



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Studio Report

Re-appreciation of space

July 2019

Paloma K. Franco Hempenius 17 Change of habits.

Home is a very personal word; people might have positive or negative connotations towards it. It can mean many places and spaces. Personally, when I am asked about what home is, I could think of many elements that represent or define home for me, but the kitchen space is one of the first spaces that popped into my mind when I was asked to represent home in the most precise way. This is usually a space where I can move almost without thinking, I know which drawer or door I should open to get exactly what I need. I feel like I could almost move through the space and use it blindfolded. Therefore, when I was asked to create what the opposite of home was, I created the new kitchen in the house that I had recently moved to. Although this kitchen is also what we call a “standard western kitchen” I had to get used to the whole space again. My body movements were not as natural, my body needed to adapt to the new space and dimension. Body movements and the effects on how we feel were very intriguing topics through the design process of Unit 1. I became very interested on how altering the automatic movements of a familiar space, such as the kitchen, would alter the mental and emotional state of the human being. In order to do research on this I decided to carry out research through testing, within my own house and house mates. The kitchen was the space that we all shared, I first studied the way in which space is being used in a “normal” way in order to see which the natural movements were and how

space is being used. I then continued to create obstacles and decided on which spaces they were or were not able to use, this based on the original movements study. Altering these spaces led to an increase of energy and enjoyment of an everyday task. The movements were no longer automatic, they were thoughtful and conscious. After carrying on this test during some nights and whilst talking to them on a more casual and informal conversation, I concluded that changing spatial elements that altered the body movements resulted in the re-appreciation of space. Reappreciation as in taking an element that already exists and looking at it in a different way. This was a beautiful finding and topic which applies to every space that we inhabit. My idea was to show people how to “un-inhabit” a space and reappreciate different elements that most of the time we take for granted due to the automatic movements. I wanted to continue exploring in which ways I could use it, and which was a more social way in which this idea could possibly be useful and helpful. In order to narrow down my research and design approach I needed to work with a target group. I was interested in targeting this towards “precarious citizens”. I looked into different options, all of them were interesting and all of them had their specific needs, but I went with my first instinct and decided to approach the people who suffer from depression. This was still a very broad group of people, but it still allowed me to create some guidelines on to how I wanted to approach the design.


“The body is living art. Your movement through time and space is art. A painter has brushes. You have your body.� -Anna Halprin


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The 1:1 model.


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In-habiting.

‘Recognizing the need is the primary condition for design.’ – Charles Eames This was also quite a personal topic close to home for me. Having been around people who had struggled with depression had given me already a close insight into the topic and therefore I could approach it based on a more intuitive, sensitive and personal experience rather than based on scientific and theorical research, which I also took some parts into account. Looking for inspiration I encountered with the work of Cristian Marianciuc, a Romanian artist who struggled with depression but through the creation of paper cranes he began to overcome it “I chose paper for its accessibility, and I chose the origami crane as a blank canvas for its rich and emotional symbolism.” he states. He really inspired me to look further into origami and think of which ways I would be able to transform it into a spatial element that could have the ability of helping people heal. I experimented with different folding techniques to get a feel of the possibilities and opportunities each might offer. After working with different origami techniques, I took the basic or staring folding points that origami uses. Vertical, horizonal and diagonal lines evolved into folding panels that allow the user to create different shapes and spaces. The spaces I intend to create aren’t permanent spaces, they are spaces that users can inhabit during several hours a day. The foldings give the option for the user to adapt the space to their needs and wishes. Climate and nature are something that will play an important role into the ways the

space is inhabited, the user must be able to adapt to the surroundings, just like sailing a boat you must change and stir to find the best position and shape. The in-between transparency allows natural light to come inside, transforming according to the position in which the foldings are created. This also allows for the user to be able to see outside without having the feeling of being observed. The edges of the foldings include the option of attaching more foldings to each other, giving the users the opportunity to create connections between other users and therefore creating a sense of community when desired. It has been a very fulfilling and learning process which gives me the curiosity to know how this could possibly continue to evolve, improving materiality and constructive details which I encountered with during the development of the protype.



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No title

July 2019

Kaylyn Jedlinski

23 Initial shape and form experimenting.

As an Afro-European I always felt strongly connected to both Europe and Africa. As a student studying in Europe, I discover a strong sense of nostalgia with my place of birth - South Africa. A part of me realised that I did not know much about the rich culture of South Africa and now being part of a European society, I was inspired to discover why the notion of ‘Home’ is so important for the people of Africa. The notion and the meaning of home for the people of Africa is something quite unique. Even though my heritage never originated from Africa, and that now my family resides in this place since World War Two. We began to adapt the importance of family, community and gathering. Living in South Africa I never felt as those I fit in, however now living in Europe I now more than ever feel that I strongly connect to South Africa which is my home. That is why I focused the topic of ‘home’ around my home and the part of home I want to know more about, in order to contribute to an authentic and contemporary South African design cultures. During the research through the making process, I aimed my focus on the traditional homestead - what inspires these pieces of architecture and how through the process of evolving and migrating to the city can it become a reminder of heritage, brought into the context of a city. Traditional homes are inspired by nature, through their organic forms and material usage, people living in their rural areas aim at paying respect to the environment, never trying to contrast against it and only adding to it.

I aimed my research at identifying a problem within a city that I was most familiar with, Johannesburg. Which is currently undergoing an urban renewal project where old buildings are being redressed from exterior to interior and new functions added to them. However, the negative spaces around these buildings such as squares remain neglected. South Africa being a hot climate for most of the year lend to people wanting to spend ample time outdoors. These open squares are spaces allowing for this to happen. However, produce a lack of seating and interesting attractions - no longer drawing people to these areas. Though Johannesburg being a city of great wealth, many people migrate from the rural areas towards the city for a better quality of life and so this topic inspired me to see in what ways I can celebrate the history and transformation of South Africa from the roots of rural living, to migrating to the city, to Johannesburg being a place for contemporary living, artistry and diversity. This research took me on the journey of identifying the roots of home to creating a new home.


‘Cultural identity, in this second sense, is a matter of ‘becoming’ as well as of ‘being’.’ - Stuart Hall


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Migration

Uncovering the Stoel


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“What we really are … what we have become “. - Clement Greenberg The form of a circle holds great symbolic importance as it is a form with no corners and only soft curves. The circle is the symbol of a community where everyone is seen as equal and nobody is able to ‘hide in its corners’. I aimed to implement this form in my making process. Along with organic, circular forms I looked at nature - animals in particular that produced these spherical forms. In the first semester I tried to find what makes African design African through looking at traditional architecture of the rural homestead. I found that organic shapes resemble the importance of a community to the people of Africa with the extensive use of natural materials in order to pay homage towards the environment. In the second semester I chose the African Millipede as my form of natural inspiration, to all the local people across all 11 cultures and languages in which South Africa has, this millipede is an iconic symbol and is known by a common name the Shongololo. The circular shelled structure and many legs are the aspects that I took as inspiration. I explored the possibilities of seating typologies that could create a connection from the roots of rural architecture, the inspiration of nature and craftsmanship in the city, the linear hard structure of the city and the new image of contemporary South African design styles. I used the Umaskhenkethe (the one with lines) or Unomgcana (traveller) or China bags in the final delivery of the project. These particular bags are a symbol for those who migrate, many people living in the outskirts and rural sections of the country use these bags

to hold all their personal belongings ‘their homes’ in order to transport them to the city where they relocate. This project combines something so familiar ‘the plastic mesh bag’ with a new unfamiliar surrounding ‘the city’. Rural life in South Africa is often spent outdoors while being surrounded, and being inspired, by nature - while city life is about spending time indoors even during times of relaxation. The city of Johannesburg provides many open spaces enveloped by interesting landmarks and history - which local people are unable to enjoy due to a lack of seating areas. This seating typology aimed at introducing interesting additions to the open square spaces, that becomes a representational element of culture and identity that being of the travellers, the nature and surroundings in the home of Johannesburg. Chairs live in the plastic mesh bags as a reminder of the travellers whole migrate to the city for better life and which holds a metaphor to these people who hold their whole home in these bags. People wanting to make use of the squares are able to unzip, remove the bags and replace them on their creased edges to create seat covers. The chairs can stand individually on their own or join together in three different positions, a chair, a bench and a lounger’ their combine methods become symbolism of a community and bring people together which is an important part of the local culture. Each seat profile has multiple legs which is inspired by nature and the many legs of the African Millipede. The seating typology symbolises home, community, nature, the old and the new as well as countryside and the city.



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A welcoming space Zehra Kahvecioglu

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In the chapter “The Apartment” where Georges Perec wrote a fictional schedule about how people tend to use the spaces in their apartment. In the end he states: “No one lives exactly like that, of course, but nevertheless like that, and not otherwise, that architects and town planners see us as living or want us to live”. In this schedule, I noticed that the entrance hall is the place at home that is being used the most. Sadly, this is also the most practical area of home from which the size and look is able to frustrate a lot of people. My fascination for the research about the entrance hall started at the point where I for the first time had conversations about this specific place of home. It is the place that opens the door to your home, it is the place where the exact transition happens between being outside and inside. The place that you welcome your guests and say goodbye. The place where your orders are being delivered or the ambulance workers arrive. For me, the entrance hall is the most crucial area that divides home from the outer world. Yet, the appearance and use of this space is hardly as poetic as it seems. Moreover, the entrance hall is a reflection of how a cultural difference could be analyzed through the use of space. According to my grandma, who is a Turkish immigrant, the Dutch entrance hall is not welcoming at all. As it is an important tradition to receive large amount of guests in the Turkish culture. These hello-goodbye ceremonies are trapped in the rectangle shaped narrow Dutch entrances. I asked my friends and family all over the world to send me pictures of their entrance

halls and tell me about it. Many people were willing to help me. I received more than fifty pictures. And found a few aspects that makes the entrance hall become more welcoming: Light, use of ornaments and rituals. People make the best out of their situations. It surprised me how similar everyone’s entrance hall looked like; whether you have a big or small house. Every entrance hall is programmed, it has to be built as functional and must take as little space as possible. Not welcoming at all. In fact, it doesn’t even matter if you live in an apartment or in and expensive single house. I read about the aesthetics of the favela in Rio the Janeiro where the author writes about the beauty and great potential of the free building area of the city. it says: “It’s as if architects spatialized time and the favela builders temporalize space”. Like the architects filled in our hello-goodbye ceremony. I could totally relate for this sensitive and free way of working, building and making without a plan, just like the people in the favelas.


“I don’t know, and I don’t want to know, where functionality begins or ends” – Georges Perec, Species of Spaces and Other Pieces.


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Experiment: subtle borderlines

What does a welcoming space look like?

Experiment: ornaments


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Experiment based on a welcoming sacral space.

‘A welcoming space; going from one space to another in the most subtle way. For me, a welcoming place is fluent space, where the transitions go fluently and smooth. In my models I try to find a way that successfully expresses my perception about going from one space to another in the most subtle way. Almost like you are flowing into another space. Plaster helped me to achieve the shape where you can clearly recognize the slightest movement within the material, and this movement expressed the act of going from one space to another space in the most subtle, delicate way. Therefor I continued with this method I used with plaster and decided to use one material, one method during the whole process. I realized that my hands and this method took over the process. I wasn’t planning, approaching or deciding what to design, it was a start of an intuitive journey to discover a welcoming space. I decided to attach more ornaments and play with the shadows, textures and light. I came across the works of great architects that raised awareness about spaces that were all about just being there. No urgent function, just being there will make you feel curious and will invite you to walk in. I investigated the architecture of churches and mosques. Somewhere sacral, sometimes inviting you to walk in, stand still for a while, be conscious of the spatial transition because you walked from outside to inside or maybe the other way around. To me, an inviting space is similar to a welcoming space. So I focused on how I could make an inviting

model. That makes you want to go inside and discover the place within. In this process, the material was leading me to a welcoming space. The feeling of each model gave me directions whether to continue with it or not. Plaster is a very surprising material, you never know how a contramould will turn out in the end. I found new ways on how to conduct architectural research with nothing but your hands. And that the architect is not in charge for designing the model, but the material is responsible for the design. This shifts my own perception of design to make before thinking instead of the other way around.



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Homeless

July 2019

Elif Liman

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Everyone in the Netherlands has a roof over their heads. At least that is what we think. But we must be aware that this is not the case. There are more homeless people in the Netherlands than we would expect. Research in 2016 shows that there are 31,000 homeless people in the Netherlands. This will of course have risen in the past 3 years. In addition, there are shortages of sleeping places for them in the shelters. In the dorms the homeless are confronted with each other’s problems, which can lead to a worsening of their own psychological problems. Approximately half of the homeless people drop out before they can move on to their own room or home. Or the homeless will be sent out to the streets again. They receive advice about where he/she may possibly be able to spend the night as an alternative. Like a hostel in the neighborhood. But usually they will not go there because these are expensive overnight stays. In addition, many prefer to spend the night outside because they know that there they are not being supervised. Homeless people have to spend an average of six months in crisis shelter before an alternative place to live can be found for them. Long waiting lists apply to spaces with protected living or a social rental home with outpatient care. For homeless youngsters there is not always a place in

the night shelter and they have to arrange a place to sleep in their own network. Being homeless means more than “not having a roof over your head”. We call this “narrower view homelessness”. Not having a shelter can be related to poverty, addiction, a psychiatric illness, ... but also simply to a disaster such as fire, a flood, etc. Everyone can become homeless, but not everyone has the same possibilities to solve the problem, to provide for their own accommodation. The thought that so many people have to live outside because they can no longer afford a house to stay for personal reasons is horrible. Your probably do not expect it or you are not concerned with it because you are on a good place. But unfortunately, it increases more and more every year. “We spend much of our lives in the home, our primary emotional connections are shaped in the domestic arena of the home: Where we live and how we live are important determinants of our social position, physical health, and individual well-being. Home is a central element in our socialization into the world.” (Grifford, Environmental Psychology, 2007) That is why I started to study the subject to create a homely feeling for the homeless even if only for an overnight stay. They have no home or even a good place to stay outside. By giving them the possibility to move


‘Homeless people are not the problem. They are the result of the problem.’


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‘Home is a central element in our socialization into the world.’ Can a (private) space for a homeless person act as a tool to stay in contact with society? For me the goal was to give the homeless people their private place in the city. Make them visible in a positive way by bringing them into contact with the city and it’s residents. This will help them to create a place in social society and bring them in contact with others. By giving them a specific place in the city, they will receive more attention. Ultimately it is intended that they have a roof over their heads during the night. In addition, it is also important that they do not have to worry about their possessions. And to be protected for changing weather conditions. For my research I started looking at the attitudes of homeless people. I noticed that they all sit or lie almost in the same position. The outline of their attitude became the starting point to design a shelter. In my first semester, my goal was to design a portable shelter that homeless people can carry to spend the night in it. But as I mentioned earlier, homeless people usually have a number of possessions with them. Giving them a shelter to carry with them would not work. They will rather choose a place where they don’t t stand out and can hide from others. This is of course not the intention. For me it was important to make them belong again and to make them feel at home.

In my second semester I started to focus on a shelter that already has a permanent place in the city. Which does not take up much space during the day and becomes a home for the homeless during the night. Because of this I started designing from folding techniques with paper. This is because my previous models already consisted of extendable or foldable technology. I noticed that the fold-out technique took much less space once it was not in use. This was also one of the most important benefits for me. It was not my intention to create obstacles in the city. By folding with paper I have made more than a hundred models. I made a selection from these hundred models to design my final model from this experiment. By combining these sketch models, I have discovered that it is possible to create a shelter where the first impression is a 2D model, but by folding from a certain point it becomes a 3D shelter in which a homeless person can spend the night. As I did with homeless people in my first semester, I deliberately chose the outline of a standard house. The intention is that if a homeless person cannot sleep at a night-care because there is no more space to sleep, they can use these shelters in the city. They will then receive a key to open the shelter. With this design in that scenario they still will be given a feeling of belonging; to be at home.



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TEMPORARY GENDERLESS SPACE

July 2019

Sıla Öztekin

41 Tension emphasise the created space more clearly.

I am in the middle of a transition, I am daughter of tradition, I am future mother of knowledge. I am in the middle of the places, I am daughter of a place, I am future mother of spaces.

This is my research project of my research on the genderless space where I try to counter the design problem that causes the genderization of public and private spaces. The process started with the questions of what the genderless space is and how to create it. In the beginning of the process the spatial models and ceramic works that I created with a two-day research through making workshop, were unconsciously feminine, ‘female’. Therefore, I started the research by creating female space. First of all, to remark why the curvilinear lines are accepted as the female forms, I danced with the lights, in the dark. The aim of the dance was being able to see and analyse the outlines of the movement. The space that I manage to create while dancing with the lights pose a question, ‘Was it a female space?’ I kept a document of the temporary space I created with long shoot photography, where 20 seconds of dance was in one frame. However, this study did not give a very clear result. Then I experimented with scenarios which would bring the woman’s body to the front. These are wearable elastic fabric tube, attached balloons as an extension of the body and tied up the body to the space itself. After this experiment I realized that limiting body movement is not the answer. On the contrary, the body should be able to continue its movement as long as possible.


Even if our existence on earth is temporary, but will leave traces, like our personal space. Is it possible to change the dynamics of the space with only existing there?


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Experiment Scenarios, Body Space.

First Design of the Final Product.


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Usage of the materials from the Final Product.

‘What is a feminine space?’ And I’ve decided that the space itself must adapt to the movement of the body. Movement needs to be able to shape the space. The area should move with the body like its second layer. The final stage of this experiment led to the idea of placing elastic stretched ropes five cm apart between two wooden planks. Due to the difficulties I experienced during the construction phase, I decided to replace the upper layer with fabric. Also, to show that I was inspired by the spatial design I included the ladder during the research through making workshop. But I realized that it was more suitable for the idea of controlling the area, the main idea of the project. During the design, I used coloured beads to secure the ropes. The clear vision of the colours of the beads refer to Richard Sennet’s book The Craftsmen, which we read in the class, as an appreciation of the material. This idea was suggested by Henri Snel. The created space was just as temporary as the photos taken in the studio. But the outlines of the space visibility are higher and three dimensional. The space you create is exactly the equivalent of your movement. You can walk, dance or just only exist. You will still be creating a void inside. This is the same ideology of the existence of Marina Abramović, from the case study ‘The House with the Ocean View’. Even in our existence on Earth is temporary, but will leave traces, like our personal space. Is it possible to change the dynamics of the space with only existing there?

July 2019



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July 2019

Privacy in Your Own Hands Ying-Ting Shen

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When we talked about home, I found that I never had a notion of home. I couldn’t find a place that I could call home. In the past few years, I have been moving from place to place, from Hualien to Taipei in Taiwan, to Germany, to Switzerland, and now in the Netherlands. In this occasion, I seldom feel settling down in a place. It’s like moving into a place, then the next step is moving out. In this changing status, I always try to pursue stability. In other words, stability becomes the notion of home for me. Recalling the most unstable and fragile period in my life, it would be the time during my stay in the hospital. The inconvenience of the body and the rules within the hospital, forcing me to change my habits. I was thinking about, that a hospital should be a place to allow patients to rest well, however, its’ environment cannot provide this quality for patients. Perhaps everyone would encounter this situation in their lives, living in a completely unfamiliar environment against their will. Trapped in this place with a fragile body, trying hard to get used to the environment. At the same time, recovering the injure. I was wondering, is there any way to improve this environment? A method to make the patients feel stable, safe and comfortable. General Survey My research process started by collecting data, in order to have an overview of patients’ condition in a hospital. In this survey, my main

target is Taiwanese medical workers. I made a questionnaire to understand how medical workers and visitors interact with patients and also patients’ behavior within a hospital. After analyzing the data, I also compared it with my own experience. According to the statistic, patients in the hospital lose their autonomy of their body and the control of their own private space. For instance, the door of the patients’ room mostly is open. The medical workers can enter and leave the room in any situation, treating patients only with standardized questions. This survey brings out another question for me: how can we create a private space for patients within a hospital environment? In the further design process, I divided the project into two directions: one is designing the equipment that patients can use; the other is designing a system that can apply all equipment in a hospital space. Each equipment serves a purpose: lock the door, hiding body, mobile coffee table, against negative sound, etc.


‘How can we create a private space for patients within a hospital environment?’


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People with the equipment within a hospital.

Changing these stereotypes of space, to give hospital environment a new life. During the research, I found people have a certain stereotype of place. For example, in the research I did in the first semester, the most common words that pop up in peoples’ mind when talking about a hospital are white, cold, clean and bleach. I was wondering why does it happen and how does this occur? Referring to Environmental Psychology for Design, written by D. A. K. Kopec, where he describes “the meaning of a place and identity may be stifled in environments where personalization of a home or workplace is restricted.” I realized that to achieve the efficiency of space utilization, the hospital design consists of specific regulation and functional purposes. These restrictions limit the meaning of place as well as users’ imagination. Under these circumstances, personalizing and re-gaining the authority of the space could help users to adapt to a new environment. By changing these stereotypes of space I could give the hospital environment a new life. In the research by making the process, I unconsciously applied this concept into my product. Changing the purpose of a daily object, giving them a new way of use. For instance, I used the structure of an umbrella and fabric to create a mobile space. The other example would be that I used the luggage handle to design a mobile table and combine it with a walker. It also happens to make the detail of the products. I saw that the edge of the umbrella could be replaced with cloth, bamboo, and beads. Therefor I used cable connectors to fix on the edge of the umbrella and

the curtain hook to hang the fabric and ropes. In this case, patients can easily change it by their own will. Apart from the practical aspect, I’ve also experienced a different way of thinking. At the beginning of this project I doubted if a project related to a hospital environment would be very difficult to develop. In fact, it’s not about the topic, it’s about the way we’re looking into it. As a designer, what kind of problem do I discover? What problem do I want to solve? How am I going to solve it? As well as: don’t forget the most important part: focusing on the possibilities, instead of the obstacles!



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The Second Skin

July july 2019

Lisabell Zint

53 An extra personal space within and a second skin for mental and physical defense - what matters?

Home – a term which can be defined in many ways and goes way beyond a simple description of a place, where someone lives permanently. Ironically human beings in earliest history actually used to be nomadic not having a certain place to live and home which might have been just a tent with a bonfire in front of it. Focusing on today’s notion of home is much more than a house with doors, windows, stairs, walls and a roof on top of it. The sense of home is among other things connected to the conditions of comfort, privacy, control, happiness, relaxation and especially safety and those conditions, in turn, are attached to feelings. Feeling at home is a process which is not easy to define (in time and specific process steps) but very diverse depending on each of us. During my research within the theme of home starting with the psychological aspect and continuing with a very personal definition of home – transparency – I gained insight into different topics like memory, human senses, home shelters and the history of the Dutch window within domestic spaces. The main essence I took out of this is that the notion of home as well as the feeling of being home is constantly changing whether we plan it or not. Furthermore, our home can be influenced by different factors like people we are living with, the culture and society which is surrounding us and the space in which we operate. As designers, we can mainly focus on the last circumstance by identifying problems and creating domestic spaces, design tools or elements which will lead to a

better change according to the inhabitant using it. Scanned by CamScanner

In order to do so, the first questions I will ask myself in the future is how to improve a certain living condition which would be: “Who am I designing for?”, “What will I bring in and what will I let out?“, “Does the inhabitant suffer from any disorder or disability?”, “Which interests and needs are the most important ones for him/her to feel at home?”, “What are my possibilities to do research?”, “How can I make my design suitable for a social group?” As the home is in fact related and dependent on space and space, regarding George Perec’s book about “Species of Space and Other Pieces” is an open definition, my conclusion is that one can feel at home not just in a house but everywhere else. Due to the huge opportunities of traveling people nowadays are creating, experiencing and even switching between several homes during their lifetime. To conclude - this reminds me again how nomads used to move from location to location not having more than a tent, a fire and familiar faces around them. This makes me speculate: Will the notion of home still exist in the future? Or will it change its meaning? Will home get a living condition for certain social groups? How would design and the working field of a designer change then in relation to domestic space?


‘Transparency and safety - My personal meaning of home embodied in a thin paper house with a mended roof’


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Latex rubber and electric wire preformed as a second skin and borderline for additional defense of the body.


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Cocooning of a way of inhabit space.

‘What could a second skin for defense look like?’ Transparency and safety - The first year of design studio has started with a very personal meaning of home and ended with a preliminary result of a research project about a second skin for defense. The process itself was driven by and emerged through theoretical as well as practical research but most importantly by and through me as a designer. During my design research process, I have developed a new concept of home for women with insecurity caused for example by domestic abuse. The concept is defined through an embodied second skin and peripersonal space with certain parameters. By asking myself throughout the process what the parameters could be to define distance in reachable space I have built very diverse models with different kinds of materials, light, thicknesses as well as scales. The main parameters which became relevant for creating the space are materiality, transparency and thickness. Focusing on the needs and interests of the inhabitant, the concept of home can also be defined through security, safety, control, transparency, privacy, identity, and new memories. Following 5 continuums by Altman & Chemers (1980), the concept is defined as being temporary, homogenous, noncommunal, identity and openness as well as enclosure due to transparency. For the first time in my study career I have been able and even asked to develop my own project and ambitions within the theme of home. The difficulties were not to take action but to control and work with almost

no boundaries; exclusively driven by the movement of the research itself alike a chain reaction. Reflecting on the mentioned personal issues of the past year I can recognize some parallels to my project as control and having some borderlines to feel secure are also the main needs of my design of a second skin. To be part of the emergence of a second skin has been very exciting as it developed into an unknown path which guided me towards new knowledge and craft skills. One particularly beautiful aspect of the process was the creation of something new and the act of constantly intertwining materiality and psychology. As the psychological part started with an extremely sensitive and global topic - domestic abuse - I was keen on doing extremely sensitive research as well. The skin represents that sensitivity. My fascination with this process has also been based on the constant emergence of connections between space and emotional needs through the making. To give an example, the tension and balancing act of transparency, safety and security is something I am fascinated about and interested in keep working with. The connection of all previously described aspects of fascination is the fundamental design research component the movement. The movement which has evolved through the interaction between space, body, and mind has been the base for my whole project and turned me into a researcher.


Colofon

Unit Report 2019

Tutor of Unit 1+2 2019: Henri Snel

Editing Bregje Tjallinks, Ingrid van Zanten

Henri Snel is an architect and interior architect, consultant for various healthcare institutions, lecturer at the Architectural Design Department of Gerrit Rietveld Academie, ArtEZ master program Interior Architecture and head of Form Studies at the Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam.After gaining experience at various renowned architectural firms, he opted for research and education, with a particular interest in the sensory experience of spaces through experimental education and Evidence Based Design (EBD). Also, from his design and research office Alzheimer-Architecture - which focuses on the question what architecture can mean for people with Alzheimer’s disease - he collaborates with students (designers of the future), scientists and (care) experts from various institutes. In addition, Henri Snel likes to bridge the world between scientific and design disciplines, in order to be able to formulate more precisely what the future of (care) architecture might look like in the future.

Design Office for Design / Loek Kemming Bregje Tjallinks Production Grafisch Bedrijf Wink, Doetinchem

ArtEZ University of the Arts

Rhijnvis Feithlaan 50 8021 AM Zwolle The Netherlands T. 038 4270500

corporeal@artez.nl www.corpo-real.artez.nl


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ArtEZ University of the Arts


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