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TeePee TeePee about the world & design

Issue

N1 April 2013

It’s all about lights this month

Featuring: Tom Dixon Renowned British Light Designer


ALL OF the LIGHTS by Kanye West

All of of the the lights lights All

cop lights

FLASHlights FLASHlights

SPOTLights

StrobeLights StreetLights

All of of the the lights lights All All of of the the lights lights All

FAST AST LIFe LIFe drug drug life life F thug life life rock rock life life thug

every night All All of of the the lights lights Turn up the lights in here, baby

Extra brighT I want y'all to see this

You know what I need want you to see everything

want you to see All of of the the lights lights All All of of the the lights lights All


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Editor’s Editor’s Notes Editor’sNotes Notes

Inspired by Kanye West’s song All of the Lights, this month explores on the theme of lights. Ever since humanity first set foot on Earth, we have been guided by light from the sun. It is the core necessity to our survival. It is the energy that fuels our life. Thomas Edison revolutionised this idea and gave the nights light. Now the function of light extends beyond. Besides being purely functional they also decorate and enhances the atmosphere. The philosophy of light cannot be explained in a single paragraph. - Teepee

Editorial Editorial Team EditorialTeam Team Chief Editor Managing Editor Designer Art Director Style Director Fashion Director Editor Copywriter Intern Intern Intern Production Marketing Manager Business Manager Advertising Manager Production Manager Circulation Manager Finance Manager Sales Manager Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor Contributor

T.P Cheong Y.X Cheong

Nate Cheong Ash Cheong

Chris Cheong

Harvey Cheong

Spector Cheong Ryan Cheong Kate Cheong

Lynn Cheong

Wynn Cheong

Wayne Cheong Alvin Tan

Nicole Tan

Mandy Quek

Amanda Wei Nic Tan

Alvin Wei Nicole Jin Nic Yi

Vin Tan

Bryan Lim Ryan Jia

Ryan Lim

Manda Cole

Alvina Ting

ALL OF the LIGHTS It’s all about lights this month April 2013


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Content Content 1 Our

Issue

N1

Vanishing Nights

by Verlyn Klinkenborg

It was once thought that light pollution only affected astronomers, who need to see the night sky in all its glorious clarity. And, in fact, some of the earliest civic efforts to control light pollution-in Flagstaff, Arizona, half a century ago-were made to protect the view from Lowell Observatory, which sits high above that city. Flagstaff has tightened its regulations since then, and in 2001 it was declared the first International Dark Sky City.

page

2 - 11

2 Interview with Tom Dixon by Natasha Ann Zachariah page

3

12 - 17

Born in Tunis in 1959, at four he moved to London; with no formal art or design education he began to explore the decorative and structural strength of recycled materials. Without a design background, he approaches design with a certain child-like niavety but at the same time quite rational.

Structuring a design: grids by Phil Baines & Andrew Haslam The grid is an organizational ool for managing large quantities of typographic and pictorial information: each of the elements on the page - whether text of image - has a visual relationship with all the other elements. A grid gives a book consistency by presenting the reader with a series of pages that relate to one another visually.

page

18 - 25


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Bibliography Bibliography Credits for Our Vanishing Nights National Geographic November 2008 Photography by Jim Richardson Article by Verlyn Klinkenborg

Credits for Interview Tom Dixon LIFE! Home & Garden, The Straits Times, 2/3/13 Natasha Ann Zachariah Images from:

www.tomdixon.net/products/us/lighting

www.tomdixon.net/products/us/furniture-and-accessories http://www.utilitydesign.co.uk/mall/UtilityDesign/ customerimages/TomDixon-53253.jpg

http://www.therugcompany.com/blog/wp-content/ uploads/2011/09/Tom-Dixon.jpg

Credits for Structuring a design: grids Type & Typography by Phil Baines & Andrew Haslam


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by Verlyn Klinkenborg Photographs by Jim Richardson


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In most cities the sky looks as though it has been emptied of stars, leaving behind a vacant haze that mirrors our fear of dark and resembles the urban glow of dystopian science fiction.


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For most human history, the phrase “light pollution” would have made no sense. I

f humans were truly at home

under the light of the moon and

stars, we would go in darkness happily, the midnight world as visible to us as it is to he vast

number of nocturnal species on this planet.

Instead, we are diurnal creatures, with eyes adapted to living in the sun’s light. This is a basic

evolutionary fact, even though most of us don’t think of us as

diurnal beings any more than we think of ourselves as primates

or mammals or Earthlings. Yet

it’s the only way to explain what we’ve done to the night. We’ve engineered it to receive us by filling it with light.

This kid of engineering is no different than damming a

river. Its benefits come with consequences-called light

pollution-whose effects scientists are only now beginning to study. Light pollution is largely the

result of bad lighting design,

which allows artificial light to

for another 7 years. From a few

wanted, instead of focusing

collective glow.

shine outwards and upward into the sky, where it’s not

it downward, where it is. Ill-

designed lighting washes out the darkness of night and radically alters the light levels-and light rhythms-to which many forms

of life, including ourselves, have

adapted. Wherever human’s light spills into the natural world,

some as aspect of life-migration,

reproduction, feeding-is affected to some extent.

For most human history, the

phrase “light pollution” would have made no sense. Imagine walking toward London on a

moonlit night around 1800, when it was Earth’s most populous

city. Nearly a million people lived there, making do, as they always

had, with candles and rushlights and torches and lanterns. Only a few houses were lit by gas,

and there would be no public

gaslights in the streets or squares

miles away, you would be able

to smell London as to see its dim Now most of humanity lives

under intersecting domes of reflected, refracted light, of

scattering rays from over lit cities and suburbs, from light-flooded

highways and factories. Nearly ll of nighttime Europe is a nebula

of light, as is most of the United States and all of Japan. In south Atlantic the glow from a single fishing fleet-squid fisherman luring their prey with metal

halide lamps-can be seen from

space, burning brighter, in fact, than Buenos Aires or Rio de Janeiro.


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hicago night urns bright nder the lankets of louds. Much f the glow scapes from treetlamps, ncluding clear, ictorian-style amps good or creating atmosphere ut poor for harnessing oday’s extraright bulbs.


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“Let the glorious light ever shine upon it,� beseeched the 1995 dedicatory prayer for the Mormon temple in Bountiful, Utah. Plenty of earthly light bathes the granite structure, its brilliance exaggerated by a long photo exposure.


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We’ve lit up the night as if it were an unoccupied country, when nothing could be futher from the truth.

We’ve grown so used to this pervasive orange haze

that the original glory of an unlit night-dark enough for the planet Venus to throw shadows on Earth-

is wholly beyond our experience, beyond memory

almost. And yet above the city’s pale ceiling lies the rest of the universe, utterly undiminished by the

light we waste-a bright shoal of stars and planets and galaxies, sining in seemingly infinite darkness.

We’ve lit up the night as if it were an unoccupied country, when nothing could be further from

the truth. Among mammals alone, the number of

nocturnal species is astonishing. Light is a powerful biological force, and on many species it acts as a

magnet, a process being studied by researches such as Travis Longcore and Catherine Rich, co-founders

of the Los Angeles-based Urban Wildlands Group. The

effect is so powerful that scientists speak of songbirds and seabirds being “captured” by searchlights on land

or by the light from gas flares on marine oil platforms, circling and circling in the thousands until they

drop. Migrating at night, birds are apt to collide with

brightly lit tall buildings; immature birds on their first journey suffer disproportionately.

Insects, of course, cluster around streetlights, and feeding at those insect clusters now ingrained in

the lives of many bat species. In some Swiss valleys the European lesser horseshoe bat began to vanish after streetlights were installed, perhaps because

The situation is even worse today. Based on calculations, 2/3 of humanity lives under skies polluted with light, and 1/5 can no longer see the Milky Way.

those valleys were suddenly filled with light-feeding

pipistrelle bats. Other nocturnal mammals-including desert rodents, fruit bats, opossums, and badgers-

forage more cautiously under permanent full moon of light pollution because they’ve become easier targets for predators.

Some birds-blackbirds and nightingales, among

others-sing at unnatural hours in the presence of

artificial light. Scientists have determined that long artificial days and artificially long nights-induce

early breeding in a wide range of birds. And because a longer day allows for longer feeding, it can also affect migration schedules. One population of Bewick’s

swans wintering in England put on fat more rapidly than usual, priming them to begin their Siberian

migration early, like most aspects of bird behaviour, is a precisely timed biological behaviour. Leaving early

may mean arriving too soon for nesting conditions to be right.

Nesting sea turtles, which show a natural

predisposition for dark beaches, find fewer and fewer of them to nest on. Their hatchlings, which gravitate

toward the brighter, more reflective sea horizon, find themselves confused by artificial lighting behind the

beach. In Florida alone, hatchling osses number in the hundreds of thousands every year. Frogs and toads living near brightly lit highways suffer nocturnal

light levels that are as much as million times brighter than normal, throwing nearly every aspect of their behaviour out of joint, including their nighttime breeding choruses.


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Artificial light from buildings confuses and traps birds, with deadly results. Avian victims collected over three months in Toronto and displayed for a school group at the Royal Ontario Museum total over 1000 birds of 89 species.


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Luminous patches glow on a map of nighttime Earth created from satellite and ground data on scattered light as of 199697. The situation is even worse today. Based on calculations, twothirds of humanity lives under skies polluted with light, and one-fifth can no longer see the Milky Way. Of all the pollutions we face, light

For the past century or so, we’ve been

design and installation yield immediate

the night, and short-circuiting the human

pollution is perhaps the most easily

remedied. Simple changes in lighting

changes in the amount of light spilled into the atmosphere and, often, immediate energy savings.

It was once thought that light pollution only affected astronomers, who need to see the night sky in all its glorious

clarity. And, in fact, some of the earliest

civic efforts to control light pollution-in

Flagstaff, Arizona, half a century ago-were made to protect the view from Lowell Observatory, which sits high above that city.

Flagstaff has tightened its regulations

since then, and in 2001 it was declared the first International Dark Sky City.

By now the effort to control light

pollution has spread around the globe. More and more cities and even entire

countries, such as the Czech Republic,

have committed themselves t reducing

unwanted glare. Unlike astronomers, most of us may not need an undiminished view

of hr night sky for our work, but like most other creatures we do need darkness.

Darkness is as essential to our biological

welfare, to our internal clockwork, as light itself. The regular oscillation of light on

Earth. So fundamental are these rhythms to our being hat altering them is like altering gravity.

performing an open-ended experiment on ourselves, extending the day, shortening body’s sensitive response to light. The

consequences of our bright new world are

more readily perceptible in less adaptable creatures living in the peripheral glow of our prosperity. But for humans, too,

light pollution may take a biological toll. At least one new study has suggested a

direct correlation between high rates of

breast cancer in women and the nighttime brightness of their neighbourhoods.

In the end,humans are no less trapped by light pollution than the frogs in a

pond near a brightly lit highway. Living in a glare of our own making, we have

cut ourselves off from our evolutionary and cultural patrimony-the light of the

stars and rhythms of day and night. Light pollution causes us to lose sight of our

true place in the universe, to forget the

scale of our being, which is best measured against the dimensions of a deep night with the Milky Way-the edge of our galaxy-arching overhead.


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Interview With

TOM DIXON Born in Tunis in 1959, at four he moved to London; with no formal art or design education he began to explore the decorative and structural strength of recycled materials; no long time later what he created in his workshop turned out to be recognizable and ordered as custom made requests. In 1989 Cappellini first introduced his S-Chair, now in the permanent collection of Museum of Modern art in New York. His workshop “Space” became a design office in 1991 and, from 1994, a space to show creations of younger designers; in the same year, his interest moved to plastics, opening “Eurolounge”, then to extrusion technique. by Natasha Ann Zachariah


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Tom Dixon's Milestones 1959 Att en d ed an ar t fo u n d at io n co u rs e at C h el se a S choo l o f A rt fo r 6 m ot h s in 1 9 7 9 b e fo re a m ot o rcyc le ac cid ent le ft him in ho spit al fo r 3 m o nth s . H e th en d ro pp ed o ut o f sc hool .

0 8 9 1 whe n 19 8 5 , in k a e r I t a lia n b ig b it h b ig G ot his w g in rk la t e r t e d wo w hic h he s t a r p e ll in i, p a C int o f ir m - c ha ir d e s ig n mous S a f w o n put his 989 io n in 1 t c pro d u

1 9 9 1 ad lva g e h t ive S a a e s r C l pie c e hib it io n ld m e t a o f F ir s t e x o t e ou m e t he r e ma d s . B ec a f u r n it u n a p wn d e ll k n o pot s a n a in ' s w it r 7 s uc h a s B r in 1 9 9 n fo s tor e s f d e s ig e r u it n he a d o ur e r o f f ur n u f a ct t c ha in ur e ma it Ha b it a n r u f h o set F I n n is . H e a ls 9 0 0 2 a nd f or d ha s 0 0 4 to 0 0 2 an f r om 2 2 k in e t l r e A o u s la b e s ig n . e p o ny m e r io r d t u p his in o t in e d o ut b r a nc h

2 000

a g a z in e rma n m e G . d 0 c o g n is e in 2 0 0 nen r e h D e s ig n o W nd 008. e kt u r a e a r in 2 Y e h A r c hit t er of D e s ig n him a s

a n is ia , to S fa x , Tu d B o r n in a oth e r n a t via n m L h c n e Fr 9, r in 1 9 5 sh fa th e a n E n g li B rita in ovin g to b e fo r e m w a s fo u r. whe n he

1979 Spe nt 2 year s play ing bass in disc o ban d Fun kapolitam n . Wor ked as a nightclub prom oter and a war eho use part orga nise r. Had anot her mot orcy cle accident and was una ble to play for som e time .

1985 Ma d e hi s n ame a nd s by m e ll in g a k in g l im it e e d it io d ns of hi s w f ur ni e ld e d t ur e . I n 19 91 ope n , he ed a s ho p , s e ll h S pa c i s pro e , to d u ct s b ec am . I t la eac ter r eat i t a nk ve t h a nd s i nk ho p f r yo un o nt f g de s o r ig n e r s.

1997 H e re c e iv e d th e B riti sh O R d e r o f th e B riti sh E m pir e , fo r se rvic e s to B riti sh d e sig n in 2 000.

2 0 08


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  Your latest venture is into the realm of 1fashion, what do you think of it? On the venture into the new realm of fashion, he says: It's terrifying. But it's the same as how I do furniture design. I like to visit the factories to see what the materials are and what their expertise is.

2   Your latest collaboration is

with Addidas, what will your collection hold for us? The core of collaboration involves luggage and also a capsule collection of fashion wear including co ats, pants and socks. (LAUGHS) I'm not going to reveal too much.

  When will we get to get a 3sneak peak at your debut fashion collection with Addidas? I will preview the line at the Milan Furniture Fair next month. The launch date itself is not confirmed though.

4

  What do you think of sportswear designers? Sportswear designers, he declares are obsessed with creating products that achieve milestones, such as the lightest shoe or one that will shave half a second off your running time. But How many people really run 100m in 9.5 seconds? It could be that something else is more important, like comfort. Maybe everything doesn't need 52 features or 18 colours. There's a lot of stuff going on and you think, maybe one thing is good enough.


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  What are some of 5your high-profile works? Academy of Arts London Restaurant and designing a luxury pool hall, lounge and bar, The Tazmania ballroom Hongkong.

  You work on interior 7design also, does that

you tell me about 6one  Could of your interior design work? I was going to rip out the old canteen in Virgin Records to make it into a showroom. But standing in it, I got excited about cooking and everything that surrounds it, and I realised I was designing kitchens and restaurants wrongly. For example, my tables were too heavy to move around. We put in wheels so that shifting them would be easy. I'm a better product designer because I now understand how hard these products have to work in an environment beyond the showroom.

influence your perception in product design now? Working on interiors, it helps me better with my core business of product design,which is why i became a restaurant owner myself.

  How does visiting the 8factories that produces your design inspire you? By understanding the way the factory makes products,

IT PUSHES ME TO DESIGN IN THE OPPOSITE WAY.


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9

  How do you stay creative? I mean hitting 30 years is a long time in the creative industry. I credit this to my SHORT ATTENTION SPAN. I get bored easily and I wish furniture seasons would change a bit faster, like fashion. but having so many things to design for, I'm always experimenting new products.

NOT HAVI NG A DEGREE I N PRODUCT DES IGN HAS HEL PED I NST I LL A

10

  What's your take on design education? I have taught at British schools such as the Royal College of Art in London, Kingston Polytechnic and Plymouth University. College is a critical environment. Some people thrive on being whipped into shape but it can be destructive for other. Schools today often try and get students to follow a specific path and if you're into innovation, it's the opposite of what should happen. I was making things for pure pleasure, with a naive kind of perspective That helps me look a problems from a fresh angle. It's fine for me to retain the joy of not knowing everything.

CHILD- L IKE

NAIVETY


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  You mentioned about making your 11objects as unfashionable as possible, why? My idea is to make things as unfashionable as possible so that people don't throw them away when it's out of style. I try and give my stuff some sense of permanence - so that the objects, people will hand them down for generations, which is sustains itself.

12  What makes you satisfied?

Would you agree that 13 good designers should be

Satisfaction, comes from the people who actually part with money for something that was an idea just a while ago. It's nice to have a medal but the stamp of approval comes from people who think that my work is interesting enough to buy. I always think if only I could redo this. I'm always faintly dissatisfied with what I've done. That's what keeps me doing the next collection...And it feels like I've just started out because there're so many new methods of designing now. So with each new piece, i always think, next time I'll really be able to make a good chair...maybe, one day.

good entertainers as well? I’m not saying that everyone needs to be a clown, but I think that you owe it to your customer to communicate properly and make things interesting. And if that also allows you to demonstrate what a process can be like, or how people can get involved in designing things, or think about what the future of design might look like and try and exopress that in some kind of show, then I THINK IT’S A GREAT THING FOR DESIGN.

in my design approach


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by Phil baines & Andrew Haslam


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uch of the appeal of books lies in the way they feel:

size and proportion are key aspects of this.


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m s ’ a d r r g a liDl ia


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S

ince the earliest times certain pages proportions have been used more than others and have proved themselves highly effective. The divisions of this sample page with proportions (1:2) are based on Jan Tschichold’s studies of medieval manuscripts and early printed books. The diagonals used to determine the text area and position are known as Villard’s Diagram - a canon of harmonious division and can be used with any page proportion. As shown on this righthand page, the point at which the diagonals cross is one third across, and one third down the page.

What matters is the harmonious appearance of the finished book rather than how slavishly the diagram has been followed.

The page can therefore be divided into sixths, ninths or twelfths. The page can therefore be divided into sixths, ninths or twelfths. The text block then starts one unit in from the spine and down from the head, and three of its corners are defined by the diagonals. In use, this construction is generally adapted after taking account of the extent of the book and its binding: often the text block will need to be moved a little outwards; what

matters is the harmonious appearance of the finished book rather than how slavishly the diagram has been followed.


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His A4-format book both explains in text and demonstrate through design his rational approach, the appearance engineered rather than crafted.

modernist approach to the grid. After world war 2 new generation of designers developed the ideas of younger Jan Tschichold and the early typographic pioneers of modernism. They questioned the relevance of old type forms, grids and layouts in relation to modern messages. Designers such as Max Bill, Emil Ruder and Josef Müller-Brockmann began to make extensive use of systematic grids in which the position of all elements of the page determined by rational structure. Josef Müller-Brockmann, a Swiss typographer, was often working ith books published in 3 languages.The multi-column grid naturally facilitated this work but Müller-Brockmann and his contemporaries sought to devise modular grid systems that could provide many variables yet retain a coherent whole and provide many variables yet

retain a coherent whole and provide what they perceived as clarity of form.

Müller-Brockmann in his book Grid systems in graphic design: a visual communication manual for graphic designers, typographers and three-dimensional designers explains his approach to the grid: ‘In a sophisticated grid system not only the lines of text align with the pictures but the captions and the display letters, titles and subtitles.’ His A4-format book both explains in text and demonstrate through design his rational approach, the appearance engineered rather than crafted. His calibrations are exact and

all elements of the grid can be expressed mathematically in whole numbers: columns are subdivisions of format; margins and units are subdivisions of columns; baselines are equal and exact subdivisions of units.


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prefer to see the as a canvas upon hich the designer sing the elements fluid rather than ized relationship.

design: grids

h the how

The diagonals used to The diagonals used to The diagonals used to determine the text area determine the text area determine the text area and position are known as and position are known as and position are known as Villard’s Diagram - a canon Villard’s Diagram - a canon Villard’s Diagram - a canon of harmonious division - and of harmonious division - and of harmonious division - and can be used with any page can be used with any page can be used with any page proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on this The diagonals used diagonals used diagonals used right-hand page, theto point at The right-hand page, theto point at The right-hand page, theto point at determine the text area the text area the text area which the diagonals cross is determine which the diagonals cross is determine which the diagonals cross is and position are known position are known position are known one third across, and oneasthirdand one third across, and oneasthirdand one third across, and oneasthird Villard’s down theDiagram page. - a canon Villard’s down theDiagram page. - a canon Villard’s down theDiagram page. - a canon of harmonious division - and of harmonious division - and of harmonious division - and can be used with any page can be used with any page can be used with any page proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on this The diagonals to The diagonals to The diagonals to right-hand page,used the point at right-hand page,used the point at right-hand page,used the point at determine the text area determine the text area determine the text area which the diagonals cross is which the diagonals cross is which the diagonals cross is andthird position areand known andthird position areand known andthird position areand known one across, oneas thirdone across, oneas thirdone across, oneas third Villard’s - a canon down Villard’s - a canon down Villard’s - a canon down the Diagram page. the Diagram page. the Diagram page. of harmonious division - and of harmonious division - and of harmonious division - and can be used with any page can be used with any page can be used with any page proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on this The diagonals used diagonals used Theatdiagonals used to the point at right-hand page, theto point at The right-hand page, theto point right-hand page, determine the text area the text area determine thethe text area cross is which the diagonals cross is determine which the diagonals cross is which diagonals and position are known position are known and asthird position areacross, knownand as one third one third across, and oneasthirdand one third across, and one one third Villard’s Villard’s Diagram - a canon down theDiagram page. - a canon Villard’s down theDiagram page. - a canon down the page. of harmonious division - and of harmonious division of - and harmonious division - and can be used with any page can be used with any page can be used with any page proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on proportion. this As shown on this right-hand page, theto point at right-hand page, theto point right-hand page, theto point at The diagonals used The diagonals used Theatdiagonals used which the diagonals cross is which the diagonals cross which is the diagonals cross is determine the text area determine the text area determine the text area one third across, and oneasthirdand one third across, and one one third across, and oneasthird and position are known position are known and asthird position are known down theDiagram page. - a canon down theDiagram page. - a canon down theDiagram page. - a canon Villard’s Villard’s Villard’s of harmonious division - and of harmonious division of - and harmonious division - and can be used with any page can be used with any page can be used with any page proportion. As shown on this proportion. As shown on proportion. this As shown on this right-hand page, the point at right-hand page, the point right-hand at page, the point at


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What matters is the harmonious appearance of finished book rather than slavishly the diagram has been followed.

structuring a design:

size and proportion size and proportion size and proportion size and proportion size and proportion size and proportion size and proportion size and proportion size size and and proportion proportion size size and and proportion proportion size and proportion

They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, from content, stands between They far view thesupporting grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting content, stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions. They view the grid as an unnecessary contrivance the reader’s experience andcontent, the author’s intentions. which, far from supporting stands between the reader’s experience and the author’s intentions.


POEM BY WIRROW give me all the flickering lights! tiny specs of fluttering rays and city glitters shimmering but only from far away.

i want them all it’s an addiction i want the christmas lights buried in snow and the blips in science fiction films from years ago.

give me all the night sky’s twinkling sprinkles and the red pulsing eyes on tvs that standby fading, flirting in and out like a game of cat and mouse.

bits of foil in the distance blowing kisses from the sun to me and showing no resistance to the photons that consistently pass notes on from one lover to the other like cupids tiny brothers.

give me all the flickering lights. light every candle and wave every phone glinting and bleeping and imprintining glowing circuses that linger while I’m sleeping. an orchestra of weeping light swan singing like star crossed choirs who play themselves to me all night.



TeePee Magazine