Page 40

La invasion de los soldados republicanos venidos del espacio exterior, 2005 Private Collection

The Secret Poetry of Mutation An the beginning of the 20th C., André Breton and his friend Jacques Vaché invented a new way for going to the movies which was to evolve into many heterodox ways of viewing the cinema, and especially ways to watch movies that one associates with the consumption of the “B” (or “Z”) film. The entered the theatre when the film was already quite far along and as soon as they began to understand the plot, they left, proceeding immediately to another cinema to do the same thing, and so on Their purpose, explained Breton, consisted of trying to liberate the poetry of the images, a poetry intrinsic to the medium, from the cage of the narrative. In the 1950s, when science-fiction became legitimate as a fully developed film genre, many film makers operated unwittingly as poets: consider, for example, the flying brains of The Fiend Without a Face (1958) by the Briton Arthur Crabtree, the extraterrestrial eyes (and friends of decapitation) of The Crawling Eye (1958) by Quentin Lawrence or the exaggerated cyber-big ugly birds of Chikyu Boeigun (1957) –also known by its English title as The Mysterians– by Ishirô 40 · ARTECONTEXTO · DOSSIER

Honda. Sometimes the shocking dream images expressed via special in the movies effects were outdone by the pulp movie poster artists, who were often unaware that they were truly artists, and that their work transcended mere advertising to become a graphic scream that echoed in our subconscious minds. With his work, Óscar Seco does something similar to what Breton and Vaché did: he refuses to accept the narrative cage that disguised as harmless adolescent consumer products the real poetry and profundity of those films . The flying brains, the tentacled eyes and the Japanese cyber-beasts are not only freed from the story, but are re-mixed with other apparently disparate iconographies to create a new story, that cannot be other then poetic. With regard to the work of the Japanese Takeshi Murakami –who devoured all the visual tradition of Manga and Anime–, critic Hiroki Azuma defined post-modernity revising the thesis of Jean-François Lyotard, who said that our times are marked by the obsoleteness of the “great narrative”, as unified by our system of knowledge. While the French philosopher contended that that “great narrative” has been

Profile for ARTEHOY Publicaciones y Gestion SL

ARTECONTEXTO Nº10.  

Dossier: COMIC WORLD / MUNDO CÓMIC 2006

ARTECONTEXTO Nº10.  

Dossier: COMIC WORLD / MUNDO CÓMIC 2006

Advertisement