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the Istanbul Biennial is sometimes mistakenly believed to be operating in a region otherwise devoid of artistic activity. However, since the late 1990s, Istanbul has been home to a number of almost entirely privately funded institutions that have begun to establish a range of exhibition spaces and residency programs in addition to a handful of independent artists’ initiatives and commercial galleries. In actuality, the relationship between the Istanbul Biennial and the city’s local art world veers, on occasion, toward the parasitic.

Stephens, Kevin. “Artist in Residence in England and the Experience of the Year of the Artist.” Cultural Trends (2001). ARTbibligraphies Modern.

Discusses the history of artist residency schemes in England and the results of the Year of the Artist residencies between June 2000 and May 2001. The author describes the evolution of artist residencies from the 1960s onwards, highlights the residency experiences of Southern Arts, Gateshead Council and Helix Arts, and analyzes the statistics relating to the Year of the Artist residencies. He concludes by attempting to measure the success of the Year of the Artist project.

Teffer, Nicola. “The Happy Camper: Best Practice for the Artist-inresidence.” Art Monthly Australia, (2000).

Continues the series on the findings of the Visual Arts Industry Guidelines Research Project in Australia (VAIGRP), and focuses on the identification of recommendations for the structuring of artist residencies. The author explains how changes in residency programs reflect shifts in arts practice. She describes artists’ experiences of residencies while

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highlighting how residencies contribute to an artists’ development, considers the duration of residencies and the forms of remuneration, and emphasizes the need to orient artists during residency projects. She explores the need for preparation, focuses on the importance of contracts, and concludes by considering the benefits of residencies for both artists and arts organizations.

Tinguely, Vincent, Yvette Poorter, Joni Murphy, and Jennifer Gabrys. Dwelling for Intervals. Greenwich, N.S.: Conundrum, 2010. Print. Dwelling for Intervals is a morphing International Artist Residency program, based on a forest retreat, which has hosted more than 150 resident artists from around the world since it began in 2001. The book tracks its development from a single studio residency to a roving para-site called Knock on Woods which has temporarily staked claim to land in Holland, France, Portugal, Berlin, Japan, and Canada.

Profile for ArteEast

Residency Resource Handbook  

This resource manual offers readers a brief overview of online platforms and print sources relevant to understanding residencies and the soc...

Residency Resource Handbook  

This resource manual offers readers a brief overview of online platforms and print sources relevant to understanding residencies and the soc...

Profile for arteeast
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